Author Topic: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow  (Read 8186 times)

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Offline Hugo

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #30 on: August 19, 2023, 10:16:57 am »
It's a shame that the Chapel was left to go derelict and I believe that there were still services there in the very early 1900's

Offline Helig

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #31 on: August 19, 2023, 10:53:27 am »
Is that the chapel of Penrhyn Old Hall? I remember seeing this back in the 1960s but don't recall more details. There was a story that they found a tunnel running from the chapel of Penrhyn Old Hall to the cave on the Little Orme where the printing press was found. This was supposed to have been used by the Catholic group to be able to operate clandestinely.


Offline Hugo

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2023, 12:02:07 pm »
That is the one Helig, it's in a field between Penrhyn Old Hall and Batty's Nurseries.      I've also heard stories about the tunnel and that they had found a tunnel when they built the tramline on Penrhyn Hill but I've
heard no more about it.
I know roughly where the printing press cage is but resisted any attempts to go there as the Little Orme can be dangerous to explore.
Two ghosts are said to still haunt the Old Hall, one is a young female descendant of the Pugh family who was murdered to stop her marrying a protestant.    The other is a monk who is said to walk about upstairs above the Baronial Hall

Offline Helig

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #33 on: August 20, 2023, 03:04:23 pm »
I have been in the cave some years ago when I lived in Penrhyn Bay and used to walk on the Little Orme down to Angel's Bay. It isn't for the faint hearted, nor is the trip to get down there.

Offline Hugo

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #34 on: August 20, 2023, 06:04:19 pm »
You're much braver than me Helig,  I was always told by my parents to keep away from the Little Orme as it was dangerous

u're https://historypoints.org/index.php?page=the-little-orme

While on the subject of caves, here's a link to caves on the Great Orme
https://www.northwalesholidaycottages.co.uk/other-information/blog/enjoying-north-wales/caves-of-the-great-orme/







Offline Helig

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #35 on: August 21, 2023, 10:50:19 am »
Thank you for these links. I used to explore the caves on the Great Orme but wasn't able to see the ones that were difficult to access. My mother used to speak about going to Pigeon's Cave in her younger days. I didn't fancy being caught out when the tide flooded it. At one time someone did walks to see the caves round the West Shore. He claimed these were used by pilgrims and travellers. I went in one of my own accord to find it decorated and festooned with all sorts of flowers. There were other items in there for people to use. It was suspected this was some sort of publicity stunt. Is that correct?

Offline Hugo

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #36 on: August 21, 2023, 12:58:41 pm »
Helig,  In my teens I used to go to Pigeon's Cove for a swim.     The ledge had a small shaft with a metal ladder going down to the bottom of the shaft where you could go into a small cave.    There was also an opening in the cliff face and another ladder took you down to the beach
At high tide I'd dive off the ledge and then climb back using the ladders that were fixed to the rock.     One year I went there by myself and just dived into the sea from the ledge but when I went to where the ladders where I found that they had gone so I was left with no alternative other than to swim out to sea and look for a suitable place to climb up the rocks.   Look before you leap was quite an appropriate saying.       Contrary to what anyone else says those ladders had not rusted away, they were deliberately removed and probably on the landowners instructions
The only cave I can think of with a Pilgrims or travellers connection is Ogaf Llech just below the lighthouse but the grotto there was built by Lord Mostyn hundreds of years ago.   It's been on TV a few times
Was the cave you went in called Ogof Arth just above the Gogarth Abbey Hotel before Anwyl Construction vandalised it.      I've often seen notes placed there and candles too.    In fact in the mid 1800's it was the home of another cave dweller and he along with Isaac Jones was also listed on some Census records

Offline Helig

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #37 on: August 23, 2023, 10:59:06 am »
Yes, that was the cave I went in. There was another one quite close to it. Was that Toby's cave?

Offline Hugo

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #38 on: August 23, 2023, 12:19:11 pm »
Helig, there are a number of caves nearby but "Toby's Cave"  is actually Ogof Arth or in English Bear's Cave.      I've got a map called Secrets of the Great Orme and it has a load of interesting things on it such as caves etc  and I've found it very handy when I've had a walk on the Great Orme

I think the name Toby's Cave came from when some vandals painted the name above the entrance to the cave in the late 1990's
In fact I've just seen a video when I put " Toby's Cave Great Orme"  in Google search.        The video is 5 minutes of rubbish so I haven't posted the link but the guy in the video says that it is called Toby's Cave because Toby lived there.
In the mid 1800's someone did live there but from memory he wasn't called Toby.    In fact his name was John Stephens a Liverpool born farm labourer.    In the mid 1800's he was visited at the cave by Lady Mostyn who sent him an iron bed to add to his bits of furniture

Offline SteveH

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Re: Welsh History ....eerie Barclodiad Y Gawres
« Reply #39 on: September 03, 2023, 10:06:27 am »
In Pictures: The enigmatic and eerie Barclodiad Y Gawres
An ancient tomb preserved into the modern day

It's not often you find clues of the way our ancestors used to live. But at Barclodiad Y Gawres - or the Giantess's Apronful as it is known - that's exactly what is on offer.

The ancient burial mound above ground has been added more recently, but below it is a passageway and chamber lined with patterns. It is one of only two tombs in the UK that was marked in such a way, along with nearby Bryn Celli Ddu.

The chamber also has the remains of an ancient fire, with two cremated men found when the site was excavated. The fire also contained ingredients from a stew made of eel, frog and snakes, to name just a few ingredients.

cont plus photos  https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/gallery/pictures-enigmatic-eerie-barclodiad-y-27438236

Offline Hugo

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #40 on: September 03, 2023, 01:41:33 pm »
It's worth having a look at if you are in that area.   There's car parking nearby and Cable Bay is a pretty beach and the monument is only a very short walk from the car park

Offline Helig

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #41 on: September 04, 2023, 10:13:51 am »
I visited this place some years ago and went in Barclodiad Y Gawres, or at least I think it was that one of the two. It was a lovely summer's day and going into the dark stillness of the burial mound was an amazing experience. Cable Bay is a beautiful spot too and doesn't get crowded even on a hot day (well it hasn't when I have been there). It is well worth a visit. I take it the burial mounds are still open to the public?

Offline Hugo

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Re: Welsh History ....bloody history that binds Wales to Glasgow
« Reply #42 on: September 04, 2023, 10:41:32 am »
Last time I went there they were not open to the public and the metal gates were locked.   However there was a notice saying that if anyone wanted to go inside the chamber then the key was at a nearby property
I wanted to see the " Irish " type symbols carved on to the stones but was unable to do that on my last visit there
Bryn Celli Ddu is open to the public and is well worth a visit too

Offline SteveH

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Re: Welsh History ....14 Welsh homes that tell the story of our past
« Reply #43 on: September 25, 2023, 09:48:02 am »
14 Welsh homes that tell the story of our past
Steeped in history, these houses are either known for being overtly different from the rest, or have been homes to our most notable figures

For years, Wales has been known for its castles which represent our heritage, ancestors and history. In fact, it's hard to ignore them as there are more than 600 of them in the country - more per square mile than anywhere in the world.

But, Wales also has its fair share of famous houses. These houses are either known for being overtly different from the rest, or have been homes to our most notable figures.

cont https://www.walesonline.co.uk/whats-on/14-welsh-homes-tell-story-27746315?IYA-reg=49560bcd-5a9c-47f0-8fc5-ba2e71710589

Offline SteveH

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Re: Welsh History ....Iron Age: How Wales was ruled from hillforts pre-Romans
« Reply #44 on: December 10, 2023, 10:51:07 am »
Welsh leaders before the Roman invasion ruled from hillforts whose stone ruins still overlook every part of the country, an archaeologist has said.

Aberystwyth-based Toby Driver said there were "big stories" still to be told about Wales' 764 Iron Age hillforts.

One of the largest, Garn Goch, looms over Bethlehem in Carmarthenshire.

Villagers said they "respect" the sprawling monument, but know little about the people who built it.

"People get very excited about the pyramids of Egypt and monuments around the world," Mr Driver said.

"We should be getting excited about this incredible hillfort heritage we have in Wales."

His new book, Hillforts of Iron Age Wales, includes illustrations showing what these "vibrant hill top villages" would have looked like 2,500 years ago.

cont https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-67285857