Author Topic: Gardening  (Read 357872 times)

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Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening.......... Can my neighbour paint my fence?
« Reply #1305 on: May 08, 2024, 10:11:58 am »
Can my neighbour paint my fence? The important rules to know

Fences and neighbours can be a tricky subject.

From who's responsible for what side to leaning items against fences and who can do what with the fence.

Several popular misconceptions have created confusion around this area of property law for years, making it even more contentious.

Especially when it comes to painting and fences, while the owner of the fence can paint the fence as they please, there is still the question of whether a neighbour can paint their side of the same fence.

cont https://www.northwalespioneer.co.uk/news/24305158.can-neighbour-paint-fence-important-rules-know/


Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1306 on: May 08, 2024, 04:42:37 pm »
If you think that the Llandudno Goats are garden wreckers then Teddy must come a close second.    He sometimes lies under the  small umbrella type Acer and munches the lower branches when I'm not looking
I don't know the variety of the pink Rhododendron but that's also coming in to flower


Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1307 on: May 14, 2024, 09:45:20 am »
Japanese knotweed: How to spot new hybrids growing in your garden
Japanese knotweed hybrids look slightly different to the original species, says expert Jennifer Holmes

Japanese knotweed is an invasive plant that grows rapidly at this time of year. While it can look quite attractive, with bamboo-like stems and heart-shaped leaves, the plant spreads rapidly and may cause damage to brickwork and drains.

It can knock thousands off the value of your property as it is both difficult and expensive to get rid of. In this country, Japanese knotweed cannot set seed or propagate via seed but it can sprout from even the smallest amount of rhizome left in the ground.

cont https://www.inyourarea.co.uk/news/japanese-knotweed-how-to-spot-new-hybrids-growing-in-your-garden/

Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1308 on: May 20, 2024, 04:08:00 pm »
I lost an established shrub about two years ago and decided to replace it with two other shrubs.    The Snowball Bush and the Cotinus Royal Purple Smoke Bush.
They will both take a while to grow but the Snowball bush is looking quite pretty at the moment so I won't prune it again until it has grown a lot taller.       The Laburnam tree in the front garden is in full flower now and the sweet scent from the flowers wafts across the garden

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1309 on: May 22, 2024, 10:51:04 am »
What flowers and plants are best for bees in the UK?
Spring is finally sprung (or just about) which means it's time to get out in our gardens and welcome in the wildlife including many insects and birds.

However, we might be getting to enjoy the (slightly) warmer weather but British bees are in trouble.

There are 35 UK bee species that are currently under threat of extinction but all species face serious threats.

However, there is plenty that we can to do help, according to Friends of the Earth. ..... https://www.northwalespioneer.co.uk/news/24334843.flowers-plants-best-bees-uk/


How to identify giant hogweed and common hogweed difference

It?s that time of year when our gardens begin to thrive for the spring and summer, from new buds growing on trees to brightly coloured flowers blooming.

But there are also unwanted visitors known for making an appearance in our outdoor spaces during the warmer months, including giant hogweed.

The invasive species is not native to the UK ? it was first introduced as an ornamental in the 19th century when it escaped and naturalised in the wild.

The sap of giant hogweed can cause burns if it contacts your skin and when exposed to the sun it can blister badly.
cont https://www.northwalespioneer.co.uk/news/24334873.identify-giant-hogweed-common-hogweed-difference/


PS
A garden thought to be the most biodiverse entry in the Chelsea Flower Show's history has been awarded a coveted gold medal.

The Size of Wales garden, external - which features more than 300 different plant species - was also judged to be the best in its category at the prestigious show.

Its message is about the importance of tropical forests, which are home to half of all animal and plant species on the planet.

Designer Dan Bristow, from Bethesda, Gwynedd, said the win was a "dream come true" and he "couldn't be happier".
cont https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/c044nlvx4xlo

Offline Hugo

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #1310 on: June 10, 2024, 02:30:39 pm »
The flowers from the Rhododendrons have all gone now but this orange Azalea has come in to flower and looks better this year.
The Peony "Bowl of Beauty"  is out now.    The only trouble with the Peony is that there are only three flowers on the shrub and it does need support especially in the winds that we have been having
I'll follow DVT's good tips on the Peony and hopefully will have more flowers on it next year

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening...What plants and flowers are poisonous to humans in the UK?
« Reply #1311 on: June 12, 2024, 09:50:16 am »
With the spring and summer upon us, many will be looking to get out and enjoy Britain's great outdoors.

However, there a number of plants and flowers native to the UK and Ireland that are poisonous to humans and pets.

If you're interested in learning more about the most poisonous plants across the country, look no further.

These are some of the most poisonous plants and flowers across the UK for humans, according to the Woodland Trust............

Read more https://www.northwalespioneer.co.uk/news/24381920.plants-flowers-poisonous-humans-uk/

Offline SteveH

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Re: Gardening.............How to be a sustainable gardener
« Reply #1312 on: June 15, 2024, 10:39:55 am »
How to be a sustainable gardener - from smart sensors to companion planting
High tech and low tech ideas that can benefit your plants - and the planet

Many gardeners have the environment firmly in mind when it comes to growing and tending their plants. They want to make informed, eco-friendly choices that benefit both their gardens and the planet.

Whether it's harvesting rainwater in (numerous) water butts, focusing on native varieties or opting for peat-free compost, there are lots of ways to lower your environmental impact. Plus, recent years have seen a huge drive to encourage biodiversity through rewilding and planting for pollinators.

cont https://www.inyourarea.co.uk/news/how-to-be-a-sustainable-gardener-from-smart-sensors-to-companion-planting/