Author Topic: Gardening  (Read 357865 times)

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Offline Nemesis

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1230 on: May 16, 2023, 09:38:56 am »
Think I might have one like that Hugo, thought we had lost it last year thanks to the goats but it is in leaf again. Can't remember the name though !
Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know.

Offline Nemesis

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1231 on: May 16, 2023, 09:43:59 am »
I do like gardening but I've made a number of mistakes by planting things too closely or not knowing what they are or how tall they would grow or spread
For instance, the Maple in the corner of the photo was a present given to me by a neighbor and it was in a pot for years and when I did come to plant it in the garden it was about 3 feet tall but now it is way above the 9 foot Laurel Hedge behind it.     Likewise the Rhododendron on the right could eventually grow to 23 feet in height
We have done the same thing with an Acer. It was growing in a pot, but we transferred it into the garden. If we don't cut it back it blocks the front door. Trouble is, it is too large to move. !
Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know.


Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1232 on: May 18, 2023, 11:25:03 am »
Pigeons seem to nest all the year round so you'll probably find more eggs sometime in the future, by the way that's a lovely plant where the egg is, what is it called?
This is one of my favourites, they are African Daisies, ours is Hardy Osteospermum ?  we have them on one side of the drive, they give a good display if cut back the previous year.

Hugo, sorry but I messed up, we have both the African Daises mentioned above, and Erigeron glaucus Sea Breeze daisies, the one you asked about was the latter, which has just flowered. pictured below.

Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1233 on: May 25, 2023, 01:32:54 pm »
I do like gardening but I've made a number of mistakes by planting things too closely or not knowing what they are or how tall they would grow or spread
For instance, the Maple in the corner of the photo was a present given to me by a neighbor and it was in a pot for years and when I did come to plant it in the garden it was about 3 feet tall but now it is way above the 9 foot Laurel Hedge behind it.     Likewise the Rhododendron on the right could eventually grow to 23 feet in height
We have done the same thing with an Acer. It was growing in a pot, but we transferred it into the garden. If we don't cut it back it blocks the front door. Trouble is, it is too large to move. !

That's a dilemma for you Nemesis as you really can't trim an Acer and you may have to cut it down,     Our Acer is already about 16 feet in width and height and the paving flagstones I put around it are already getting raised by its roots
The lucky thing for me is that it is at the top of the garden ans well away from the house

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening...Tips to grow your own fruit and vegetables
« Reply #1234 on: May 27, 2023, 10:08:41 am »
InYourGarden: Tips to grow your own fruit and vegetables with limited garden space
Comparethemarket has offered advice on growing harvest favourites, but what conditions should you consider?

There's something delightfully British about an allotment, or that secluded spot at the end of the garden - a retreat from the everyday world to a plot full of edibles tended to by your fair hand. A price comparison website has shared a series of tips to help homegrowers bring an abundance of summer fruits and vegetables to the table and how to achieve good results in a limited space.

Comparethemarket has offered guidance on the best methods to produce homegrown tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and raspberries, including the ideal timings to plant your own and the conditions you must consider. But as some residents do not have sufficient space, and one in eight British households has no garden at all (ONS data), you'll be pleased to learn it is possible to sow seeds on a balcony, window ledge or at a community garden or allotment.

https://www.inyourarea.co.uk/news/inyourgarden-tips-to-grow-your-own-fruit-and-vegetables-with-limited-garden-space/

Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1235 on: May 27, 2023, 10:46:11 am »
A few years ago I had a bright idea of planting a Clematis in the garden and letting it grow over my garden shed and a nearby shrub.
It did look good when it was smothered in flowers in the Spring but Clematis can suffer from Clematis wilt and mine did about 2 years ago and then died.
This year I got the courage to cut it all out  and what a job it was.  Seven wheelie garden bins later  and it now looks like the second photo and is still a work in progress

Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1236 on: June 10, 2023, 02:43:10 pm »
During this long dry spell I have had to water my plants and shrubs nearly every other day and both the water butts are nearly empty now.    We are on a water meter  and as we have a Combi boiler we try to save as much water as we can and put any water back in to the water butts to use on the garden but it's surprising how much water the plants need now.
It's important too to top up the water in the bird baths when we're watering the plants

A



Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening.... Which plants need watering most
« Reply #1237 on: June 17, 2023, 09:57:54 am »
InYourGarden: Which plants need watering most in summer?
As the mercury rises, which plants should we be prioritising and are there some we shouldn?t worry about watering?

RHS chief horticulturist Guy Barter offers some tips on how to prioritise your watering regime, especially if you are short on time?

cont https://www.inyourarea.co.uk/news/which-plants-need-watering-most-in-summer-2/

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1238 on: June 18, 2023, 09:50:51 am »
Gardeners urged to plant drought-tolerant plants
As the summer heats up picking plants that are suited to arid conditions means your garden stays looking its best - this article contains affiliate links

The experts at GardeningExpress say last year's unprecedented weather with record high temperatures and water shortages gave a glimpse of life with water restrictions.

They suggest including drought tolerant plants into the garden to help keep it looking healthy throughout the summer and ease the pressure on limited water. Among the varieties they recommend are country garden favourite Lavender, tropical Passion Flowers and elegant Cordylines

https://www.inyourarea.co.uk/news/gardeners-urged-to-plant-drought-tolerant-plants/

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1239 on: July 01, 2023, 09:56:22 am »
Gardening expert shares best time to prune lavender to keep it healthy and frost-resistant
Lavender is a much-loved garden staple with a rich fragrance and purple colouring, but it's important to prune it at the correct time of year.

 "This means that the best time to prune lavender is between September and October. It is good to prune lavender around this time so that the pruned areas of the lavender plant have a good amount of time to become established before the harder weather comes in.

"When pruning lavender, you should simply trim a third of the plant's growth from the flowering season over summer. Try not to cut back too far, though, as it could make them susceptible to frosts over the winter months."

read more https://www.inyourarea.co.uk/news/lavender-pruning-flowers-gardening-experts-best-time-to-prune-lavender-to-keep-it-healthy-and-frost-resistant/


Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1240 on: July 07, 2023, 02:16:16 pm »
A of photo of this years Hydrangea blooms, at one point I thought it was going to die off, but as you can see, all is well, and photo bombed
by a local too............ :)

Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1241 on: July 08, 2023, 09:11:38 am »
It certainly looks like a good healthy shrub now Steve and I like the bird on the photo bomb.    It seems like you have a bird friendly garden and that "Vicar" the Ring Ouzel that visits you is a bonus .
We have a few Hydrangeas in the garden and the one in our window box seems to like it there.  It gets no special treatment other than when I chuck bowls of water on it.
I bought a deep blue Hydrangea andp lanted it in the garden over a year ago but it looked more dead than alive so I dug it up and put it in a large plant pot.    I put the pot by a hole in the fence where Teddy the dog used to escape from and it seems to have revived thank goodness as it was quite expensive.

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1242 on: July 22, 2023, 10:28:12 am »
A POPULAR department store has won the silver award in this year?s Llandudno In Bloom competition.
Clares, on Mostyn Street, claimed silver in the gardening competition, with hanging baskets from Battys Nurseries adorning the exterior of the store.

In a social media post, the store said: ?We are absolutely delighted to have been awarded silver in this year?s Llandudno in Bloom.

?A huge thank you to the team for their gardening skills and keeping the plants fed and watered - a special thanks to Sonia and Kerry.

?The stunning hanging baskets are a work of art, thank you so much to Battys Nurseries.?

The full list of winners will be announced in due course ? awards will be handed out at a ceremony to be held on Tuesday, 26 September.

On Monday (July 17), Llandudno was judged in the Royal Horticultural Society?s (RHS) Wales in Bloom competition.

The Town has also been invited to enter the Britain in Bloom competition, whose judges will visit the town on Tuesday, 1 August to undertake a tour of various community groups? projects.

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1243 on: July 25, 2023, 10:11:42 am »
Charity s Lawn Rangers scoop Llandudno in Bloom gold award!

A MUCH-LOVED charity has won a gold award in this year?s Llandudno In Bloom competition.

St David?s Hospice Llandudno site, based on Abbey Road, claimed gold in the ?Communal Garden? category.

Hospice volunteers, who have christened themselves The Lawn Rangers have been donating their time since September last year to give the hospice gardens a well-deserved facelift.

Founding member and local gardener Yvonne Cheadle suggested putting the garden forward for the competition, and even donated 1,400 bedding plants.

cont https://www.northwalespioneer.co.uk/news/23675929.charitys-lawn-rangers-scoop-llandudno-bloom-gold-award/?ref=rss&IYA-mail=


Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1244 on: July 25, 2023, 02:44:41 pm »
I was there last week visiting a friend who was poorly and we noticed how nice the gardens were,     Credit to all the volunteers who are making the gardens looking so good