Three Towns Forum - Talk about Llandudno, Colwyn Bay & Conwy

Members' Lounge => Hobbies and Interests => Topic started by: Hugo on September 23, 2010, 04:52:58 PM

Title: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 23, 2010, 04:52:58 PM
Just after our puppy went into Kennels and we went away for a few days I carried out repairs to the lawn.   The pup has been digging and using the grass as a toilet so there were about 30 holes and patches to repair  :(  and this break gave us a chance to patch up the lawn and sow some grass seeds.
We've had plenty of rain but there is no trace of any grass seeds growing yet and the puppy is at it again!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on September 23, 2010, 06:27:07 PM
Training is the answer.  Walk him past my house and let him crap on the pavement as other dog walkers do! :Scot:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 23, 2010, 08:28:56 PM
He's a very big dog Yorkie so I hope you've got some of those large black bin bags handy! :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on September 23, 2010, 09:20:38 PM
Unfortunately my cat has now decided that the lawn is favourite to deposit. In payment for having the cheek to go away I came back off holiday to be be greeted by one pile per day of absence.Not a great deal in these days of credit crunch and financial crises but when you step in the last one while mowing the lawn!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 25, 2010, 04:36:01 PM
I bought a container of Miracle Grow Patch Up which was advertised on TV for dealing with circles in the grass and holes caused by our dog digging in the garden.  It's quite expensive for what you get and consists of grass seeds,lawn food and a compost that expands quite a lot when wet.   I filled in the holes but the compost soon ran out and I then completed the job using a similar preparation that I had,had  to make.
Immediately after I had finished the job it rained quite heavily so I was pleased with that but two hours later when I was back in the garden it looked like I had mole hills everywhere.
 The Miracle Grow treatment had expanded so much those holes had now become hills!    So then I had to go around every one and stand on them to flatten them.
I looked at the lawn today and am pleased to say that the seeds have started to grow. :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on September 25, 2010, 08:42:05 PM
You have to be careful with that stuff:  :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on October 02, 2010, 11:56:21 AM
Autumn is definitely here. This is our small Schumacher tree sometimes called Tree of Heaven.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on October 02, 2010, 01:23:45 PM
Are you taking the "Michael"?    _))*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on October 05, 2010, 05:17:22 PM
Trimming, pruning, generally tidying up - it's a good job we have the green bags to dispose of the debris. One of the better ideas in recent times in my opinion.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on October 05, 2010, 06:37:15 PM
Definitely, although I would like to see more people composting their own garden waste so it doesnt need to be transported in order to be composted at the council depot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on October 06, 2010, 08:30:39 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Autumn is definitely here. This is our small Schumacher tree sometimes called Tree of Heaven.



Wow--- mine is still green.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 06, 2010, 01:41:25 PM
Those Schumacher trees have got fantastic Autumn colouring and I was going to get one for the garden until I read that they throw up suckers all over the lawn.    Have yours done the same?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on October 06, 2010, 02:02:05 PM
I used to have a couple of them in my old garden and they were favourites of mine. Their offspring appeared occasionally in the surrounding border but I never found any in the lawn, which was a only a couple of feet from the plant.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 06, 2010, 03:21:44 PM
Perhaps the suckers were in the lawn Dave but constant mowing may have  taken the tops off them.   That happens to me with my Yucca Tree and I just mow the tops off them. One day though, I'm going to have to dig them out because they are multiplying like mad.
My mother in law had one of those Schumachers in a border but the shoots ended up coming through the paved patio and tarmac covered driveway and only stopped when the main tree died.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on October 06, 2010, 06:10:14 PM
Mine began life as someone elses sucker--
given as a gift when a friend moved away.
 :(
It is now a tree with suckers of it's own-- not in the lawn though.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on October 06, 2010, 07:40:19 PM
Yes ours started as suckers. The one in the pic above has not thrown any suckers up but a smaller one in the front garden I notice has produced a couple within a few feet in the same border.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on October 22, 2010, 10:23:58 PM
My wife and I  (seem to have heard that expression before somewhere!!), have visited some of the major garden centres in the past few days. Holland Arms, Gaerwen, Stapeley Water Gardens, Bridgemere Garden World, Trentham Gardens and Grosvenor Garden Centre. Vast areas have been given over to their Christmas displays and Santa's grottos and it's only October. Still I suppose the sparkly lights cheer us up a little bit at a somewhat depressing time of the year when the nights are rapidly drawing in and I think the clocks go back next weekend. But that does mean an extra hour in bed - so something to look forward to..

Stapeley and Bridgemere appear to be in the throes of major revamps but of those we visited Trentham was the most impressive, and you can get Cadwalladr's ice cream there as well.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on October 23, 2010, 08:27:25 AM
Does Trentham Gardens have their Christmas displays up yet?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on October 23, 2010, 10:50:40 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Does Trentham Gardens have their Christmas displays up yet?

Not their full displays I wouldn't have thought - they have some Christmas items though, my wife particularly liked the pair of life-size deer!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on October 23, 2010, 11:04:22 AM
Inspired by you, Stan, we may well pop over for a browse in the next month.  I enjoy seeing the different grottos,  I must admit.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on October 23, 2010, 11:16:37 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Does Trentham Gardens have their Christmas displays up yet?

Not their full displays I wouldn't have thought - they have some Christmas items though, my wife particularly liked the pair of life-size deer!

I thought they were 'two deer'  (too dear)  _))*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on October 23, 2010, 01:03:42 PM
That's what I told her!

PS Ian - I am pleased that I am still up to providing inspiration!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on October 26, 2010, 03:05:44 PM
Signs of Autumn now especially after last night, leaves all over the place!
I took this pic of the beech tree on our front garden a few days ago and now the "tints" are even more....and the number of leaves less!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on October 26, 2010, 03:24:30 PM
I now have quite a number of magnolia splattered bushes courtesy of the decorators ! :o :D. Should I start a trend?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 26, 2010, 05:08:29 PM
I painted my white dovecote recently using a wonky ladder and now the Clematis and Honeysuckle are completely spotted too.   In fact the paint on the dovecote has got more runs than a Pakistani cricket team!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on October 26, 2010, 05:16:56 PM
who would have bet on that  :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on October 26, 2010, 06:54:27 PM
Quote
I painted my white dovecote recently using a wonky ladder

Wouldn't a brush have worked better?

 ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on October 26, 2010, 10:45:46 PM
Ian, I was going to do the same joke L0L
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on October 27, 2010, 12:29:43 AM
Those low-down areas must play havoc with your back.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on October 27, 2010, 08:08:37 AM
Quote
Ian, I was going to do the same joke


Sorry about that :-))   ))*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on October 27, 2010, 05:34:43 PM
great minds and all that D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on October 27, 2010, 05:51:27 PM
 $dins$

Indeed :-))
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 11, 2010, 07:52:10 PM
My Pampas grass was starting to look very impressive but with the winds we are having this afternoon I've watched the plumes go down one by one.  I bet by the morning they'll all be down.       :(
The garden furniture has blown down, but I had already put the large bird feeder on the ground to avoid damage as it's usually the first to fall over.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on November 11, 2010, 09:00:15 PM
I had to dig (now that's a task that looked a lot easier than it was going to be) the pampas grass out of the front garden during the spring. It was too painful watching the wind spoil in 1 night what it had been growing up to in the previous 3 months.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on November 11, 2010, 09:05:41 PM
Large purple budleia completely uprooted in the winds over the weekend. I've cut it right back and replanted it.Fingers crossed it will make it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on November 11, 2010, 09:17:36 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Large purple budleia completely uprooted in the winds over the weekend. I've cut it right back and replanted it.Fingers crossed it will make it.

It grows fairly easily on abandoned sites eg the old Billington's Garage in Conwy, so I would be fairly optimistic about it.  ££$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on November 11, 2010, 09:19:15 PM
The Buddleia will be fine, I'm sure, they are practically impossible to kill!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on November 12, 2010, 02:18:03 PM
We had three very healthy buddleia in our garden, but they had been planted by previous owners on a slanted banking that was too shallow. 
So they were leaning very badly last year, and I had to remove two of them before they fell over.

The last one has died now, I think because the roots couldn't get deep enough and it became unstable. ... I'll need to remove that one also. 

Shame, because they didn't have attract the butterflies.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 13, 2010, 04:30:01 PM
Buddleia's seem to grow anywhere.  I've seen them growing out of roofs in Bangor and I had one appear in my compost heap this year.
They can stand any amount of pruning and I think that they advise people to hard prune each year.  Butterfies just can't resist them.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on November 19, 2010, 01:51:00 PM
There are still even in November, a few plants providing colour in the garden. Here is a clump of Nerines on our front.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on November 19, 2010, 01:53:02 PM
And here a clump of Kaffir lilies

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on November 19, 2010, 01:58:55 PM
I've noticed that the geraniums in the garden are still in full flower, also.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 23, 2010, 02:18:16 PM
Most of the  Cherry Trees leaves came off in the recent gales and I spent Sunday raking and mowing them up.    I tend to mow all the leaves up as I find that you don't fill up the green garden waste bags as much.
There are a few leaves left on the Maples but they'll blow away soon.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 27, 2010, 04:14:32 PM
We had a fall of snow yesterday and overnight it froze and is still frozen now.  I've put some fleece over some of the  less hardy plants but won't know whether I've done it too late.
Last year I lost one of my Australian Tree Ferns because of the cold but strangely the Lemon tree survived.
Winter has come early this year and I wonder if it'll be as harsh this year compared to last year.
Here are some photos from earlier this year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on December 15, 2010, 09:28:20 PM
Popped down to Talgoed  Nursery yesterday and bought a Christmas tree off John. The wife also got a kiss off him under the mistletoe. Glad I didn't go on my own!

Called at Snowdonia Nurseries on the way back - they have a very impressive Christmas display and grotto. However Father Christmas was having a day off yesterday because he had been so busy over the weekend. (Proceeds for Ty Gobaith the notice said).

Visited Bodnant Garden Centre this afternoon and whilst pleasant enough I thought their displays a little disappointing, a view shared by my wife. The outside area had very few plants and shrubs for sale, in fact a large part was 'roped off'. There was quite a good selection of Christmas trees though. A number of the small units there were unoccupied and had "to let" notices on them, the only unit open was the Tina Holley Picture Gallery. Only a few other people there apart from the two of us and hardly anyone in the cafe.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 18, 2010, 10:40:33 AM
Hope you're safe and sound over there with all the snow Bellringer.   We had further snow last night and the garden is under a thick blanket of snow but no sign of Badger or Fox tracks there last night, perhaps they went elsewhere.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on December 18, 2010, 11:44:41 AM
Hugo, yes we are fine thanks and we hope you are too. Our friendly local farmer/contractor has been down the road with his big red tractor and snow-plough so we could get the car out if required.

Showed your pics. to my wife and she wants a dog like yours. That's a lovely photo above - I couldn't get our border collie Ted to stand still long enough for a pic., he was so excited and charging around like a mad thing.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on December 18, 2010, 12:18:53 PM
Managed to get "Ted" to stay still long enough for this
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on December 18, 2010, 12:21:12 PM
Our monkey puzzle tree this morning with the weight of snow really making those lower branches hang down.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 18, 2010, 01:09:41 PM
Ted looks like he's enjoying himself in the snow, does he come in with snowballs attached to his feet and legs like Marco does?  I liked your Monkey Puzzle tree and think the Squirrels deserve to be rewarded if they dare to climb up it!
I'm going to start to dig the snow from the drive as we're hoping to go to Maenan Abbey for a meal tomorrow afternoon but knowing my luck it'll snow straight after I've finished clearing the drive!
There's a solar light on the table somewhere under the snow just like the one you've got.
 :Sisyphus:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 20, 2010, 04:07:15 PM
There were Cyclamen under there before the snow came but we'll have to wait and see if they survive.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 22, 2010, 11:26:49 AM
Pictures taken this morning after a heavy snowfall last night.   I don't think that we'll be using the picnic table or the sunloungers in the near future.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on December 22, 2010, 05:27:58 PM
The monkey puzzle tree today. No, Ted is not lying down, and he really did enjoy charging around frantically in the snow.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on December 22, 2010, 06:11:50 PM
That's fantastic, Stan.  :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on December 23, 2010, 08:05:13 AM
...in the true sense of the word.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on December 29, 2010, 07:50:14 PM
Looks today that our garden pond was not deep enough for some of the fish to survive the very cold temperatures of the last couple of weeks.
The strange thing is that the larger fish seem to have succumbed while some of the smaller ones can still be seen moving about below the ice.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 30, 2010, 11:10:19 AM
Sorry to hear about the loss of your fish bellringer, the ice has been thicker than normal recently.  A neighbour of mine keeps a large ball in his pond to prevent the ice from freezing completely on the surface of his pond.
I don't know if the reason for this is to get oxygen into the pond or not.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on December 30, 2010, 06:23:40 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Sorry to hear about the loss of your fish bellringer, the ice has been thicker than normal recently.  A neighbour of mine keeps a large ball in his pond to prevent the ice from freezing completely on the surface of his pond.
I don't know if the reason for this is to get oxygen into the pond or not.

So that's what the large ball at Portmeirion was for -  to stop the fountains & ponds from freezing over?

It must have blown out of the water, as it was roving all over the place.

Every time I turned around it was there. Strange.  :-X

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on January 27, 2011, 08:26:41 PM
Besides gardening, I wonder if anyone is having a go at 'growing your own' this year. I've a few dozen raspberry canes in, hundred strawberry plants or so, about 50 leeks, 25 shallots, 100 onions, five or 6 rhubarb. Plenty more to go in yet, just waiting on the warmer weather. I will probably start chitting my spuds next week in preparation for March. Feel free to ask any Q's on growing your own and i'll do my best to help folks.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on January 28, 2011, 03:12:25 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I will probably start chitting my spuds next week in preparation for March.

 :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on January 29, 2011, 08:52:53 AM
'ch', 'ch', 'ch'...'itting'! My personal vibes are that it will be a good season for the garden this year be it flowers, veg or fruit that you choose to grow. Very mild start to the year. In the UK at least.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on January 29, 2011, 10:10:03 AM
Not a very mild start here in Conwy Craig, it's freezing this morning - current temp -5C. Bright and sunny though.
Snowdrops are starting to look good.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Paddy on January 29, 2011, 01:55:53 PM
I was hoping to start putting some bulbs in my planters. Daffs, tulips etc. But I've been told I'm too late. Is that right?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 29, 2011, 02:52:22 PM
too late really but if you've got them (and they may well be shooting by now) put them in anyway. A couple of years ago someone I knew bought a bag of daff bulbs very cheap about this time of year. He did'nt bother planting them properly but just chucked them on the soil and emptied a cheap bag of compost over, they all came up very nicely! (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-chores023.gif) (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on January 29, 2011, 04:23:15 PM
My view is quite simple.  Plant the stuff and if it is worth its salt it will grow.  If not the bulb, seed, cutting or whatever apparently just lost its will to live!      D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on January 29, 2011, 06:23:56 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I was hoping to start putting some bulbs in my planters. Daffs, tulips etc. But I've been told I'm too late. Is that right?

You are fine to plant the bulbs, being told it's too late still doesn't leave any viable options. Leaving them until the end of the year you may find many will have sprouted thus depleting their stored energy reserves or fail in storage and start rotting. Pop them in now and don't delay, just don't expect the same vigour until the following season as bulbs accumulate their reserves months in advance before spring. They will be ok though.

Happy Growing.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on January 30, 2011, 02:11:33 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
'ch', 'ch', 'ch'...'itting'! My personal vibes are that it will be a good season for the garden this year be it flowers, veg or fruit that you choose to grow. Very mild start to the year. In the UK at least.

Sorry Craig  ))* must change my glasses prescription.

My avocados and lemons are coming along well.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on January 30, 2011, 02:12:58 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I was hoping to start putting some bulbs in my planters. Daffs, tulips etc. But I've been told I'm too late. Is that right?

Maybe not Paddy. Batty's Nurseries are open until five.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on January 30, 2011, 08:49:01 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
'ch', 'ch', 'ch'...'itting'! My personal vibes are that it will be a good season for the garden this year be it flowers, veg or fruit that you choose to grow. Very mild start to the year. In the UK at least.

Sorry Craig  ))* must change my glasses prescription.

My avocados and lemons are coming along well.

Lemons, very exotic Trojan. I'm sure you have bounty's of lemons with the warmth over there. I have a calamondin orange myself indoors presently. When I get round to putting my greenhouse up, I will have a go at either lemons or limes I think. I've started a few pomegranates from seed, i'm not expecting anything for at least 3 years. In the UK they are an ornamentle, though with a better than average summer I could expect some small fruits from it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: brumbob on February 05, 2011, 06:53:13 PM
A 25ft Eucalyptus toppled in the wind today (not looking forward to sawing that up)
all my Cordylines and semi exotic plants lost to the frost and snow  :rage:
It's going to be an expensive time in the spring at the garden centre  :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on February 05, 2011, 08:39:42 PM
Tremendous shame to lose such a large tree. Will you be replacing like for like, or trying something different this time? A mexican palm or monkey puzzle tree would be a good suggestion for you :) Obviously whatever you put would have to look right in it's place.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: brumbob on February 05, 2011, 08:54:16 PM
I'll probably leave the tree, we have two others(if they survive this wind)
although they are very fast growing, i'll never see a new one in maturity as we will be moving in a couple of years
but the palms etc, I will definately have to replace.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on February 06, 2011, 11:13:05 AM
Did that Spiraea of yours survive after the hacking you gave it last winter?   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: brumbob on February 06, 2011, 02:54:56 PM
Yes, Hugo, looking dormant at the moment but should be fine.

Eucalyptus tree trunk (about 8" in diameter) all cut up into manageable pieces now ready to take to the recycle yard
thank god for shredders and reciprocating saws
Shame I hadn't got a wood burner, I bet eucalyptus smells wonderful burning.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on February 06, 2011, 06:11:21 PM
Eucalyptus essential oil smells wonderful burning... but it should be diluted to 10 parts water to 1 part oil.
Even then, it is so strong that it is like having 25 packets of Tunes or Lockets one after the other!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: brumbob on February 06, 2011, 10:52:26 PM
Fester, what do I need to make essential oils out of a tree, or do I just dilute it?  :P
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on February 06, 2011, 10:59:38 PM
Eucalytus essential oil comes from the leaf ... via a slow and laborious process of steam distillation.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: brumbob on February 06, 2011, 11:09:29 PM
I'll put the kettle on

wondered why my koalas smelt so nice  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on February 07, 2011, 08:12:31 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I'll put the kettle on

wondered why my koalas smelt so nice  :D

 _))*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 21, 2011, 01:15:55 PM
As I was doing the first cut of the lawn this year I saw a beautiful Peacock butterfly on a yellow Primula but by the time I found my camera the butterfly had gone,  While I'm typing this I've noticed some more about so perhaps the warmer weather is here at last?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 01, 2011, 05:52:16 PM
Just as the Magnolia Stellata has come into flower the winds have picked up and started to blow the flowers off and since I took this photo earlier this afternoon that lage bird table has blown over.  It's a shame that the flowers don't last longer and that you get a chance to appreciate them.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: brumbob on April 01, 2011, 07:17:50 PM
I'm sure you'll appreciate your bird table again  :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 01, 2011, 07:50:21 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I'm sure you'll appreciate your bird table again  :laugh:

I will do once it's back up again!   (I've modified my last comment so it makes sense!  :-[ )
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 20, 2011, 04:03:59 PM
The Prunus Kanzan is in full flower at the moment but the blossom is already starting to fall.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 25, 2011, 12:37:48 PM
We inherited this lovely patch of late flowering daffodils from the previous owner of our garden. Still in flower today.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Micox on April 25, 2011, 06:08:22 PM
Under this lot is an old caravan which is my office.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 01, 2011, 05:38:04 PM
No one would ever know that there was anyone in the caravan Mike if it wasn't for the sound of your Saxaphone playing.     :) 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 01, 2011, 05:42:49 PM
Japanese Tree Peony,  Rhododenrons in flower and most of the Cherry Blossom is now on the lawn
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2011, 04:21:30 PM
The Clematis have started to come into flower and the Hosta seems to have survived the transplanting.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 08, 2011, 05:17:36 PM
Hugo, you are obviously a keen gardener. Do you have any advice for us? We have lost 3 well established clematis this winter. Only one survived which was the most recently planted one, a clematis montana. Any ideas what could have caused this? I would hate it to happen again.
Yours looks lovely at the moment.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on May 08, 2011, 05:33:16 PM
I'm sure Hugo will answer but I would put it down the very severe Winter we had.  Many, many plants have suffered including lots that we would normally see survive a normal Winter.   C'est la vie!    ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2011, 06:23:50 PM
I'm afraid that I know little about plants but do enjoy gardening. Clematis can suddenly die but I don't know what causes them to die except for my own Clematis that was growing up the Dovecote and died this year.
That was caused by my dog Marco chewing the stem!     :(
Yorkie could be correct with the weather killing some plants and shrubs because I lost a few this Winter including an Australia Tree Fern. That was my fault though because I forgot to protect them and didn't cover them until it was too late.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 08, 2011, 06:43:25 PM
We have clematis growing where we did not expect (we only moved here in July last year) all are doing well, I do know that you have to plant them deeper than other plants as you can get 'clematis wilt' where it appears to die but can regrow later from below. Also the roots need to be shaded by stones, Montanas seem to be very tough, we had an enormous one back in Oxfordshire.
We lost a hebe in the frosts and the fuchsias all died back, we just cut off the dead branches and its regrown very well  D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 08, 2011, 07:07:30 PM
Thanks all for your advice.
I need advice on posting now!
I have just tried to post 2 photos of the clematis that we have lost but I am getting this message.

The upload folder is full. Please try a smaller file and/or contact an administrator.

I have resized the photos the same way as others I have posted before.
Help please!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on May 08, 2011, 07:12:59 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I have just tried to post 2 photos of the clematis that we have lost but I am getting this message.

The upload folder is full. Please try a smaller file and/or contact an administrator.

The same thing happened to me earlier.

This is the thread for problems: http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=6.0 (http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=6.0)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on May 08, 2011, 07:16:50 PM
There is a limit to the amount of pictures per page and with many running at 3 per post it soon gets filled up.    >>>
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on May 10, 2011, 06:24:43 PM
We have had one or two casualties which we have put down to the extreme winter weather. On the left of this picture is a pittosporum which has in the last few weeks shown extreme signs of dying, while beside it on the right and looking OK is a canary bird rose.

I thought a suitable caption might be "The living and the dead" but would welcome other suggestions.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 10, 2011, 07:17:43 PM
These are two of our casualties. We only have the photos of these now.  :'(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on May 10, 2011, 07:21:37 PM
Can anyone identify these large plants?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on May 10, 2011, 07:54:44 PM
Good book, that. John Wyndham's finest hour. I remember watching the tv series when i was in school.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on May 10, 2011, 08:25:07 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Good book, that. John Wyndham's finest hour. I remember watching the tv series when i was in school.

 $good$ Very good!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 12, 2011, 12:41:50 PM
Bridgemere Garden Centre by Nantwich
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on May 12, 2011, 12:57:47 PM
If only Happy Valley looked like those last two photos!  :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on May 12, 2011, 07:22:24 PM
The last pic looks like Cheshire's "Granny's Armchair" Hugo.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 15, 2011, 02:22:44 PM
The Poppies are only just starting to come out, but they don't last very long with this heavy rain and this big fella running through them.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on May 15, 2011, 05:16:10 PM
If they were here, they'd have had their heads chewed off by now. Ours are coming on nicely--in the front-- a Frizzy Free area !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 16, 2011, 08:18:48 PM
Marco did that too when he was a lot younger so the flowers are a lot safer except when he treads all over them.  :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on May 27, 2011, 04:38:35 PM
Despite the wind and rain I have at last got some summer colour coming.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 27, 2011, 09:17:35 PM
You've got some very attractive plants Nemesis, is the third one a Peony?   It's such an unusual colour for a Peony, I've not seen one like it before.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on May 28, 2011, 04:40:50 PM
Yes you are right Hugo, the plant was here when we moved in and I can't seem to find a name anywhere for it, but funnily enough I saw someone carrying a bunch of them in town this afternoon !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 07, 2011, 11:09:44 AM
I've rescued these peonies from the wind and rain in the garden today.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 07, 2011, 02:45:35 PM
Today, I harvested my first spring onions of the season.  More goodies to come!   Z**
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 07, 2011, 05:49:25 PM
I love visiting gardens. Last July I visited East Ruston Vicarage Garden in Norfolk. It is only 1.5 miles from the North Sea but it is incredible what they manage to grow there.
The wild flower meadow was my favourite part. I think these are really difficult to grow. We bought some wild flower seed last year and all we have are weeds!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on June 07, 2011, 06:01:19 PM
Very impressive! I always think more roadside verges should be seeded with wild flowers.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 07, 2011, 06:20:56 PM
A bit closer to home.....Bodysgallen blossom!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on June 07, 2011, 07:04:44 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Today, I harvested my first spring onions of the season.  More goodies to come!   Z**

What's with the 'drinking beer' smiley?

Do you put onions in your home-brew?  :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 07, 2011, 07:38:57 PM
'Tis Cranberry Juice, very good for the water-works I'm told.   Don't drink beer, never have.  When I did drink it was G & T, Vino and Brandy - before, during and after a meal.  Been virtually TT since 1990 but do have the occasional glass of vino with a meal.    Z** $drink$   $drink1$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 07, 2011, 07:49:56 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Very impressive! I always think more roadside verges should be seeded with wild flowers.

I agree.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on June 08, 2011, 11:08:04 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
The wild flower meadow was my favourite part. I think these are really difficult to grow. We bought some wild flower seed last year and all we have are weeds!

Lovely photos, Hollins.  You're right that wildflower meadows are difficult to grow.  It the soil's too fertile, the grasses become too vigorous and the wildflowers can't compete.  Growing yellow rattle with the grasses is supposed to help, as it's partially parasitic on grasses and suppresses their growth (I have a colleague who's trying this at the moment).  Starting the wildflowers in pots and then planting them out can also help them to get established.  (Sorry if I'm telling you things that you know already.)  A more expensive alternative is "Meadowmat" - wildflower turf.  I've not yet seen "Meadowmat" growing but I have some sedum matting from the growers:
http://urlwww--enviromat--co--uk.rtrk.co.uk/pages/meadowmat.php (http://urlwww--enviromat--co--uk.rtrk.co.uk/pages/meadowmat.php)

Dave, more wildflowers along the verges would be very attractive and should be good for wildlife and there are certainly some wildflower seed mixes available for sowing on a commercial scale, e.g.:
https://www.cotswoldseeds.com/seedmix/wild-flowers (https://www.cotswoldseeds.com/seedmix/wild-flowers)

However, there are some concerns regarding large scale sowing of "wild" flowers in relation to the provenance of the seed, which may be genetically very different to the endemic plants (in some cases the seed may originate from the continent). Cross pollination between endemic and introduced plants could thus affect local biodiversity.  Ideally, the seed would be sourced locally - nothing's ever simple, is it?!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 08, 2011, 11:44:36 AM
Thank you Blodyn for the info on growing wild flowers. We are in need of all the help we can get!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on June 08, 2011, 04:06:45 PM
Hollins, the advice on maintenance of "Meadowmat" (http://www.enviromat.co.uk/pages/meadowmat.php) may be helpful for any wildflower meadow:

"Maintain Meadow mat just as you would a wild flower meadow - cut it back to 4cm in July, allow the seeds to fall back into the sward and then remove the hay after 2-3 days.

"If your soil is too rich, deplete the nutrient levels by cutting Meadow mat two or three times between September and March.  ALWAYS remove the cuttings."

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 11, 2011, 10:04:56 PM
Help please!
Does anyone know the name of this shrub which is flowering now.
Thanks.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 11, 2011, 11:03:43 PM
it looks like a kalmia (I've just looked through my shrub book)

http://www.english-country-garden.com/flowers/kalmia.htm (http://www.english-country-garden.com/flowers/kalmia.htm)

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 12, 2011, 07:44:32 AM
That's it!
Thank you very much. I spent ages looking through all the rhododendrons and couldn't find it.
 $thanx$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 22, 2011, 08:09:35 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Help please!
Does anyone know the name of this shrub which is flowering now.
Thanks.

It's also called the Calico Bush and is a beautiful evergreen shrub. I've got one in my garden too but made the mistake of planting it too near a Pieris and they have merged together.
I've got a Spiraea that is late in flowering and the photo was taken recently but sadly all the flowers have gone now.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 26, 2011, 12:06:46 PM
I have a large plant container with a fairly mature Rosemary Bush in it.  The leaves have gone yellow and the plant looks in a sorry state.   I decided ro remove it and plant a new one.  When removing the plant I found that the container is a monstous ants nest with millions of ants and their eggs.   Before I plant the new bush can anyone tell me the best way to get rid of the nest, including the ants, and preventing a recurrance of the problem?

Thanks.    $thanx$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 26, 2011, 02:11:37 PM
Have you anything that you could set fire to it in?
Cruel I suppose, but you'll be over run if you don't get rid of it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on June 26, 2011, 02:14:46 PM
A kettle full of boiling water poured over it?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 26, 2011, 03:24:44 PM
I'd need a bathfull or two of boiling water for this lot!    I did flood the pot using the hose pipe and as it is drying out the little blighters are moving all their eggs to a new location on a raised bed.    I have found it fascinating watching them, maybe I could turn it into a Llandudno Tourist Attraction!   ZXZ

Can't set fire to it the container is pottery.    Maybe I'll put down some sweet sticky stuff for them to get themselves solidly stuck to. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Pendragon on June 26, 2011, 03:34:09 PM
http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=1001651 (http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=1001651)

Have a look on this forum, they seem to know what they're talking about Yorkie..........Borax and sugar is suggested.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on June 26, 2011, 03:44:53 PM
Just dribble a trail of honey over to your next-door neighbours' garden.  8)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 26, 2011, 03:54:24 PM
I'm ahead of you there T!   D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on June 27, 2011, 07:06:01 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I have a large plant container with a fairly mature Rosemary Bush in it.  The leaves have gone yellow and the plant looks in a sorry state.   I decided ro remove it and plant a new one.  When removing the plant I found that the container is a monstous ants nest with millions of ants and their eggs.   Before I plant the new bush can anyone tell me the best way to get rid of the nest, including the ants, and preventing a recurrance of the problem?

Thanks.    $thanx$

Have you not seen them 'ant farms' you can buy on the internet. They are transparent with an edible gel which they drill through inside. You could have always transferred a few quite easily, along with their eggs. It's quite fun watching them at work. Ants are very particular with regards to the soil structure, so if you use a more organically rich compost in your pots you should find that they won't take much interest in siting there. If it is more of a sandy, silty soil, it is just perfect for constructing their dwellings though this too is what Rosemary likes though the plant is fairly tolerant of other soil medium types. Good luck with your new specimen Yorkie. Try an organic seaweed feed in the spring, plenty of that stuff to be found along the shoreline. To make the feed, google has plenty of info on how to.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 27, 2011, 07:19:09 PM
Thanks for the advice Mr O.  The problem has been moved and I am hoping that they will be happy in the garden of the empty house next door!    ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 03, 2011, 01:16:26 PM
Just picked these from the garden. I think I could have posted this in the bargains section because most of the seeds came from the pound shop in Llandudno!
Dave R and Blodyn........where are you when I need you!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on July 03, 2011, 01:35:54 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Just picked these from the garden. I think I could have posted this in the bargains section because most of the seeds came from the pound shop in Llandudno!
Dave R and Blodyn........where are you when I need you!

 $good$  a very nice display!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 03, 2011, 04:25:23 PM
Yes, well done!  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 04, 2011, 09:29:04 AM
Lovely photo, Hollins.  Your garden must look super with all those growing in it. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 04, 2011, 01:16:36 PM
The Llandudno Allotment Association (http://www.llandudnoallotments.btck.co.uk/) now has a website. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 04, 2011, 02:12:52 PM
Hi there, although I'm currently in Wirral, I plan to move to Llandudno, and of course the climate in Llandudno is better than that of Wirral so more plants can be grown (and survive over winter).

This is a photo of my garden in Wirral, although when I move to Llandudno hopefully I will transplant some of it there (if I can move these plants without killing them!)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2734.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2702.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2700.jpg)

I am a huge fan of Haulfre gardens, some of the Cordylines there are absolutely monsterous... and the Banana plant by the tearooms is pretty spectacular!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 09, 2011, 06:17:50 PM
That looks like a really lovely garden, hope that you can transplant them ok when you move here.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 09, 2011, 10:17:00 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I am a huge fan of Haulfre gardens, some of the Cordylines there are absolutely monsterous... and the Banana plant by the tearooms is pretty spectacular!
I's just a shame that they are getting tattier and tattier. I see the old trick of replacing the annual bedding plants with shrubs has been carried out on some of the flower beds in the lower lawn area. Where will it all end?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 11, 2011, 05:41:31 PM
Hugo, they should be ok, but the Yucca has very fragile root systems, - that said snapped root grow a new plant from where it lands.. Cordylines are well known to be very bad transplanters though  :-[

Dave, It is disappointing when plants are just substituted for the easiest option. Depends what kind of shrub though of course, an insanely colourful, unusual shrub may be welcome, but if its one of those hideous common laurel bushes then I 100% agree.

Here's is some photos of Haulfre I took last year in summer.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/DSCF2179.jpg)

These were certainly the largest Cordylines I've come across..

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/DSCF2178.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/DSCF2169.jpg)

This is absolutely beautiful!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 11, 2011, 06:09:00 PM
My RHS Encyclopedia says that they can grow to over 30 feet in the right conditions..-- Conditions must be right ! :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 11, 2011, 06:21:25 PM
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4e/Cordyline_australis_Rangitaiki_plains.jpg)

 :-X  :o

How long do we reckon until the promenade ones look like this?

Actually there one well on it's way near the roundabout at the end of the prom!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 11, 2011, 07:17:18 PM
It's interesting to note that none of the Cordylines in Haulfre have been killed by the cold last Winter, whilst the ones along the Prom were devastated, at least 70% of them were badly damaged and had to be cut down. That said, they are all growing again from soil level, which is good news. I think they are an important part of Llandudno's Prom.  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 11, 2011, 07:32:19 PM
I noticed the ones toward Craig y Don where cut back when I went in March, but near the Orme they were untouched, even the red Cordylines where fine, and very surprisingly the Yucca elephantipes (the houseplant one), was also fine.

It seems any type of shelter has helped, and also a little height or any eastern facing aspect helps.

It would be interesting to see if any up the Orme survived.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 11, 2011, 08:22:42 PM
Yucca Trees are quite hardy and mine has survived many Winters here.  At present there are 6 flowering stems on the plant but some years I've had as many as 13 and it usually flowers twice a year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 11, 2011, 08:36:11 PM
Looks like Yucca gloriosa there, a nice hardy Yucca. Yours has probably reached it's maximum height, maybe it'll grow a little bigger.

Here is Llandudno's monster Yucca.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2607.jpg)

on the other hand, here was mine before it got hit by winter a year ago.

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2592/3784940861_f7d6589c1d_z.jpg)

*By the way if anyone likes the look of Yucca elephantipes, but like me, can't seem to grow it, try Yucca aloifolia it looks almost exactly the same, but its leaflets are lethally sharp (also aptly called the Spanish Bayonet)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 13, 2011, 02:50:40 PM
Earlier this year I ordered 24 large plugs of double, non-stop Begonias. When they arrived I immediately contacted the firm as they were in such a state, leaves off, stems broken etc. 24 more duly arrived--no better. This time I took photos and contacted the firm again.24 more then arrived--worse than ever. By this time I was cheesed off and kept on planting the decent bits in troughs vowing not to use this firm again.
Later, although I hadn't complained a third time an apology arrived--more of a grovel really. It seems that most of these plants had been hopeless.
Well out of 72 plants I have a dozen of these!--- Was it worth it I ask myself ?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 13, 2011, 09:50:55 PM
The offending company didn't begin with a 'C' did it?

I also have problems with mail order plants, I purchased a Jasminum officinale from a company, and it died recently, not acceptable really so I know how frustrating it is.

Have you asked the company for a refund, if you have the invoice still I would have thought you are entitled to it, either that or you could get a perennial plant for the same value as the Begonias (although no certainties it will be any higher in quality).

I suppose it's best buying from nurseries/garden centres. I certainly won't be buying online again.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 14, 2011, 01:03:00 PM
No not a C. And yes I agree-- I only buy what I can see from now on. My best blooms this year are Geraniums from M&S and Petunias and Mimulus from Colwyn Bay Market ! Cheap and cheerful !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 14, 2011, 07:52:49 PM
You can get some absolute gems from Markets, some real rare beauties and usually very cheap! Markets are some kind of treasure trove and quality is nearly always good  $good$

On another subject I grow a plant called Crassula sarcocaulis (Bonsai Crassula), it's a trunk forming succulent (similar to the money plant, but more tolerant of cold), and its been spinning off seedlings everywhere to the point where it's actually now a weed. Not only that but I saw one of the seedlings has some red roots which has drilled into a pebble!!  :o Scary stuff!

Here's the plant in question:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2806.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2807.jpg)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 15, 2011, 01:25:15 PM
Today's garden crop!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 15, 2011, 02:55:32 PM
Today's garden crop a few hours later!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 15, 2011, 09:12:41 PM
Yummy!  &well&
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 15, 2011, 09:41:54 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Today's garden crop a few hours later!
You have been busy!  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 16, 2011, 04:34:37 PM
The Bear's Breeches are starting to come into flower but I noticed traces of the customary mildew starting on one of the leaves. I've been trimming the hedges most of the week and noticed that another Bear's Breeches was riddled with the mildew so I've chopped it down which is a pity really because that bush was also starting to flower.
Earlier this year I moved a Hosta from one of the borders and put it into a large pot near the house. It's not an ideal spot for it but the Hosta seems to be doing ok.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 16, 2011, 08:05:43 PM
Your Hosta seems to be doing very well, in fact!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on July 16, 2011, 08:16:15 PM
ANyone any idea what this is?   I'm trying to win a quiz!  L0L
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on July 16, 2011, 08:17:58 PM
Yes... its a Tiffany Lamp-shade Flower... !   L0L L0L
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 16, 2011, 08:20:06 PM
It's a hoya!
Now you can get your own quiz questions on Yorkie!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on July 16, 2011, 08:54:46 PM
I am not a gardener but this year I planted half a dozen courgette seeds and I now have six darn great plants adorning my raised bed.  They are full of big Orange flowers and the signs of baby courgettes following on.   I am surprised at the number of "fruits", if one calls them such, on each plant they will keep us going for ages.  The prickly big leaves and stems are a bit rough.

Does anyone know if courgettes can be frozen?  If so do they have to be blanched, and sliced or whole?

I plan to batter and deep fry the flowers.    :D   :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on July 17, 2011, 08:38:40 AM
I Googled it.

Courgettes

Choose young ones. Wash and cut into ½ to 1in (1 cm) slices. Either blanch, or saute in a little butter

1 min.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on July 17, 2011, 08:59:12 AM
Thanks TheMedz.  Silly me I could have done that myself!   Had a look and it seems that they turn out a bit rubbery or watery when thawed and not too appetising.  Popular solution seems to be making soup with them.   I think I will try making a ratatouille and freezing that in handy portions.  Watch this space!    ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 17, 2011, 09:23:56 AM
Thought that someone might like this recipe for courgette soup. It always comes out the same and tastes really creamy even though there is no cream in it.

Courgette soup
3 courgettes
1 small onion
1 small potato
1 pint  or so vegetable stock

Melt an ounce of butter and fry the chopped onion in it, then add the chopped up potato.
Chop up the courgettes and add those to the pan. Give it all a good stir , add salt and pepper and let it sweat for a few minutes. Then add the stock and cook for about 20 mins.
Put it all in the liquidiser and then add a little milk at the end.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on July 17, 2011, 01:05:44 PM
Thanks Hollins - I also do another version which is virtally the same with the addition of a few carrots.  With the pots and carrots it turns out fairly thick so needs more stock.   Freezes very well.

I find making soup is a good way of using up stuff from the veg rack that has past its best.   Why do bought potatoes sprout after a couple of days but your own don't?    :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 17, 2011, 01:12:52 PM
Hugo-- I tend to chop off the leaves of my Bears Breeches and leave the flowers, usually more leaves appear.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 17, 2011, 03:24:12 PM
Thanks for the advice Nemesis and I'll do that next time.   $good$
 
This time I just used the hedge cutter and chopped the lot down to ground level but I've still got two others left.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 17, 2011, 03:30:09 PM
Shouldn't try it today Hugo, you'll be soaked ! :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 17, 2011, 04:23:42 PM
And it's also an electric Hedge cutter!       :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 17, 2011, 09:56:45 PM
Ouch :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Llechwedd on July 18, 2011, 12:37:03 PM
Any advice please?  I planted a  rose bush by a grave at Llanrhos but noticed that some of the leaves are turning yellow.  Other graves look ok and I havn't watered it just when I put it in.  The soil is really claggy but I'm detremined to put something there as other graveowners have done.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on July 20, 2011, 03:44:26 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Watch this space!    ;)

Has Steve Hunt authored a cookery book now?  ???
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on July 20, 2011, 08:26:00 AM
Yummy!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on July 21, 2011, 06:58:41 PM
Llechwedd, it's not very traditional but it will give you colourful flowers in summer, and can tolerate wet, rubbishy soil - the Bottlebrush plant.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Llechwedd on July 22, 2011, 12:05:55 PM
Oh thanks for that wonder if it will tolerate Llanrhos!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 22, 2011, 02:34:27 PM
Suppose alot depends on which part of the graveyard you planted the rose. The old bit is very shaded in places and the new bit under the glare of the summer sun. The grave which I tend is right at the bottom of the old part and gets overrun with ivy very quickly. The wild flowers there are lovely though.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 26, 2011, 01:56:38 PM
Just picked these sweet peas from the garden and put them in some of my torquay pots
Wish you could smell the flowers!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 26, 2011, 04:25:47 PM
What a lovely display, Hollins.  I can imagine the scent!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 26, 2011, 05:14:10 PM
Thanks Blodyn.
We had a photographer friend to stay last week. I was showing him some of yours and DaveR's photos. He went in to the garden and took these pics for me. What a difference to my attempts.
I think your wild flower photos would make a great series of cards and notelets for visitors to buy, "Flowers of the Great Orme!"
I would buy them anyway.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 27, 2011, 03:15:21 PM
Thank you very much, Hollins, that's really kind of you. 

A couple of years ago I did toy with the idea of producing a set of blank cards "Flowers of the Great Orme" (great minds think alike!) as part of our fundraising for St. Tudno's Church.  However, the minimum print run by our card manufacturer is 1250 copies per design so I didn't pursue it, though we do have our own Christmas cards with photos of the church (one design per year!).  My next "bright" idea for fundraising was to sell 10" x 8" prints of the flowers etc at our church fairs: several fairs later I still have quite a lot in hand - it's just as well the church fundraising doesn't rely on me!

Those are nice photos by your friend, you must have a very productive garden. 

 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 27, 2011, 03:27:17 PM
Have a look at this website.
vistaprint.co.uk
I have used them for Christmas cards and calendars. They have some free offers also. I thought it was too good to be true at first but I have ordered several of the "free" calendars and it does work. You might have to pay postage but there are sometimes offers for free postage as well!
I usually go for the cheapest method of shipping, 21 days, but they have never taken longer that 3 days and they come from Holland!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on July 27, 2011, 04:27:25 PM
Why not print your own Xmas cards?    Modern colour printers will generally handle 120 (or greater) gsm card and if one uses a "coated card" which has a semi gloss surface some very presentable home made cards can be produced.  An A4 page can be folded in half or in 4 to make a smaller card.   Fold them carefully and ensure you get a good crease on the fold.

You can put your own verse inside and even have them personalised with your address!    ZXZ
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 28, 2011, 12:29:45 PM
Thanks for your suggestions, Hollins and Yorkie.  We could perhaps experiment on a small scale, even if we make only a minimal amount for the church funds.  I'll let you know how we get on. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 30, 2011, 04:44:13 PM
Hollyhocks were always a favourite flower of my parents but I've never grown any until someone gave me a few plants last year.   The yellow one has come out and looks nice but I've not seen a sign of the other one which is almost black in colour.

Nemesis, I've taken you advice on the Bear's Breeches and cut off the leaves with mildew on as the flowers still look very good.   Only trouble now is that there are more flowers on the plant than leaves!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 30, 2011, 06:07:46 PM
Mine are the same Hugo, but I'd rather look at a clump of flowers than a load of mouldy leaves ! People always say-- oooh aren't they nice, reach out and touch them, and jump back saying "Ouch"
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 31, 2011, 10:18:57 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Mine are the same Hugo, but I'd rather look at a clump of flowers than a load of mouldy leaves ! People always say-- oooh aren't they nice, reach out and touch them, and jump back saying "Ouch"

I've done it myself even though I know they are spiky but Marco has more sense than me and keeps away from them!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 04, 2011, 09:00:20 PM
Looked around two lovely gardens today.
The first two photos are at Bodysgallen Hall and the rest at Bodnant.
Lots of inspiration!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 04, 2011, 09:03:14 PM
More Bodnant photos.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on August 04, 2011, 09:04:04 PM
Love the waterlillies
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on August 04, 2011, 09:07:40 PM
You're getting good at this photography lark, Hollins!  ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 04, 2011, 09:16:53 PM
Blimey, DaveR.... the ultimate compliment!
No lightroom used!

Yes Nemesis, it was worth going for the water lilies alone. They were gorgeous.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on August 27, 2011, 03:54:41 PM
Some of the mature trees and gardens of Highclere Castle (Downton Abbey)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on August 27, 2011, 04:01:18 PM
The river flowing through the park in Winchester and also a water feature near the Cathedral.  The picture isn't very good but there were flowers on the large Magnolia tree in the photo.  I never realised that Magnolia trees had flowers this late.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 10, 2011, 02:22:51 PM
Picked these from the garden today before the hurricane comes. Mind you it is very windy already and very warm.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 10, 2011, 02:35:44 PM
Phew--isn't it just, I had to tie in my climbing rose again this am. OH just gone on the Orme with the dog, bet they come back wet!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 25, 2011, 02:30:26 PM
My mother is staying with us at the moment and she has just made me these beautiful autumn baskets from bits and bobs out of the garden. Still creative at 85!
 $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 25, 2011, 03:14:13 PM
Super display Hollins-- your Mum could work for a posh magazine!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on September 26, 2011, 11:41:03 AM
Those are lovely arrangements, Hollins.  Congratulations to your Mum. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 26, 2011, 11:58:36 AM
Thanks Nemesis and Blodyn. I have passed your comments on to my mum and she is looking very pleased with herself. Actually you can't imagine how beneficial your words were. She has been a bit poorly lately. We don't think anything bad physically but it has shaken her confidence as she lives on her own normally. We are now on a boosting confidence crash course so the comments really helped!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on September 26, 2011, 12:03:43 PM
Hope your Mum's soon feeling better, Hollins.  Do give her my best wishes. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 26, 2011, 05:45:26 PM
And my wishes too !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on October 21, 2011, 08:44:40 PM
some dark, autumnal, flowery pictures.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2938.jpg)
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2943.jpg)
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2948.jpg)
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v709/stephenprudence/100_2953.jpg)

All we need now is a mild, frost free winter, and these flowers should carry on well into January!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 31, 2011, 03:49:18 PM
Autumn colours.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 07, 2011, 11:38:50 AM
Took this this morning just before the sun went in. Very frosty night. Did you have a frost in Llandudno?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on November 07, 2011, 12:08:24 PM
Yes!     D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 07, 2011, 12:43:13 PM
That's beautiful, Hollins, what gorgeous colours. 

How's your Mum, by the way?  I hope she's feeling better by now. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 07, 2011, 01:55:11 PM
Thanks Blodyn. How kind of you to remember about my mum. She is fine now thanks and back to her old self again thank goodness!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 07, 2011, 05:49:43 PM
I'm glad to hear your Mum's better, Hollins. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 08, 2011, 11:29:36 AM
Not really gardening but these two Orchids were given to me over the years as gifts. This is what happens with sheer neglect every year!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 08, 2011, 02:15:20 PM
Those look lovely, Nemesis.  I've not managed to keep an orchid for more than a year. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 08, 2011, 03:01:58 PM
I had 4 but last year's harsh temperatures killed two of them. One of those which I lost was given to me by our first visitors back in 1999 and it had flowered every year since then. I tend to ignore them  and the fluctuating temperatures in the kitchen have never affected them until last year. :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 08, 2011, 03:10:24 PM
That Japanese Maple is absolutely stunning Hollins. I've got 3 different ones in the garden including the variety Osakasuki but have never had colours like you have on your tree. What variety is it?

All I can say Nemesis is that you must have green fingers to keep an Orchid in that condition. It's really beautiful and one of my favourite colours for an Orchid. I think my wife has just killed our last one but I haven't chucked it out just yet in case a miracle happens and it gets resurrected!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 08, 2011, 03:53:20 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
That Japanese Maple is absolutely stunning Hollins. I've got 3 different ones in the garden including the variety Osakasuki but have never had colours like you have on your tree. What variety is it?


Thanks Hugo. Yes it is an absolute beauty. Here are 3 photos of it. The first one was yesterday. It goes red after the yellow leaves have fallen. The second one is high summer and the third I think was in May when the gorgeous cornus is in flower just below it.
We don't know the exact variety. We did try to find out but there are so many different ones. I would be great if someone out there knows. We were so lucky to inherit it with the house a few years ago. The previous owner must miss it very much.
I have a vague plan to take a photo of it in each season to make a calendar. I think I'll have to try and get Dave R interested in a photography project!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Quiggs on November 09, 2011, 12:10:00 PM
Sorry to interrupt, my wife had an Orchid for a birthday last Nov. After the flowers dropped she was going to throw it away, but I kept it and gave it a few drops of water regularly. It flowered again this year and still has 3 blooms on and is producing loads of shoots coming out sideways, I assume that they are seeking new ground. My query is I think it needs a larger pot, what is the medium that I require to put in the new pot? Thanks in anticipation.  $thanx$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Llechwedd on November 09, 2011, 12:15:07 PM
I've got the same problem Quiggs. The roots are growing out of the small pot but it's still flowering so I'm not doing anything yet.  You cut the stem down to just above a bump once it's finished flowering and it will come again next year.  You can buy orchid compost in Homebase.  It's in the house plant corner against the wall if you are in Llandudno.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Quiggs on November 09, 2011, 12:41:24 PM
Thank you Llechwedd, it is a different Orchid to the one in the earlier picture, mine has broad leaves growing out sideways, I've just noticed that there is a new shoot growing upwards from the base. When the flowers drop I'll chance re-potting it. My main incentive is that my O H. said it would never grow, I said it would.   ;D  Right again.   D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 09, 2011, 02:09:26 PM
 I have only ever re-potted one once, was told by an "expert" not to, but it split the pot, so I had to !
http://www.orchid.org.uk/orchidpotting.htm (http://www.orchid.org.uk/orchidpotting.htm)

Perhaps this might help.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Quiggs on November 09, 2011, 03:12:51 PM
Thank you Nemesis, but having read through the site that you suggested, am more unsure than before! I think the first thing that I need to ascertain is the Species / type that my plant belongs to, then take it from there. Perhaps my O H may win in the end.   :-[   $smack$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 09, 2011, 08:13:57 PM
Re: Orchid roots, don't worry about it, Orchids are significantly able to take aridity, and as such sideways roots won't be a problem if they're out of the pot. Best thing to do is repot in a slightly larger pot with sphagnum moss.. if you repot too wide the Orchid will fall over. Orchids don't root well in soil, and don't like being watered too much.

On another subject I brought two unusual plants from a garden centre recently, they are only seedlings, one was a Grevillia robusta which has very little chance of surviving out of a greenhouse, the other one the Albizia julibrissin, an attractive flowering plant/tree. They're both staying indoors for the winter although might have to keep the Albizia outdoors, not sure really.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Llechwedd on November 10, 2011, 11:58:32 AM
Thanks steophen prudence I'll try a slightly bigger pot. Minehas broad leaves too Quiggs.  I bought it from Aldi for £8.99, two years ago and it has gone berserk ever since only coming to an end now sort of.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 10, 2011, 12:53:42 PM
Sounds like a Moth Orchid, like the right hand one in my pic. That was bought from Morrisons about 5 years ago.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 10, 2011, 11:47:08 PM
I always say if you can look after an Orchid, you're an expert gardener, because they are really tough to look after, especially those with tropical origins like the Phalaenopsis Orchid. I've lost two in recent years through light deprivation and over watering.

A clear pot is a good idea too, as the tropical orchids love intense light, and even in the tree canopies in the rainforest where it grows as an epiphyte, it still has much brighter light than we do in our homes or in winter in general.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 12, 2011, 12:30:05 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
That Japanese Maple is absolutely stunning Hollins. I've got 3 different ones in the garden including the variety Osakasuki but have never had colours like you have on your tree. What variety is it?


Hugo, Just in case you are still interested I think we found the variety of our tree yesterday. We were at the RHS garden at Harlow Carr and bought this. We think it is the same. Acer palatum Sango-kaku.
Had a delicious breakfast in Betty's too!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Quiggs on November 12, 2011, 03:23:45 PM
I've just added a drop of water to my Orchid and noticed that there is a new shoot growing up from the base, also a new bud has appeared at the end of a flowering stem. It would appear that it is quite happy as it is. So I'll take a chance and leave well alone.   $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 12, 2011, 03:28:08 PM
Sounds like a good plan. $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 13, 2011, 08:39:48 PM
Anyone notice how little frost there has been this year? This means most of the bedding from the summer is still in flower  :o :o :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on November 13, 2011, 08:43:33 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Anyone notice how little frost there has been this year? This means most of the bedding from the summer is still in flower  :o :o :o
I did notice this. I was in Rhyl the other day and the summer bedding around the clocktower was still going (fairly) strong - amazing for November:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 14, 2011, 11:28:16 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
That Japanese Maple is absolutely stunning Hollins. I've got 3 different ones in the garden including the variety Osakasuki but have never had colours like you have on your tree. What variety is it?


Hugo, Just in case you are still interested I think we found the variety of our tree yesterday. We were at the RHS garden at Harlow Carr and bought this. We think it is the same. Acer palatum Sango-kaku.
Had a delicious breakfast in Betty's too!

Thanks very much for posting that Hollins. I love Japanese Maples and used to go to Betws Y Coed in the Autumn to see some of the trees there in their Autumn colours.    $good$
Glad that you enjoyed your breakfast in Betty's but it's making me hungry now just thinking about it.    $dins$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 14, 2011, 10:28:46 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Anyone notice how little frost there has been this year? This means most of the bedding from the summer is still in flower  :o :o :o
I did notice this. I was in Rhyl the other day and the summer bedding around the clocktower was still going (fairly) strong - amazing for November:

I tell you what, if I was a visitor from another northern European country, I'd be thinking the UK is some kind subtropical paradise looking at that bedding in November! That will still be there in December (providing Rhyl council don't rip it out).

Around here they're often too quick to replace the summer bedding with winter bedding. When they ripped out the summer bedding here it was still looking strong.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 18, 2011, 11:32:26 AM
It is amazing how well things are looking despite us being well in to November. We have only just brought this hanging basket in to the greenhouse.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on November 18, 2011, 06:13:59 PM
I,ts freakish don't you think, but at least it is shortening the winter
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 18, 2011, 06:39:33 PM
The strawberry tree fruit has ripened here, and whilst I'd never eaten one before, and everyone says they weren't that nice... I found quite the opposite! The strawberry tree (Arbutus spp) is a very nice tasting fruit, nicer than figs in my opinion! They taste like a less sweet (but still sweet) version of a Nectarine crossed with a pear.

The fruit has to be ate when it is red though.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on November 18, 2011, 10:24:58 PM
We walked up the hill from town and sat out and had a beer in the garden this evening at about 6 o'clock. I can't remember either wanting to or being able to sit out at that time this late into November. The forecast looks good for the next few days but you always get the feeling you're going to wake up one of these mornings and open the curtains  to witness white frost covered plants and shrubs. Long may the current weather continue.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 19, 2011, 11:49:37 AM
Medz, certainly not much chance of frost in the forseeable future. Wendnesday morning is the closest it may come, but even then we're only looking at night temperature of 4-6C which may be to high for ground frost.

Thereafter it'll be a mix of mildness, a few cool spells, but not frost from what I can make out.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 19, 2011, 12:30:45 PM
A good day for cleaning out the greenhouse!
Still sunny.
Hope it stays fine for emma p.
 $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on November 19, 2011, 03:59:30 PM
I like the big Orange Smiley against the back wall!    :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 19, 2011, 10:40:07 PM
Stephen, I've never considered trying to eat a strawberry tree fruit!  Did you eat the whole thing?  They look rather knobbly to me. 

Hollins, hope you got the greenhouse sorted out - it looks a big job!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on November 20, 2011, 12:18:50 AM
is that the tree with teabag like flowers on in spring that turn into what look like strawberry's when the flower dies off?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 20, 2011, 04:40:08 PM
Blodyn, the softer the better, it's actually one of those fruits best eaten when into the 'very ripe' or past ripe stage!

That's the ones I think SC - although I'd wonder how many it would take to make a cuppa  ;D


Other garden shrub fruit thats good to eat at this time of year;

Barberry (Berberis vulgaris/Berberis darwinii)

Fuchsia (some berries are nicer than any other fruit in the world, some are quite plain - all edible though)

Mahonia japonica/Mahonia aquifolium.. an ok fruit, not amazing, but not bad if you hungry and you have no money with you.

Yew berries - apparently an amazing berry in terms of flavour, if you know what you're doing... ingestion of the seed can cause death though, if you are brave enough, make sure the seed is discarded.

In fact if you're not sure don't bother with the Yew, or if you are going to eat the berry, make sure and absolutely sure that the seed is removed before putting anywhere near your mouth and wash hands afterwards if you scratch the seed accidently.


Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 20, 2011, 05:36:37 PM
OMG it all sounds dodgy to me ! :o
Same with mushrooms-- I can never be sure !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 20, 2011, 06:00:33 PM
Anything with berries seems to have looked good this autumn. This was our cotoneaster this morning.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 21, 2011, 04:57:31 PM
Stephen, I agree with Nemesis!  You obviously like to live dangerously - eating yew berries sounds much too exciting to me.  :o

I think I'll stick to blackberries. 

Hollins, that's a very colourful cotoneaster - plenty of berries there for Stephen to have a go at! 

Here are a couple of (fairly) recent photos from my garden.  I love the bright colour of the marigolds at this time of year.  Last year they survived the November snow but December finished them off. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 21, 2011, 05:03:13 PM
Here are some teasels in my garden. 

You wouldn't think that a teasel would be a comfy roosting place for a snail (and the snail evidently agreed as it had gone by the next morning) but you can see how it got there, gliding across the prickles on its slime trail, which shows why some of the so-called "barrier" materials have so little effect. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: stephenprudence on November 23, 2011, 11:25:03 AM
There two trains of thought on the Yew Berry, people won't eat it because it has the consistency of snot, but on the other hand, if you have a sweet tooth, it's sweeter than anything you'll find in the sweet shop.

To be honest though it's not worth the risk, though the de-seeding is a simple process, you can never be sure if the seed is undeveloped, and may leak toxins into the fruit. It's worth leaving therefore.

As for today it's 12C lovely a mild for a late October day, no frost last night, and the flowers are still going strong.

I have some Begonia semperflorens (aka wax Begonias), that just keep on flowering, but this is not unusual, they are very tough indeed, and will go through a winter in flower if it is mild enough - I saw many go through the winter of 2006 completely in flower, but the lowest temperature that entire winter was 0.2C!

Zonal Geraniums (Pelargoniums) are still going strong, despite some yellowing to the leaves due to the cooler weather, and some tuberous Begonias still going well.

It's all looking rosy (excuse the pun), with no frost due for the remainder of November into December as far as I can tell.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 29, 2011, 03:37:29 PM
The recent gales have left my garden in a right mess.  The Pampas Grass has been hammered and the plumes that didn't come down are looking in a sorry state.      :(
Plant pots have blown over and so have some of the garden furniture    The wind seems to have died down for now thank goodness.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 29, 2011, 04:44:06 PM
So sorry about your garden Hugo. It must have been bad because I had a text from my husband to say even he wasn't out gardening in it. Must have been terrible!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on November 29, 2011, 05:31:00 PM
Following of the some strong winds last year I decided to give up on the pampas grass in the front garden and remove it altogether. Good plan but an absolute nightmare executing the removal. I tried digging it out, cutting it down and digging it out and even tried to burn it out. Had there been some dynamite available I was so frustrated after about three weeks I might even have resorted to that.  It was very similar to having a really deep rooted tooth extracted at the dentist. I ruined two good garden forks in the process. In the end I went onto E-bay and bought the toughest, sharpest bow saw I could find and cut it out a small piece at a time.   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on November 29, 2011, 06:25:36 PM
Would have been easier to hire a mini digger for a few hours!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 29, 2011, 08:00:49 PM
I grew a Pampas Grass in my previous house and someone told me that you should burn them when the leaves are dying off as it encourages them to grow the next year.
I did this and as it wasn't burning too well I added some newspaper to get the fire going and also added some petrol.   It worked but I never saw that plant again!         _))*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 30, 2011, 10:25:56 AM
When I was a child I was fascinated by pampas grass and kept trying to persuade my parents to put one in the middle of the front lawn.  It sounds as if they were right not to do so, however disappointed I was! 

Sorry to hear about all the wind damage in your garden, Hugo. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 30, 2011, 11:51:25 AM
I brought one with me when we moved here and now spend too much time shoring it up and clipping it back-- it always gets it's own back as well. I'm usually cut to ribbons. Nasty thing ! :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on December 01, 2011, 02:04:48 PM
Nemesis, is your pampas grass in the front garden? 

If so, it might be sending out messages about you.   :o  Listen to this interview on the BBC:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15974553 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15974553)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Pendragon on December 02, 2011, 10:59:56 AM
 :laugh: Ah Nem you best dig/burn it.  That's so funny.  Swingers ay  L0L
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on December 02, 2011, 11:05:55 AM
mmmm-- I heard that as well !
Luckily the only one I have  is safely out of sight in the back. I got rid of 3 in the front.
Got a huge New Zealand Flax in the front-- hope that doesn't mean anything sinister ! :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on February 24, 2012, 09:29:09 PM
Here are some pictures from the garden after this morning's rain, which left everything covered with drops of water.

Before anyone points out that the rain would leave everything covered in water ;), what I'm trying to say is that the water was in distinct droplets, rather than a film across the surface!  The photos should show what I mean. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on February 24, 2012, 10:14:31 PM
grate photos blodyn, love the detail in them
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on February 25, 2012, 09:38:49 AM
Super pics Blodyn.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 25, 2012, 10:17:30 AM
Gorgeous photos Blodyn. I can't believe the drops on the daffodil in particular.
They look magnified and a bit unreal.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: emma p on February 25, 2012, 02:05:06 PM
Fabulous pics........a sure sign that spring is on its way.
Mine are just beginning to think about it. We had some snow which i think has held them back a bit.
Been laughing about the pampas grasses......mine will be due for a haircut soon. Not a job we look forward to !!!
 ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on February 26, 2012, 12:21:27 AM
Thanks, everyone, you're all very kind.   $thanx$

Hollins, the daffodil is a miniature one, so it is magnified in this photo.  All the little daffodils were covered with drops like that!

Emma, are you sure you should admit to owning a pampas grass?  :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: emma p on February 26, 2012, 08:02:39 PM
lol, its in the back garden so i think im quite safe !!!!
We inherited it from the previous owners of the house and i hadnt the heart to dig it up. It was only a baby then but now its enormous and to be honest it fills a spot.
Thinking about it my parents had one in their front garden for years when i was a kid......but then again that was in the seventies and everyone had a pampas !!!

ps. spotted three little flowering crocuses today.....its all the sunshine weve had the last few days. roll on spring, im itching to get digging and planting again.  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on February 26, 2012, 08:35:38 PM
I'm sure I once read that setting fire to the pampas is the best way to manage it as it replicates what happens naturally in the pampas regions when lightening strikes and burns the grasslands, promoting new growth.  Not of course that I am condoning arson in your garden  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on February 26, 2012, 09:34:04 PM
Hollins, have you seen the BBC series  Bees, Butterflies and Blooms (http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0152fty/Bees_Butterflies_and_Blooms_Villages_Farms_and_Countryside/)?  I've just been catching up with it on BBC iPlayer and the first episode (available till 29 February) has quite a lot of infromation on creating wildflower meadows. 

The three eposides all suggest ways of encouraging bees, butterflies and other pollinators. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on February 27, 2012, 07:47:50 AM
We have a wildflower and ecological meadow where we cultivate rare weeds and attract loads of wild life - we call it the garden! _))*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 27, 2012, 08:21:55 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Hollins, have you seen the BBC series  Bees, Butterflies and Blooms (http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0152fty/Bees_Butterflies_and_Blooms_Villages_Farms_and_Countryside/)?  I've just been catching up with it on BBC iPlayer and the first episode (available till 29 February) has quite a lot of infromation on creating wildflower meadows. 

The three eposides all suggest ways of encouraging bees, butterflies and other pollinators.

Thanks Blodyn,
Yes I have watched them. I am hopeful that more things will sprout up this year after last year's disappointment.
How kind of you to think of us.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on February 27, 2012, 09:47:34 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I'm sure I once read that setting fire to the pampas is the best way to manage it as it replicates what happens naturally in the pampas regions when lightening strikes and burns the grasslands, promoting new growth.  Not of course that I am condoning arson in your garden  :D

We did that with one of the ones in the front-- problem was containing the flames to just the Pampas and putting out the smouldering remains as the fire gets down to the roots !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Llechwedd on February 27, 2012, 12:02:42 PM
Can anyone advise please.  My rose bushes have flowered fine for the last two years but the leaves have become all yellow/black blotches.  Can I spray them with anything?  They are pruned at the moment so no leaves.  Also my apple tree had cookers but the leaves all curled up and sort of grey. I've cut them off ut wonder how to stop it, whatever it is from coming back?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: emma p on February 27, 2012, 04:02:19 PM
I spray my roses regularly with 'black spot' spray as i have this problem too. I use 'roseclear'. But it does advise not to spray buds. I asked at the garden centre why i am getting this as most roses now are disease resistant and they put it down to either the plant being too dry, too wet or overcrowded. I also take off infected leaves throughout the season. I think the problem gets worse as the summer goes on and then i do have a jolly good prune back to new buds.
Hope that helps.  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Llechwedd on February 28, 2012, 12:02:36 PM
Thanks for that Emma I'll go to B & Q and get some spray and only do it once they have leaves.  You are right it does get worse as the "summer" progresses.
Fingers crossed.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 11, 2012, 05:33:09 PM
We visited the gardens at Bodnant and Bodysgallen Hall today. It was lovely to see many plants just about to burst forth in flower.
The first two photos are Bodnant and the second two are at Bodysgallen.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: emma p on March 11, 2012, 07:56:42 PM
Wow, those daffs look glorious. Ive never been to Bodysgallen Hall.......maybe this summer eh.
Ive got in the garden for the first time this year today. Its been so lovely (the sunshine helped) to clear away the winters debris and discover all the new growth. My crocuses are in full bloom but still only two daffs open up to yet. Its my hellebores that are a picture at the mo. I do love them, especially the ones i grew from seed. Its very satisfying to see them in bloom after a couple of years of just foliage.
I also have loads of ladybirds and there have been quite a few bees buzzing round too......all good.  :D
So, ive got the gardening bug again and am busy planning some new planting for this year. Gardeners World is back on the telly so Spring is just around the corner. Happy days   8)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on March 13, 2012, 10:46:39 PM
Those look lovely, Hollins.  What a super picture looking up through the magnolia. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 16, 2012, 06:20:51 PM
Thanks Blodyn.
Here are a few pics from the garden today.
The last one is the sweet peas on their way, that's if the mice don't eat them first!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on March 16, 2012, 11:12:36 PM
That's a lovely camellia, Hollins.  Isn't it nice to see the flowers coming out?  Good luck with the sweet peas.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 02, 2012, 04:44:49 PM
That Camillia does look really good, I don't know the variety but it looks like one I had called "Donation"   The ones I have now all all single flowered ones and a couple of bushes have whitish flowers tinged at the edges similar to a Carnation but they are also throwing out some red flowers too on the same bush.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 07, 2012, 06:29:02 PM
I like your pink tinged camellia Hugo. Ours are all a solid colour. I was amazed to hear Monty Don saying a few weeks ago on Gardeners World that he didn't like camellias. I think they are beautiful.
It's a good job we have digital cameras now and don't have to go out and buy roll film any more because I would be bankrupt with the amount of photos I have to delete because they are hopeless.
However, I was inspired by Blodyn's droplet photos and I have tried to take some in the garden this afternoon.
It's fun trying anyway!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on April 07, 2012, 10:05:02 PM
Hollins, what lovely photos, they really are good. 

 &well&
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 08, 2012, 08:33:15 AM
Thanks Blodyn. Mum has had one of your cards for Easter and one for her birthday.    $thanx$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on April 08, 2012, 08:50:46 AM
They're really good, H; beautifully shot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on April 26, 2012, 02:22:21 PM
I mentioned my allotment under the wildlife thread (I have a large resident population of snails) and Hollins asked what I grow, so I thought that I'd answer the question here.

I'm just starting my third year on the allotment, which was fairly overgrown so this will be the first year that I'm cropping all of it. 

There were already blackberries, raspberries and rhubarb on the allotment and I've put in a damson, which I'm planning to fan train.  So far I'm growing only things which can be planted / sown directly, rather than being started under cover.  At the moment I have: onions (autumn and spring planted sets), elephant garlic, broad beans (autumn and spring sown), peas, kale, chard, perpetual spinach, beetroot, raddishes, first and second early potatoes.  Still to be planted / sown are: runner beans, French beans, more peas, asparagus peas, slasify, scorzonrea and main crop potatoes (three cultivars). 

I've also got a few herbs and some nasturtiums (which I grew in my first year and which have been merrily self-seeding since then) - good flowers for bumblebees.  I'm planning to grow some more flowers for the bees this year.  At the moment, last year's kale is in flower and is feeding a range of bumblebees and solitary bees. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on April 26, 2012, 03:46:30 PM
You have been a 'busy, busy bee' haven't you?

An impressive variety of things, hope you have some good results.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on April 26, 2012, 09:25:29 PM
Having some idea of your whereabouts I wondered if your allotment was at the same altitude? If so I think you do well for things to grow with the wind and rain we have had recently! Well done!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 27, 2012, 12:13:49 PM
Goodness Blodyn, you will be having a veg stall at the next church fair!
Good luck with them all.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on April 28, 2012, 09:18:36 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You have been a 'busy, busy bee' haven't you?

 ;D

Nemesis, the allotment is much nearer sea level than is my garden.  It was an inability to grow rhubarb up here which prompted me to get an allotment.  Looking at the price of rhubarb in the shops, my rhubarb crop alone pays the allotment fees. 

Thank you all for your good wishes for my crops.  There are some very good growers on the allotments who are always ready to offer advice, so I hope to keep improving.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 03, 2012, 12:20:37 PM
The star turns in the garden this week are the late flowering daffs, just coming out, and a lovely delicate white flowering camellia.
We have not seen this flower before because it was a very leggy shrub when we arrived here. My husband cut it back heavily as we had seen them do at Bodnant and this year it is just starting to flower and looks healthy again.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on May 03, 2012, 04:14:13 PM
Do you open your garden to the public, Hollins?   $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 03, 2012, 05:51:34 PM
No! Would be happy to show any interested forum members round though!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 13, 2012, 05:18:03 PM
Rowen's Open Garden Day is on Sunday May 20th 2012 and 20 of the best gardens will be open to visitors then. Tickets cost £5.00 per adult and £1.00 per child.
Let's hope that the weather will be good so everyone can enjoy the day,
My favourite gardens two years ago were at the Treetops and the Mill but they were all nice and had made a great effort.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 20, 2012, 05:32:03 PM
The Rhododendrons and azaleas are out in bloom at the moment.  The smaller one on the left is the variety called Linda and the taller one is called Cynthia but I haven't a clue about the others.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Michael on May 20, 2012, 08:58:17 PM
Well Hugo you did the trick wishing a week ago for nice weather today. Carry on doing that for every weekend for the rest of he summer!! Mike
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 20, 2012, 10:31:46 PM
It was a lovely day today but I didn't go to the Rowen Open Day after all.   It was our dogs 3rd birthday so we took him to the Dog Show at the RSPCA in Bryn Y Maen instead.
Hope that you had a great day on the course today and topped up that tan of yours.  I've just gone like a Lobster after a few hours in the Sun at Bryn Y Maen!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on May 22, 2012, 12:03:36 PM
Finally we have some warmer weather. I have got myself plenty of potatoes in the ground in the back garden. Swift first earlies and Jersey Royals to follow. Anyone growing their own food besides flowers? If anyone needs any help re growing fruit/veg, I can offer some help with your questions.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 23, 2012, 01:53:53 PM
Thanks for the offer of help.
We have some fruit bushes. The biggest problem we have is trying to get to the fruit before either birds, squirrels or rabbits do. We have netting over but they still seem to find a way in.
Any solutions for that one?
By the way, Blodyn is growing a lot of produce on her allotment. See post 280 on this thread.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 23, 2012, 02:35:07 PM
We bought some brussel sprout plants and two cherry tomato plants at the boot sale last Sunday, sadly nothing to eat yet!  ;D  We will see how they do!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on May 23, 2012, 07:33:42 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Thanks for the offer of help.
We have some fruit bushes. The biggest problem we have is trying to get to the fruit before either birds, squirrels or rabbits do. We have netting over but they still seem to find a way in.
Any solutions for that one?
By the way, Blodyn is growing a lot of produce on her allotment. See post 280 on this thread.

Hi Hollins, only too happy to help. I'll do my best to be your gardening guru, i'm much better with fruit and veg than flowers though mind.

There is little to my knowledge by way of stopping squirrels, they are very clever and thrifty creatures. Rabbits, you really need to review the preventative measures you have in place, walls/fences that kind of thing.

As for birds, this might sound counterintuitive but if you do not already done so, assemble a bird feeding station topped up with plenty of nuts and fatballs. This should prove a great distraction and they will be less likely to target your fruit. Typically anything red in colour is a prime target, cherries rarely make it to your mouth. If you grow your own strawberries, naturalise the patch and let grass grow as a companion weed, this makes it harder for the berries to be spotted but make sure you sprinkle plenty of slug pellets to keep them at bay.

You could also try purchasing an imitation bird of prey and purch it in the vicinity of your fruit patch to deter opportunist thieves such as minor birds, just remember to keep moving the imitation bird of prey as they soon become used to it.

Let me know what you think of my suggestions,

All the best, Craig.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on May 23, 2012, 07:49:19 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I mentioned my allotment under the wildlife thread (I have a large resident population of snails) and Hollins asked what I grow, so I thought that I'd answer the question here.

I'm just starting my third year on the allotment, which was fairly overgrown so this will be the first year that I'm cropping all of it. 

There were already blackberries, raspberries and rhubarb on the allotment and I've put in a damson, which I'm planning to fan train.  So far I'm growing only things which can be planted / sown directly, rather than being started under cover.  At the moment I have: onions (autumn and spring planted sets), elephant garlic, broad beans (autumn and spring sown), peas, kale, chard, perpetual spinach, beetroot, raddishes, first and second early potatoes.  Still to be planted / sown are: runner beans, French beans, more peas, asparagus peas, slasify, scorzonrea and main crop potatoes (three cultivars). 

I've also got a few herbs and some nasturtiums (which I grew in my first year and which have been merrily self-seeding since then) - good flowers for bumblebees.  I'm planning to grow some more flowers for the bees this year.  At the moment, last year's kale is in flower and is feeding a range of bumblebees and solitary bees.

Hi Blodyn, sounds like you are having a lot of fun on your plot. Have you ever considered setting up a blog for your own plot to record your plot through the seasons. Feel free to visit my plot at www.dykesedge.blogspot.com (http://www.dykesedge.blogspot.com) , apologies some of the pics are down presently I have changed service provider and am relinking these in time. 'Growing my own' is a particular interest of mine amongst other things, once the pics are up again you will be able to see how I turned an unruly plot into a pleasant little allotment garden. Having tasted allotment life last year, this year I will be focusing on the 'kitchen garden'. Let me know if there is anything I can help you with.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on May 23, 2012, 09:27:56 PM
I walked along the Prom today and the gardens along there are less than impressive, it looks like nobody could care less about them. Practically the only flowers visible in the half a mile stretch I walked were these ones, can anyone tell me what they are?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: craigollerton on May 23, 2012, 09:53:15 PM
I'm terrible with flowers Dave, sorry :) I'm sure one of the ladies here can help you.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 23, 2012, 10:16:38 PM
I think it is a cistus, rock rose.

http://www.cistuspage.org.uk/Halimium%20%27Susan%27.htm (http://www.cistuspage.org.uk/Halimium%20%27Susan%27.htm)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 23, 2012, 10:21:16 PM
Craig, Thanks for your suggestions. Will give everything a try and let you know. $thanx$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 12, 2012, 01:07:50 PM
With the recent wet weather the slugs have been at all my Hostas apart from this one which is just coming into flower.
John at Talgoed Nurseries has got some lovely Dahlias at the moment and we have put some into the ornamental bike that was given to us as a present by our neighbours.  Tom Butler from Holywell made it and was selling them at Colwyn Bay market some time ago.
Marco had to get into the photo too!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 17, 2012, 02:40:30 PM
My favorite flower--amazing it survived last night's storm.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on June 17, 2012, 07:20:38 PM
it,s a pity the petals drop so quickly, they are beautiful in full bloom
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 01, 2012, 01:06:02 PM
Not sure if it is only the red one you like Nemesis but we have this one out at the moment.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 01, 2012, 01:17:39 PM
Those are lovely Hollins-- are they of the Meconopsis strain? Or do they only come in blue? I have tried in vain to grow them-- don't think they like my soil.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 01, 2012, 01:27:24 PM
I'm not absolutely sure but I think the meconopsis refers to the blue one as you said which we have also failed on.
These seem to have sprouted up from nowhere and I think we might be getting some different coloured ones.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 01, 2012, 04:05:58 PM
I planted 140 Geranium plug plants this year but have lost a lot already, mainly the ones in pots in the middle and back borders.  Later on I ordered super plug Geraniums to replace them and the same thing was happening again.
A closer look revealed that the Geraniums had been pulled up and scattered around the grass so I replanted them and now keep a careful eye on them.
I've got 4 suspects:-  the Badgers, birds, Squirrels or Marco but my money is on the Squirrels as I've recently bought a Squirrel proof nut feeder and perhaps this is their way of paying me back!      :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 01, 2012, 05:06:46 PM
Despite using pellets, which I detest, the slugs and snails have left me with a row of stumps instead of Petunias $angry$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 04, 2012, 11:40:06 AM
I have a couple of troughs of 'summer bulbs' which are growing well, but I have suddenly ben inundated with poppy plants in red and deep purple within them in and amongst the freesias. An empty trough which had nothing but soil in it is packed with purple ones. They are lovely, but I cannot fathom where so many have come from.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 04, 2012, 11:57:56 AM
That is weird. That is just what has happened to us.
Did you buy the summer bulb pack from the pound shop in Llandudno?
I did that and I wondered if they were lurking in there. They are lovely though so lucky us!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SDQ on July 04, 2012, 12:49:11 PM
Have either of you got bird feeders by any chance?
Is it possible poppy seeds have come from there if you have?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 04, 2012, 01:56:39 PM
Ahhhh-- Yes I have and the troughs were very near it over the winter !! The Sparrows must be Opium addicts at this rate !!
I got my bulbs on an offer from a newspaper, but they could still have come from the same source.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 04, 2012, 03:16:04 PM
Thanks for the suggestion SDQ but I don't think the bird feeder is to blame in our case. Enjoying the poppies nevertheless.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 04, 2012, 05:07:43 PM
Would have actually thought that poppy seeds were too small to stay in a feeder, but you never know.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 07, 2012, 02:06:38 PM
I have just rescued these from a very sodden garden. The weather was unbelievably bad yesterday. The rose and peony buds are rotting with the wet. The sweet peas are finally sprouting some flowers but they are way behind previous years.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 20, 2012, 06:16:11 PM
A friend who is a keen gardener gave us these crocosmia plants. We haven't grown them before but they seem to have survived all the rain we have had.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: 1_rob_1 on July 20, 2012, 10:05:51 PM
I have these in my garden & I know them as montbretia. They are very hardy & arent too fussy where you plant them, & dont care about extreme weather conditions. They do grow best in full sun & their colours vary from fire red, down to yellow. They can also spread very fast, so keep them in check.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 27, 2012, 06:44:25 PM
Crocosmia/Montbretia-- as you say it takes over and so do Evening Primroses, but I can't resist them-- I save the EP seeds every year to keep them going.
The other pic is my first attempt at growing Freesias from bulbs
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 27, 2012, 08:27:57 PM
Those are all doing well, Nemesis, and I love the bright colour combinations.

The flowers on my Senecio bush had been starting to look rather bald and I thought that it was probably the snails.  On Wednesday evening I caught them red handed.  The garden was overrun with slugs and snails - standing quietly I could hear them rasping away at my plants!

On the allotment things aren't much better - the weather, slugs, snails, etc have finished off most of my seedlings (apart from the broad beans, which produced a reasonable crop) and I've not had much success with raising them at home.  I've tried a basic coldframe for hardening off seedlings started indoors and the slugs think its wonderful - it gives them a nice, humid, warm shelter so that after gorging on my seedlings they can just curl up comfortably around the stumps to sleep off their big meal! 

However the rhubarb on the allotment has done brilliantly, the potatoes and onions are fine and the blackberries are coming along nicely.  At least I haven't had to worry about watering! 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: 1_rob_1 on July 27, 2012, 09:47:53 PM
Slugs & snails are a pain. Beer traps work well - Most slugs/snails must be male.  :)
If you are environment unfriendly, slug pellets work.
Alternatively, as a natural measure,  encourage hedgehogs. - foxes will also eat slugs.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 31, 2012, 09:27:19 PM
Rob, they're very sensible suggestions but I can't bring myself to kill them!   :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on July 31, 2012, 09:43:24 PM
you can have some of mine if you want, Blodyn
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on July 31, 2012, 09:44:56 PM
Well, that's very generous of you Snowcap but as I have plenty of my own I won't deprive you of yours!  ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 12, 2012, 04:23:05 PM
Today's crop!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on August 14, 2012, 09:23:26 PM
Excellent display!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 14, 2012, 10:27:15 PM
Thanks Dave. I think I'll have to set up a flower shop as there are so many!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 21, 2012, 04:29:52 PM
Anyone like dahlias?
This year we left the ones in the first photo in the ground and the ones in the second photo took out and re planted.
They have both grown back better this year than last. I think we were lucky because of the mild winter.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on August 23, 2012, 05:29:02 PM
Lovely flowers, Hollins.

This is my latest crop.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 23, 2012, 06:33:41 PM
Last year I had a glut of courgettes.  This year so far all the flowers are male.   However, my runner beans have gone absolutely wild.   I'm picking every day and have already frozen loads.   There is also still a lot of blossom keeping the bees busy, so plenty more to come! :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on August 24, 2012, 10:25:38 AM
Your runner beans sound good, Yorkie, mine were a complete failure (I blame the slugs).  I'm glad the bees are keeping busy. 

On my allotment the nasturtiums have done a bit too well.  The bumblebees are enjoying them but there's a limit to the amount of nasturtiums one can eat! 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 06, 2012, 10:40:49 PM
It's been a funny year in the garden this year with so much rain.  Our Hydrangeas have done well but other shrubs have not.  I've got some plants called "Bear's Breeches" which I've always had problems with mould on their leaves but this year there has been no mould whatsoever, mind you there have been no flowers on them  either so I might just dig it up at the end of the year.
Our Yucca Tree has always flowered twice a year and has done for the 26 years we have been her but this year there have been no flowers at all.      :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 07, 2012, 11:34:34 AM
My Bears Breeches are the same, but I had mould on the leaves-- till I cut them off.! A new lot have grown, but still no flowers. The ones in the Dunoon garden have had flowers, but not a vast amount
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 07, 2012, 05:04:49 PM
Our bears breeches look like doilies. Something is finding them very tasty.
Doing better with the sweet peas though.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 17, 2012, 11:49:48 AM
We have got this beautiful tree flowering in the garden at the moment. It is called eucryphia.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 05, 2012, 06:38:36 PM
Just come back from Talgoed Nursery Glan Conwy with a large carrier bag full of King Alfred Daffodils.   A great bargain at just £5.99   :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on October 06, 2012, 01:19:59 PM
ooh more back ache !!  :o You got a good buy there Hugo.
During this last week I have planted 55 more Tulips and 30 more mixed types of Narcissus, we had lots of tulips, but gradually something has been nibbling and we only had 2 or 3 appear this year. Thus I am hoping that whatever it is that is eating them desists and we get a few more blooms
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 06, 2012, 06:01:53 PM
Hope that you get more luck with your Tulips next year Nemesis and I must confess that I've been back there again today for some more Daffodils. This time though I have picked three different varieties.
My friend just picked a mixture of Daffodils and had so many in that the handles broke!   A great buy if anyone is after some Daffodils.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on October 06, 2012, 09:39:24 PM
make sure you plant them deep enough or they will not flower.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2012, 01:33:45 PM
Thanks Snowcap for that good advice and that probably explains why some of my Daffodils haven't flowered in the past!      :-[
I had a look on Google for the depth that they should be planted and was quite surprised at how deep they need to be.   Luckily I haven't started planting any yet as I've got hundreds of bulbs.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 07, 2012, 01:43:18 PM
Hugo, you might find it interesting to watch last night's Gardener's World in which Monty Don was planting bulbs. He had a really handy looking long handled bulb planter which looked ideal if you have a lot to plant......save your poor back!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2012, 05:12:45 PM
Thanks very much for letting me know Hollins,  this old back of mine needs all the help it can get!
  I've planted some in the lawn today, but there are hundreds left and my Geraniums are still in flower so I can't use the large pots while they still look ok but I can always store them for next year perhaps.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 22, 2012, 01:38:13 PM
Still got loads of dahlias out in the garden but I guess their days are numbered with the cold weekend weather forecast.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on October 22, 2012, 06:25:56 PM
That's pretty, Hollins.  It's also nice to see that there are still some butterflies about.  I hope your dahlias and Hugo's geraniums keep flowering for a while longer. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 16, 2012, 04:04:23 PM
I've just let the moths out of my purse and bought a new camera.  There's a limited range of wild flowers on which to try it out at the moment, so I took a walk through the gardens at Happy Valley. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 16, 2012, 04:18:11 PM
There are still quite a lot plants in flower in Happy Valley but I realised that the battery was running very low (got some spares, now), so I had only one or two shots at each flower. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 16, 2012, 04:31:33 PM
It's great to see you back in action with a new camera Blodyn.
Love the little brown pony on the wildlife thread.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on November 16, 2012, 04:51:28 PM
Thanks, Hollins, I've missed having a "proper" camera.

The ponies seem really sweet in nature as well as to look at. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on December 13, 2012, 10:05:26 PM
Anyone interested in blight resistant potatoes? 

The Sarvari Research Trust  (http://sarvari-trust.org/), based at the University Farm at Henfaes, is responsible for developing some of the most blight resistant potatoes available in the UK - all conventionally bred (i.e. not GM).  These include "Sarpo Mira", which is the most blight resistant potato currently available, and "Blue Danube" which has blue skinned, very blight resistant tubers.  I grow these on my allotment and even in this rather wet summer they performed well.

The Sarvari Research Trust is currently looking for crowd funding to further the development work and this is the link to their page: Sarvari Research Trust crowd funding (https://www.buzzbnk.org/ProjectDetails.aspx?projectId=84), with six days to go to reach one of their targets.  Anyone interested can sign up free as a supporter or donate from £10 upwards, receiving various benefits. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 13, 2012, 10:22:15 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Thanks, Hollins, I've missed having a "proper" camera.

The ponies seem really sweet in nature as well as to look at.

Super photos again Blodyn.      $good$                       What camera have you got now?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blodyn on December 14, 2012, 11:29:44 AM
Thanks Hugo, that's very kind of you.  My new camera is an Olympus OM-D.  It's a four thirds, rather than a DSLR and is smaller than a DSLR.  I love it! 


A bit more on the blight resistant potatoes which I mentioned on the previous page.  I have received this email from David Shaw of the Sarvari Research Trust, which explains their aims better than I did.

"I am sending this just in case you are not aware of our Crowdfunded project.  We started this back in September and have now raised 75% of our £10k target.  We have 5 days to raise the remaining £2,500 and at the present rate, I think we might make it.  The project is detailed on the Buzzbnk website (below) with full list of rewards for each kind of backer.  Essentially, the fund will allow us to progress one of our promising blight resistant seedlings to National Listing and at the same time allow us to benefit greatly from data sent in by our  crowd of over 100 backers who are allowed to trial the seedling. This is a nice example of citizen science.  :)

If you are looking for a present for a potatoholic relative or if grandma is tired of being given a goat for Christmas, then here is your chance.  As Alys Fowler tweeted last night, ”This is honestly the best present for a foodie/ gardener . Fund the future of organic, blight free potatoes with Sarvari Research Trust”

And if we don’t hit our target on time?  We lose the donations already made on milestone 2  :(

Best wishes

David


Dr David Shaw
Sarvari Research Trust
Henfaes Research Centre
07906 710704

Why not join our research project on www.buzzbnk.org/sarvari
 (http://www.buzzbnk.org/sarvari)
More than 100 eager researchers make up our CROWD (http://www.hartley-botanic.co.uk/gardening-tips/john-walker/crowd-cultivation/)

listen to interview on Radio Dublin podcast  (http://www.sodshow.com/2012/11/29/the-sodshow-meets-david-shaw-of-sarvari-trust/)

Twitter @SarpoUK "
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 11, 2013, 04:42:29 PM
We have got this lovely camellia flowering profusely in the sun room at the moment. It is making me look forward to seeing the fine specimens at Bodnant in a month or so.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: martin on February 11, 2013, 05:30:20 PM
Lovely, cheers you up on a cold winter day.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on February 11, 2013, 10:27:36 PM
I don't know about Bodnant Hollins, your estate takes some beating!      You'll have to think about opening yours to the public.     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on February 11, 2013, 11:40:49 PM
A large amount of daffodils are now emerging on the upper part of my garden.

On the lower areas, they are still hiding away.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on February 12, 2013, 08:53:58 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I don't know about Bodnant Hollins, your estate takes some beating!      You'll have to think about opening yours to the public.     $good$

Hoping to head to Bodnant today-- the last of the 'dog friendly' days for the moment. Will report !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on February 12, 2013, 10:27:42 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
A large amount of daffodils are now emerging on the upper part of my garden.

On the lower areas, they are still hiding away.

I planted dozens of Daffodils in the lawn this year and started planting them individually with a special tool for the purpose.  After a short while though, I got fed up and dug up large sods of grass and then planted the bulbs underneath and then  put the sods back.
Can't see any sign of the bulbs so far but the sods are coming up and it looks like I've got grass molehills all over the place!     :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on February 12, 2013, 03:13:07 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I don't know about Bodnant Hollins, your estate takes some beating!      You'll have to think about opening yours to the public.     $good$

Hoping to head to Bodnant today-- the last of the 'dog friendly' days for the moment. Will report !

Spent a pleasant hour or so in the gardens, lots of people with dogs, free biscuits and poo bags, hot soup for a couple of quid etc down in the Dell and a roaring fire. Rather raw and cold though, as you can see from the pics.
The last pic shows how the gardens are having to recover from the latest flooding.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: andyCYD on February 13, 2013, 11:37:13 AM
First daffodil to flower in the Park in Craig y Don.  One of several thousand planted by the Friends of Queens Park as part of Llandudno Daffodil Capital Wales. Bulbs were supplied by CCBC

(http://schnap.it/home2/ux/uxus62/photos/1.jpg)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on February 15, 2013, 08:33:34 AM
Just an odd one in the Happy Valley when I was up there earlier in the week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2013, 02:28:33 PM
I've  had 140 Jersey Geraniums arrive this week  just two days before we had 6 inches of snow!    They'll have to stay in the sunlounge for now and  I'll pot them on when the weather gets a bit warmer.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on March 24, 2013, 02:45:04 PM
Good job they have jerseys on to keep warm!  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on March 25, 2013, 12:00:22 AM
should have got snowdrops instead.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 27, 2013, 04:54:17 PM
Perhaps I should have but I'll know better for next year.   I potted on half of them and took them up to the shed just as a heavy snowfall started again.      :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2013, 05:01:44 PM
Our first rhododendron is in flower. It's a weird looking thing really but at last the garden is coming to life.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 15, 2013, 05:15:55 PM
Our old Pampas needed tidying up after the winds had blown the plumes over so I started to trim it today because the weather has been good.  As I trimmed it the centre seemed dead and sodden so I kept on cutting it back but got carried away and now it is only about 6 inches high and I've 4 full bags of garden waste just from the one plant.
I didn't realise how difficult it would be and I'm well and truly cream crackered after doing it.  It doesn't look very healthy at the moment but only time will tell if I have killed it off or not.      ???
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on April 15, 2013, 05:35:55 PM
Hugo, I don't think it is possible to kill that stuff.  It will probably grow even more vigorously now just to make up for the hacking you've given it!   My garden is still a bit of a sorry sight but the daffs are still coming out.  Some of my perpetual onions have taken a pounding from the severe cold but I'm hoping they will revive once the warmer weather starts.   I'm not a green fingered gardener but my hit-and-miss approach seems to yield adequate results.   ££$  with yours.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 15, 2013, 08:04:20 PM
Yorkie,  I did kill the Pampas grass in my last house.    It was doing ok but I read in my gardening book that if you burn the Pampas at the end of the season it encourages new growth.
I put some paper in the Pampas but it soon burnt out so I thought that I'd help it along by adding some more paper and some petrol just to get it started.
It went on fire very nicely but it never reappeared!        :-[ :-[
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on April 16, 2013, 08:49:13 AM
We did that with our last Pampas and it hasn't regrown thank goodness. The main problem at the present is an ever increasing New Zealand Flax. I keep hacking the outside off to reduce the size, but am loath to cut the height as they tend took look dreadful if lopped heightwise.
My doorsteps full of daffies in pots are now finished, so I am about to replace them with polys or pansies. Few tulips struggling in the wind and some smaller, lower bulbs all out, but the daffs are almost done.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 18, 2013, 03:53:17 PM
Some nice things out in the garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 19, 2013, 12:57:28 PM
Beautiful photos and colours in your garden Hollins and lovely to see the gardens coming on after this long Winter. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 19, 2013, 05:35:45 PM
Our Daffodils were very late this year and were at their best at the end of April and our Rhododendrons are only now flowering.  The variety Linda is the smaller shrub and Cynthia the larger one.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on May 19, 2013, 07:55:14 PM
I wonder if any of my gardening friends on the Forum can tell me what this plant is? I saw it in the grounds of Plas Ty Coch at Caernarfon this weekend, it grows to a massive size. The first photo shows the plant as it is now, the second when at full size in Summer:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on May 19, 2013, 08:11:12 PM
I think you will find this is Gunnera.  One at Snowdonia Nurseries just alongside the exit path from the checkout.  Looks like giant rhubarb.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on May 19, 2013, 08:15:58 PM
Thank you!  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on May 19, 2013, 09:24:54 PM
Here is a condensed YouTube video of Gunnera growing from a shrub to its giant size, over 5 months...

Gunnera - The Growth Of A Giant (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9YrfZFbGt8#)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 20, 2013, 04:16:11 PM
Here's my little helper in the garden yesterday,  I've let him have the day off today as it's his 4th birthday.     <:<:<:<
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Tosh on May 20, 2013, 04:55:53 PM
I know him, didn't he used to work for Dulux in Builder Street?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on May 20, 2013, 06:39:59 PM
Happy Birthday -- Frizzy will help him celebrate-- he is expert at digging big holes! :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 22, 2013, 04:15:14 PM
I visited Holker Hall gardens in Cumbria yesterday. They were stunning. Sorry but my photos don't do them justice.
There were masses of tulip displays and wonderful rhododendrons in flower.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sam on May 27, 2013, 07:03:42 AM
Can anyone help with the identification of this plant in my garden please? I've had it for a few years - it was a cutting from my taids garden which he gave me a couple of years or so  before he died so I just call it 'the taidy bush'. It's no taller than a meter high and the same width I guess. Just coming into flower the last couple or so weeks, pale lilac spikes, no fragrance (that I've noticed ), and evergreen, glossy, purple edged leaves -around 2-3ish cm large on woody stems. Think that covers the description - cannot find it on the internet or books - very time consuming to look! Be great to know what it is after all these years although it will still always be ' the taidy bush ' to me.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 27, 2013, 09:57:26 AM
Hi Sam,
I think it could be Hebe Hulkeana. Your name sounds better!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sam on May 27, 2013, 05:17:39 PM
Ah thanks Hollins - think you're right....at last I know! Kept getting directed to hebes on the net when searching but I didn't think it was...apparently this kind is different from all other hebes so that's why I dismissed it as a hebe. It's also known as New Zealand lilac. Cheers  $thanx$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 02, 2013, 09:06:05 PM
A splash of colour!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 07, 2013, 12:06:55 PM
This good weather has sent my 'cottage garden' into overdrive !!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 07, 2013, 01:56:31 PM
That looks really pretty Nemesis.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 07, 2013, 02:24:23 PM
Thankyou Hollins-- It ends up as a survival of the fittest !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 07, 2013, 04:03:25 PM
Lots of lovely colour, very nice!  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 09, 2013, 02:03:06 PM
When the Bee Flowers ( Lysimachia) are out it all turns to yellow. Trouble with that stuff is that it takes over.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 09, 2013, 02:53:52 PM
Can anyone I.D. this plant for me please. ?It is about 3 1/2 feet tall and is growing amid something else. The leaves have quite sharp spines down the centre back. I am loath to pull it out as it is fascinating me !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on June 09, 2013, 05:13:40 PM
I think it is a teasel! Birds love the seed heads and popular in dry flower arrangements  ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 10, 2013, 10:02:09 AM
Thanks Jack, Yes it certainly looks like one and this morning I think that I can see the beginnings of a flower head. :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 17, 2013, 07:35:37 PM
We visited Ness Gardens today but to be honest I was disappointed.
There were several unplanted areas making it look untidy and it was in need of some heavy weeding.
However this wisteria arch was lovely.
Not sure what the mound was in the middle of the border. Anyone have any ideas?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 18, 2013, 06:35:29 AM
Is it maybe the rugged rock round which the ragged rascel ran?l    :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on June 18, 2013, 08:35:15 AM
Giant moles! :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on June 18, 2013, 09:40:35 PM
set for the next Dr.who
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 04, 2013, 02:11:37 PM
Some photos from the garden.
I bought a tray of small delphinium plants from the RHS garden at Harlow Carr a couple of years ago. They are huge this year, about 7 feet tall and stems like tree trunks.
A close up of the peony.
A photo of our gunnera in amongst the supposed wild flower garden, for that read not got round to all the weeding there!

Dave R, I have taken these photos with the new camera. I am only using it on automatic setting. The picture sizes are coming out between 4-9MB so I am having to resize the photos before putting them on the forum like the old days.
Is there an easy way to set them to come out smaller. I can't really understand the instructions!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 11, 2013, 05:36:19 PM
When we moved here over 25 years ago I remember someone telling me that I should dead head all my Rhododendrons after they had flowered.  I can't remember the reasons why I had to dead head them but I've done the same thing year after year.
Now the shrubs have grown quite tall and I can't reach all of the flowers, but in the wild they are not dead headed and they still continue to thrive.
Can anyone tell me if they dead head their Rhododendrons and the reason why they do it?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 11, 2013, 06:47:50 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Dave R, I have taken these photos with the new camera. I am only using it on automatic setting. The picture sizes are coming out between 4-9MB so I am having to resize the photos before putting them on the forum like the old days.
Is there an easy way to set them to come out smaller. I can't really understand the instructions!
Yes, Press the 'Menu' button on the back and look for 'Image Size'. Select that and then change it to a lower one, i.e. Small maybe.

I don't have the camera with me at the moment, so cant give more detailed instructions, but see how you get on. $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 11, 2013, 06:52:25 PM
Thanks DaveR. Done that, so easy when you know how. It was set on large so I have changed it to small as you suggest.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 11, 2013, 06:53:54 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
When we moved here over 25 years ago I remember someone telling me that I should dead head all my Rhododendrons after they had flowered.  I can't remember the reasons why I had to dead head them but I've done the same thing year after year.
Now the shrubs have grown quite tall and I can't reach all of the flowers, but in the wild they are not dead headed and they still continue to thrive.
Can anyone tell me if they dead head their Rhododendrons and the reason why they do it?


We've never dead headed any of ours Hugo. This year seemed a really good year for the flowers.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 11, 2013, 07:27:27 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Thanks DaveR. Done that, so easy when you know how. It was set on large so I have changed it to small as you suggest.
That should do the trick.  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 12, 2013, 11:18:16 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
When we moved here over 25 years ago I remember someone telling me that I should dead head all my Rhododendrons after they had flowered.  I can't remember the reasons why I had to dead head them but I've done the same thing year after year.
Now the shrubs have grown quite tall and I can't reach all of the flowers, but in the wild they are not dead headed and they still continue to thrive.
Can anyone tell me if they dead head their Rhododendrons and the reason why they do it?


We've never dead headed any of ours Hugo. This year seemed a really good year for the flowers.

Thanks very much for the advice Hollins,  it's such a tedious job so I won't miss doing it at all. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on July 15, 2013, 03:53:17 PM
Some pics in our garden, the blue flower is a Morning Glory which has just bloomed today! I have not had any luck with them in the past!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 15, 2013, 05:02:01 PM
Cracking photos ME that new camera certainly takes good pictures.    $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on July 15, 2013, 11:26:25 PM
Thanks Hugo, yes I'm still happy with the camera!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 17, 2013, 06:30:51 PM
I'm loving the spell of good weather but I don't think that the plants and shrubs are.   My two water butts have been empty for a few days and our water meter is working overtime.
As we have a lot of plants in pots they have to be  watered every day and they seem in good health.   The Hostas seem slug free which is most unusual.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 21, 2013, 01:22:37 PM
That looks healthy Hugo.
I am getting on with my picking before the birds and beasts!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on July 21, 2013, 01:33:53 PM
Those strawberries look yum, H!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 21, 2013, 01:48:10 PM
I'll bring you some next time I am in town.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2013, 07:08:14 PM
Last year for the first time ever we had no flowers at all on our Yucca Tree.   This year we have loads of them, must be the recent spell of good weather.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 30, 2013, 05:31:10 PM
You were right-- it is a teasel-- a tall one too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Trojan on July 31, 2013, 03:40:02 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Those strawberries look yum, H!

Those raspberries do too!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 04, 2013, 01:31:30 PM
Lunch from the garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 04, 2013, 02:03:59 PM
I'm being invaded by Cabbage White Butterfies.  They are trying to decimate my Purple Sprouting Broccolli, laying lots of little clutches of eggs on the underside of the leaves.   I keep rubbing them off and they just lay more!  I'm determined that no hairy caterpiller will destroy my first ever attempt at growing this lovely veg.  Is there an easier way?
 :rage:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on August 04, 2013, 02:10:33 PM
Can't you build a frame and net it?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 04, 2013, 03:47:09 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Can't you build a frame and net it?

The amount I am growing does not really justify such expenditure.  I only have about 6 or 7 plants on a small raised bed.  The garden is essentially a VERY LOW maintenance enterprise and the only other veg I grow is the same number of runner beans, which I absolutely love.   

I will just have to continue with my purloining of the eggs.  I thought of saving the eggs in a box, waiting untill they hatched, and then feeding the resultant caterpillers to the birds, so they will have at least, served some useful purpose!
 $dins$ $dins$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on August 04, 2013, 04:47:28 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Lunch from the garden.

Another lovely photo Hollins, you have a gift for making any food look so appetising.     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 04, 2013, 05:42:47 PM
Thank you Hugo. Hope you had a good lunch!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on August 04, 2013, 06:56:26 PM
Hollins, were you also at the Maenan Abbey today then.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 04, 2013, 07:00:50 PM
No, not been out today.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 10, 2013, 07:26:47 PM
Here are a few photos from East Ruston garden in Norfolk. It is one of the most incredible gardens in Britain in my view.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 18, 2013, 03:11:46 PM
Picking and arranging today.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on August 18, 2013, 04:58:07 PM
Wow what an amazing garden Hollins.

That must take some upkeep?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 18, 2013, 05:11:56 PM
Thanks Jack. It has been a struggle this summer with Mr H out of action but we have had some help.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on August 19, 2013, 08:51:53 PM
I saw this very vibrant flower in the gardens at Nant Clwyd house in Ruthin, and was wondering if anyone knew what it was?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 19, 2013, 09:06:24 PM
Looks like a cardoom (artichoke thistle). We have got them. They are huge like triffids.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on August 19, 2013, 09:25:55 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Looks like a cardoom (artichoke thistle). We have got them. They are huge like triffids.
Thank you, now you mention it,they definitely looked like a member of the thistle family.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 20, 2013, 11:31:52 AM
Here are a couple of photos of our cardooms.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on August 20, 2013, 05:29:15 PM
Didn't Clarissa Dickson-Wright have a thing about them?

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2011/oct/28/british-food-clarissa-dickson-wright (http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2011/oct/28/british-food-clarissa-dickson-wright)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on August 20, 2013, 06:29:13 PM
I was amazed by the vibrancy of the flower colour.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 20, 2013, 07:18:55 PM
Just noticed I have been spelling it wrongly. Should be cardoon. Sorry about that.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bosun on August 20, 2013, 07:51:12 PM
Hope that you don't mind me asking in this arena, but can anyone recommend a proper gardener in the Deganwy area? I don't mind a knowledgeable amateur or (semi) retired person, to take care of some boarders. No heavy work.

I thought that someone might like a few hours work occasionally.

I have posted for someone in other areas on the blog without a reply, but thought that there might be someone here that it would appeal to.

Thanks. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 20, 2013, 08:37:57 PM
I know someone who could take care of the boarders, but he's useless at gardening!   :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bosun on August 21, 2013, 04:40:46 AM
Thank you Yorkie, for pointing out that typo. Without your eagle-eyed genius, non one reading the post would have been even vaguely intelligent enough to possibly realise that I meant flower borders, rather than pirates or lodgers.

You don’t bother to follow Cicero’s adage then?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 21, 2013, 07:09:59 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Thank you Yorkie, for pointing out that typo. Without your eagle-eyed genius, non one reading the post would have been even vaguely intelligent enough to possibly realise that I meant flower borders, rather than pirates or lodgers.

My pleasure Cap'n!   :D   No fun allowed on this Forum then?    ???

Bosun also said, "You don’t bother to follow Cicero’s adage then?"

Yep I do!  I believe that I and many others on this forum, especially the cynics, follow the second specification!   ;D   Put yourself in whichever slot you wish.    :-X
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on August 21, 2013, 10:10:45 AM
 :o _))* :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on August 21, 2013, 10:18:48 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
eagle-eyed genius
:laugh:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 21, 2013, 12:58:29 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
eagle-eyed genius
:laugh:

Can't argue with that    L0L!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bosun on August 21, 2013, 11:22:19 PM
ita probaverunt.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 22, 2013, 08:22:55 AM
The rule of friendship means there should be mutual sympathy between them, each supplying what the other lacks and trying to benefit the other, always using friendly and sincere words.

Marcus Tullius Cicero


QED :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on August 23, 2013, 12:30:37 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
:o _))* :o

 $lol$ I think a moment just to think happy thoughts :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on August 23, 2013, 10:37:21 AM
Karma
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on August 23, 2013, 11:56:41 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Karma

Karma and calmer  ZXZ . Just a gardening question.Could anyone help me, Im wondering why my Rasberry plants havent produced any fruit this year, i planted them spring 2012. Plenty of foliage but nothing else.  ???
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: 1_rob_1 on August 23, 2013, 01:32:20 PM
Hi, Linda

Did your raspberries flower?
If not, then the following may help.

I dont know much about diseases etc, but I do know from experience that raspberry canes produce fruit in their second season, so if your original canes have died back & all your canes now have green stems, then they will not produce any flowers/fruit till next year.


Rob

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on August 23, 2013, 02:58:31 PM

Mine haven't had much in the way of fruit Linda. I was blaming the weather.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on August 23, 2013, 10:02:06 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Hi, Linda

Did your raspberries flower?
If not, then the following may help.

I dont know much about diseases etc, but I do know from experience that raspberry canes produce fruit in their second season, so if your original canes have died back & all your canes now have green stems, then they will not produce any flowers/fruit till next year.


Rob

Thanks Rob, i think they got cut back last year after something got some nearby gooseberries, whatever it was they striped the gooseberry stems bare and shoots were dropping off. Really weird. The rasberries seem to be fine and untouched but like i said just foliage. Maybe ill have better luck next year if i havent sold my house by then :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on August 23, 2013, 10:03:46 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Mine haven't had much in the way of fruit Linda. I was blaming the weather.

me too i thought it was too dry and warm. Great for tomatoes though  ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: 1_rob_1 on August 23, 2013, 10:44:41 PM
If they flowered & the flowers/fruits dried up, then it could be that the ground dried up.

Re: gooseberries  -  My major prob is the green caterpillars from the cabbage white butterflies - they can strip thewhole plant bare in a few days - I dont like to spray, so i pick them off one by one & relocate them.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on August 24, 2013, 10:21:06 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
If they flowered & the flowers/fruits dried up, then it could be that the ground dried up.

Re: gooseberries  -  My major prob is the green caterpillars from the cabbage white butterflies - they can strip thewhole plant bare in a few days - I dont like to spray, so i pick them off one by one & relocate them.

I think thats sounds about right with mine altho i didnt see many green catapillars just a couple but had loads at that side of the garden last year spent a lot  of time collecting and humanely relocating to the top of a local hill :)
so could be the caterpillars responsible for the gooseberries but the rasberries havent produced any flower or fruit so i guess next year maybe.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2013, 03:04:29 PM
I am back from visiting some stunning gardens in South West Scotland complete with walled gardens, huge lily ponds and even some with their own lochs.
Here are some photos.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2013, 03:10:51 PM
These next ones were taken at Dunskey Gardens near Portpatrick.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2013, 03:18:37 PM
Dunskey again.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 19, 2013, 02:32:28 PM
The sweet chestnut trees are looking good at the moment.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 22, 2013, 06:27:23 PM
The leaves are already starting to change colour in the garden and it will be interesting to see if the dry Summer has made a difference to the Autumn colours this year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 22, 2013, 08:37:14 PM
Gorgeous colour there Hugo but a bit sad to think the summer is over and all those leaves will be waiting to be cleared.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 25, 2013, 11:48:32 AM
The Chinese lanterns have gone mad this year!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 22, 2013, 01:54:11 PM
Nearly November but don't tell the garden!
Ooops, just realised the seagull pots might not go down too well, don't look!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on October 22, 2013, 09:20:27 PM
Stunning displays Hollins, I love to paint when time allows me too and these wonderful colourful flowers and foliage are crying out to be painted (probably someone better than me)  ;) but would love to try. Also what camera are you using ,looking for something to give me detail etc but not hard to use.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 22, 2013, 09:37:56 PM
Hi Linda, Good luck with the painting. I used to paint for a job (textile design) so regrettably I don't do it any more. Still feels like work, but I think I might take it up again one day!
Regarding the camera I am indebted to DaveR who recommended a little wonder camera! It is called a Sony RX100.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on October 23, 2013, 10:30:12 PM
Thankyou Hollins for info on camera , Christmas is coming  $good$ Also i can understand your reluctance to paint if it was your job. I feel like that over cooking as OH had a pub for many years there are only so many steak and kidneys pies, apple pies etc etc you want to make
so marks and sparks here i come  ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on October 24, 2013, 10:51:00 AM
See where you are both coming from-- the only hair I cut these days is my OH's and the only cooking I do is for us !-- Apart form full English of course!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 12, 2013, 07:53:16 PM
I wish I had this tree in my garden.  I saw it from the road as I was driving past
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on November 12, 2013, 07:58:09 PM
Wow, stunning colour  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 12, 2013, 08:01:40 PM
I was having a walk in Beddgelert today and drove past the Swallow Falls Hotel and it was in the next Forestry car park and I just had to stop and take a photo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 12, 2013, 08:07:54 PM
Stunning. The acers are a magnificent colour at the moment. I took this one this morning.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 12, 2013, 08:19:57 PM
That one must be more sheltered than mine ! The last few leaves are clinging on, but mainly they are all gone.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on November 12, 2013, 09:02:09 PM
My Japanese Acer has gone completely!  It got too big so had to suffer the indignity of the chain saw.   Got a nice Rowan in its place that I will try to keep in check.   ZXZ

Lots of Folklore about the Sorbus so I'll take a special interest. ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 12, 2013, 10:31:34 PM
Absolutely beautiful colours Hollins,  were the photos taken in your garden?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 13, 2013, 08:29:31 AM
Yes, so lucky.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 17, 2013, 01:17:23 PM
The acers are so colourful at the moment I have been trying to take some close ups of the leaves, not a great success but they do make such beautiful patterns. The yellow leaves in the last photo are the sorbus. It has white berries.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on November 17, 2013, 11:57:55 PM
Just a few photos of todays Bodnant garden visit, my camera doesnt do justice . I will have to ask Santa for a new one and a steadier hand  :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 18, 2013, 08:19:53 AM
Lovely, the first one looks like a painting. Thanks for putting those on Linda.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 18, 2013, 02:50:32 PM
Beautiful Autumn photos Linda and Hollins.     $good$


I bought a Japanese Maple "Osakasuki"  a few years ago and although it is nice I'm disappointed that the Autumn colours are not as vibrant as I expected.   I've looked at the leaves on the variety Osakasuki on Google and they look different to mine but I can't check because my leaves on the tree have all gone, not one left in the garden.
Must wait until the Spring to see if I've been duped!   
 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Linda on November 19, 2013, 01:47:26 PM
lovely shots Hollins... I did manage to get them on ok. Just wondering about Acers I have one in our present garden and altho healthy it only changes to slightly yellow before leaves fall.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on November 28, 2013, 10:40:07 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Regarding the camera I am indebted to DaveR who recommended a little wonder camera! It is called a Sony RX100.
A minute's silence please.... I was in Chester the other day taking some photos at Dusk from the Walls and the wonder camera slipped out of my hand and fell 20 feet onto the concrete below. Needless to say, it is now deceased.  :( It's a testament to Sony build quality that it still turned on (albeit to display an error message) when I retrieved it!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 28, 2013, 10:53:42 AM
Oh no!    :'(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 28, 2013, 11:40:04 AM
Ouch ! :-X
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on November 28, 2013, 04:30:16 PM
Please avert your eyes, Hollins, it's not a pretty sight...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on November 28, 2013, 04:53:55 PM
I hope you have possessions insured for when they are away from the home! :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Quiggs on November 28, 2013, 05:18:49 PM
Sorry for your loss Hollins, but that is why they usually have a wrist strap    :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 28, 2013, 05:20:34 PM
Oh dear! Hope your insurance covers it!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 28, 2013, 05:43:43 PM
Too late DaveR, I caught a glimpse of it and it gave me the shudders.

Quiggs, It is DaveR's in the photo and not mine but rest assured it has made me think hard about using the wrist strap.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 28, 2013, 05:44:42 PM
Amen to that Hollins ! :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 06, 2014, 10:55:08 AM
I left about 4 pots of Geraniums in the garden as they were in flower and also in bud, as I didn't have the heart to pull them up.
The strange thing is that they are still doing well despite the atrocious weather we have had these last few months.   I'll keep them there until the frost finally finishes them off
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on January 26, 2014, 01:23:39 PM
Some snowdrops to cheer us up. A sign of life in the garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 26, 2014, 05:05:40 PM
That's a beautiful display of Snowdrops, they look so impressive when planted like that.    The old Church in Caerhun has masses of Snowdrops too although not quite as striking as the ones in your photo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 19, 2014, 11:32:28 AM
We were so lucky to inherit some wonderful plants from the previous owner of this house, not least this gorgeous camellia in the sun room.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on February 19, 2014, 11:37:35 AM
Lovely photos Hollins and the Camelia is one of my favourite shrubs.   I had a variety called "Donation"  which was beautiful but I neglected it and then had to get rid of it which is a shame.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 07, 2014, 12:44:12 PM
It is lovely to see things springing into life in the garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on March 07, 2014, 01:31:12 PM
Very nice, I love the spring when everything comes back to life!  D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 07, 2014, 06:27:27 PM
Lovely photos of the flowers,  the weather this last week has certainly brought the gardens to life.
Is that last picture one of a "Calico Bush" ?  ( can't remember it's real name)   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 07, 2014, 06:51:56 PM
Hi Hugo, It is a viburnum tinus.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 07, 2014, 10:47:17 PM
Thanks Hollins,  I have one in my garden but made the mistake of planting it too near another shrub and the Pieris Forest Flame and the Calico bush have intertwined and it's too late to separate them.
The flowers on my Calico Bush haven't come out yet because of where I live and are usually a month behind others that are on a lower elevation.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 07, 2014, 10:57:59 PM
The calico bush is kalmia latifolia. I think we also have one of those and it does flower later.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 09, 2014, 02:20:01 PM
Hugo, I am not sure but I think this maybe our calico bush. It does have pink flowers but obviously they are not out yet. What do you think?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2014, 04:50:10 PM
Hollins,  I'm not an expert on plants but my calico bush  ( kalmia latifolia.) is more compact than the one in your last photo.    It's hard to tell but yours looks a bit like a rhododendron, you'll soon see when the flowers come out.
I've just gone into my garden to take a photo of the Calico Bush and it's looking odd to me.   Most of the shrub is  not in flower, but the parts that are, are looking more like the colour of the leaves of the Pieris that is intertwined with it.   
No wonder the plant is confused as it's my fault for planting them so close!
The Primulas are out now but that is all the colour I have in the garden at the moment.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 09, 2014, 04:58:40 PM
Thanks for your help. Like you say we will have to wait until the flowers come out. I will post another photo then.
Your garden looks really lovely.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 09, 2014, 05:06:05 PM
I was looking through the original posts on this gardening thread trying to see if I had posted a pic of the kalmia before and I saw the amazing photos that Hugo and Bellringer posted of their snowy gardens in December 2010. Worth a second look!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 09, 2014, 05:14:51 PM
Sorry, I had asked the question before about this shrub in June 2011 and ME had very kindly given me the answer then!
It still looks quite different to yours though Hugo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2014, 05:24:47 PM
Those flowers look very much like the ones that come out on my Calico Bush.   Here's a photo of the flowers that I took years ago, sorry about the quality of the photo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 09, 2014, 05:29:17 PM
Yes, I see. I think ours is just a sickly version of yours!
 :'(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2014, 05:32:53 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I was looking through the original posts on this gardening thread trying to see if I had posted a pic of the kalmia before and I saw the amazing photos that Hugo and Bellringer posted of their snowy gardens in December 2010. Worth a second look!

This is my favourite photo from the posting.   It doesn't look like we'll be getting any snow this Winter though.   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 09, 2014, 08:28:19 PM
I have been back and looked through my Dec 2010 photos. It is hard to imagine that winter now compared to the one we have just had or am I speaking too soon! Let's hope not.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Neil on March 09, 2014, 09:32:04 PM
I'm back from Malta on Wednesday, but I am remembering last year when the winter didn't really start until I'd got back from my winter holidays in mid March, hope that is not the case this year!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on March 09, 2014, 10:07:35 PM
are the flowers primroses  in your third photo Hugo? What are the blue ones called I.v got them in mine but not a clue what they.r called, Come back Blodyn
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2014, 10:36:21 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
are the flowers primroses  in your third photo Hugo? What are the blue ones called I.v got them in mine but not a clue what they.r called, Come back Blodyn

Yes Snowcap, they are primroses and the blue flowers near the Australian Tree Fern are called Muscari or Grape Hyacinth.     On the left of the photo the ordinary Hyacinths are starting to come into Flower.   
I had heard that Blodyn was still busy with her work but hope too that she gets some time off to do some postings     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on March 09, 2014, 11:06:50 PM
thanks for that Hugo now i know what to call them instead of referring to  them as those blue things.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on March 11, 2014, 01:23:16 PM
Our dwarf rhododendron is looking great this year!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 13, 2014, 12:21:08 PM
Well done ME, lovely early colour.

Bodysgallen was looking good yesterday.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 02, 2014, 03:40:51 PM
It seems a bit dreary here today especially after yesterday's sunshine so I have just picked these to try and cheer the place up a bit.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 02, 2014, 04:38:56 PM
They look lovely!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 11, 2014, 03:24:13 PM
The blue Muscari are all out at the moment and the white Azalea has come on well since I moved it into a pot last year.     
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 11, 2014, 04:09:53 PM
Looks lovely, I love spring!  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 11, 2014, 05:12:24 PM
Me too. Looks gorgeous Hugo. I love the blue and white together.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: mull on April 11, 2014, 05:21:05 PM
Thats it Hollins,

Everton......Your in my heart, Your in my soul.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 11, 2014, 05:41:02 PM
Ha! I dropped myself right in it there. Red and white not bad either but could be L.......l also!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on April 11, 2014, 10:25:40 PM
glad to see common sense prevailing in the end Hollins
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 11, 2014, 10:45:40 PM
Let's hope that the red flowers don't fade as quick as the team this season     WWW
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 11, 2014, 10:51:44 PM
 :'(   Ouch    :'(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 12, 2014, 11:53:24 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
:'(   Ouch    :'(

The truth does hurt     :(,  but I must say that at least your flowers and garden are a delight to watch.       $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 16, 2014, 07:38:10 AM
I don't know if it is just me but this year the blossom, camellias and magnolias seem better than ever. The first two photos here were taken at Plas Bodegroes near Pwllheli. We went there for lunch but they also have a beautiful garden. The others were taken at Portmeirion.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 26, 2014, 04:18:13 PM
These late flowering daffodils are only just coming out and they are scented too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 26, 2014, 04:27:16 PM
Lots of things in bud at the moment and another attempt at a bee photo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on April 30, 2014, 11:49:15 AM
I wondered why the buds had been dropping off my Montana Rubens Clematis this year. As it is in a strange little yard between the old buildings I didn't investigate and blamed the weather. As the flowers have come out they seemed to being eaten, so this morning I went into the yard to investigate. The contents of the bucket are from where I could reach !!!! Eeeeek !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 04, 2014, 05:59:35 PM
I visited a lovely garden today called Milntown which is near Ramsey on the Isle of Man.
Here are a few snaps.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 04, 2014, 08:42:53 PM
Very nice! Like the sign and the duck!  :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2014, 11:34:42 AM
Some of our Rhododendrons are coming out now (first two photos) but yesterday in Nantmor I just had to stop and look at this beautiful garden which is near the car park.   The photo doesn't do it justice though which is a shame.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2014, 06:11:35 PM
Rowen Village Gardens Open Day

Rowen, Conwy Valley, North Wales
Sunday 18th May 2014 (resting in 2013)
10.30am to 5.00pm

Some 18 lovely gardens open for one day every two years, full of ideas to take home, in award-winning village in Snowdonia National Park. Several refreshment stops.

Proceeds in aid of Rowen Memorial Hall.

Plant sales:
Plant stalls

Cost:
£5.00 per person
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 15, 2014, 04:39:03 PM
I love clematis time.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 16, 2014, 10:29:33 AM
That's a nice collection of Clematis Hollins and they all seem to be doing well.    I haven't had much luck with the large flowering variety but  this year I bought three of the large flowered ones from Aldi,   Daniel Deronda,  Doctor Ruppel and Mrs N Thompson for £5.99 each and am keeping my fingers crossed that they will survive.
The smaller white Montana though just keeps on growing and the small umbrella type Acer has survived me mowing around it!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 16, 2014, 10:55:11 AM
Fabulous Hugo! I think our blue one came from Asda. They are wonderful the way the flowers are so prolific.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 18, 2014, 06:38:46 PM
I enjoyed a nice day at the Rowen Open Garden Day today.  The place was crowded with people making the most of the lovely weather and I particularly enjoyed the gardens at Old Llannerch Y Felin, Bulkeley Mill and Oakbank.
The Handkerchief Tree in Oakbank was drawing a lot of attention as it was in flower and is over 100 years old.
I wasn't able to see all the gardens but I did manage a cup of tea and a delicious scone with strawberry jam and cream at Gwynant and then another cup of tea and slice of a lovely coffee cake at Seion Chapel.   It's hard work walking around gardens!         $good$

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 19, 2014, 05:10:21 PM
Those handkerchief trees are beautiful. I think I remember seeing one in flower at Bodysgallen.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 23, 2014, 05:28:52 PM
It is very dreary out there at the moment so here are a few photos of the irises which look lovely this week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 23, 2014, 07:43:56 PM
A lovely sight on a wet day like this!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 24, 2014, 11:04:28 AM
This photo is on Bodnant's Facebook page. Hope it is okay to put it on here.
Great timing for all the Bank Holiday visitors.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 24, 2014, 02:54:21 PM
That garden of yours is really beautiful, you must get so much pleasure from seeing every thing growing.   You'll have to open it to the public.   
If you ever do, don't forget to provide refreshments because Mike from the Golf Course keeps telling me how nice the cakes were.    $good$   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 30, 2014, 03:15:36 PM
Thanks Hugo. There has been talk in the past of having an open day for charity but not happened yet!
Anyway here are some of this weeks pics.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 14, 2014, 12:35:41 PM
It's delphinium week. I bought these plants a few years ago from the RHS garden at Harlow Carr for the cut flower garden but I am going to need a big vase for these. They are 7 feet tall and seem to come up bigger and stronger each year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on June 14, 2014, 01:25:22 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
They are 7 feet tall and seem to come up bigger and stronger each year.

Bit like each succeeding generation of children!   :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 14, 2014, 03:41:28 PM
They look wonderful!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 01, 2014, 09:38:24 AM
I have grown these for years, but this year they are amazing-- at dusk they almost glow. Trouble is they are taking over !
Oenothera biennis -- Evening Primrose.
If any one wants seeds let me know, I shall have hundreds.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 15, 2014, 03:37:15 PM
We have a late flowering rhododendron blooming at the moment.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 26, 2014, 10:41:47 AM
I'm in sweet pea heaven!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on July 26, 2014, 10:48:04 AM
They look great! One day I might grow some again!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on July 26, 2014, 01:11:38 PM
Just picked my first crop of Runner Beans, but looks like there are plenty more to come.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Gwynant on July 26, 2014, 02:14:57 PM
        I pass this plant/flower/vegetable every morning in a front garden on my way to the local paper shop and have often wondered what it is. I have been told that it is some sort of artichoke but I am sure some of the gardening experts on the Forum will confirm or correct that. The first photo was taken about 3 or 4 weeks ago and the other 2  were taken this week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 26, 2014, 02:41:50 PM
Hi Gwynant. they are called cardoons.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Gwynant on July 26, 2014, 03:05:51 PM
        Thank you for your info. Hollins. Are they flowers or vegetables and are they related to the artichoke family in any way? A neighbour said that the insides could  be eaten if they were removed before the plant flowered, (or he was winding me up!).
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 26, 2014, 03:24:06 PM
Yes, I think they are related to the artichoke but with this type I think it is the stems that are more edible. Here is an article with a recipe but it sounds like hard work to me!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/10816050/Bring-back-the-great-cardoon.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/10816050/Bring-back-the-great-cardoon.html)


http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/248.shtml (http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/248.shtml)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 26, 2014, 05:17:16 PM
Clarissa Dixon Wright liked them if I remember correctly . Once saw her cook them on 'Two Fat Ladies', but can't remember what she did !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on August 17, 2014, 06:10:40 PM
Most of my Nasturtions were covered in Black Fly and the leaves were turning yellow so they had to go.   It's a shame really because they are so easy to grow and provide a lot of colour.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 17, 2014, 06:15:29 PM
You're sure that the handsome fellow who is looking so innocent, didn't have something to do with it?    :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on August 18, 2014, 12:49:41 PM
Walking down Gloddaeth Ave. past the bigger car park, noticed some Himalayan balsam, nasty stuff.
Anybody know if the council needs advised of this, and/or which dept.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on August 18, 2014, 01:35:02 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Walking down Gloddaeth Ave. past the bigger car park, noticed some Himalayan balsam, nasty stuff.
Anybody know if the council needs advised of this, and/or which dept.

Sounds like a drug, so maybe the HIGH ways Department!   D)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on August 18, 2014, 01:49:04 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Walking down Gloddaeth Ave. past the bigger car park, noticed some Himalayan balsam, nasty stuff.
Anybody know if the council needs advised of this, and/or which dept.

Sounds like a drug, so maybe the HIGH ways Department!   D)
Not the answer I expected, had to think about it, then .... _))*......
But, seriously if this gets a hold, even the most basic gardeners will be P.O. Google Himalayan Balsam for more details.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on August 18, 2014, 02:51:32 PM
I've got some in my garden and to be honest it looks quite nice when it's in flower but I do keep it under control by regular cutting down.  It is invasive but it's not a risk to humans as far as I'm aware.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on August 18, 2014, 05:39:08 PM
Hi Hugo,  No risk I know of, and I'm pleased yours is ok, But it does have a negative effect on local plant and insect life, long term, if not controlled   we have had/having serious invasive problems from this plant on a golf course over Cheshire way, even to the point that the club is being sued by surrounding properties, this is after some serious clearing by the ground staff, I was afraid that a similar situation could arise here.
I did not know if it was a local problem, but thought better to check it out.
This plant under control such as yours, is OK but, when the seeds reach open areas, such as the Orme, it could be very damaging.
So still looking for advice........
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on August 18, 2014, 05:49:53 PM
I was going to put a photo here, but its better to Google image and see the lot....I could'nt choose...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 01, 2014, 02:55:12 PM
Here are some photos of the gardens on Isola Bella, Lake Maggiore.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 02, 2014, 02:01:03 PM
Hollins, you do get about a bit and good for you.     $good$

It's another place I'd like to visit.   I've always wanted to go there after speaking to an Italian waiter in Casanova's in Llandudno.    He lived there before coming to Llandudno and told me how beautiful the area is.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 27, 2014, 03:42:37 PM
When we moved here we planted a circle of these roses around a weeping cherry tree. It is called Cottage Rose from David Austin. We have been so pleased with them as they have flowered all summer and have a lovely scent.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 06, 2014, 03:26:50 PM
We were so lucky to be able to visit Bodnant last Thursday. What beautiful weather it was then. The roses and asters in particular were looking good.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on October 07, 2014, 08:37:22 AM
When we visited last Sunday, I was pleased to see that more of the woodland area of the garden had been opened up for public access. I also believe a further section by the Upper Lake is being opened up next year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 14, 2014, 01:14:22 PM
Flowers from the garden. Not bad for 14th November!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 14, 2014, 01:49:02 PM
They look really nice and you're so gifted with your flower arranging   $good$


Not too bad either when you're taking photos of those mouth watering gateau's that you frequently have in Switzerland and all the other places.    $dins$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 14, 2014, 02:06:53 PM
Thanks Hugo.
Here is one for you from our favourite cake place in Badenweiler, Germany. They call it milk cake. It has sultanas in it and is served warm with cherries and vanilla sauce, yum!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on November 14, 2014, 04:14:37 PM
Plenty of Stollen in both ALDI and LIDL ready for the Festive Season.   ZXZ

And, of course, The very best Gluwein!   Z**
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on November 14, 2014, 05:09:21 PM
Very bad for the blood pressure,  and mine is 'through the roof', apparently.   &shake& &shake&

I have just been informed of this in the last hour!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on November 14, 2014, 08:30:55 PM
I blame Ian and Dave R. for building your hopes up offering you that refund. You must be in a right state trying to hide it from Mrs. Fester
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on November 15, 2014, 07:39:13 AM
Quote
I blame Ian and Dave R. for building your hopes up offering you that refund

Mea Culpa, and Fester's been having several drinks to calm himself down and reduce the pressure...  WWW
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 15, 2014, 09:03:51 AM
Yum ! Stollen---the stollen mini bites are a lovely mouthful too. I also see that Iceland are selling exotic meats.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Yorkie on November 15, 2014, 01:25:24 PM
Kangaroo!  Yummy!   ;D

And Ostrich!  Mmmmmmm!   ZXZ
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 24, 2014, 12:55:15 PM
I saw these "Bear's Breeches" in the Chateau Rhianfa grounds on Sunday and it's the first time I have ever seen the leaves without any mould on them.
Mine last for a month or so but then become infected with a type of mildew and I just cut the leaves off and leave the spikey flower alone.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 03, 2014, 04:18:06 PM
I haven't planted all my Daffodil bulbs yet as the Geraniums are still flowering and I haven't got the heart to pull them out of the pots while there is so much colour in the garden.
It's getting colder at night now so I'll let the frost finish the Geraniums off and then I can put the Daffodil bulbs in.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on December 03, 2014, 04:34:51 PM
Hugo, do you protect your tree fern against frost?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 03, 2014, 07:04:47 PM
Normally I do but last year I didn't and got away with it.    A few years ago I lost one Australian Tree fern because I didn't protect it from the frost and it died.   I scooped the top of the fern out and put an ordinary fern in the crown instead but am not sure if it has taken or not.
This year I'll cut the leaves off and protect the crown with a type of fleece blanket soon.   At the moment the fern is quite green and healthy and I must admit that I hate cutting them off while they are still looking good but it has to be done.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on December 03, 2014, 09:21:44 PM
Thanks for the reply Hugo, in the past I have dressed the crown of mine with straw and wrapped it in plastic sheeting but I think this year I will invest in a fleece!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 03, 2014, 10:22:04 PM
I have used straw before and even some of my dog's wool but never plastic as I think that would make the fern sweat and could damage it or so I'm told.
With the fleece jacket, it breathes just like the fleeces we wear when we are walking and keeps the frost out too.   The fleece jackets are normally too big but I do use the excess fleece on the crown of the fern just for additional protection.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 07, 2014, 03:10:44 PM
I just finished mowing the lawn on Thursday just before the rain and hail came down so I was quite lucky.
Against advice from other gardeners I kept the blades low so this will be my last mowing of the lawn until the coming Spring.   I've dozens of Daffodil bulbs planted in the lawn so fingers crossed that I haven't chopped the heads off like I have done in the past.     :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on January 24, 2015, 01:38:34 PM
Signs of spring!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on January 24, 2015, 02:08:29 PM
I have just read in the National Trust magazine about another new area opening at Bodnant on 28 March. This one is called The Far End and here is a link to some info about it.

https://bodnantgarden.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/far-reaching-dream-coming-to-fruition/
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 24, 2015, 03:03:35 PM
Beautiful photos Hollins and so nice to see such nice colours at this time of year.   I must visit St Mary's Church in Caerhun soon as there is usually a good display of Snowdrops there about this time of year.
You must be pleased with that camera of yours as those photos you've posted are really good.    $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on January 24, 2015, 05:37:55 PM
Thanks Hugo. Yes, it was money well spent. One of the best things I have ever bought and I only ever use it on the automatic setting.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on January 25, 2015, 08:31:42 AM
But it's not just the camera.  Getting in close and framing the photos as well as you do is all you, H :-))
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on January 25, 2015, 09:12:08 AM
Thanks Ian. I have to thank the cropping tool on Picasa for that!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on January 25, 2015, 08:24:06 PM
picasa oh, no wander they are so good
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 26, 2015, 10:30:11 PM
The Snowdrops have now started to appear in St Mary's Church in Caerhun
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 05, 2015, 09:24:16 AM
I love the flowers of the hellebores but it is a shame that they hang their heads and you can't always see them properly.
I was amazingly lucky with this photo. I held the camera against the floor lens pointing towards the flower and just pressed and hoped for the best not being able to see what it was showing and hey presto, the wonder camera triumphs again!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 15, 2015, 12:03:21 PM
Back in the land of snowdrops.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 24, 2015, 04:06:37 PM
A few more hellebore pics.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on February 28, 2015, 01:44:03 PM
Just one of my daffodil pots.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 31, 2015, 08:14:34 PM
It was very windy here last night and the wind has taken it's toll on my Daffodils but at least most of them are ok.  The gusts of wind in Capel Curig reached 97 mph last night so any Daffodils there would have taken a battering.
I've had to put all the garden furniture down again to save it from wind damage and that must be about the 7th time this Winter that I've had to do that.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on March 31, 2015, 10:14:58 PM
As is usually the case we either get the wind full on and everything in the garden goes everywhere or we hear it, see it in the bay but don't feel it.

I've got the earplugs on standby, the recycling containers are currently tied down to the garden bench and the greenhouse is covered in bungee ropes and wedged in with calor gas containers.

However today it was really calm (windwise anyway!) around the garden.

The goats have also voted with the their feet (hoofs) and are nowhere to be seen on Pen Dinas, which is usually a sign of us being in for a gusty time.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 01, 2015, 08:23:46 AM
I've had to put my house number on all the green garden waste bags and also the green stacker bins that they have provided as they often end up in some other garden.
I tend not to put them out when it's very windy as it saves the hassle of clearing up in the morning
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 01, 2015, 02:09:55 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
It was very windy here last night and the wind has taken it's toll on my Daffodils but at least most of them are ok.  The gusts of wind in Capel Curig reached 97 mph last night so any Daffodils there would have taken a battering.
I've had to put all the garden furniture down again to save it from wind damage and that must be about the 7th time this Winter that I've had to do that.

The daffs have taken a battering here too. The poor things are all turning their heads to the south away from the wind but there are many casualties as you can see in one of these photos.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 05, 2015, 01:39:46 PM
You have a lovely selection of Daffodils in your garden Hollins, shame about the winds this week but hopefully it won't be too windy for the rest to survive.
These in my front garden were the lucky ones this week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 08, 2015, 09:04:32 PM
It's camellia time.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 12, 2015, 11:29:24 AM
They all look good and healthy Hollins  I like all of them but especially the one in the fourth photo that's my favourite.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 12, 2015, 11:51:04 AM
The winds have been very strong today and my garden furniture has been blown over again so it's all down, to save the furniture from further damage.
The gusts seem to be well over the 50 mph predicted and my dovecote which is fixed to a small tree, has been swaying backwards and forwards just like the pendulum of a clock and the tree now looks like it will snap any moment
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 12, 2015, 12:12:16 PM
It is horrendous up here too. I never saw this coming in the forecast. All the lovely things coming out in the warm weather last week are now getting blown to bits in the wind and horizontal rain.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on April 12, 2015, 02:05:03 PM
Quote
The gusts seem to be well over the 50 mph predicted

Mostly around 32mph, but occasionally a little more. Our max was 33mph at 10.01.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 12, 2015, 06:38:48 PM
I wish it was that calm up here this morning Ian.   My wooden picnic table disintegrated in the wind and all the heavy pots on top of it  fell down and broke.   The top of the garden is a right mess with soil all over the place.      :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on April 12, 2015, 08:56:48 PM
Strange things Gusts; they can cause enormous damage in one street, yet leave the next untouched. But we did have almost half an inch of rain in the past 24 hours.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TheMedz on April 12, 2015, 10:06:33 PM
Wild up on the Orme this morning (50mph gust apparently around 11:00 am) even though the wind was from the west a direction from which we are normally protected. Early morning paper re-cycling (ours and everybody from the Orme above us) collection from around the garden as normal.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 17, 2015, 05:44:20 PM
I visited a lovely and most unusual garden yesterday. It was called Westbury Court garden in Gloucestershire. It is a Dutch style canal garden and I hadn't seen one like it before.
It almost met a sticky end in the sixties when the garden was derelict and the land was about to be sold for housing.
However in 1967 the local council gave it to the National Trust and they have done their usual fantastic job of restoring and maintaining it despite being flooded in more recent times.
It looked immaculate yesterday. Here are a few photos.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 24, 2015, 01:30:58 PM
The weather this week has been great and everything seems to have come on really well.   The Magnolia Stellata is in flower and the Spirea next to it will be in flower soon.
The Azalea that I put in a pot seems to be doing well too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 24, 2015, 02:31:54 PM
It was great to see your magnolia flowering so profusely. I planted this one in 2008 and I think if I am lucky I am going to see my first flower this spring.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 24, 2015, 06:01:31 PM
It's a beautiful colour Hollins, what variety is it?      I've seen one variety called Susan and from memory looks a bit like yours.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 24, 2015, 06:15:54 PM
It is called Black Tulip Hugo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on April 24, 2015, 06:38:22 PM
Do you have bunny issues, Hollins?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 24, 2015, 06:49:39 PM
Ha, yes Jack. Not so bad now though since the cat and her two kittens adopted us.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 19, 2015, 10:09:16 AM
I visited a lovely garden at Picton Castle near Haverfordwest yesterday complete with lawnmower museum!
The place is maintained by a charitable trust and relies on volunteers. Compared to Bodnant it was more like a wild garden and it makes you realise what a massive amount of work must go in to keeping Bodnant looking as neat and tidy as it does.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 20, 2015, 08:33:01 AM
My Rhododendrons have just come out this week,so I hope the winds won't spoil the flowers too much
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 22, 2015, 03:43:27 PM
They look lovely Hugo.
I can't believe how far behind things are this year compared to last.
The first photo was taken on 9.5.14 and the second one today.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 25, 2015, 03:04:55 PM
I bought the Clematis from Aldi last year and it has just started to flower.  It only cost me £5.99 so it was good value for money.  The Clematis Montana on my shed has also started to flower but there are still loads of buds waiting to open
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 25, 2015, 03:14:35 PM
Love your shed Hugo!........and your garden.  :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 25, 2015, 03:48:36 PM
Thanks Hollins.    $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 28, 2015, 07:42:54 PM
Bodnant is looking fantastic at the moment as you would expect for this time of year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 28, 2015, 07:51:27 PM
Bodnant this afternoon.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 28, 2015, 09:25:03 PM
Looking wonderful!  $cool$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 06, 2015, 02:28:09 PM
Some lovely things out in the garden this week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 11, 2015, 05:06:44 PM
Some pics from the garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on July 11, 2015, 10:14:38 PM
rose looks like it could be "mischief" Hollins
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 11, 2015, 10:35:33 PM
Sorry, not sure snowcap.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 12, 2015, 07:56:44 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
rose looks like it could be "mischief" Hollins


Found the name of the rose.
It is called "Compassion."

Are you a keen rose grower snowcap?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on July 12, 2015, 10:02:11 PM
no unfortunately it,s just that i have a rose tree called mischief in the garden and it is the most lovely smell  i have ever smelt from a rose, it,s an orangey red in colour and i believe they have a perfume named after it
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 02, 2015, 10:35:59 AM
I am enjoying the cut flower garden at the moment!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 01, 2015, 01:53:25 PM
Yellow is the colour in this lovely sunshine.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 19, 2015, 06:03:49 PM
The trees are changing to the Autumn colours now.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 28, 2015, 07:35:22 PM
Autumn colours.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 31, 2015, 09:59:45 AM
My wife and I enjoyed a walk around Bodnant Gardens yesterday.  The Autumn colours this year were very good, but it looked like it won't be long before the leaves are off the trees
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 31, 2015, 02:53:06 PM
Lovely to see those photos. Not been there this autumn. Thanks Hugo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 01, 2015, 08:56:14 AM
Thanks Hollins,  it's a while since I was last the but it was great to see those Autumn tints.     I think that once we have a strong wind the rest of the leaves will fall too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 01, 2015, 09:01:49 AM
I'm late in planting Daffodil bulbs in my pots this year because I've been waiting for the Geraniums to finish flowering.  The Geraniums are still in flower and there are new buds on them too so it looks like it may be December when the Daffodils get planted.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on November 01, 2015, 10:24:52 AM
Weather patterns are certainly changing.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 01, 2015, 02:46:29 PM
What a gorgeous day! Got my mum here this weekend making these arrangements.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 01, 2015, 03:11:48 PM
Beautiful arrangements Hollins, I can see where you get your talent from.    $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 23, 2015, 04:00:41 PM
We had our first heavy frost last night and I'll probably have to lift all the Geraniums up soon after the frost damage.    I've just come back from John's Nursery at Talgoed Glan Conwy with three heavy bags of Daffodils so that they can go in the troughs and pots that the Geraniums are presently in.
His prices are very good and the bulbs are large and of good quality, well worth going to if you are in that area.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 02, 2015, 03:17:49 PM
The Squirrels destroyed my peanut feeder for the birds so I sent off for a Squirrel proof peanut feeder and it arrived yesterday.   I set it up today and filled the feeder with nuts and left the birds enjoy the nuts.
When I came home I saw that the Squirrels had lifted the top off and scoffed half the peanuts      :rage:    so now I've tied the lid on with wire and we'll see how we get on.

Meanwhile      Squirrels 1   v   Hugo 0
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 26, 2015, 03:38:39 PM
2015 has been a strange year for gardening,  I had to pull up my Geraniums from their pots in December in order to plant my Daffodil bulbs which should have gone in around Sept/Oct.
My Hydrangea is flowering now and the Yucca Tree has numerous new flowers coming up but any frost will soon kill them off.
One thing I have noticed in the 30 years I have lived here is the constant wind this year, I've never noticed it as bad before and the metal garden furniture is down again
At the moment there is driving rain and the wind has gusted to over 50 mph so I'm not looking forward to taking my dog out for his afternoon walk but needs must.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on December 26, 2015, 04:20:26 PM
The joys of dog ownership Hugo ! WE have more wet garments hanging in our utility than I care to count ! Still we are better off than some poor souls.
 Happy New Year to you.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 26, 2015, 04:32:23 PM
I've just come back after taking Marco for a walk and just found out that my waterproof walking gear isn't so waterproof after all.

I count my blessings after seeing all those people suffering from the floods and after the heavy rain in Wales today I fear for those towns at risk from the River Severn, I just hope that they can escape from getting flooded.

A Happy and Healthy New Year to you too.

I reckon Frizzy's scruffy cousin from the farm could do with going out in this rain and then he'd look more like Frizzy then
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on December 26, 2015, 05:53:14 PM
A more modern one for you Hugo. He still gets grubby, but not quite like the one in your pic !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 26, 2015, 06:14:32 PM
He looks absolutely gorgeous Nemesis,  I'll have to remember not to show that photo to my wife as she's been on at me for years to have a Bichon Frise as a companion for Marco.
Don't take him to visit his cousin at the farm or else Frizzy will look like his scruffy cousin.      ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on December 27, 2015, 02:04:22 AM
Don't even go there Hugo ! We have had dogs now for more than 50 years of varying breeds and he has been the most difficult. He is now 5 and calmer, but we still daren't let him off the lead and he will tackle anything he doesn't like the look of.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on December 27, 2015, 02:56:39 PM
Thanks for the advice Nemesis,  I'll remember that if Mrs H carries on again about getting one.      $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on December 27, 2015, 10:24:10 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Don't even go there Hugo ! We have had dogs now for more than 50 years of varying breeds and he has been the most difficult. He is now 5 and calmer, but we still daren't let him off the lead and he will tackle anything he doesn't like the look of.

Maybe he's got a streak of Little Gomez in him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoDTef6pDg4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoDTef6pDg4)

We've  only had three dogs in my lifetime and don't have one now.  Meg, a border collie we had during our time at Skerryvore could be quite headstrong.  Goes with the breed - I don't think I'd recommend them as family pets and despite her having a big playground with Skerryvore garden, Bodysgallen woods near by, etc. and I believe her having a good home, I sometimes felt she really belonged on the Welsh mountains as a working dog (she came from working stock in Llanbedyr Y Cenyn and I believe the farm gave her away as she turned out brown and white).
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on December 27, 2015, 11:12:32 PM
And to move to gardening... My mother was given 2 roses as a Christmas present today.  I can't remember what they are but one is a climber/rambler and the other a bush rose.

She once had perhaps 3 or 4 roses stolen from the garden in Skerryvore, Bryn Pydew. Quite weird.  The only thing  taken were these newish David Austin roses.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on December 28, 2015, 01:06:55 PM
Does anyone else use micro irrigation systems? As my mother who (except for some greenhouse salad stuff which I do) is the gardener here grew older, watering became more and more of a chore so we switched to this stuff. It's worked out pretty well.

The vegetable plot, small greenhouses, etc. round the back might be of interest. We collect rainwater from the roof of the house and from a shed in the field.  There are 12 x 200L butts in total. One group is about 30M from the other - they are connected by a run of 25mm plastic pipe.

I use a solar panel set up and a pump to water this area. I chose a marine fresh water pump (they are used to pump fresh water to taps, etc. on boats) to do the pumping. They had a reasonably low power consumption (unlike some of the "water butt" pumps I looked at) and have the big advantage that they work on demand - turn a tap on and the pump starts up. This enables easy usage of standard battery powered tap timers.

I use 4 station Sunmate timers.  These allow me to split some areas into smaller sections, helping to conserve water and keeping the demand on the pump and the battery lower. We don't use the automatic scheduling part of the timers but do make use of their ability to water a station(s) for a given length of time. It's sort of push a button to set the watering going. This rainwater system will usually carry us through dry spells and enable say a weekly dose of Phostrogen to the veg plot and/or the Vitalink stuff I use in the greenhouses.

We use one of those Dosatron injector things for the fertiliser - I have one on a trolley.  I did look at the cheaper bag things but they didn't really suit or requirements (I think you usually have to empty the bag in one watering for starters). With this one, I can change the container of fertiliser as require and change the dilution ratio. I have 5L containers of "concentrated fertaliser" (eg. say 1Kg of phostrogen in 5L of water) and worked out a table on a spreadsheet that gives what I need to set the Dosatron to to bring my concentrate down to the correct dilution.

It's a bit expensive.  In fact the whole project for our smallish areas has been expensive but when you consider, the whole thing was done over 10-15 years with bits added or modified as required and that the set up has contributed in some  way to extending my mothers gardening years in some areas, it's probably not that bad.

I think we are on a winding down period now though.  I've no interest in taking on the main gardening although, while I'm here I'll try to keep a supply of fresh salad stuff for as long as I can. My mother is slowly but surely replacing squares in the veg plot with fruit trees.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on January 04, 2016, 11:58:47 AM
The first snowdrops are coming up.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 04, 2016, 12:16:57 PM
Lovely photo Hollins and it looks like there are many more Snowdrops on their way up.       $good$
 
 Nature is fascinating in how it copes with all kinds of adverse weather.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on January 04, 2016, 12:46:18 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
The first snowdrops are coming up.

Always a welcome sight, I think and often a sign of the changing seasons to me.  I didn't spot any one a quick scan round the front of or garden in north Norfolk but I'm sure we will be seeing some soon. Later in they year, I think one of the local churches has a sort of "snowdrop day" - an area of their ground gets covered in them.

One of the things in flower here  is the common primrose - sorry but I don't seem able to capture the pale yellow this morning.  In the background, there is some sort of daffodil/narcissus coming up.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 26, 2016, 07:40:24 PM
Our first Daffodils survived the gales today but more gales are forecast so I'll have to keep my fingers crossed that they will survive the next lot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 09, 2016, 12:59:49 PM
Finally, a glimmer of sun came out so here are a few pics of the hellebores and snowdrops.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Meleri on February 09, 2016, 04:03:43 PM
Your dog appears to have shrunk, Hugo.  ;D

Hollins what beautiful Hellebores one of my all time favourites and such a lovely colour.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 03, 2016, 02:25:39 PM
I called at Talgoed Nursery at Glan Conwy earlier and John has a nice selection of Polyanthus there.     A tray of 15 Polyanthus costs £10.00 and well worth it but if you buy two trays then you get the two for £15.00
I've now got 30 lovely plants and will have to find space for them in my garden somewhere, as all my pots have now got Daffodil bulbs in them
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 07, 2016, 08:19:55 AM
Summer seems so far away at present but this little clip of an English Country garden makes it seem nearer.   I  remember the song the first time around too but that was ages ago!

https://www.youtube.com/embed/y7OqzUQRxq4?rel=0 (https://www.youtube.com/embed/y7OqzUQRxq4?rel=0)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on March 07, 2016, 09:19:03 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Summer seems so far away at present but this little clip of an English Country garden makes it seem nearer.   I  remember the song the first time around too but that was ages ago!

I've just been trying to find out how old the song really is.  The tune is a old dance tune which was popularised by a Percy Grainger piano arrangement but I found nothing definite about the words, except the list of birds in the lyrics I've found fit a North American garden rather than an English one:

Quote
Bobolink, cuckoo and quail
Tanager and cardinal
Bluebird, lark, thrush and nightingale

I guess for this time of year, we could (if it wasn't so cold and wet here)  go Welsh here with Moliannwn

Quote
Now lads, we give praise
The spring has arrived
The winter and coldness has passed
The trees will be wearing their leaves
And the fair warmth of the sun
And the lambs to frolic in the meadows.
...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9xUOTe_dqI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9xUOTe_dqI)

Back to our garden. I want to get the sweet peppers and aubergines started in the propagator this week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 07, 2016, 04:49:44 PM
Some of the Polyanthus plants that I got from Talgoed Nursery in Glan Conwy.       3O plants for £15.00 and they add a bit of colour to the garden at this time of the year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bellringer on March 07, 2016, 04:53:04 PM
We did the same on Friday last, good plants and as you say Hugo, they add colour.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on March 07, 2016, 05:27:55 PM
I only really do the greenhouses and some other salad things but will be growing some plants from seed for my mother:

Marigolds.  I've done them for the past few years and look well with/ are supposed to be good companions for the things in the veg area round the back.

Sweet William to go in the mostly perennial border in the front to fill some gaps and add some colour.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 13, 2016, 09:37:22 AM
Yesterday Tellytubby and I visited Talgoed Nursery in Glan Conwy and the Polyanthus were now £10.00 for 2 trays.   After a nice hot chocolate there Tellytubby came away with two trays, thats 30 good plants for £10.00.    $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 14, 2016, 04:15:10 PM
Some signs of spring on this lovely day.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on March 19, 2016, 05:11:24 PM
I've assembled a small 2 shelf staging stand for my mother this afternoon. It took me the best part of 2 hrs!  Some of the reason for it taking so long was I'd missed something in the not so clear instructions and near the end of assembly, I found a part was upside down – I had to undo a fair bit to correct this.  Still, I think its green coated aluminium looks good and (unlike the wooden one replaced – they never seem to last that long) should last and mother is happy.

I only got round to getting the heated propogator out yesterday.  I'm letting the compost warm up first but I'll (at last…) get the peppers (Topepo Rosso – a sweet pimento type – I do better with these than bell peppers) and aubergines (Hansel – on of the types you can pick small and is well suited to our small greenhouses) in tomorrow.

We bought a printer to print laminated labels mostly (I've a few other things I want to use it for) with gardening in mind.  We also got some plastic sticks to go in plant pots, to suit the 12mm tape. I've only just worked out the cost. 7p per stick and if I'm to guess the average length of tape used per label is 40mm, around 7p worth of tape. So 14p per labelled stick.  Some of the sticks will be reused though and we'll switch to “compatible” tape (Amazon has some in packs of 5 at £3 per cartridge compared to the £13 we paid for one genuine Brother cartridge) in future.

It won' be that long now before my windowsill and the porch are full of plants waiting to go out to the greenhouses – I aim for 1st May for that.  We only buy small packs (say avg 10-20 seeds) of seeds and I usually plant the whole packets where (eg. with the Ailsa Craig and Roma tomatoes for the greenhouse) I may only want 4-6 plants. There always seems to be people who will eg. be happy to take a couple of spare tomato plants.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 20, 2016, 10:41:39 AM
Mr H has been busy germinating seeds for us too.
I can't wait for sweet pea time to come around again.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squiggle on March 20, 2016, 12:02:10 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Mr H has been busy germinating seeds for us too.
I can't wait for sweet pea time to come around again.

My mother buys the sweet peas (and most other flowers) as plants.  I'm pretty sure that a Thomson and Morgan box of sweet pea plug plants arrived on Saturday.

She is fond of them too and tells me (I've a poor sense of smell...) they have a lovely scent which with some varieties can be quite strong.   Again, there will be vases of the cut flowers in the house later in the year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Blongb on March 21, 2016, 03:27:36 PM
Lots of Sweet Pea plants out the back of M & B plus lots of the other spring varities as well at very reasonable prices *tumble*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 27, 2016, 01:11:56 PM
No need to water the garden today is the best thing that I can say about the Easter Sunday weather!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 07, 2016, 02:38:45 PM
Back home to spring.
These are in memory of the lady that planted this garden who passed away recently.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 07, 2016, 03:30:12 PM
Her memory lasts on in more ways than one so that's really nice.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 07, 2016, 03:42:03 PM
I am the third owner of the house that I live in and years ago  kept in touch with the original owner of the property.   I remember telling him that I had dug up the old woody roses that were in my garden window box and chucked them in the bin.
I then wished that I hadn't said anything as he said that they were the only Roses in North Wales that came from Charles Dickens' garden and he would have liked them for himself.      :-[
They weren't very nice looking though and when I pricked my finger on one of the thorns then they just had to go!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 07, 2016, 03:44:28 PM
Some photos from the garden today
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on April 07, 2016, 06:19:36 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I am the third owner of the house that I live in and years ago  kept in touch with the original owner of the property.   I remember telling him that I had dug up the old woody roses that were in my garden window box and chucked them in the bin.
I then wished that I hadn't said anything as he said that they were the only Roses in North Wales that came from Charles Dickens' garden and he would have liked them for himself.      :-[
They weren't very nice looking though and when I pricked my finger on one of the thorns then they just had to go!

We are only the 5th owners of our property, which seems amazing as it was built in the late 1840s. All the previous owners have now passed away, but have had some interesting conversations with their families. Apparently some of the past owners grew enough veg. in the back to feed the whole house, before the construction of the garage and car park.!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 20, 2016, 10:54:44 PM
The warmth of the last few days has brought the buds on this bush into flower, but our large Rhodendrons show no sign of coming into flower just yet.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 22, 2016, 04:20:10 PM
Looks lovely Hugo. Our first rhododendron is on its way out and we also have this large magnolia tree in flower at the moment.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 05, 2016, 04:42:23 PM
After the snow, sleet, hail and rain we had on Saturday, yesterday was the first day that I could mow the lawn.    After a few hours and four bags of grass cuttings later the lawns looked good.
Today they still looked good in the sunny weather, but there were dozens of Dandelion flowers all over the place.   They  seem to have popped up overnight, just wish our flowers would do the same.         :rage:
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 05, 2016, 05:05:13 PM
Not noticed much in the dandelion department here but some lovely blue things appearing. Can't wait for the next month or so when the garden really gets going.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 09, 2016, 09:39:17 PM
Spent this morning in my new "job" as a "Laburnum Archer" in Bodnant!  Extra volunteers were required to deal with the expected high number of visitors and, as I have a long link to Bodnant, I decided to become one of them.  Surprisingly busy this morning in the sunshine!

The first three laburnum flowers are now out, only a few thousand more to go!  Plenty of colour with rhododendrons, azaleas, tulips, magnolias and other plants.  The next few weeks will be the best, so hopefully some good weather to match!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 09, 2016, 10:43:16 PM
Well done you. Good luck!
 We arrived there at 4.50pm the other day and were disappointed to find that it closed at 5. I thought it might be open later at this time of year when it is in its full glory.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 10, 2016, 09:23:33 AM
Sorry you couldn't get in - but next week and week after will be the arch in full glory.  Bodnant Gardens will be open until 8pm on Wednesdays, dogs are also permitted between 5pm and 8pm (not loose, short leads please!).  Other days it will be 9am to 5pm.

Check out their website for full info www.bodnant-garden.co.uk (http://www.bodnant-garden.co.uk) !!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 10, 2016, 10:22:27 AM
Thanks and good luck with the job!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 18, 2016, 02:34:16 PM
The recent spell of good weather has now brought out our Rhododendrons into flower
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 18, 2016, 02:54:26 PM
So lovely Hugo. Must go to Bodnant and check on how DVT is getting along!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 18, 2016, 03:05:14 PM
Thanks Hollins,   Mrs Hugo was there last week and said that it was well worth the visit.      Garthewin in Llanfair TH is open on Sunday according to the NWWN


https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjj9sm65OPMAhWGVRoKHegTCCUQFggiMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ngs.org.uk%2Fgardens%2Ffind-a-garden%2Fgarden.aspx%3Fid%3D19072&usg=AFQjCNEgwnvCDGNK6Vx6U76ZzBajbvqssw (https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjj9sm65OPMAhWGVRoKHegTCCUQFggiMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ngs.org.uk%2Fgardens%2Ffind-a-garden%2Fgarden.aspx%3Fid%3D19072&usg=AFQjCNEgwnvCDGNK6Vx6U76ZzBajbvqssw)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 18, 2016, 04:46:02 PM
I bet that is lovely too. Have you been there before Hugo?
This is what is out in our garden today.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 18, 2016, 05:18:08 PM
I haven't been to Garthewin before but the photos of the garden look really good.    With all the lovely photos of the plants in your garden and the animals that visit it too, I had you down for living on an estate something like Bodnant or Garthewin.    ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 30, 2016, 06:37:35 PM
This last week has brought the Clematis on and there's a shed underneath all that lot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 30, 2016, 10:13:59 PM
Seems Hugo has a mini Bodnant of his own!

The Laburnum Arch is almost complete - give it a couple more days!!!  Over 3000 visitors yesterday (Sunday 29th) and today (Monday 30th) was up to 1500 when I finished my stint of duty at 1pm.  Plenty of colour throughout and the visitors have really been overwhelmed by the colours throughout the garden.

Gardeners World were in filming last Thursday - 12 hours on site for 5 minutes on the programme this Friday (3rd) - BBC2 at 8.30pm - you may catch me in the background but I suspect will be edited out!!!

On duty tomorrow (Tuesday 31st) to assist with the kids pond-dipping but then not in until next Monday due to prior commitments with the Three Castles Classic Rally.  Wonderful gardens and classic cars - this isn't work, it's sheer enjoyment!!!

Hope you all visit, well worth it!  I have met one forum member (big bad henry)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 31, 2016, 11:12:38 AM
You're so lucky to be working in such a beautiful environment DVT,  not many people have an office like that.

That Laburnum arch is always spectacular to see and I read in the NWWN that some of your team went to the Happy Valley in Llandudno to work on the Laburnum arch there.  It has been a few years since I saw the Laburnum arch in Happy Valley but it looked good at the time.

I don't know what conditions make the Laburnum so special when in flower, but last year we had hardly any flowers on the tree and in fact we thought it was dying.  This year though, the flowers have been particularly good so perhaps the weather is a factor in how it flowers.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on June 02, 2016, 07:20:18 PM
I'm not at Bodnant for a few days due to commitments with the Three Castles Classic Rally, but will be back on Sunday afternoon ... the arch is expected to be at its very best this weekend and everyone expects it to be hectic as Bodnant is being featured on Gardeners World tomorrow (3rd) BBC2 at 2030 hours.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 02, 2016, 07:31:07 PM
Fabulous DVT, thanks. Good luck with your rally job also. Hope the weather stays like this for everyone.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on June 02, 2016, 08:35:32 PM
A bit more info about the random pics I posted!

Top left - the Chilean Fire-Tree - I know of three, one a very large bushy one which is a blaze of red.
Top centre - the male of a pair of tame pheasants
Top right - Wisteria on the terrace steps

Centre left - Himalayan Blue Poppy - there are not many truly blue plants but this is splendid.
Centre centre - don't know what this is - must find out - there is also a blue version.
Centre right - view from Furnace Woods towards the house - the woods are opening to the public in 2017 - see the deature in today's Daily Post about the "penjellick walk"

Bottom left - the conifer closest was planted by HM The Queen in 1977, and the next one was planted by Prince Philip - suspect they're grown a bit since then!
Bottom centre - the Chinese handkerchief tree that is often asked about - this is the smaller one of two in the glades - some say it's their best year yet.
Bottom right - giant sequoia in the glades - a tree-creeper is nesting in a crack in the bark!

Laburnum arch - that picture doesn't do it justice - taken on my phone camera early before it got crowded!  The light continually changes throughout the day and when in full sunlight it glows all the way!

If you do visit, and it's well worth it, say hello if I'm on duty - I go under the name of Dave T and am one of the yellow "archers"!!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on June 03, 2016, 12:19:38 AM
saw the laburnum arch on the news at six tonight, mine as started to lose its petals already, what a mess to pick up but lovely to see all the same
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on June 03, 2016, 11:20:46 AM
Great photos Dave T , I saw the "penjellick walk" article in the Pioneer,I thought you must be doing such a great job that they are giving you another 100mtrs  ;)   

http://www.northwalespioneer.co.uk/news/162794/gallery-new-plans-unveiled-for-bodnant-garden-expansion.aspx (http://www.northwalespioneer.co.uk/news/162794/gallery-new-plans-unveiled-for-bodnant-garden-expansion.aspx)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 03, 2016, 12:15:53 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
saw the laburnum arch on the news at six tonight, mine as started to lose its petals already, what a mess to pick up but lovely to see all the same

You are right Snowcap, I only have the one Laburnum tree and it's a mess afterwards.   I mow all the petals up but I still manage to fill two or three green bags with the flowers.      The flowers and the scent from them make it really worthwhile   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on June 03, 2016, 09:42:59 PM
Imagine clearing up the laburnum arch after flowering - 64 trees and 10000 flowers!

I did make it onto Gardeners World - they got my best side ...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on June 06, 2016, 10:25:05 PM
The laburnum arch today (June 6) now in its full glory.  Hopefully the sunshine and showers will keep it well groomed for the next two or three weeks.

2700 visitors today (Monday), about 4000 yesterday (Sunday) - this pic was taken late afternoon!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 06, 2016, 10:29:29 PM
Incredible!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on June 08, 2016, 12:59:23 PM
Visit Bodnant's pop up garden at Llandudno promenade this weekend
 
THIS weekend, Bodnant Garden will be hosting a mini-garden by the sea on Llandudno promenade, complete with deck chairs, lemonade and cake.

The team will showcase the wide variety of plants from across the world that are grown and looked after at Bodnant Garden- including American redwoods and Asian rhododendrons.

Visit the promenade from 10am and the team will provide the opportunity for passers-by to know more about the worldly plants they look after at the garden, that you can visit this summer.

The pop-up comes as National Trust Wales launch their latest campaign to encourage the people of Wales to explore the four corners of the globe without leaving Wales – by visiting National Trust gardens across the country.

Bodnant Garden are also looking for volunteers, to help in a host of roles from guides to gardeners. Visit the pop-up garden to find out more information ref pioneer
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on June 10, 2016, 02:23:34 PM
More than 20,000 people visited Bodnant Garden in the first week in June making it the attraction’s busiest week in history.

Fine weather at the stunning garden saw visitors flock to the attraction National Trust garden near Conwy.
The week saw an average of 363 visitors walking through the gardens gates every hour, with that figure rising to more than 700 visitors per hour at peak times.

The garden also received more than 7,000 visitors over the weekend – another record – and enjoyed its best-ever late night opening, with more than 500 evening visitors – many of those bringing their dogs for Wag Wednesday walkies.
Bodnant Garden general manager William Greenwood said: “Crowds have flocked to see the famous Laburnum Arch in spectacular June sunshine.
Mr Greenwood continued: “This year we’ve pulled out all the stops to make the June experience a memorable one for everyone, opening the garden gates early, and late, and offering breakfasts in the tearoom for early birds.

“We’ve also recruited a team of special volunteers,     $good$    Laburnum Archers,   $good$   to help visitors coming here for the flowering spectacle, which normally attracts around 50,000 people over three weeks in June but the way things are going we could well break that record by the end of the month too.”
MORE  http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/conwys-bodnant-garden-best-ever-11454331 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/conwys-bodnant-garden-best-ever-11454331)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 10, 2016, 03:35:58 PM
Bodnant Gardens is a credit to everyone involved and we are so lucky to this beautiful place so near to us.     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 12, 2016, 01:56:56 PM
The first photo is a bit of a sad one as we have lost a clematis again. Top half was last year and bottom half this year.
We seem to lose at least one each year and no idea why because they have died after cold winters and mild ones. Does anyone have any ideas?
I think the one that died was Clematis Montana and fortunately we still have another one on a different wall which you can see in the middle of the second photo. This pic shows the ones that are out in flower this week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 12, 2016, 02:13:52 PM
That's a shame Hollins because all your other Clematis all look very good and healthy.   The one you lost is the Montana variety, the same as the one we have on our shed.
I don't know much about Clematis but I bet DVT  will have an answer for you.    There is a thing called Clematis wilt which occurs sometimes without any warning but it normally goes for the larger flowering types and the smaller ones like the Montana ones are more resilient to the disease.
I believe that Clematis don't like dry conditions or having the bottom of the stem exposed to the Sun but there may be a number of reasons that may affect them.
I hope that you get the answer you are looking for because your garden always looks so nice and it's rather sad when you lose such a nice plant like that
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on June 19, 2016, 01:38:04 PM
World’s top 10 most exotic plants and where you can find them in Wales.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/local-news/worlds-top-10-most-exotic-11490419 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/local-news/worlds-top-10-most-exotic-11490419)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 19, 2016, 04:10:20 PM
It's delphinium city here this week!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on June 19, 2016, 04:40:18 PM
Hello to Hollins ... just saw the post by Hugo a few days ago so have tried to find the answer for you - I am certainly not a gardening expert, just someone who appreciates all the work that goes into them, although have learnt a lot during my six weeks at Bodnant!

Anyway, I got hold of the expert at Bodnant and described what you had said - seems the Bodnant clematis plants sometimes do the same thing - just die off without warning.  Clematis wilt was mentioned, as well as exposure to the sun.  Another possibility is that the bark low down has been damaged in some way - could be slugs/snails or a break due to wind - as the outer bark contains the "feeding tubes" of the plant and by damaging them there is no way that the food can get to the rest of the plant (this also applies to many other trees and shrubs).

Sorry cannot be any more helpful than that.  Hope you can find the cause from the above comments, and sort out a replacement if necessary.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 19, 2016, 04:47:53 PM
Many thanks to DVT and Hugo. Excellent replies and most appreciated. We will investigate!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 19, 2016, 10:52:11 PM
I put a large broken terracotta pot over the bottom part of my Montana so the Sun couldn't get at the roots or base of the plant and it is doing very well.
Having said that my large flowering Clematis which is exposed to the Sun for a lot of the day has no cover whatsoever and is also doing ok so I don't know the answer.
I've also read that you prune one type of Clematis ( can't remember whether it's the large or small flowered variety)  but I don't bother pruning any of them.   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 23, 2016, 08:17:36 PM
Visited Bodnant today and sorry we didn't see you DVT.
The laburnum arch had died back but still looked impressive. The highlights were the blue mecanopsis, the water lilies and the roses. We were impressed with what they have done at the "Far End" where the lake and the boat house is.
I really liked the way they had planted the water lilies at the pin mill pond at either end in cream and bright pink. It looked very pretty and I managed to get the bright blue flies in the photo. There were loads of them there. What are they?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 23, 2016, 10:31:40 PM
Superb photos Hollins.   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on June 23, 2016, 11:25:29 PM
 Common Blue Damselflies
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on June 24, 2016, 02:24:36 PM
Sorry Hollins, wasn't on duty yesterday (Thursday) and did my last laburnum archer stint this morning, but I am planning to return next week as an "ordinary" volunteer!!!

The laburnum has almost gone over although digital photos are still bringing out the yellow in it.  There was a bed of dark blue mecanopsis near the pin mill, but gone over.

Roses and water lilies now at their best, I spent Wednesday afternoon listing all the varieties in the rose beds!

The damsel-flies are plentiful, there are a few yellow ones as well.  When we had the pond dipping for the kids a couple of weeks ago plenty of their larvae were pulled out of the pond (and put back).  Down in the dell you could have seen the electric blue demoiselle caddis flies, very stunning, and if very lucky the emperor dragon-flies.

First thing this morning I took a walk to the far end, saw the female shelduck with five ducklings, Canada geese with their one remaining offspring (it is suspected that mink has taken the other two) and a rare sight, a family of goldcrests.  Didn't see the kingfisher which I did catch a quick sighting of last week!

I was thinking to myself as I was there that I'd like to go back 50 years and start my working life again, but this time I'd try and get to work in the gardens (but not as a gardener!) - can but dream!!!  My father and great-grandfather worked for Bodnant Estate, grandfather worked on the estate and surrounding area as a postman!  Hopefully get close to that dream as a guide in the coming weeks.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 24, 2016, 04:11:50 PM
Thanks snowcap and DVT.

It was a pity we didn't meet you DVT because you are obviously very knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the place.
Like Hugo said we are so lucky to have this attraction so near to us.
I wish you all the best with your next phase of volunteering and look forward to your updates.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 24, 2016, 07:17:54 PM
Good luck with your dream DVT  that's certainly a nice office to work in and keeping the family tradition going.      $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 28, 2016, 03:07:45 PM
Some years ago I planted a Hosta in a very large pot, it's in the wrong spot but seems to be doing ok and at least the slugs and snails haven't bothered it.   Apart from that it's far too heavy to move so it's going to have to stay where it is.
One shrub I like is the Kalmia Latifolia  aka   Calico Bush, it's now in flower but these will finish soon.    I have no idea how you should prune these bushes but I just use my hedge cutters and hope for the best and it seems to respond to this hard pruning.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 29, 2016, 08:43:42 PM
I wonder if anyone else has had a similar problem with Camellias this year.    I have about five Camillia bushes in the garden and not one has flowered this year, in fact there isn't a single bud on any of the bushes which normally all flower every year.
If they still haven't flowered by the time I get the hedge cutter out in July they are going to get severely pruned.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 20, 2016, 03:38:46 PM
Just picked these from the garden.
Happy Days!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2016, 01:06:16 PM
The Yucca tree is in flower now, the most flowers I've ever had on it is 13 but then it became so heavy I had to chop half of them off
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 21, 2016, 02:18:02 PM
Amazing! Could be the Riviera especially with that view.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: spotty dog on July 21, 2016, 05:03:44 PM
That looks like the Yucca tree in the front garden of Edited by mods my in laws old house ?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: rhuddlan on July 21, 2016, 07:47:07 PM
That's a lovely shot of your yucca Hugo!
If you ever decide to sell up that pic would attract loads of enquiries!
Rhuddlan
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2016, 08:27:30 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
That looks like the Yucca tree in the front garden


Well spotted Spotty Dog,  the name was (Edited by Mod) named after the first owners, we are the third owners of the property and changed the name when we moved in

We've had to remove the address after a member asked
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2016, 08:29:22 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
That's a lovely shot of your yucca Hugo!
If you ever decide to sell up that pic would attract loads of enquiries!
Rhuddlan

Thanks Rhuddlan,  see you on Saturday
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2016, 08:34:23 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Amazing! Could be the Riviera especially with that view.


Thanks Hollins,   more sunshine and much more cash and I'll imagine that I'm there now.          ZXZ
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 21, 2016, 09:42:21 PM
Probably classed by all you 'posh' gardeners as a weed, but here are my amazing evening primroses which self seed every year and give me a glowing display and great pleasure.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 29, 2016, 02:29:57 PM
I've got an Acanthus ( Bear's Breeches ) in my back garden and it's had a powdery mildew on the leaves every year so I've taken Nemesis' advise and chopped all the leaves off leaving just an attractive but spiky flower remaining.
This year and having been through one of the wettest June on record there has been no mildew on the plant which is quite surprising so I'll just have to see what happens to it for the rest of the season
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 29, 2016, 03:19:36 PM
No mildew here but no flowers either! Something likes eating the leaves too, oh dear!

 :'(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 29, 2016, 04:15:15 PM
Those leaves look healthy enough Hollins but has your plant ever flowered?     The flowers are tall and very attractive but the plant looks silly after I have cut all the mouldy leaves off it and I have to make sure that my dog doesn't walk on them as they are so spiky.
I don't know much about the plant apart from what Nemesis has said so I looked up on a Q & A  on the plants
Q    Why doesn't my Acanthus flower?
A     This is probably due to there being snails in the crown of the plant. The flowers spikes are lovely and soft and extremely attractive to molluscs. Snails are often seen “sliming” along the leaves after it has rained. Another reason can be that the plant has been caught by a very sharp frost and the flower buds have been spoilt. The last cause could be exacerbated by the soil being too rich or if the plant is fed with too much nitrogen. In this instance, the plant is too well fed to need to flower or set seed.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 29, 2016, 04:46:03 PM
I think it has flowered in past years but no sign this year.
Maybe it is the snails that are eating our leaves?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on July 29, 2016, 06:36:18 PM
I have one flower spike and some very 'holey' leaves........................and a lot of snails.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 08, 2016, 04:20:50 PM
Busy bee!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 01, 2016, 01:01:53 PM
The Geraniums are out at the moment and the hedge and Marco have been clipped so all that's left is to mow the lawn this afternoon.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 05, 2016, 09:20:27 AM
The giant Begonias have flowered quite well this year but in the last few weeks there has been a powdery mildew on the leaves, I'm not going to do anything about it now as they are at the end of the season and the flowers are dropping off now.
The strange thing is  that in the back garden there is no mildew on the Begonias there and the Bear's Breeches which are notorious for having its leaves infected with a powdery midew has had none this year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 05, 2016, 11:14:18 AM
Lovely Hugo. Mine were very slow to start with, but we haven't had any mildew as yet. But I have only had one flower between 2 Bear's Breeches plants. One had dreadful mildew and the other has been infested with snails.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 06, 2016, 06:40:03 PM
The recent heavy rain seems to have weighted down most of my Begonias, but here is just one of the survivors.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 07, 2016, 08:31:47 AM
It's a beautiful coloured flower Nemesis, is it one of the giant Picotee variety?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 07, 2016, 10:43:52 AM
Picotee  Sangria Hugo.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 07, 2016, 04:26:30 PM
Thanks Nemesis.     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 10, 2016, 09:45:13 AM
Last night's weather didn't do them much good !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 10, 2016, 04:44:44 PM
September garden. Damsons anyone?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 10, 2016, 04:59:20 PM
They look delicious Hollins, you'll  be able to make Damson jam with that lot and some left over for Damson wine too.     ZXZ
Those plants look interesting what are they all called?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 10, 2016, 05:12:39 PM
This is the first year we have had fruit on that tree and what a lot!

I'm not sure of the exact varieties of the plants but the general names are these.....
Top row, left to right.....David Austin rose, Hoya, Hydrangea.
Bottom row, left to right......Cyclamen, Rudbeckia, Scabious in bud, Dahlia.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 10, 2016, 05:14:38 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Last night's weather didn't do them much good !

It was a real howler up here too.  The trees were bending like mad but this morning it was so calm and unbelievable from the night before.
Some of my gardening tasks today were sorting out those Begonias,  at this time of the year if you  touch them the flowers  just seem to fall off, and as for Marco's tail then that can do a lot of damage to the plants.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 10, 2016, 05:16:40 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
This is the first year we have had fruit on that tree and what a lot!

I'm not sure of the exact varieties of the plants but the general names are these.....
Top row, left to right.....David Austin rose, Hoya, Hydrangea.
Bottom row, left to right......Cyclamen, Rudbeckia, Scabious in bud, Dahlia.

Thanks Hollins, your garden must look a treat now with all that colour.     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2016, 07:59:22 AM
Not much colour this morning Hugo, cobwebs and fog!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2016, 08:15:05 AM
Still very effective Hollins and those cobwebs look good in the hedge.    I think at this time of the year we also get the trailing variety of cobwebs that seem to wrap themselves around your face and body.    Ugh!
I like your panorama photos too and I'm going to have to learn how to do that as my camera does have that facility.    Rhuddlan is an expert on that so I'll have to ask him next time we go for a walk together.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on October 27, 2016, 12:05:32 PM
Some pics taken at Bodnant yesterday - mid-morning!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 27, 2016, 12:49:16 PM
Thanks for posting those photos DVT as I was wondering how things were looking now especially in the Acer garden.
We went there at the end of October last year and it was spectacular.     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on October 27, 2016, 02:34:33 PM
DVT,......Excelent photos,.....  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on October 27, 2016, 07:11:18 PM
Thanks for the comments - the acers have really shown well this week, so hopefully the good weather will continue for a while longer.  Plenty of colour elsewhere also, defies the calendar!  From Tuesday (1st) the entry fee is halved (good) and you can also bring your dog (arguably not so good!).

I'm there Monday 31st and Wednesday 2nd this next wee, then back to Wednesdays and Thursdays from thereon.  Say hello if you're there, I'm the one with Dave T on my badge!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 28, 2016, 02:34:50 PM
Lovely to see your photos of Bodnant DVT.
We are back from a holiday to find the acers looking great, but also, quite amazingly, the delphiniums!
We watched Monty Don on Gardeners World saying that if you cut them back after the first flowering you could get a second crop. I never would have believed this result though on 28th October.
We mustn't have had any frost yet.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 28, 2016, 09:53:24 PM
Autumn is such a lovely time with all the trees and bushes changing colour and those Acers are brilliant.  The Crafnant Valley was looking good when I saw it very briefly the other week and I bet the Lledr Valley is also looking good at this time of the year.


Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on December 29, 2016, 10:06:09 PM
It's still December and the daffodils are out in Bodnant!  It's a variety called "Cedric Morris" and they're in the Winter Garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on January 07, 2017, 10:05:52 AM
Brilliant photos and excellent article about the Bodnant Winter Garden in the February 2017 edition of a magazine named "The English Garden" ... yes, English - the editor needs geography lessons!!!

Strangely the cover photo is almost identical to one I took a couple of weeks ago ... no, it;s not my photo in the magazine.

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 05, 2017, 09:40:18 PM
Some gorgeous things out at Bodnant today despite it being early Feb.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on February 17, 2017, 04:57:47 PM
Signs of spring.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 06, 2017, 03:21:54 PM
A lovely spring day.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 03, 2017, 01:20:13 PM
It's a good sign of Spring when the Daffs and Magnolias are out but the Magnolia Stellata has already started to lose its petals in the winds we are having now.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 05, 2017, 09:44:02 AM
So pretty, those magnolias Hugo.

A different type of gardening here, not gardening as we know it!
Back to supervise action man in our garden tomorrow.   ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 12, 2017, 06:37:44 PM
There was a very nice clip of Bodnant Gardens on the ITV  Wales news at 6.00pm and the garden looked in fabulous condition.      Was it DVT that was getting interviewed?        $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 12, 2017, 08:35:25 PM
Yes it was me, guilty as charged!!!

Spent all day yesterday in Furnace Wood, then all day today - will be there again tomorrow signing autographs (!!!)  ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 12, 2017, 11:02:48 PM
Famous at last DVT     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 13, 2017, 09:11:29 PM
Sorry to miss your claim to fame DVT and the garden but well done.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 15, 2017, 12:20:13 PM
I was a bit late cutting the grass last year and noticed that there were dozens of small Cowslips in the lawn. Normally I would just mow over them but I picked out a few and placed them in a spot in the garden and they seem to be doing ok so this morning I've picked up a few more and will do the same again.
The Pieris has started to turn red and looks all right from one side but on the other side is a Calico Bush which was grown too close to it.    I could do with a few lessons on gardening  from DVT  but couldn't afford his commission now that he's reached celebrity status on TV     ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 15, 2017, 05:33:04 PM
Gardening is something I don't do but certainly learning a lot about the plants.  Gardeners at Bodnant are always very helpful with identification and advice!  I get to wander all day enjoying their work!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 15, 2017, 11:08:50 PM
You're a lucky guy DVT  to be working in such a nice office, good luck to you and I might see you there one day.     $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 16, 2017, 02:14:56 PM
Every year I put combings from my dog Marco into the garden in March and April for the Crows and Jackdaws and other birds to come and take away for their nest building.    This year was no exception and over the weeks I have put the combings in the garden until the supply ran out.
Recently I've noticed soil on the floor underneath some wall baskets I use for planting Geraniums but thought no more about it until I caught the culprits at it today.     A pair of Crows were tugging away at the lining of the wall brackets and have done a good job because the lining now has all but gone.
I won't get some new material until the nesting season has finished
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 23, 2017, 01:33:30 PM
Blossom weekend.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 23, 2017, 04:51:33 PM
Spring is such a nice season when everything is coming back to life, lovely photos Hollins.           $good$ 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 04, 2017, 08:19:29 PM
The warm sunny weather this week has started to make  the Rhododendrons come into flower
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 07, 2017, 11:05:59 AM
On Friday we visited the one time home of Clough Williams Ellis, Plas Brondanw.
Well worth a visit to see the gardens, house and grounds full of his favourite features!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 07, 2017, 11:12:29 AM
Plas Brondanw.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 07, 2017, 06:48:51 PM
Looks Lovely!   $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 18, 2017, 10:39:15 PM
It's officially been declared today that Bodnant's Laburnum Arch is now in full flower - probably be at it's full best early next week - earlier than last year so hopefully no-one gets caught out and misses it!  We are seeing record numbers of visitors lately so get there early to view.  Looks as though I may need to be there more than my current two days!

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/bodnant-garden (https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/bodnant-garden)

The film of Daphne du Maurier's classic "My Cousin Rachel" is due for release next month - the plot involves laburnum seeds - the seeds used in the scenes were supplied by Bodnant last year.  We expect the final credits to include "Starring Rachel Weiss ... poisoning by Bodnant" !!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 24, 2017, 06:57:15 PM
Iris week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 08, 2017, 09:21:17 AM
A few pics from Plas Cadnant Hidden Garden.
Well worth a visit.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 09, 2017, 04:06:43 PM
I had been doing a lot of garden clearance work in a neighbours garden recently so consequently I've neglected my own lawn and the grass had grown a bit.
When I got the lawn mower out and started mowing the lawn I noticed this Orchid popping up above the grass so it's had a temporary reprieve from the lawn mower!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on June 26, 2017, 11:37:58 AM
This week's star turn, cornus kousa, (dogwood).
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 12, 2017, 10:48:03 PM
The National Botanic Gardens of Wales are well worth a visit if you are down that way.
I hadn't realised that it was originally the site of a big house, Middleton House, now sadly gone.
the big dome is very impressive and there is also a huge walled garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 12, 2017, 10:54:59 PM
There is also a butterfly house, an old ice house and a bee garden amongst other things of interest.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 17, 2017, 12:13:28 PM
Late flowering rhododendron looking good this week.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 15, 2017, 05:23:23 PM
Sweet pea heaven!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on August 25, 2017, 05:46:31 PM
I've been away for a couple of days and came back to this lot.
Hope you all have a lovely weekend.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on September 05, 2017, 07:49:49 PM
These were from last year, we saved them, dusted them with sulphur powder and re-planted them.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 05, 2017, 11:04:08 PM
They look in very good condition Nemesis, I wish mine were like yours.     I save the Begonias from the previous yea and usually have a nice display of them but this year they have been very disappointing.  The leaves are covered in a powdery mildew and are brown and dying and the flowers are extremely poor.
It's nearly the end of the season anyway so I'm going to dig them up and throw them away and buy new ones next year.


By the way Bodnant Gardens has a free entry day this Saturday the 9th September 2017 but unfortunately the weather forecast for Saturday looks like rain for most of the day
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 02, 2017, 11:41:59 AM
I’ve taken on the grass cutting this year, including  trying to reclaim some “lost” bits and keeping a farm track (needed by us for access to a septic tank and or deliveries of wood) and we got some new tools:

Petrol mower. We don’t have a great deal of width of grass but now I’ve got the initial clearance done (and provided farm tractors don’t decide to start using the track again and churn things up and create ruts), I can now mow from our gate, a good 100yds along the track and have that bit done in no time.

Cordless mower. Mostly with a change of plan for the veg plot in mind. We had been keeping  most paths in this small area  clear using weed killed but we’d like to grass them all.  The petrol mower is too wide and heavy for that but  this light weight 33cm job which cuts neatly to the boards for the raised beds should make the task easy.

Strimmer #1.  There will always be bits that can’t be mowed and this lightweight 25cc one seems just the job. Its easily manoeuvrable and is good eg between trees.

Strimmer #2.  I think we might look to sell this some time next year.  It’s a 50cc one with the cow horn bars. Used to clear some really dense patches, mostly on the track but once everything is under control I doubt there will be a need for it.

Maybe it’s all been a bit OTT but the other side of the coin is that even in a couple of 30 minute stints  on a fine day (I’m not up to long spells…and it’s not that vast an area, just feels big to me)  is that we have made progress and mum is delighted with what has been achieved so far.

Of course there is another tool I’d like but I think it would mean hiring someone to use it for a day. A power scythe would probably rip through a mixture of mostly blackthorn and bramble but there is no rush and I think secateurs, etc. will eventually get there,
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 02, 2017, 02:45:42 PM
I've got an electric hedge cutter and an electric chain saw on a pole. mainly because the petrol ones are heavier and I've now got a trapped nerve in my back.
In August this year, I cut one of my three hedges and it's a conifer hedge about 8 foot high and over 100 foot long and I made the mistake of doing it all in one go.     Just before I finished the hedge the electric hedge cutter over heated and just blew up so I had to buy a new one.
I've now got to tackle the laurel hedge at the back which is over 11 foot high but only about 55 foot long.  I'll do that in two stages though in case the same thing happens again
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 02, 2017, 03:23:51 PM
On tool breakages etc.,  over the years, we had a couple of cheap strimmers break in the shaft and couldn't get the parts and there was one, a Mountfeild I think, I could barely use and mum struggled with that had a very sharp bend.  For the one that I think will stay in regular service, rather more then we need maybe but we went for the smallest of the Husqvarna pro range with straight shaft this time, hopeing it sees us out. It's really light (about 4.5kg) and low vibration. 

I got hit in the head (no real damage done) by a tool that can kick the same way a chainsaw does and won't use a chainsaw now.  I know there is safety equipment as well as protection devices on a modern saw but its a tool for a trained pro only as far as I'm concerned.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on October 02, 2017, 04:42:38 PM
All this talk is taking me back in time, when I lived up the valley, I have never been a "flower" gardener, but I liked a tidy garden, my wife will tell you the term "big boys toys" was invented just for me, I built a shed/barn to hold them all, .... quad bike truck, sit on lawnmower with pickup brush and collector, brush cutters, chain saws, as squigglev2 said extremely dangerous, but I had the good sense to attend the forestry commission courses and obtained my certificate plus all the safety gear, still a few scary moments though, we ran two wood burners that burned logs at a wicked rate, the shed also housed our wood pile, sorted by age and type, birch,oak,ash and pine, it is a work of art choosing the right combination, for heat and slow burning, anyway that was over 20 years ago, could'nt do it now, but I miss it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 02, 2017, 05:16:01 PM
I’ve often fancied a go on lawn tractor Steve.  And a on quad bike.  We are in the unusual position of renting a bit of otherwise working farm land (a service pipe to a septic tank prevents the farm ploughing or crossing a portion) for the back garden and out of our gate, I could have 90 acres to play on – but I don’t think they would approve…

Woodburners.  We had a scare once when in Pydew.  Dad had been burning a lot of wet pine, the sap built up and one day I think as mum opened the door it was “boom”.  I came home to a blazing (and at that time, unlined) chimney and although it had dampened by the time they got there, it was a fire brigade job – as they say if you are in doubt (and in this case, at one point, I had visions of the roof going up with this one), call them).  Still, I like them and we have one here. A bit more careful over what we burn  though.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on October 02, 2017, 05:58:58 PM
When your dad was a senior fire officer, you do not take chances, our house was built in 1850, so we had the chimney's Thermocreted , they pass an inflatable tube down, block the bottom, pump in the light weigh mix, and let it set, deflate the tube and remove, you are left with a reinforced chimney and a perfectly smooth vent.

Pine is the worst, it creates a lot of tar, as you found out, like I said it is a skill you acquire with experience, but definitely no green wood, the pine I got from the forestry commission had to be on the ground, which suited us, we were not allowed to cut standing trees. 

The sit on lawnmower is fun, no effort at all, and you can even drink and drive.  (small beer) for those of a nervous disposition.  8)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 02, 2017, 06:05:54 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
the chimney's Thermocreted , they pass an inflatable tube down, block the bottom, pump in the light weigh mix, and let it set, deflate the tube and remove, you are left with a reinforced chimney and a perfectly smooth vent.
Skerryvore (Pydew) was done that way after the incident.  I'm not sure that we were aware of lining chimneys before then.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 04, 2017, 09:07:27 AM
I am hoping these hydrangeas dry well that I picked yesterday.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: born2run on October 04, 2017, 10:14:29 AM
Can anyone recommend the best place locally to get some stuff to put in my garden. I'm no gardener by any means, so don't know any terminology! What I want is stuff similar to  what you see in parks, the brown stuff that is normally in play areas? Looks a bit tree like. This will go over what were flower beds. I'd need quite a lot of the stuff so looking for somewhere as cheap as possible. Otherwise looking for recommendations of what else I could use, thought about rocks and artificial turf but not sure how viable those options are.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on October 04, 2017, 10:31:18 AM
You’re thinking of shredded tree bark, I think? You can get it from B&Q or any garden centre in big bags. If you use it, I would also recommend laying a liner first, keeps it all tidy and helps to stop weed growth.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 04, 2017, 10:56:51 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Can anyone recommend the best place locally to get some stuff to put in my garden. I'm no gardener by any means, so don't know any terminology! What I want is stuff similar to  what you see in parks, the brown stuff that is normally in play areas? Looks a bit tree like. This will go over what were flower beds. I'd need quite a lot of the stuff so looking for somewhere as cheap as possible. Otherwise looking for recommendations of what else I could use, thought about rocks and artificial turf but not sure how viable those options are.

’m probably  as inexpert as you but think I’d be looking at something living rather than artificial turf. 

I guess you are looking to lower maintenance and that is a problem we are facing although I guess our problems and solutions will be different.  I don’t think I’d realised anywhere close to how much my mother was doing outside until arthritis and I guess general old age has really slowed her down over the past few years. I don’t have the same degree of dedication or even her stamina of old.

For us so far. We have planted fruit trees in a couple of the veg squares.  We still have some roses to remove but I have removed some small flower beds that had got over grown between a few trees.  I don’t suppose it will ever be as nice as when mum had things at their best but we should get to a point where I can simply mow/strim and keep things looking tidy. And in the veg area still have room for favourites such as a good sampling of new potatoes.

There is a back bed at the front of the house where mum seems to think hydrangeas are the answer. Apparently the need little other than an annual dead heading and should fill the area out while reducing the need for constant weeding.  We did get 2 new ones this year but I think a few more are needed.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: born2run on October 04, 2017, 12:05:50 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You’re thinking of shredded tree bark, I think? You can get it from B&Q or any garden centre in big bags. If you use it, I would also recommend laying a liner first, keeps it all tidy and helps to stop weed growth.

Thanks Dave I've got the liner down all ready just need to get the stuff to put on top of it  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: born2run on October 04, 2017, 12:08:54 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Can anyone recommend the best place locally to get some stuff to put in my garden. I'm no gardener by any means, so don't know any terminology! What I want is stuff similar to  what you see in parks, the brown stuff that is normally in play areas? Looks a bit tree like. This will go over what were flower beds. I'd need quite a lot of the stuff so looking for somewhere as cheap as possible. Otherwise looking for recommendations of what else I could use, thought about rocks and artificial turf but not sure how viable those options are.

’m probably  as inexpert as you but think I’d be looking at something living rather than artificial turf. 

I guess you are looking to lower maintenance and that is a problem we are facing although I guess our problems and solutions will be different.  I don’t think I’d realised anywhere close to how much my mother was doing outside until arthritis and I guess general old age has really slowed her down over the past few years. I don’t have the same degree of dedication or even her stamina of old.

For us so far. We have planted fruit trees in a couple of the veg squares.  We still have some roses to remove but I have removed some small flower beds that had got over grown between a few trees.  I don’t suppose it will ever be as nice as when mum had things at their best but we should get to a point where I can simply mow/strim and keep things looking tidy. And in the veg area still have room for favourites such as a good sampling of new potatoes.

There is a back bed at the front of the house where mum seems to think hydrangeas are the answer. Apparently the need little other than an annual dead heading and should fill the area out while reducing the need for constant weeding.  We did get 2 new ones this year but I think a few more are needed.

Thanks Squiggle I really have no time, knowledge or desire to do a lot of gardening. I just want it to look as little a mess with a little effort as possible! These flower beds are a nightmare for weeds they can grow a few meters high in just a couple of months! So I'm happy I've got the liner down to stop them and I just need something presentable for now. We do have a row at the top that has some small trees planted that look very nice and are easy to maintain.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 04, 2017, 01:19:28 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Thanks Squiggle I really have no time, knowledge or desire to do a lot of gardening. I just want it to look as little a mess with a little effort as possible! These flower beds are a nightmare for weeds they can grow a few meters high in just a couple of months! So I'm happy I've got the liner down to stop them and I just need something presentable for now. We do have a row at the top that has some small trees planted that look very nice and are easy to maintain.

Sure born2run, I know aims, time, desires and abilities vary. I'm also aware of weeds (and I fear there is the dreaded creeping thistle on the farm patch) that grow tall and thick - put the big strimmer through "walls" of weed recently but yes, even a freshly dug veg square can quickly turn to weed and it can need a daily routine...

I've always enjoyed eating fresh produce but never thought of myself as a gardener (outside bits of  grass cutting).  I think one of my first efforts here came when mum found watering harder.  For round the back, I set up a series of water butts, used a solar panel and marine fresh water pump and between that and the micro irrigation bits, we can do the veg plot and the small greenhouses by pressing buttons on tap timers.  I was happy as "garden tech".

Then I take on the salad bits and like growing the tomatoes etc.  I think this year, I became more aware of how we were loosing more ground which leads on to the new tools and me trying to be responsible for more and the looking at simplifying some bits. 

I guess some things sort of creep up on you, although I think I'll enjoy my increased role again.  I don't at this stage see myself as becoming a flower gardner or the person going round daily pulling up weeds.

It's not been the easiest of years this year with dad in hospital for a couple of months, and mum in for a week (which believe it or not started with a cut from a tomato tin and turned into a nasty infection) and things got more out of control than ever but I think we are heading in the right directions, as far as we can foresee anyway..
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 04, 2017, 02:10:43 PM
On another subject, not many to do this year but there will be a little bit of apple juicing to do soon. Our old method was to put them through an electric juicer. It was quite a factory, on a good year, maybe two wheelbarrow fulls to juice. Mum washing and cutting, me pushing them through, pouring the juice into demijohns from which I would later sypohon off the nice (in this case, pink) juice into bottles for the freezer. Other bits like the cleaning out of "sludge" were split tasks.

We later got one of these apple presses and a pulping thing.  I know things, including the yeild from the old apple tree we liked to juice have changed but it can seem to me that we got more juice per apple plus the juice looked nicer (pink vs brown) our old way.

I know the presses are an old established way and that when you look at the ads, these things just pour out juice and am aware I might be doing something wrong.  Anyone with any experience with them or opinions over both possible methods?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: born2run on October 04, 2017, 04:21:21 PM
I can see where you're coming from - I would love to be able to grow fruit or vegetables as I'd be getting something tangible out of it for my efforts! It just looks like a complex thing to get into and I really don't have time. Flowers do look nice but then I think the effort outweighs the result. We live in a pretty nice part of the world I can take a walk up Conwy mountain or to the beach at lunch times with no effort at all and see all the beauty I want to see. I'm just happy if my garden is not covered with 10 foot weeds that look like monstors out of a 50s sci fi!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 14, 2017, 04:06:38 PM
I've just come back home after taking my dog for a walk and went past a man on a main road using one of those noisy leaf blowing machines.

Nothing unusual about that I suppose,  except that the wind on this high ground must be around 40 mph at present , much stronger that the 18 mph that was forecast for the town.           &shake&

The only good thing was that the gardener was getting paid for his effort, no doubt his services will be required again after Monday.     ;D

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 30, 2017, 01:17:46 PM
In my garden this year I've noticed that the Autumn colours haven't been as good as they were last year, the Acers in particular were not so good.

Just past the Swallow Falls Hotel there is a car park with a Maple in it that I'd love to have in my garden but although it was a nice colour it wasn't as vibrant as I have seen it in the past.    Perhaps the cold weather that has been forecast may turn the leaves a brighter colour?

Has anyone noticed the Virginia Creepers on the  roof of the cafe Ty Hwnt i'r bont in Llanrwst?     It used to be an outstanding red colour at this time of the year but now looks as if it's dead
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 30, 2017, 03:02:55 PM
In my area, we saw what we think is an ornamental cherry that looked quite splendid in its autumn colours but I can't remember where. I can't think beyond that.

Drifting a little and moving to our garden round the back in the field. I think that for me, that our later in the season star has long gone for the year.  Not leaf colours but a self set rowan mum left to grow in one of the pigsty openings. It looks superb in berries. Overall star is probably a silver birch planted when she came here and is now very tall - it looks good fully leaved or "naked".  I think I have to wait till spring for the next real show of colour that side.  Lots of hawthorn and blackthorn around and some fruit trees blossom.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 30, 2017, 03:19:58 PM
I know what you mean about the acers Hugo but how about this for a new autumn colour?
Ceanothus in flower, photo taken yesterday!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on October 30, 2017, 04:19:04 PM
The weather has a major affect on the colours in autumn, the trees have been fooled by it, and the recent winds have not helped trees hang onto their leaves.  The acers are particularly colourful with a huge variety of colours, whilst there are many plants that are flowering at what seem to be the wrong times!  Still well worth a visit to the popular gardens in the area.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 30, 2017, 07:56:16 PM
That's nice to see those plants flowering so well at this time of the year.     I've been waiting for the Geraniums to stop flowering so that I can pull them out of their pots and plant some Daffodil bulbs instead but the Geraniums are still doing well.
I'm going to have to be a bit ruthless soon but I just don't like pulling the Geraniums up when they are providing a nice display
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on October 30, 2017, 08:22:54 PM
I have Primroses flowering !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 07:10:33 AM
We have just bought another house with a big garden, one tree that I do not recognise,  anyone know what it is?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 07:12:52 AM
Shame the image is sideways!  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on November 09, 2017, 08:48:21 AM
Hi ME ...

... I'm off to Bodnant in the next hour where there are experts who can help!!!  Any chance you can send a pic through to my phone 07788 995345 (What's App or as attachment to a text) so I can show them.

... also how tall is the tree, and are those pods about pea pod size and a bit squidgy - if yes to that then I know what it is!

Cheers

Dave
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 10:59:51 AM
Seems it is an Indian been tree. Thanks for your help Dave ! $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 09, 2017, 11:19:08 AM
The Indian Bean Tree looks very nice as do the flowers and it has a height of 12 metres with a spread of 8 metres so it's a good job that you have a big garden ME.      $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 12:30:02 PM
Hi Hugo, the tree is not very big at the moment, it's a big garden  an old Edwardian house in Rhos on Sea, we are not moving in yet until various jobs have been done inside. Pic shots part of the back garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on November 09, 2017, 01:32:53 PM
Very nice ME , room for the pigeons  ?    ££$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 02:58:34 PM
Oh yes, lots of room!  :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 09, 2017, 03:12:20 PM
Very impressive ME,   it looks like it could rival Bodnant Gardens with that nice collection of trees.      You could have a few Pigeon lofts there.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 09, 2017, 03:37:49 PM
Oh wow, Mr and Mrs ME!
That looks like a fantastic new project.
All the best for your move, looks wonderful.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on November 09, 2017, 04:10:04 PM
Thanks to one of the Bodnant experts it seems to be an Indian Bean Tree (Catalpa) ... which does not come from India!  I was told there was one right next to main entrance to the Hall front courtyard (not where public are allowed) - unfortunately all the leaves had dropped.  That tree is approx 70ft high.

There are lots of variations so hopefully ME can establish which one he has.

ME will have to go some to rival Bodnant but that looks like a really good start!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 04:38:46 PM
A few more pics of the back garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Quiggs on November 09, 2017, 05:01:29 PM
Now I know why you wanted my petrol mower.   :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 06:48:29 PM
Lol, I am looking for a small ride on mower, anyone got one for sale?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on November 09, 2017, 10:06:31 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Lol, I am looking for a small ride on mower, anyone got one for sale?

Have you actually moved now ME?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 09, 2017, 10:52:55 PM
Not yet, we got the keys on 27th October, going to get everything we need doing first before we move in.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fester on November 10, 2017, 12:07:14 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Not yet, we got the keys on 27th October, going to get everything we need doing first before we move in.

Very wise, hence the ride on mower.  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DaveR on November 10, 2017, 09:01:33 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Hi Hugo, the tree is not very big at the moment, it's a big garden  an old Edwardian house in Rhos on Sea, we are not moving in yet until various jobs have been done inside. Pic shots part of the back garden.
Congratulations on your new house, ME!  $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 10, 2017, 09:18:19 AM
Thanks Dave! It's a great house, great views from it too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on November 12, 2017, 01:08:09 PM
The acers are looking good now.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on November 17, 2017, 12:16:32 PM
They are all nicely coloured Hollins, we have only one left with any leaves on and the display this year wasn't as good as last year.
Because of work going on in my house I'm behind with planting Daffodils and when I went to Talgoed Nursery the other day all the bulbs had gone.       :(
They had nice displays of indoor Cyclamen so I came away with two of them
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on November 19, 2017, 11:09:37 AM
The world has gone mad. This was flowering this morning in a wild area in Llanrhos cemetery.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on November 19, 2017, 12:53:15 PM
There is a variety of daffodil that does flower before Christmas, I don't know if it's that one though!

Nature is certainly being fooled by the "new" seasons.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 28, 2018, 05:01:09 PM
For the last three January's we have had a walk along the River Dwyfor to see the Snowdrops but this year they seemed a bit later than usual but there are thousands of them along the banks of the river.
In about a week or two they should be at their best
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on February 18, 2018, 11:12:06 AM
The warm sunshine yesterday has helped to bring out the Crocus in the garden
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on February 28, 2018, 08:43:04 PM
Bodnant's laburnum arch was decidedly empty today !!!

... and the pond at the Far End frozen over (well, it was once known as the Skating Pond)




Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 01, 2018, 09:49:50 AM
Lovely photos DVT.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on March 01, 2018, 10:03:40 AM
Superb.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on March 01, 2018, 11:27:21 AM
I’ll probably start the peppers and aubergines off in the heated propagator in the porch next week.

Just done my outside good deed for the day. Thawed out the “fountain” part of a small pebble pond.  It’s quite a popular source of water with the small birds that visit the garden. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 02, 2018, 02:40:26 PM
Well done squigglev 2  it's bad enough for humans with this weather but those little creatures need all the help that they can get in these atrocious conditions.
My garden's well stocked with food and like you I make sure that they have the water too..

Just as a side issue I was due to see someone that you know in Pydew this week but I called it off as there is no safe way in or out of the village at present.  I'll arrange a meeting when the weather improves and post something on the forum so you'll be able to swap tales with him about the Swan and the village life.  It'll be something to look forward to.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: spotty dog on March 02, 2018, 03:02:48 PM
 Send my regards to the Mayor of Pydew when you visit Hugo
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on March 03, 2018, 09:20:11 AM
I will do spotty dog         $good$
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on March 03, 2018, 01:47:32 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Well done squigglev 2  it's bad enough for humans with this weather but those little creatures need all the help that they can get in these atrocious conditions.
My garden's well stocked with food and like you I make sure that they have the water too..

Hopefully I’ve got a treat for them today, Hugo.  While tidying a cupboard, I found a stray (we are well stocked with our favourite basmati and arborio and I can’t work out where this came from) packet of rice. By coincidence, while looking something else up, I found the RSPB site say.
Quote
"Cooked rice, brown or white (without salt added) is beneficial and readily accepted by all species during severe winter weather. Uncooked rice may be eaten by birds such as pigeons, doves and pheasants but is less likely to attract other species."

So I’ve cooked some of the pack today and if they like it, they can have the rest over the next couple of days.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on March 04, 2018, 07:58:31 AM
Just noting that no birds ate the cooked rice. I guess some might have taken it if nothing else had been available but it does not seem to be a food of choice for any of our visitor to the garden.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on March 04, 2018, 11:58:32 AM
I used to bake any spuds that were going soft in the microwave and put them out where we lived before. The starlings used to go mad for them. Never see a starling here !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on March 04, 2018, 05:24:54 PM
I thought of the starling as a common bird when I lived in Pydew but it’s not a bird I see here either.

Anyway. Back to the garden- ish.  There are a few piles of snow but in general, the thaw has been very quick around the garden here.  It’s a bit chaotic out there at the moment but this is a scene from round the back.

The first  is about as snowy as it got here. The snow actually cleared quite quickly from the farmed/ploughed part of the land because of strong winds (and at times, it looked like smoke blowing across the field ) but there was little change with the rest until today.  The second picture is around lunchtime today.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on March 10, 2018, 08:10:38 PM
All trimmed and tied up ready for the fabulous display in a couple of months time ... gardeners Laura and Dave spent four weeks pruning and tying the branches to the structure - over 20,000 pieces of string and all the knots face the same direction - such dedication.  Looks quite spectacular even without the leaves and the flowers ... all ready for the 4,000 visitors each day during it's flowering period (mid-May to mid-June, keep an eye on the Bodnant Garden NT website).
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on March 11, 2018, 08:01:31 AM
Thanks DVT. Really interesting to have insider info!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 08, 2018, 05:14:37 PM
Top pic 8 April 2018, bottom pic 8 April 2017!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 09, 2018, 09:29:36 AM
The seasons are changing with some odd results.  This year's frosty days are much later than last year so accounts for the situation that Hollins' rhodies are in.

I am in Bodnant every Wednesday and Thursday and it is amazing just how much change can happen in a week.  I am in the fortunate position of being able to walk around the whole place during the day - I reckon I have the best job there - no gardening involved!  Last week the camelias on the bank behind the Pin Mill were looking good, yet they weren't noticeable the week before.  Daffodils on the park are at their best.  Rhodedendrons and azaleas (which are now labeled rhodedendron!) coming out as well.

I expect this week that more tulips will be out on the range border as soon as you enter the garden, later than they were last year - and the winter garden is still looking good despite what the calendar says!

Plenty more changes will happen over the next few weeks - spring just happens to be late this year!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 19, 2018, 04:39:42 PM
The last  few days have been quite warm and brought the Magnolia Stellata into flower in our garden
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 19, 2018, 08:21:40 PM
Magnolias at their best in Bodnant now ... and there are some very small flower buds on the laburnum ... difficult to predict when it will be in it's full glory as nature is being fooled by the ever-changing weather.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 20, 2018, 12:03:58 PM
Thanks for the info DVT.     
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 25, 2018, 12:30:08 PM
We have several of these plants growing in the garden, they look like some exotic lilly, anyone know what they are?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 25, 2018, 12:47:54 PM
Erindoors found it on a book, Arum maculatum.  :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on April 25, 2018, 03:48:51 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Erindoors found it on a book, Arum maculatum.  :)

Not a particularly friendly plant.     
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 25, 2018, 10:15:46 PM
Common woodland and hedgerow plant which must hold the record for greatest number of different common names - "cuckoo pint" and "lords and ladies" being the most common names.  Poisonous so dig it up (wear gloves) if you have kids who could be attracted to the red berries later.  More info here ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arum_maculatum
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 25, 2018, 10:23:23 PM
Thanks for posting that DVT,  I've got a plant that resembles the one with red berries in the garden so I'll have a closer look at it tomorrow
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 28, 2018, 04:44:48 PM
Mr H has gone a bit mad with his tulip choices this year!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 28, 2018, 06:18:25 PM
There are some truly spectacular shapes and colours in the tulip species - the display in Bodnant really gives the wow! factor when you first go in.  However, watch out ... there is something called tulip fire to spoil things.  It has been found on some of the plants in Bodnant and the tulips are checked daily with some being removed promptly.  Unfortunately, because of this, the tulip display will not happen again for at least three years to ensure the virus has been killed off.

Hollins ... I sincerely hope that your tulips are not affected, but good advice in the link below.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=252 (https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=252)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on April 28, 2018, 06:19:02 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Common woodland and hedgerow plant which must hold the record for greatest number of different common names - "cuckoo pint" and "lords and ladies" being the most common names.  Poisonous so dig it up (wear gloves) if you have kids who could be attracted to the red berries later.  More info here ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arum_maculatum

I have a large patch of the one with variegated leaves. Just waiting for the spaithes to show.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2018, 06:44:28 PM
Those Tulips look really special Hollins,  mine are just the ordinary ones but I'll have to buy some more for next year as they look best in groups.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 29, 2018, 07:15:11 PM
Yes, Hugo, they do seem quite different. I asked Mr H where he got them from and he couldn't remember.
DVT, thanks so much for the advice. It is very useful for us to have a Bodnant expert on hand. We are okay so far, touch wood!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 02, 2018, 07:16:49 PM
Bodnant's laburnum arch is coming along nicely - gone green since last week and the flower heads have doubled in size to look like catkins!  These pics were taken this afternoon (May 2nd) ... give it a month and it will be full of visitors!!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bri Roberts on May 02, 2018, 07:30:41 PM
DVT, whilst away last month there was an advert for Roberto Coin played regularly on the television.

https://youtu.be/N2-l35169tc

By any chance, was it filmed in Bodnant Garden?

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 02, 2018, 09:14:08 PM
No, it's not Bodnant - have tried googling but cannot find where it is!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 02, 2018, 10:21:39 PM
The video says that it was located on the Appian Way which is the Roman Road in Italy.    I've put Roberto Coin Appian Way in Google and there are some lovely photos but I can't pinpoint the location.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 03, 2018, 09:36:40 AM
Rowen open day is on the 13th May 2018 and is for one day only.    Let's hope that the weather is good for the day so that everyone can enjoy the gardens and the walk around the pretty village
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2018, 03:07:24 PM
Just a reminder about the Open Garden Day at Rowen this Sunday the 13th May 2018


http://rowenconwy.org.uk/gardens/rowen-village-gardens-open-day/ (http://rowenconwy.org.uk/gardens/rowen-village-gardens-open-day/)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 09, 2018, 06:44:47 PM
Recently visited Picton Castle gardens near Haverforwest in Pembrokeshire.
Well worth a visit at this time of year. I was fascinated by the display of unfurling ferns.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 09, 2018, 06:48:32 PM
National Botanic Garden of Wales.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 12, 2018, 07:39:47 PM
Some pics of the back garden at our new home, interesting to see what appears, just weeding and trimming really for the first year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 12, 2018, 07:41:19 PM
No idea why 2 pics are sideways, they are the right way up on my phone! ::)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 12, 2018, 08:54:36 PM
Lovely to see those whether they are the right way up or not! Looks a super garden.
Especially good though to see Mrs ME looking such a happy girl!
Regards to you both.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Ian on May 13, 2018, 08:29:29 AM
Tweaked them, ME.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 13, 2018, 10:40:44 AM
Thanks Ian! Cheers Hollins 😁
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on May 14, 2018, 01:13:45 PM
Garden is coming on slowly but surely from the chaos of last year and other bits of neglect. I got most of the grass under control towards the end of last years growing season but there have been/still are other bits in need.

I sorted out the small greenhouses and have tomatoes, peppers and aubergines doing well as well as some outside tomatoes.  We have lots of leeks, a sampling of a salad potato and onions growing and at least sweet corn to go in. I’ve got my small bed I use for lettuce back, etc. And we have some extra help for an hour a week.

While we are making progress, I think this needs to be (another…) year of assessment, taking into account what mum (who is the real gardener here) is able to do now and what I’m perhaps willing to do. I guess that could mean another fruit tree or two and/or giving more garden over to grass – something I can deal with quite swiftly and easily.

I notice a patch at the front of the house which brother and family had a good blitz on one morning while they visited us from N Wales last month is already looking a bit overgrown. I don’t see grassing this area of chippings and a couple of small round beds as an easy option but I think we’re going to have to get some weed killer out fairy soon, even though the forgetmeknots do look pretty.

Thinking of a similar looking flower although the plant is quite different, green alkanet is becoming a bit of a scourge here.  Might need to declare war there.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on May 14, 2018, 02:40:14 PM
Just a few random photos to show some of what I’m talking about.

The first is the front garden.  I obviously go about with my eyes shut as the bit nearest the house brother and co played with looks more than a bit overgrown.  I think we need new plans for much of this area but will need to see what mum comes up with..

#2 is what we call the wood garden.  It would be nice to have the short paths restored.

#3 just shows some of my water buts.  They link with more with behind the shed in #4 round the back. There is a solar panel on the shed and I can pump water to the greenhouses and the veg plot, etc. from there.

#5 is mainly focused on the old pigsties. 2 are wood storage, one houses a small greenhouse and the other we call the BBQ shed, there is a BBQ behind the wall and inside the shed is set up for cups of tea, etc.

#6 is towards the veg plot, some beds in order, others needing sorting.

#7 and 8# just show the track I’m now keeping open and forms most of my mowing/strimming. It’s off our rented patch but we need it open for logs and septic tank empting and the farm don’t keep it clear.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on May 14, 2018, 02:41:39 PM
Continued...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Neil on May 16, 2018, 02:48:22 PM
I noticed this tree by the Mere in Ellsmere Shropshire last weekend, has anybody got any idea what it is? I have tried to find it on the internet but failed.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 19, 2018, 11:29:43 AM
Rowen Open Garden Day last Sunday had a good turn out and there were hundreds of people looking around the twenty or more gardens that were open to the public. 
We had a look at Llanerch Y Felin by the car park first of all and then headed to our favourite gardens  at Bulkeley Mill and Oak Bank and spent some time chatting to the owners before heading up the steep hill to Angorfa where we had a delicious cream scone and tea. 
From there we went down hill and then up an equally steep hill as far as Tawel Fan.
All the properties on that section have nice gardens with bridges that cross the fast flowing Afon Roe.
The last garden we saw was Gilfach and that had spectacular views down the Conwy Valley to Trefriw and beyond

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 19, 2018, 11:31:52 AM
Rowen Open Garden Day
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jack on May 19, 2018, 11:38:14 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
I noticed this tree by the Mere in Ellsmere Shropshire last weekend, has anybody got any idea what it is? I have tried to find it on the internet but failed.

Think it's Goat Willow, Salix caprea.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Neil on May 19, 2018, 02:54:02 PM
Thanks for that info Jack, it looks like you are correct.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 20, 2018, 10:49:56 PM
The colours on the Rhododendrons are starting to fade now but they have been a nice show this year, it was Marco's 9th birthday today so I had to include him in his garden
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on May 21, 2018, 10:09:29 AM
Happy Birthday Marco. Hope you had a good time.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 21, 2018, 12:34:46 PM
Thanks Nemesis, those years have gone by so quickly.   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on May 21, 2018, 05:48:59 PM
Gorgeous and Happy Birthday to Marco.
We have these rhododenrons out at the moment.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 21, 2018, 10:27:50 PM
Thanks Hollins, those Rhododendrons look really good, it's a shame that the flowers don't last for longer but they are great to see when  they are out.
I was grateful for your advice some time ago when you said that I didn't have to dead head the flowers as my cerise coloured Rhododendron is about 10 foot tall now and eventually grows to 23 feet   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 24, 2018, 10:03:46 PM
It's out !!!

Yes, it's Bodnant's Laburnum Arch !!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 24, 2018, 10:06:59 PM
... and the Himalayan Blue Poppies as well !!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 24, 2018, 10:10:05 PM
... and how about the Chilean Fire Trees - Bodnant has the National collection of embothriums so will find quite a few around the garden, but this is the biggest one.  The handkerchief trees are also fully out as well ... next week is going to be very busy!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on May 27, 2018, 02:46:56 PM
Great photos DVT, our Laburnum tree didn't look very good last year with hardly any flowers on it but I'm pleased to see it in better shape this year
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 04, 2018, 02:44:16 PM
I must admit that I haven't got a clue on how to prune or treat Clematis so when mine "died"  last year I cut the dead stuff down to about a foot from the soil and planned  to get rid of them this year.
Then they started growing again this year, so I just kept watering them and  they seem ok so far.   The blue flowered one seems to have both single and double flowers on the plant.
Not bad from Aldi at about £6.00 each four years ago
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 07, 2018, 12:46:20 PM
The fields may be scorched and yellow all around us but the gypsophila is thriving in the hot dry weather.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Meleri on July 07, 2018, 01:36:33 PM
What beautiful flowers Hollins, what are the blue ones they look very unusual?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 07, 2018, 01:44:13 PM
Thanks Meleri. They are side shoots that I cut off the delphiniums.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 07, 2018, 02:29:50 PM
That's a lovely arrangement of flowers Hollins, you've certainly got an artistic talent for flower arranging.    What are those flowers in the background by the wall as they look nice too?

Our lawn is parched but the clover is growing very nicely    ???     The two water butts we have are empty and I've already lost two mature Azaleas that were in tubs so I'll have to make sure that all the others don't die of thirst.    I do top up the bird baths regularly as it must be a difficult time for them but the Blackbirds are so funny when they have a bath, their wings flap like mad and the water goes everywhere so I have to top up the baths after them too.

The ground is so dusty now and I must cut the lawn ( or the clover )  this week so today I've just been out to get a dust mask as the ground is so dry
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 07, 2018, 03:10:12 PM
Thanks Hugo,
The pale blue flowering plants are hebe.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Meleri on August 12, 2018, 04:42:41 PM
Did the downpours today fill up your 2 empty water butts Hugo ;) Our patio is like a swimming pool and drive like Niagra falls and there is more to come I believe. At least the garden has had a good watering.
How did everyone else fare?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 12, 2018, 06:30:40 PM
We are visiting family staying down in Llanrwst and must have missed it all !!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on August 12, 2018, 07:25:44 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Did the downpours today fill up your 2 empty water butts Hugo ;) Our patio is like a swimming pool and drive like Niagra falls and there is more to come I believe. At least the garden has had a good watering.
How did everyone else fare?

The water butts are full now Meleri but the heavy rain has done some damage to my giant Begonias.  It was quite a downpour and I'm glad that I wasn't out taking my dog for a walk  as we would have been absolutely soaked
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nemesis on August 13, 2018, 09:08:22 AM
We had been out with the dog with us all morning, so waited until after the first lot of heavy rain to take him out again. Big mistake------we got caught in the second lot and were literally wet to the skin. No respite standing under a tree as it was coming straight through it !
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on August 13, 2018, 03:42:23 PM
I got back home in the gap, nice and dry, and standing looking out at the downpour I was hoping it was doing the same at Llantysilio where firefighters have been battling the huge blaze on Llantysilio Mountain for more than three weeks.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2018, 04:47:24 PM
Came back from holiday to a forest of asters!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on September 15, 2018, 12:47:57 PM
LLANDUDNO has struck gold in this year's Wales in Bloom awards.
   
The results were announced at a ceremony in Colwyn Bay yesterday.
Llandudno was awarded gold in the Class 11 Coastal category, for areas with a 12,000 population.
In July, RHS judge Jim Goodwin enjoyed a guided tour of various places of interest within Llandudno on judging day.  ref Pioneer

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 19, 2018, 12:21:57 PM
Storm Ali has been causing havoc in the garden today with the bird table and a number of large tubs being blown over.    The Yucca Tree in the front has taken a battering and there were 18 flowers on the large tree so I've had to cut a few off and just hope that the branches don't break with the gusts of wind we are having
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on September 19, 2018, 12:50:03 PM
Hugo, sorry if I am repeating myself, are you aware that only mature yuccas flower and that part will die, sometimes followed by up to three new heads on the main stem, I snap some of these off while they are small,(they come off easily)  as a way of shaping the plant, I put the snapped shoots in water, and they root quite easily (for friends and family), I find this a good way of stopping them from getting top heavy.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 19, 2018, 02:07:42 PM
Our Yucca is certainly a mature tree, we have been here 33 years and it was here long before we arrived.    The problem is that the flowers and branches become so heavy that they can snap off in high winds as the trunk is a bit like balsa wood.
We do have a plan B though as there is a smaller Yucca tree on the right hand side of the drive and we have also allowed another one to grow alongside the bigger one just in case it died or was damaged by high winds.
Like you we have given many baby plants away to friends and family but I've taken the cuttings from the ground as they had a habit of popping up quite often.
Luckily now Storm Ali seems to have moved up north so by now Mull must be feeling the brunt of the storm
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 19, 2018, 05:05:24 PM
Some serious damage here and no power. This is our drive.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 19, 2018, 06:03:33 PM
Wow Hollins that's some serious damage.     Hope that the rest of your garden and your property has escaped the storm.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on September 19, 2018, 06:47:27 PM
H. Sorry to hear your news, hope all sorted soon, lots of stories being reported now, two people blown over in Mostyn St. this morning, taken to hospital, we witnessed a large trampoline with netting, being blown from a side street onto Gloddaeth ave, after hitting parked cars, carried on, causing traffic problems on the ave. before half a dozen people bravely manhandled it into a sheltered position.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 19, 2018, 10:44:32 PM
Power came back on at 10pm, well done Scottish Power. Luckily no injuries or damage to the house. Three different people had come down our drive in the couple of hours before the fall. Thank goodness no one was hurt.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on September 20, 2018, 06:37:40 AM
Hollings, sorry to see that, hope you get it sorted ok!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on September 20, 2018, 11:38:08 AM
I've just seen that heavy rain is forecast for today then tomorrow we'll be battered by gusty winds of over 40 mph so I hope that you don't get any more damage to your house and garden Hollins.

I've just picked up all my fallen garden furniture and plant pots but I did that before I read about the forecast for tomorrow.     I suppose my game of golf will have to be cancelled tomorrow      :(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on September 22, 2018, 04:19:35 PM
Third time lucky with this post. The forum demons don't like my big size phone photos.
Clearing up has begun but on a brighter note here are the flowers I picked from the garden last Sunday. What a difference a few days can make!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on September 22, 2018, 04:48:08 PM
Glad you are getting things sorted, looking at the log pile,   :'(    I miss the days of using my chain saws, I loved being out, and working up in the hills around lynn Geirionydd, don't think I could even start one these days :(   hope you have a wood burner.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on September 26, 2018, 07:04:52 PM
Big day at Bodnant Garden today to celebrate 100 years since women (some) got the vote and the involvement of Laura MacLaren and the suffrage movement.  Amazing wicker sculpture on the lily pond terrace to celebrate "unbind the wing" - it stands 14ft high and will be in situ for next few weeks.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on October 05, 2018, 06:57:38 PM
Chatsworth gardens looking great the other day especially the colour from the acers and maples.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on October 29, 2018, 11:09:42 PM
We had a heavy frost here last night and the frost killed most of the Begonias and the Yucca Tree which had it's third  lot of flowers coming up this year and they will not have escaped the frost
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: squigglev2 on October 30, 2018, 02:00:52 PM
Sorry you lost some things, Hugo.

It reminds me though, I need to bring in the tap timers, drain a pump, etc. for winter.  Plus I could do with a final mow for the season.  I'm running behind schedule.

There was a time when we had to bring some plants in and we have a couple of paraffin heaters that would keep a shed at least above freezing in most conditions but it's quite a few years since we did that.

The only plant move I'm aware of probably being needed, at least going by the instructions, is an indoor plant.  I got my mother a bonsai tree for her birthday and it lives in the living room but I think when we have the wood burner (sometimes) raging (and we are reaching the point where it will be needed at least for the evenings), it will want a cooler spot with more consistent temperature.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on January 12, 2019, 02:46:28 PM
Not much gardening involved here but I did buy this amaryllis bulb for £4 from the Manchester Xmas market and Mr H planted it. Not sure if it is normal to have 3 big stems from one bulb, still lovely flowers though.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snowcap on January 22, 2019, 10:30:07 PM
driving into StHelens this morning saw the first daffodils in full bloom at least a dozen or so, There are quite a few ready to burst through at our golf club, looks like spring is a little bit early this year
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on January 22, 2019, 11:03:55 PM
Daffodils (the miniature ones) have been in flower in Bodnant Garden since before Christmas ... the full-size ones have now been in bloom for over a week ... they've bloomed before the snowdrops.  Dwarf irises in abundance, also quite a few rhododendrons.  Magnolias and camelias in bud and the Winter Garden with the coloured cornus looks fantastic.

The seasons have got mixed up, if this is global warming then let's have more!!!

Pay a visit, say hello if you find me (I'm there Wednesdays and Thursdays)!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 23, 2019, 09:11:11 AM
I was surprised to see so many daffodils out in bloom when we drove down Llandudno promenade last Saturday, it's quite a cheery sight to see on a cold Winter's day.
Glanwydden  Lane is a nice place to drive along when the Daffodils are out, you can see hundreds of them along the grass verges.

DVT, would you mind posting on here again when the Magnolias and Camelias are out as it's a wonderful thing to see them in bloom.   I'll be able to recognise you now that you are a TV celeb      ;D

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on January 23, 2019, 10:53:59 PM
Hugo ... there are over 300 varieties of rhododendron in Bodnant and there is always one or more in flower on any day of the year - quite a few red and pink ones flowering now!  Also camelias, there are some out now, with plenty more in bud.  Magnolias well in bud also.  The best time for a lot of colour is springtime, but plenty to see at any time of the year, and at the moment the Winter Garden is amazing, and the views looking down on the dell area are not hidden by leaves on the trees!!!  Wildlife is also abundant with numerous sightings of the kingfishers (we have at least two) along with some other uncommon birds - pair of little grebes on the far end with the moorhens and redwings on the meadow!  At the moment two of our gardeners are busy pruning and re-tying the laburnum arch ready for the show in May - that involves over 20,000 pieces of string with all the knots facing the same way!  Always worth a visit, I am lucky enough to see it every week!!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on January 24, 2019, 07:58:44 PM
Thanks for all that info  DVT  it's absolutely fascinating and as you say well worth a visit at any time of the year.   My favourites are the Rhododendrons but I also like to see the Acers in their Autumn colouring
It must be nice working in a place like that
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on February 21, 2019, 03:58:14 PM
Looking at the calendar I see today is 21st February 2019 ... which means we're in winter time.

However, looking at these pics I took earlier today suggests otherwise!

... and there's plenty more colour to be seen at Bodnant Garden!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 12, 2019, 08:21:44 AM
Bodnant looking great yesterday.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 12, 2019, 09:34:27 AM
I was there yesterday (Thursday 10th) as well, giving tours!  One hour tour in the morning down the terraces and two hour tour in the afternoon all the way round.  Was a great day for a walk and with lovely groups of visitors!  Magnolias and camelias have had a really good show this year (and it is still going strong) as there has been virtually no frost.  Rhododendrons and azaleas now looking really good as well (note azaleas are now called rhododendrons, so don't been fooled by the labelling!).
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 12, 2019, 10:40:06 AM
Sorry to miss you again DVT. I did look out for you. There were loads of people there but they soon seem to spread out.
You are right the magnolias are really impressive this year and I loved the wicker lady that you had mentioned on here before.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 12, 2019, 10:53:57 AM
We visited Bodnant  the other week, looked fabulous!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on April 12, 2019, 11:11:09 AM
Love your two pics of the ladies and the amazing blue sky.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on April 12, 2019, 09:34:35 PM
Bodnant fact ... the tall magnolia in Hollins' pic is the tallest magnolia in the UK !!!  It is near the Old Mill.

Bodnant has 43 champion trees within the garden area, that means they are the tallest or biggest girth of their species - that magnolia is looking particular magnificent this year.  When it has lost it's flowers people don't believe me when I say it's a magnolia!!!

If (when!) you go to Bodnant look out for the trees with blue labels - they're the champions.  There is a special leaflet about them to help you find them - ask at reception.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on May 22, 2019, 09:46:53 AM
Bodnant Garden's Laburnum Arch has flowered early to put on this stunning display.

Photos.....  https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/gallery/bodnant-gardens-laburnum-arch-flowered-16309820 (https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/gallery/bodnant-gardens-laburnum-arch-flowered-16309820)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bri Roberts on May 22, 2019, 01:05:24 PM
Mine from yesterday
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 22, 2019, 08:27:12 PM
You must have got in early!  Angle of the sun and the fact that it's empty!  I was there today and managed to get it empty for some early snappers!  Back again tomorrow!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bri Roberts on May 22, 2019, 08:59:33 PM
 &well&

8.55am, DVT, and behind a couple from Warrington. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: DVT on May 22, 2019, 10:29:12 PM
8.55 - that's five minutes before we open!!!  Best time for the "glow" effect is around mid-day when the sun is in direct line with it - but to get the best pic you need to have the sun shining and the arch empty ... getting sunshine is the easiest to achieve at that time!!!  It should be looking good for the next couple of weeks at least.

But that's not all - the handkerchief trees are good for another week, there are quite a few mecanopsis (blue poppies) around, the Chilean fire trees are aflame, primulas and irises of all colours, and there's another surge of azaleas happening (note azaleas are now called rhododendrons!)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bri Roberts on May 22, 2019, 11:01:30 PM
Yes.

The gatekeeper’s watch must have been fast 😂

We love it first thing when it’s quiet.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 12, 2019, 12:35:46 PM
I've had to have a gardener to mow my lawns recently, but this week I was able to mow it myself.  The grass had grown quite a bit since it was last cut and had numerous wild flowers growing there including a number of Common Spotted Orchids.
They look quite nice when in flower so I made a note of where they were but then when I mowed the lawn I forgot about the Orchids and cut the grass very close        :(
Now I'm left with 10 green bags with just lawn cuttings but at least the binman is calling here tomorrow
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SteveH on June 12, 2019, 01:43:22 PM
Hugo, I have a sit on mower, life is much easier, highly recommended .              *cycle*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 12, 2019, 02:56:27 PM
I hope that you're wearing your padded shorts when you mow the lawn Steve as that seat looks lethal
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 12, 2019, 03:04:31 PM
I've had a Mountain Laurel ( Calico Bush )  in the garden for quite a while now and had no idea how you are supposed to prune them so once a year I just put the hedge cutter on it and it seems to have survived.
It's quite an attractive shrub with glossy evergreen leaves and the flowers are only small but come in bunches and are quite pretty
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: wally on June 12, 2019, 07:18:09 PM
Kalmia Latifolia is the 'proper' name for the Calico Bush.If pruning is needed to keep it in shape, it should be done immediately after flowering so that you don't lose any flowers the following year. As your plant is flowering so well, you're obviously pruning at the right time.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on June 12, 2019, 10:30:22 PM
Thanks Wally,  it's quite an attractive shrub and I think that is more by luck than my judgement but I will get the hedge cutters out after flowering and give it a short back and sides ready for next year
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: hollins on July 09, 2019, 07:06:53 PM
We have got a yucca flowering for the first time. I remember seeing Hugo's on here and being amazed by it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Hugo on July 09, 2019, 11:55:18 PM
It's well worth waiting for Hollins that's a beautiful flower but watch those leaves, they are deadly