Author Topic: Wild flowers  (Read 118883 times)

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Offline Blodyn

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Wild flowers
« on: March 04, 2011, 09:57:25 pm »
Walking up the zig-zag path on the Great Orme on Wednesday I came across my first violets of the season, so despite the frosty nights it really feels as if spring is in the way.  The European gorse which has been producing a few flowers throughout the winter is starting to put on a good show. 

Which wild flowers are appearing in other parts of the Three Towns area or further afield?

brumbob

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2011, 03:42:21 pm »
nice pics, it's good to see spring has sprung  :)


Yorkie

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2011, 04:29:55 pm »
Reminds me of a little poem>

Spring is sprung,
Der grass is griz.
I wonder where dose birdies is!
Dey say der birds are on da wing.....
But dat's obserd, da wings are on da bird!

Offline Pendragon

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2011, 10:29:58 pm »
Spike Milligan

There Are Holes In The Sky

   
There are holes in the sky
Where the rain gets in
But there ever so small
That's why the rain is thin.

Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Offline Blodyn

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2011, 09:27:23 pm »
I like the little poems - does a primrose inspire you at all?

Spotted in St. Tudno's churchyard this morning.  I think that the primroses there are wild but can't guarantee it. 

Offline Blodyn

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2011, 11:01:31 am »
The primroses on the Great Orme are starting to come into flower, so as the one that I photographed at St. Tudno's may not be a wild one, here's one which certainly is. 

Offline DaveR

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2011, 11:05:55 am »
It's good to see all the plants springing back into life after that harsh Winter. Quite a few of the ones in my garden seem to have not survived and I notice that a lot of the Palm trees in peoples' gardens appear to have been killed by the very cold weather we had.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 11:36:05 am by DaveR »

Yorkie

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2011, 11:34:55 am »
During the past couple of years we have seen the disappearance of many (lots) Palm trees in Porugal all of which has been caused by a nasty little beetle.

The problem is moving across Europe and to save me boring you with a long diatribe I will just point you to a very interesting and comprehensive web site.

http://www.aambiental.org/_en/PalmWeevil.htm

This is the nasty animal.

Offline Nemesis

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2011, 03:12:19 pm »
Decided to stroll round St Agnes Cemetery as it was such a lovely afternoon. Carpets of celandines, lots of speedwell, primroses and daffs. Plentr rabbits as well ! Hadn't my camera with me--pity as it was beautiful
Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know.

Offline Trojan

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2011, 05:33:14 pm »
Has anyone ever seen a Creigafal y Gogarth - Rock apple of Gogarth or Cotoneaster Cambricus?

http://www.ukwildflowers.com/Web_pages/cotoneaster_cambricus_wild_cotoneaster.htm

This plant is one very few remaining on the Great Orme and is the only place in the British Isles where you can find this very rare Cotoneaster in the wild.

brumbob

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2011, 06:12:51 pm »
Historically, the species was much more abundant on the Great Orme when it was discovered in 1783. The population was reduced in the 19th century by collectors deliberately digging plants up for their gardens, and more recently by overgrazing by sheep, feral goats, and rabbits, and by invasion by seedlings of other species of Cotoneaster arising from cultivated plants in gardens in nearby towns. It has full legal protection under Schedule 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

So it could well be flourishing in some local gardens

brumbob

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2011, 06:17:57 pm »
It's good to see all the plants springing back into life after that harsh Winter. Quite a few of the ones in my garden seem to have not survived and I notice that a lot of the Palm trees in peoples' gardens appear to have been killed by the very cold weather we had.
I'll have to start saving to pay for all the plants I lost this year, even all my hebes that had up to now survived everything nature threw at them, are brown and withered.

Offline DaveR

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2011, 06:55:22 pm »
Cut em right down, they may yet spring back to life. I have a Fuchsia that has just started showing signs of life right from its base, although the main plant is dead and will have to be cut right back.

Offline Hugo

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2011, 03:34:12 pm »
Saw this Vinca by a quarry in Penrhyn Bay today.

Offline Blodyn

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Re: Wild flowers
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2011, 09:38:08 pm »
The blackthorn on the Great Orme was starting to come into flower on Saturday, particularly these cropped bushes on the SW facing slopes.