Three Towns Forum - Talk about Llandudno, Colwyn Bay & Conwy

The Local => Local News & Discussion => Topic started by: Ian on September 10, 2010, 07:44:26 PM

Title: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on September 10, 2010, 07:44:26 PM
Electricity meter top-up scam warning
Doorstep electricity meter 'deals' aren't genuine


08 September 2010
Electricity meter

Consumers are being warned about a doorstep scam promising cheap electricity which actually ends up costing them twice as much for their energy.

According to energy companies and government consumer body Consumer Focus, an estimated 85,000 households have been hit by the illegal sale of electricity meter top-ups.

The scam works by selling £50 worth of electricity credit to prepayment meter customers in exchange for a cash payment of just £25 - but customers end up paying twice because the money doesn't going to their energy supplier.

Visit the Top Up Safe website or call Consumer Direct on 08454 04 05 06 if you think you've been affected.


According to Christine McGourty, director at the Energy Retail Association, a body which represents energy companies: 'Just like when you buy something fake online - like a ticket for a football match or a music concert - you're the one who'll end up losing out in the end.

'Energy companies can detect the fraud and you'll end up paying twice for your electricity, first to the criminal and then again to your energy company, who can always detect when electricity has been used, but not paid for through the proper channels.'

Consumer Focus is urging electricity prepayment meter customers to only buy top-ups via an official seller - such as the Post Office, Paypoint or Payzone - and to be 'on the alert for anyone who comes to their doorstep claiming to sell electricity credit' as part of a national campaign.

Crimestoppers also pledged its support and is calling for consumers to contact them anonymously on 0800 555 111 or via the Crimestoppers website if they know someone illegally selling electricity top-ups.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on September 10, 2010, 07:46:47 PM
Cybercrime hits two thirds of web users
Norton survey reveals extent of internet threat


Cybercrime including computer viruses, online credit card fraud and identity theft has hit over 59% of adults in the UK or around 30 million people, according to a survey.

The average cost to victims is £103 per person, which adds up a total of around £3 billion to UK consumers, claims report titled The Norton Cybercrime Report: The Human Impact.

As well as the financial impact the report shows that cybercrime has a significant emotional impact on its victims. The strongest reactions are feeling angry (58%), annoyed (51%) and cheated (40 %); in many cases, victims blame themselves for being attacked.

Former cybercrime victim, Michelle, for example told us she felt awful ‘guilt and anxiety’ when she fell victim to a fake ticketing website. Michelle paid for tickets to the Tea in the Park concert using her mother’s credit card but the tickets didn’t arrive and, by the time she realised it was a scam, over £700 had been drawn from her mother’s account.

‘I felt awful,’ says Michelle. ‘No-one can afford to lose that amount of money and it was worse that it was my mother’s money. It was horrendous. When you realise you’ve been had and it’s someone else’s money it was the worst thing.’

When you realise you’ve been had and it’s someone else’s money it was the worst thing

Of the 7,000 people surveyed only 3% don’t think it will happen to them while 80% do not expect cybercriminals to be brought to justice.

‘We accept cybercrime because of a “learned helplessness”,’ said Joseph LaBrie, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Loyola Marymount University.

Worryingly, people are doing little to prevent themselves becoming a victim of cybercrime. Only half (51%) of adults saying they would change their behaviour if they became a victim. Even scarier, fewer than half (44%) reported the crime to the police.
Solving internet crimes is frustrating. It takes an average of 28 days to resolve a cybercrime, and the average cost to resolve that crime is $334 (£217).

Despite the hassle, reporting a cybercrime is critical, says Norton lead cyber security advisor Adam Palmer. ‘We all pay for cybercrime, either directly or through pass-along costs from our financial institutions. If you fail to report a loss, you may actually be helping the criminal stay under the radar.’
Cybercrime victims out in the cold

Sadly, future victims of cybercrime in the UK will struggle to find the emotional support that they need with charity E-victims.org facing closure.

The charity has stopped sending out its email advisory service after running out of cash. Jennifer Perry, the charity’s founder told Which? Computing: ‘I’d sought funding from various government departments, the internet industry and from business. But funding hasn’t been forthcoming.’

The information on the E-Victims site will remain for a further six to 12 months but the service won’t answer individual queries or send out its scam alert.

The website’s demise is a serious blow for victims. ‘It was the only place where consumers could get direct, hands-on expertise on internet-related crime,’ said Howard Lamb, the Federation Against Copyright Theft’s internet liaison officer. ‘I don’t know where people can go now,’ he added.
Action Fraud service won’t plug the gap

The newly-created Action Fraud (AF) service is unlikely to plug the gap left by the E-Victims service.

Which? Computing reader Peter Bulloch called Action Fraud to report a cold caller pretending to be from Microsoft but the service refused to create a fraud report about the case.

An AF spokesperson clarified the agency’s role. ‘AF was set up to provide a place of support and advice for victims of e-crime. We’re there for victims of e-crime, but we also provide advice on how to stop people becoming victims.

‘If consumers wish to alert the authorities of a fraud or they have escaped being defrauded themselves then they should report the incident to Consumer Direct or Scambusters, part of the Office of Fair Trading.’
Protect yourself from cybercrime

Consumers should ensure that they have up-to-date security software to protect themselves from cybercrime. The release of The Norton Cybercrime Report coincides with the launch of Norton AntiVirus and Norton Internet Security 2011.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 02, 2010, 08:04:33 AM
"Good day,

It took me a lot of time to summon courage to email you. It is a fact that we have not had any previous business dealings, but I strongly believe that with understanding and trust we can have a successful business relationship.

My name is Craig Jones, the Chief financial officer of New Zealand's Oil & Gas Company Ltd. For proper confirmation, visit http://www.nzog.com/staff (http://www.nzog.com/staff)

We have been on a project called The Kupe project. This project is to be the first phase development of gas field discoveries first made by New Zealand Oil and Gas (NZOG) in 1986. The project was given the final go ahead to move into the construction phase in July 2006. However, a large amount of design, assessment and pre-development work preceded this decision. For proper verification on this project, visit http://www.hydrocarbons-technology.com/projects/kupe/ (http://www.hydrocarbons-technology.com/projects/kupe/)

I have access to very vital information that can be used to move a huge amount of money out of the project account to a secured account. I have done my homework very well .I have the machineries in place to get it done since I am still in active service. If it was possible for me to do it alone I would not have bothered contacting you, ultimately I need an honest foreigner to play an important role in the completion of this business deal.

Kindly get back to me for the next line of action if you are willing to commence. I look forward to meeting you in person and doing good business with you and please treat as confidential.

You can reach me on my private email : craig_jonescfo@yahoo.co.nz

Signed:

Craig Jones

CFO- NZOG "
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on November 02, 2010, 08:46:41 AM
Thanks for the info Ian.

I would like a part of the action so have rushed off a mail to Craig Jones indicating my interest in his enterprise.    Assuming that he will require details of my various bank accounts for me to receive my great wadge of the cash I have given him full details of all my various accounts so he will have no problem with making the correct deposits.

I hope you approve of my actions and will welcome me as a new milllionaire once the money comes flooding in.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on November 02, 2010, 12:54:58 PM
Ha ha .. nice one Yorkie ...
But just in case you forgot, I too have sent him details of YOUR bank accounts ....well, I didn't want to risk you missing out!
I knew you would appreciate it.



Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on November 02, 2010, 03:29:57 PM
Gosh - and I did the same thing for you with all your accounts, well knowing that you would love to be in on such an opportunity!
   _))*  L0L  _))*  L0L  ZXZ
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on November 02, 2010, 04:44:45 PM
...and with our joint massive proceeds, perhaps we could buy The Pier Pavilion Site, and build a lasting legacy?

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bellringer on November 02, 2010, 05:11:15 PM
Oh you are a pair of jokers, but I like you!!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on November 02, 2010, 05:28:05 PM
"The release of The Norton Cybercrime Report coincides with the launch of Norton AntiVirus and Norton Internet Security 2011."

What an amazing coincidence!  :laugh:
Title: WARNING
Post by: Yorkie on January 17, 2011, 11:15:11 AM
The men in the plain vans with ladders on top are on the prowl again.   :o

Got a ring on the front door bell this morning to be confronted by a rather scruffy bloke with his unmarked white van parked outside and his mate sitting in the passenger seat.  "Got a load of sand and cement left from a job we just finished up the road.  Would you like your xxxxxx repointing?"

Enterprise or a scam?    Who knows?  But it is worth while keeping your wits about you and only getting work done by reputable companies who you know, or are well and worthily recommended.
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: DaveR on January 17, 2011, 01:40:19 PM
Most likely a scam, by the sound of it. Anyone with an unmarked van should be treated with extreme caution.
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Yorkie on January 17, 2011, 01:47:07 PM
Makes a change from wanting to Tarmac your drive!   Or prune your trees, or fix a digital ariel, or fix a loose roof tile,or repoint your ridge, or paint your garage door, or . . . . . . . fill in your own details here.    D)

Even Boy Scouts wanting to wash your car now charge more than a Bob!       L0L
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Hugo on January 17, 2011, 03:12:09 PM
We have signs in the street saying "no callers" and these "tradesmen" can be fined if they do call, but it doesn't seem to stop them from calling.     
It's best to turn them down and look for a reputable company like Yorkie has suggested.
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 17, 2011, 03:31:59 PM
The Penrhyn Beach estate has lots of 'no cold callers' signs everywhere yet we still get them :rage: :rage:
we had one a month after we moved in, he said ' we've had a very good response from our neighbours (in other words no one told him to b****r off) and we are in the area to do the roofs' he then handed me a leaflet. I said 'let me stop you there, you want to take the moss of my roof which causes no problem and then coat it in an entirely pointless chemical and then charge me 3 or 4 thousand pounds for the privilege',  'er well, er sort of' he said. I said it's been on Watchdog and Rogue Traders on the BBC, was it you I saw on there?' at this point he took his leaflet back and left  _))*
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Hugo on January 17, 2011, 05:35:54 PM
Three of those traders called at my house within a period of two weeks and I sent them all away but I'll stick one of those signs on the front door that CCBC supplied in their pack and hope that the cold callers will take the hint!
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 17, 2011, 06:29:08 PM
I've not seen these signs or packs, what are they?
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Yorkie on January 17, 2011, 06:51:52 PM
Some small plastic stick on signs that just say all cold callers will be shot!      L0L

You can make a better one yourself.
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 17, 2011, 06:58:47 PM
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Some small plastic stick on signs that just say all cold callers will be shot!      L0L

You can make a better one yourself.

well I can soon make one and laminate it, mind you it could scare any neighbour who calls in the cold weather without a coat on!  L0L

I'm also fed up with all these plastic charity bags wanting all of my valuables and GOOD clothes, if my clothes are still good then I still wear them! we seem to get about 2 a week here  :rage: any valuables etc that i don't need either go on Ebay or to the bootsale when they start again  D)
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Yorkie on January 17, 2011, 07:23:43 PM
I have a hand made sign that I have been using for over 10 years now.  It simply says:

We do not wish to offend anyone but:

We do not discuss business at the door
We do not discuss religion at the door
We do not give to charities at the door
We do not buy anything at the door
We do not give sponsorship at the door.
All tradesmen must produce identification which will be checked by telephone.

It has proved very effective.
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Pendragon on January 17, 2011, 07:58:04 PM
The sign on my door reads

I'M A JEHOVAH WITNESS, KNOCK IF YOU FANCY A CHAT

Now that really does the trick  _))* _))*
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Trojan on January 17, 2011, 11:16:48 PM
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The sign on my door reads

I'M A JEHOVAH WITNESS, KNOCK IF YOU FANCY A CHAT

Now that really does the trick  _))* _))*

 L0L
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: DaveR on January 18, 2011, 08:28:18 AM
What happens if some Jehovahs Witnesses knock on the door wanting a long chat with their brethren?  :o
Title: Re: WARNING
Post by: Blongb on February 04, 2011, 12:18:33 AM
I had a good long chat with 2 young American Mormon Missionaries, who came round offering me everlasting life. I smiled and pointed to my children: Sorry lads you’re too late, I said. I've already got it.  D)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on February 05, 2011, 02:11:45 PM
This is currently doing the rounds:

Dear Customer.

Your package has been returned to the Post Express office.
The reason of the return is "Incorrect delivery address of the package"

Attached to the letter mailing label contains the details of the package delivery.
You have to print mailing label, and come in the Post Express office in order to receive the packages.

Thank you.
Post Express
>>

It has an exe file attached. Don't open it.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Paddy on February 05, 2011, 03:47:36 PM
Just recieved this e-mail from a friend. I'm not sure how true it is!

FOUR THINGS YOU PROBABLY NEVER
KNEW YOUR MOBILE PHONE COULD
DO !!!


There are a few things that can be done in times of grave
emergencies. Your mobile phone can actually
be a life saver or an emergency tool for survival.
Check out the things that you can do  with it:

FIRST
Emergency

The
Emergency Number worldwide for all Mobile Phones
is 112. If you find yourself out of  the coverage area of your
mobile network and there is an emergency, dial 112
and your mobile will search any existing network in your area to establish the emergency
number for you, and interestingly this number 112 can be dialled even
if the keypad is locked. This works on all phones worldwide and is free. It is the equivalent of 000.

SECOND
Have you  locked your keys in the car?

Does  your car have remote keyless entry? This may come in handy someday. Good
reason to own a cell phone:
If you lock your keys in the car and the spare keys are at home, call
someone at  home on their mobile phone from your cell phone.

Hold  your cell phone about a foot from
your car door and have the person at your  home press the unlock
button, holding it near the mobile phone on their end.
Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive
your keys to you. Distance is no object. You could be thousands of miles away,
and if you can reach someone who has the other 'remote' for your car, you can
unlock the doors (or the trunk).  Editor's  Note: I didn’t believe this when I heard about it! I rang my daughter in Sydney from Perth when we went on holiday.  She had the spare car key.  We tried it out and it unlocked our car over a mobile phone!'

THIRD
Hidden
Battery 
Power

To activate, press the keys *3370# (remember the asterisk).  Do this when the phone is almost dead.
Your mobile will restart in a special way with this new reserve and the instrument will show a 50%
increase in battery life. This reserve will get re charged when you charge your mobile next time.
This secret is in the fine print in most phone manuals.  Most people however skip this information without realising.


FOURTH
How to disable a STOLEN mobile phone?

To  check your Mobile phone's serial
number, key in the following digits on your  phone: * # 0 6 #  Ensure you put an asterisk BEFORE the #06# sequence.

A  15 digit code will appear on the screen. This number is unique to
your handset. Write it down and keep it somewhere safe. If your
phone ever get stolen, you can phone your service provider and give them
this code. They will then be able to block your handset so even if
the thief changes the SIM card, your phone will be totally useless.
You probably won't get your phone back,
but at  least you know that whoever stole it can't use/sell it either. If
everybody did this, there would be no point in people
stealing mobile phones.
This secret is also in the fine print of most mobile phone manuals.  It was created for the very purpose of trying to prevent phones from being stolen.


Also -ATM   PIN Number Reversal - Good to Know  !!

If you should ever be forced by a robber to withdraw money from an ATM
machine, you  can notify the police by entering your PIN # in
reverse. For example, if your  pin number is 1234, then you would put
in 4321. The ATM system recognizes  that your PIN number is backwards
from the ATM card you placed in the  machine. The machine will still
give you the money you requested, but unknown  to the robber, the
police will be immediately dispatched to the location.
All ATM’s carry this emergency sequencer by law.

This information was recently broadcast on by Crime Stoppers
however it is seldom used because people just don't know about it.

 

Please pass this along to everyone. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on February 05, 2011, 04:00:25 PM
Mostly untrue, I'm afraid. Why do people make up things like this? The bits about the 112 number and the IMEI code are correct, though.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: brumbob on February 05, 2011, 04:19:51 PM
Only partly correct Dave
112 is not worldwide, just mainly European
and
not all service operators can disable a mobile phone from an IMEI number
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on February 11, 2011, 02:44:47 PM
HSBC are currently warning customers that fraudsters are telephoning people, claiming to represent HSBC, and telling them that there is a problem with their card . They then tell the customer that they'll be sending a courier around to collect it, and the PIN. 

I don't think this is new, but it's certainly seen a  resurgence of late.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on February 27, 2011, 08:34:45 AM
These folk want us to send them scam mail and email:

http://www.actionfraud.org.uk/ (http://www.actionfraud.org.uk/)

There's now a major push on to track down the scammers . Time will tell if this makes any difference whatsoever.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 27, 2011, 08:57:19 AM
About time too, but I suspect that the 'scammers' will be several steps ahead, I can never understand why people send money off expecting a big winning prize when they never entered a competition in the first place? 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on February 27, 2011, 09:07:43 AM
Quote
I can never understand why people send money off expecting a big winning prize when they never entered a competition in the first place? 

Like you, I can't really fathom it, either but I suppose the elderly and confused are at risk.  BBC news yesterday paraded several very elderly ladies and gents who'd parted with several tens of thousands in the hope of winning something. Very sad.  And I remember a vicar who'd fallen for the Nigerian crowd .
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 27, 2011, 09:28:44 AM
Once one of these scammers get you to reply you start receiving similar mail from many, many others.  When I was an Advocate with Age Concern I had a client who had lost thousands , all in small sums, some by cheque and most by credit card.   Mail would arrive at her door by the sackfull, and I mean the sackful.   It was a difficult job to wean her off the habit of replying but it gradually reduced the amount of mail.   With some of the scams you actually give a continuing credit card authority which is very difficult to stop.

Once it quietened  down she started to receive gifts from them to encourage her back into the fold and she certainly was temted again.  It was a hard job and she had lost so much, she had to sell her nice little bungalow.

Non of the scams were Nigerian and all mail came from Holland, the UK or other European countries.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 04, 2011, 10:27:15 AM
Just to remind everyone that we have a steadily growing list of really useful links here:

http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=325.msg9853#msg9853 (http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=325.msg9853#msg9853)

Ian
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 07, 2011, 01:49:30 PM
Warning over cashpoint crooks (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1jTFzyDa7Q#)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: brumbob on March 07, 2011, 03:53:52 PM
It only takes a second to catch you off your guard
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on March 07, 2011, 04:09:52 PM
Typical common three handed steal.
   
One distracts possible witness so that he doesn't see the steal.
Two distracts target
Three does the steal

And the poor old man hasn't a clue which one did it!   
One reason I never have, and never will, use ATM's, no chance of losing my PIN or being robbed!   _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on May 04, 2011, 04:51:03 PM
Why is it that no matter what time your Dentist's appointment you are still kept waiting a further half hour or so.    Went today with the OH for a 10.15 appointment and the first thing the receptionist said was, "The dentist is running late."    How can one get to be running a half hour late when you have only been working for an hour?   

Just another of life's mysteries ---- like ..........................

In ASDA  bottle of wine £7.27 or if you like £5.74.    Buy one it is list price.  Buy two they are list price.  Buy three and you get the lot for £10.00.

Logic makes me ask, "Is there some idiot somewhere who buys just two bottles?"     ZXZ
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Trojan on May 04, 2011, 05:50:06 PM
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In ASDA  bottle of wine £7.27 or if you like £5.74.    Buy one it is list price.  Buy two they are list price.  Buy three and you get the lot for £10.00.

Logic makes me ask, "Is there some idiot somewhere who buys just two bottles?"   ZXZ

Have you fallen off the wagon?  ZXZ
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on May 04, 2011, 07:59:50 PM
Just happened to catch my eye. 

Just 'cos you don't buy doesn't mean you can't look at the goods!   As the old fella walking down The Reeperbahn, in Hamburg said!     _))*
Title: WARNING Llandudno building scammers
Post by: born2run on January 06, 2012, 06:15:00 PM
Apologies if this has been posted before, if not it is well worth knowing.

A work friend told me today that her elderly Mother & Father were targeted by building scammers in their home in St Seriols Road (sure I've splet that wrong!) near the oval.

Apparently, a builder knocked on there down and began to discuss the condition of the house with her mother. As they were doing this two other blokes were round the back and had put PVC over what they said was a "hole" in the roof.
They insisted that the work must be carried out and it would cost £1800. They were very insistent and frightening, especially to an old person and assured her that they would be back at 9am the next morning to "start the job"

When they came my friends Mother - told them in no uncertain terms that she had contacted her insurance company and she must have 3 quotes before any work can be done, at this they became very confrontational and threatening. My friend has called the police and hopefully they will be stopped before too long.

But if any of you have elderly relatives it might be worth telling them not to hand over money to any roofers that come knocking as I could see how someone could easily be scared into handing them money

Absolutely sickening I hope they are locked up  :(
Title: Re: WARNING Llandudno building scammers
Post by: Yorkie on January 06, 2012, 06:34:13 PM
If you are suspicious, just close the door and phone the Police.  If possible get the vehicle number and colour etc. if they have one and also try to remember the description of at least one individual.

I know it is difficult but try not to get drawn into a conversation or the pressure will be put on.
Title: Scams
Post by: Michael on January 20, 2012, 12:46:57 PM
Tell your friends is the title, but if any moderator thinks this post should be elsewhere, feel free to move it.
I've just received a very lengthy and details email from a very well placed business person, the last person to fall for a scam. But, she nearly did. I am fairly sure I would have fallen for it. The local police are aware of it, they say to tell everyone you know to be aware. I have drastically reduced the contents of this e mail because it is far to long for a forum.
Your phone rings. B T here, you owe us £300 and we need at least £30 now by bank card or we are going to cut you off.
In the case I am writing about, the lady said "I'm not even with B T, I'm with virgin phone (or similar).
The caller was'ent put off, his reply - yes, virgin have to pay us a commission, and if I don't have £30 now I'm going to cut you off.
Lady. How do I know you are telling the truth. Apparently the caller called himself Tom brown (or similar) but had a strong African accent.
Man. I'll prove to you I'm BT. I'll cut you off now, just try and make a call to a friend, and I'll phone you back in five minutes.
Lady. O K
Her phone immediately goes dead, she try's to dial, nothing, no dialling tone, nothing. So after five mins the phone rings.
Man. Now do you believe me. And here is our department phone number and he gives a number something like 0087 0085 2345

To cheer you up the lady said get stuffed or something, but I think he would have done enough for me to give him card details for £30

So how is it done. Dead easy.  The caller presses the mute button at his end, he can then hear you trying to call a friend,  after a minute or two  he puts his phone down and then recalls you. The phone number he gave is indeed some unpaid bill dept at B T but with just one of the noughts in a different place. The reply to the given number is "no such number.".  Dialling those magic numbers that tell you who has been calling you results in"number withheld."

Be warned. And don't forget, the £30 wouldn't have gone through, the merchant services I think they are called would have stopped the payment. But the caller probably wouldn't even try. He had a much bigger fish. Your card details including the three numbers on the back----for an extended shopping trip at your expense
Title: Re: Re: Tell your Friends!
Post by: Fester on January 20, 2012, 02:12:54 PM
Mike, knowing you, I don't think for one minute that YOU would have fallen for that.

I can see that some vulnerable people might... but not so many.
Title: Re: Re: Tell your Friends!
Post by: Yorkie on January 20, 2012, 03:23:25 PM
You can add your telephone number to the Telephone Preference Service which puts it on a special list as to not be called will sales chat etc.  It operates a bit like the Mail Preference Service to stop spam mail.

Reputable companies refer to these lists and it can prevent a lot of unwanted mail and calls.

These "crooks" will probably not pay any attention to such lists but it's worth a try.   ££$
Title: Re: Re: Tell your Friends!
Post by: martin on January 20, 2012, 03:33:43 PM
On the subject on unwanted phone calls, there is a useful website called "WhoCallsMe" if you get an unwanted call put the number into their search engine and it will show you who the organisation is.  Against that it will show comments made by other people who have been contacted by the company, you also have the option of leaving your own comments, it has a link to the Telephone Preference Service.  Although the TPS is no use when faced with calls from outside the UK.  We subscribe to the TPS and in the last year, I think we have had only one call from a marketing company, which we reported.
Title: Re: Re: Tell your Friends!
Post by: Bellringer on January 20, 2012, 05:25:41 PM
Martin. What you say is mainly true but quite often when you do a 1471 after answering a call when there is no one there, you get "We do not have the caller's number" or "the caller withheld the number".  In these cases of so called "silent calls" there is therefore no number to put into their search engine.
Title: Re: Re: Tell your Friends!
Post by: martin on January 20, 2012, 06:00:36 PM
Often these no number callers are from outside the UK, callers from within the UK are, I think I am right in saying, now required by law to show their number.  As with most laws in the UK the whole thing is a bit of a fudge, calls are not allowed from companies trying to sell you things, but if it is classed as market research, then it is allowed.  All that said, if you do get a number, it is well worth running it through the WhoCallsMe site.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on January 20, 2012, 06:17:35 PM
Quote
So how is it done. Dead easy.  The caller presses the mute button at his end, he can then hear you trying to call a friend,  after a minute or two  he puts his phone down and then recalls you.


This is a very old scam and it works on the principle that if the person who initiates a call effectively blocks the person they're calling from making an outgoing call so long as the caller doesn't hang up.  It's the same thing that happens when someone you know and who has your number on speed dial on their mobile 'calls' you accidentally, by knocking it. When you answer you can hear talking, but no one realises they've called you.  Unfortunately, until they do, or until the 'phone company auto-disconnects, then you can't dial out. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TheMedz on May 21, 2012, 07:34:43 PM

http://www.petrolprices.com/ (http://www.petrolprices.com/)

Handy petrol price comparison site.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on May 23, 2012, 11:38:26 AM
Fuel prices in the Canary Islands varies form 1 Euro to 1.09 Euro per litre!   And that is even after transporting it there.  Must be our high taxes that makes the difference!
 Z**
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 23, 2012, 12:28:13 PM
Did you bring some back with you?     To avoid the outrageous fuel tax here  $angry$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on May 23, 2012, 01:45:40 PM
Ah! There lies the rub!  I didn't have a big enough container!   

But, in Portugal it was 1.70 Euros a litre if that makes you feel any better.      WWW
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Paddy on May 23, 2012, 07:20:55 PM
Someone is going to be very, very disappointed!
Title: Phishing
Post by: Yorkie on June 12, 2012, 08:19:24 AM
I received this in my e-mails today, with the Tesco logo above and addressed to my e-mail rather than my real name.  And, of course, I don't even have an "account" with Tesco!

These phishers seem to stop at nothing to try and get bank and other details from us.   $angry$


This e-mail has been sent to you by TESCO customer support to inform you that we were unable to verify your account details. This might be due to either of the following reasons:

1. A recent change in your personal information. (eg: billing address, phone)
2. Submitting incorrect information during registration process.

Due to this, to ensure that your service is not interrupted, we request you to confirm and update your information today by clicking here.

If you have already confirmed your information then please disregard this message as we are processing the changes you have made.

Regards,
TESCO
Costumer Support

Thanks for your co-operation.
Title: Re: Phishing
Post by: Nemesis on June 12, 2012, 08:21:13 AM
Had the same type of thing from a couple of banks which we have nothing to do with.
Dangerous for the unwary.
Title: Re: Phishing
Post by: DaveR on June 12, 2012, 08:27:38 AM
About 5 of these a day appear in my Spam Email folder, from an assortment of UK and International Banks. Naturally, you should should NEVER reply or give out any further information.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on June 12, 2012, 01:52:04 PM
Did anyone notice that it is from Costumer support?   George has maybe had a part to play in it.   _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: majormellons on June 12, 2012, 02:15:42 PM
Olympic Flame (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FLAME-FROM-THE-LONDON-2012-OLYMPIC-TORCH-/170852289802?pt=UK_Sports_Memorabilia_ET&var=&hash=item27c7970d0a)

(http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g236/llandudnorugbypics/Ebay.png)

How could anyone fall for it?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on June 12, 2012, 02:40:15 PM
Fair play, it is quite funny. I like the bit in the Q&A section where he explains you have to supply your own bin for the large flame and he will come round and light it!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: hollins on June 12, 2012, 02:45:06 PM
I liked this comment,

"Q:     Can I please ask how you can justify being such a pathetic and greedy piece of scum? You are exactly what is wrong with humanity. I feel ashamed to be on the same planet as you.    12-Jun-12
A:     I'd just like to point out that I am in no way officially connected with the London 2012 Olympic Games. If you would like to complain about the games themselves I suggest you contact your local MP. I hope that this clears up any confusion."
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on June 12, 2012, 02:52:33 PM
With jokes like this you can tell by the questions which people are just playing along or if they actually think it's a genuine ad.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Pendragon on June 12, 2012, 03:17:54 PM
Yeah that's funny  :laugh:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 12, 2012, 03:59:18 PM
I would buy one but I already have one from the Tokyo Olympics, tricky to store!  ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Jas on June 12, 2012, 06:49:23 PM
can anyone tell me how to stop spam emails I have tried to block them, but they seem to just change their email address. is there a way I can block them for ever???
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on June 12, 2012, 10:04:29 PM
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can anyone tell me how to stop spam emails I have tried to block them, but they seem to just change their email address. is there a way I can block them for ever???
If you use a decent email provider like Gmail, then they will automatically filter 90%+ of spam emails so you never see them. You should never attempt to unsubscribe from a spam email, as it merely confirms that your email address is active.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on June 13, 2012, 08:07:30 AM
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can anyone tell me how to stop spam emails I have tried to block them, but they seem to just change their email address. is there a way I can block them for ever???

One way to prevent a lot of Spam is to be careful visiting "funny" or "spurious" sites on the Internet.  One of the worst sites for gathering Spam are the "xxx" rated sites.   I'm sure you know what I mean without me having to be explicit!

There is a good article from the BBC here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/webwise/guides/stopping-spam-emails (http://www.bbc.co.uk/webwise/guides/stopping-spam-emails)

This mail is not Spam -

THIS IS SPAM  . . . . . . . . !
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on June 13, 2012, 08:30:47 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
One of the worst sites for gathering Spam are the "xxx" rated sites.


You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
About 5 of these a day appear in my Spam Email folder


Hmm, what does this tell us about DaveR?   :laugh:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on June 13, 2012, 09:08:34 AM
 L0L   L0L   L0L
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on June 13, 2012, 10:02:47 AM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
One way to prevent a lot of Spam is to be careful visiting "funny" or "spurious" sites on the Internet.  One of the worst sites for gathering Spam are the "xxx" rated sites.   I'm sure you know what I mean without me having to be explicit!
It doesn't say that in the BBC article, though? Probably because it's not correct! A site can't obtain your email address just by you visiting it - that's nonsense. The only way spammers can obtain your email address is by you giving it to them or by you unwittingly downloading a Trojan etc to download your address book.

Interestingly, if you use email aliases as I do, you can easily pinpoint where the spammers are getting your email address from. The answer in my case, perhaps surprisingly, was Ebay sellers. Obviously, less scrupulous ones must sell on the list of email addresses that they have done business with in the past.

So...beware!  :)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Jas on June 13, 2012, 12:13:58 PM
Thanks for all the info. I dont know how they got my email address, I dont go into xxx sites, dont even have an ebay account, So  the  only thing is I just delete as they come in.  :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on June 13, 2012, 12:20:33 PM
I've had some in the past that had obviously come from the member directory of my ISP as the other people on the list all had similar e-mail addresses as mine and they were all in alphabetical order.
Title: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: cygnusx-1 on June 29, 2012, 05:30:12 PM
I happened to be at home yesterday afternoon when the phone rang and a gentleman from somewhere in Asia I think, told me that my computer was downloading infected files which will cause severe problems in the future...........as I have heard of this before I went along with him thanking him for ringing me.

He asked me to close the open windows on the PC which I happened to be on and to click on the start button.........when I said after a few minutes that I did not have a start button he asked was I using an Apple Mac and I said no as I was using Linux Ubuntu he just put the phone down.

This was a scam to start using remote access to my PC which is only available via Windows opearting systems to probably put some little programme on such as a keylogger.

About 30 mins later the phone went again and this time it was a lady representing the same company wanting to help me again............I went through the same helpful procedure and wasted a few more minutes of their time but this lady did not understand that Linux operating systems do not have a Start button.


My message to anyone who gets this helpful phone call...............ALWAYS tell them you are on an   APPLE MAC or LINUX machine as it stops them in their tracks.
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: Nemesis on June 29, 2012, 06:47:55 PM
I have told a fair few of them that I don't have a computer, that soon takes the wind out of their sails !
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: pkevin on June 29, 2012, 07:26:43 PM
Just ask them to phone back on the other line that is next to your computer, which coincidentallyis the same as North Wales Police.
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: 1_rob_1 on June 29, 2012, 09:55:15 PM
Some of these claim to be phoning from Microsoft.
As cygnusx-1 posted, tell them you are using a Linux operating system. Or confront them directly & tell them that if they know that your system has a virus or any other problems, then they must be hacking your system, & to know this they are contravening the data protection act, & you are going to take action against the call. - - - They will soon hang up ;D
These are common scams. In the first instance, they will claim to get rid of the virus/spyware by asking you to download their removal software, or to remotely access your pc to manually remove it. - - - For this, you will be charged about £80.    this will not work because the "virus" has installed itself too deep inside your pc. - - they will then charge you another £70 ish to finish the removal.  - - - After you have paid again, your pc will probably be unusable until you pay a local techie to sort it out at a fraction of this cost.

REMEMBER: If anyone phones you to say that your pc has any problems whatsoever - - To know this, they are illegally hacking your pc, or lying.   So if they are hacking, they wont phone you.

This scam actually catches a lot of people out & they get stung for a lot of money, so dont forget, nobody that phones you knows whether your pc is infected or not.  - - So HANG UP.

Also while I am on this post. If anyone gets any windows that open on their screen to say that their computer has a number of infections & the computer needs to be scanned to remove them. DONT unless it is a message from the antivirus/antispyware program which YOU installed on your pc.

Stay safe

Rob   
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: DaveR on June 29, 2012, 09:57:14 PM
Microsoft Windows *shakes head sadly*  &shake&
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: 1_rob_1 on June 29, 2012, 10:03:16 PM
Its not actually Microsoft. They just claim to be phoning on behalf of microsoft , just to get your trust.
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: snowcap on June 29, 2012, 11:06:24 PM
i received a warning which i think should be passed on but i don't know how but ill try this is it (i hope) Do not open any message with an attachment called:"Invitation FACEBOOK", regardless of who sent it.
It is a virus that opens an Olympic torch that burns the whole hard disc C of your computer. This virus will be received from someone you had in your address book.
That's why you should send this message to all your contacts.  It is better to receive this email 25 times than to receive the virus and open it.
If you receive E-MAIL called: "Invitation FACEBOOK", though sent by a friend, do not open it and delete it immediately. CNN said it is a new virus discovered recently and that has been classified by Microsoft as the most destructive virus ever.
It is a Trojan Horse that asks you to install an adobe flash plug-in.  Once you install it, it's all over. And there is no repair yet for this kind of virus. This virus simply destroys the Zero Sector of the Hard Disc, where the vital information of their function is saved. wow it worked,
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: DaveR on June 30, 2012, 12:37:34 AM
http://blog.dynamoo.com/2012/05/invitation-facebook-hoax.html (http://blog.dynamoo.com/2012/05/invitation-facebook-hoax.html)
Title: Re: Beware of helpful phone calls!
Post by: Gixer181 on June 30, 2012, 01:24:45 AM
My brother in law had the same and they got very abusive towards him when he questioned them. Then last week we had another one asking to speak to MY DAD who died on the 6th june this year, when we told him he had died she turned round and said she had spoken to him the day before which is strange seeing he died 2 weeks before. :o
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: 1_rob_1 on June 30, 2012, 04:04:20 PM
The olympic torch "Facebook Virus" is a hoax - it doesnt exist. The message has been in circulation for quite a long time now.
There are a lot of emailed Facebook invitations though which are linked to unsafe websites, so it is best to ignore any email invitations from Facebook, & just check your account manually.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on June 30, 2012, 05:05:38 PM
A good way to determine whether a warning message is a hoax or not is to copy and paste part of it into Google before posting it anywhere.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: 1_rob_1 on June 30, 2012, 10:29:33 PM
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A good way to determine whether a warning message is a hoax or not is to copy and paste part of it into Google before posting it anywhere.

Correct!!
but you can still get a lot of duff info from some of the sites that are displayed.
One of the most reliable sites is snopes.com
http://www.snopes.com/computer/virus/virus.asp (http://www.snopes.com/computer/virus/virus.asp)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on July 01, 2012, 08:29:40 AM
Agreed.  $good$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 23, 2012, 07:51:37 AM
Unless you use VMWare virtual machines, this won't affect you (http://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/crisis-windows-sneaks-virtual-machines), but it's better to be forewarned, since it targets both Macs and Windows.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 02, 2012, 11:17:14 AM
I've been asked by a friend to publish the following:-

"We have what we know is a scam operating from a man in Middlesbrough (Mark Heslehurst) whereby he is asking for (and receiving) money, via the Internet, claiming it's to reunite him and his small son living in Cambodia.  He tells people the son is ill; that he and his Mother are living in poor conditions as refugees, etc.  I did some digging and found that his ex-wife, as she now is (Dominique Dufieux - google her and see), is living a good life there as a lawyer and the child is well - she takes him on hols all over the world! I also found he did the same scam in the USA 2 years ago. The police looked into it and decided he was not breaking any law because he himself actually states that the money will be used for adverts in newspapers and that he will tell his story world wide - which in turn might make the PM in the UK help him get the child back here!  As long as he believes that will happen - he is OK! Money is rolling in - but I am like the proverbial dog with a bone and I won't let him get away with this. People in Harrogate and Birmingham (where he tried to get money earlier) contacted me and we are determined to expose him."
You receive a letter saying that your child's school has entered his/her poem for publication in a book. You can buy a copy of the book for only £xx.xx plus postage. Is this a scam?

Truth is, it's a rather clever moneymaking scheme but, at the same time, it's quite legitimate. If you think the price is affordable and that it might encourage your child to write, then there's no shame in buying a copy. More...

From Pete:-

I publish this in the hope that it might help prevent readers from being similarly scammed, as has just happened to my son.

He had just returned to university a few days ago after working an internship at David Brown Gears during the summer, and was looking at cameras for sale through "Gumtree" - a classified ads website - with a view to upgrading his current digital camera, when he was distracted by an ad for a brand new, unopened, Retina MacBookPro going for only £800. He decided he had to have it.

Now, my wife and I were on holiday and I knew nothing of all this, otherwise I could have advised him that it was probably a scam and not to touch it with a ten-foot barge pole. In actual fact, he had contacted my wife and asked her if he could borrow the money to buy it, paying her back when he got his wages. This, they both kept from me, fearing I would veto it (the amount of stuff that goes on behind dads' backs is amazing, don't you find?!) Besides, we had enough on our plates as number-two son had just lost his wallet on the Isle of Wight and we were frantically trying to cancel debit cards, etc.!

To get back to the story, my son rang the mobile number on the advert, and it was an Orange Ansafone message - as it was every time he rang it. The people on the other end always replied by email.

Turned out that they were selling the unopened RetinaMBP on behalf of their wheelchair-bound auntie who had somehow got it and didn't want it, and the seller didn't want it as they were happy with their current MBP. (Yeah, I know - it gets worse!)

At this point, my son made his interest clear and they got down to business. Apparently, they didn't accept Paypal; they didn't accept credit cards; and if you wanted to pay cash on collection, lo and behold they lived right out in Crediton in Devon - enough distance to prevent most people from collecting! They only really accepted direct bank transfers.

Don't get me wrong, alarm bells were ringing in my son's head - just not loud enough to stop him wanting a RetinaMBP!

He got the address in Crediton, and then asked (all this by email, remember) for proof that they lived there as he was worried about sending all that money to a complete stranger. By return email he received a scanned gas bill with the name Heather Jones on it - the same name he had been dealing with. He decided to take the plunge and transferred the £800 into the account they had given him. Bye-bye, money. Bye-bye summer wage / loan from 'Bank-of-Mum'! Bye-bye camera.

No more emails. He was now getting frantic, and after sending more and more emails, containing more and more pleading for the money back, he finally received one more. It just said something about sex and travel, and the letters "LOL".

Calls to Gumtree's 0845 number were fielded with an 'out-of-hours' notice. Calls to NatWest seemed to hold out hope as both my son's account and the crook's account were with NatWest. The fraud department there took all the details and they said all the right words, but to be honest they probably then put the report at the bottom of a very large pile of similar please for help after they'd hung up.

The police in Devon listened and then confirmed that no such person lived at that address. Furthermore it was the address of a hardware store. He was then given the number of a fraud investigation department of the police and had a long conversation with them during which he could tell the whole story. Then came the hardest phone call of all for my son to make - the one to me.

As luck would have it, I was only about 80 miles from Crediton at the time, and considered a drive round there, but me going to jail for assault with a baseball bat would have just added to the problems, let's face it! So, it occurred to me that Heather Jones might not live there, but she *might* work there and so I found the number of the shop and rang it from the top of the cliff facing Durdle Door in Dorset asking to speak to Mrs Jones. "Is this about the iPad?" the man asked, "I'm sorry but someone is using this address in his scams". Turned out that other people had been going through the same amateur sleuthing that we had been doing after being similarly duped. It seemed that the last scam had been for an iPad, and now a RetinaMBP. The police had been informed by the keeper of the store. One woman had put £500 into an account for the iPad and not received it, and a couple of chaps from Manchester had thought better of paying out the money to strangers and had actually driven all the way down to the address only to find out they had gone on a 'wild goose chase'.

We then knew that all was lost.

The scammer is probably working something like this:

1. He gets a free pay-as-you-go sim card and uses the number in his advert. He then makes sure he never answers the call, asking that interested parties leave their email addresses on the ansafone.

2. He uses a free yahoo.co.uk email address (along with hotmail, googlemail, gmail, etc., the scourge of the Internet!)

3. He sets up a bank account - possibly using the identity of someone whose details he acquired from a previous scam*

4. When he's lured some people into parting with their 'hard-earned' he empties the account and closes it. Easy to do online. He closes the email address and moves onto another one. He then chucks the sim card, or even the whole phone away and forgets the misery he has inflicted, moving onto his next prey.

*Let's face it, he now knows my son's name, AppleID, email address, bank account details, address, mobile phone number - surely enough there to possibly use for the crook's next scam!

For days you are racked with rage and thoughts of getting even with this pond-slime, but to be honest, all you can do is chalk it up to experience and make sure you are never caught out again.

Please don't be caught like this. If something is too good to be true, it usually is.

Pete
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on October 03, 2012, 08:52:49 PM
I had a phone call early last week from someone claiming to be helping people get compensation for damaged hearing due to working in factories.  I suggested it was a scam, but the guy insisted it wasn't.  He knew I had worked in a factory (although didn't say or ask eher - it was well known for washing machines) and wanted to know if I would be interested in pursuing a claim for loss of hearing.

My hearing isn't as good as it was, but I put that down to age.  He asked if I was free to go for a hearing test this week, and we agreed on yesterday (Tuesday) 10.30am at the YHA Sychnant Pass in Conwy (his pronunciation was something else!).  He also said that I would receive information through the post, but did not ask for my address.

Information was received through the post the following day, from the Industrial Hearing Clinic in Bury.  I googled them and there were people saying it was a scam, but I thought I'd go along and see what happens, making sure I gave away no important details.

I was first seen by a young girl who checked my name and age - her paperwork showed by age as two years less than it really is but I made no effort to correct her.  Then took me for a hearing test.  Put on headphones, she pressed buttons on her keyboard and various sounds were heard - all I had to do was press the button when I heard them.  She made some notes then said my hearing was 12dBA down.

Then I was seen by a man, who said he was from a firm of solicitors in Plymouth, and all he asked me was how long had I worked in a factory (39 and a half years!), what was my role (Design Engineer) and how much noise had been subjected to (bit on the shop floor as I was not confined to the office).  He asked if I was interested in pursuing the claim, I said yes if there was something to gain - but he then said that my hearing was only down by 12dBA so it would be unlikely that I would get anything.  He apologised for having wasted my time - I left!

Something that puzzled me was that the girl did not look into my ears before doing the test, as I know I am in need of having them syringed, so that would have undoubtedly affect the test results!

Just seemed an awful lot of effort if it was a scam - there were a few others going through the same process although no-one I recognised from the many that had worked where I had.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blodyn on October 03, 2012, 09:55:21 PM
I had a similar phone call from someone offering compensation for hearing loss as I'd worked in a factory.  I told them that that was completely untrue, that they should not be calling me as I have caller preference and hung up. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 13, 2012, 07:57:27 AM
Thius is a report of a scam that first occurred in Australia around 2008 and might have resurfaced here recently:


There is a new and clever credit card scam - be wary of those who come bearing gifts. Please circulate this. It just happened to friends of ours a week or so ago in Guildford, and it can pretty well now be happening anywhere else.

It works like this:     

Wednesday (17 October 2012) I had a phone call (I’m in the BT Phone Book) from someone who said that he was from "Express Couriers" asking if I was going to be home because there was a package for me, and the caller said the delivery would arrive at my home in roughly an hour or so. Sure enough, about an hour later, a deliveryman turned up with a beautiful basket of flowers and a bottle of wine. I was very surprised since it did not involve any special occasion or holiday, and I certainly didn't expect anything like it. I wondered who would send me such a gift, I asked  who the sender is. The deliveryman's reply was, he was only delivering the gift package, a card was being sent separately I think; (the card has never arrived!). There was also a consignment note with this gift.

He then went on to explain that because the gift contained alcohol, there was a £3.50 "delivery charge" as proof that he had actually delivered the package and not just left it on the doorstep to just be stolen or taken by anyone.

This sounded logical and I offered to pay him cash. He then said, they are not allowed to take cash, the company required the payment to be a credit or debit card only so that everything is properly accounted for, right address etc…

My husband, who, by this time, was standing beside me, pulled his wallet out of his pocket with the credit/debit card, and 'John', the "delivery man", asked my husband to swipe the card on the small mobile card machine, which had a small screen and keypad where Frank was asked to enter the card's PIN and  3 digit security number. A receipt was
printed out and given to us.

To our horrible surprise, between Thursday and the following Monday, £4,000+ had been charged/withdrawn from our credit/debit account at various ATM machines, particularly in the London area!

It appeared that somehow the "mobile credit card machine" which the deliveryman carried now had all the info necessary to create a "dummy" card with all our card details, after my husband swiped our card and entered the requested PIN and security number.

Upon finding out the illegal transactions on our card, of course, we immediately notified the bank, which issued us the card, and our credit/debit account had been closed.

We also personally went to the Police, where it was confirmed by the Police it is definitely a scam, because several households have been similarly hit.

WARNING: Be wary of accepting any "surprise gift or package", which you neither expected nor personally ordered, especially if it involves any kind of payment as a condition of receiving the gift or package. Also, never accept anything if you do not personally know or there is no proper identification of who the sender is.

Above all, the only time you should give out any personal credit/debit card information is when you yourself initiated the purchase or transaction!

Please pass this on; it may just prevent someone else from being swindled by these scumbags
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on November 13, 2012, 08:10:18 AM
The UK version is just the Australian version from 4 years ago rewritten - why do people do this?!
 
http://www.hoax-slayer.com/flowers-wine-credit-card-scam.shtml (http://www.hoax-slayer.com/flowers-wine-credit-card-scam.shtml)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 13, 2012, 06:10:04 PM
It is, but it might have re-emerged.
Title: postal scam
Post by: snowcap on November 18, 2012, 08:47:18 PM
Postal Scam:
Can you circulate this around especially as Xmas is fast approaching: 
 
It has been confirmed by Royal Mail. The Trading Standards Office are making people aware of the following scam:

A card is posted through your door from a company called PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) suggesting that they were unable to deliver a parcel and that you need to contact them on 0906 6611911 (a Premium rate number).
 
DO NOT call this number, as this is a mail scam originating from Belize .

If you call the number and you start to hear a recorded message you will already have been billed £315 for the phone call.
 
Title: Re: postal scam
Post by: Yorkie on November 18, 2012, 09:06:14 PM
That scam was supposed o have been closed down in 2005.   Untrue rumour in 2011 that it had resurfaced.   You are your best own judge!   ££$
Title: Re: postal scam
Post by: DaveR on November 18, 2012, 10:04:22 PM
As Mulder once said...the truth is out there:

http://www.snopes.com/fraud/telephone/pds.asp (http://www.snopes.com/fraud/telephone/pds.asp)
Title: Re: postal scam
Post by: born2run on November 19, 2012, 10:49:56 PM
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Postal Scam:
Can you circulate this around especially as Xmas is fast approaching: 
 
It has been confirmed by Royal Mail. The Trading Standards Office are making people aware of the following scam:

A card is posted through your door from a company called PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) suggesting that they were unable to deliver a parcel and that you need to contact them on 0906 6611911 (a Premium rate number).
 
DO NOT call this number, as this is a mail scam originating from Belize .

If you call the number and you start to hear a recorded message you will already have been billed £315 for the phone call.

The scam is still working I phoned the number and sure enough you do get a recorded message

 :D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on November 20, 2012, 09:23:57 AM
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The scam is still working I phoned the number and sure enough you do get a recorded message
 :D

Don't expect us to have a whip round for the £315 you've been charged! L0L
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on November 20, 2012, 11:27:18 AM
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You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

The scam is still working I phoned the number and sure enough you do get a recorded message
 :D

Don't expect us to have a whip round for the £315 you've been charged! L0L
I actually think its impossible to be charged so much for one phone call, even at premium rate. The maximum you can be charged is £2.55 a minute and thats from a mobile phone:
http://www.phonepayplus.org.uk/For-the-Public/Premium-rate-number-guide.aspx (http://www.phonepayplus.org.uk/For-the-Public/Premium-rate-number-guide.aspx)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on November 21, 2012, 09:39:59 PM
I think texts can be more though - seen a few for charity etc where you can donate a fiver to charity - and there used to be a betting one that you could do where it would charge you a fiver straight from your phone bill or credit. But it allowed you to put any winnings back into your own account

thus

I had my own scam going at the time - because I was on pay as you go - with Orange if you topped up by £30 or more you got free texts and phone calls all month.

So I would top up by £30 -  stick on 6 relatively easy win bets at a fiver each- and then stick all the winnings back in my account.
Most times I would get at least all and often more of my £30 back and enjoyed the luxury of having free texts and calls!
o
But alas the i phone bug got me so I'm now tied up all in a contract  :'(
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on January 18, 2013, 01:35:05 PM
A new Scam on the block, or new to me.   Receipt from PayPal payment to Skype asking you to follow a link if you dispute it.
Details here to save me a lot of typing.

http://www.hoax-slayer.com/skype-top-up-paypal-phishing-scam.shtml (http://www.hoax-slayer.com/skype-top-up-paypal-phishing-scam.shtml)

Don't get caught. $good$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 05, 2013, 12:13:14 PM
In early November last, I had new Gas and Electricity meters fitted at the instigation of British Gas.  They are the new, so called, Smart Meters, and smart they certainly are!   My first bill has increased by 70% over the same period last year, so that's SMART - especially for British Gas!  Needless to say Yorkie is a bit miffed, and apart from filing a complaint, has stopped the DD until the amount can be justified.

Anyone else had any experiences with BG?
 :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on February 05, 2013, 12:21:14 PM
Yorkie... not British Gas as such, but...

Since having a lot of work done on our house, we have done away with the Gas Fire, and the Gas Cooker.
The only Gas appliance we have is the boiler, and although it is serving more radiators now, I had expected a reduction in the amount of Gas we use.

Sadly, our average gas bills are about 30% higher than previously!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on February 05, 2013, 01:15:45 PM
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In early November last, I had new Gas and Electricity meters fitted at the instigation of British Gas.  They are the new, so called, Smart Meters, and smart they certainly are!   My first bill has increased by 70% over the same period last year, so that's SMART - especially for British Gas!  Needless to say Yorkie is a bit miffed, and apart from filing a complaint, has stopped the DD until the amount can be justified.

Anyone else had any experiences with BG?
 :rage:
Perhaps your old meter was faulty?

https://www.gov.uk/smart-meters-how-they-work (https://www.gov.uk/smart-meters-how-they-work)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 05, 2013, 02:02:47 PM
Yorkie, were you away on a cruise a year ago? Was the weather milder a year ago? We are with Scottish Power, dual fuel, direct debit, Internet account, it went down for us recently!  D)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 05, 2013, 03:22:05 PM
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In early November last, I had new Gas and Electricity meters fitted at the instigation of British Gas.  They are the new, so called, Smart Meters, and smart they certainly are!   My first bill has increased by 70% over the same period last year, so that's SMART - especially for British Gas!  Needless to say Yorkie is a bit miffed, and apart from filing a complaint, has stopped the DD until the amount can be justified.

Anyone else had any experiences with BG?
 :rage:
Perhaps your old meter was faulty?

https://www.gov.uk/smart-meters-how-they-work (https://www.gov.uk/smart-meters-how-they-work)

But then again, it may not.  We shall wait and see.  Meters are not accurate and being a new installation could be incorrectly calibrated. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 05, 2013, 03:27:03 PM
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Yorkie, were you away on a cruise a year ago? Was the weather milder a year ago? We are with Scottish Power, dual fuel, direct debit, Internet account, it went down for us recently!  D)

Cruise was prior to charging period.  Our use of power tends to be fairly constant as past bills (over a number of years) indicate. Taking into consideration increases in charges.

The difference is a bit too much for me to find a reasonable explanation.  :D

Might be time for a change in supplier which I have never done in the years we have been here.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on February 05, 2013, 04:06:58 PM
What's the actual difference in Kwh or Units for this year as opposed to last year?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 05, 2013, 04:45:43 PM
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What's the actual difference in Kwh or Units for this year as opposed to last year?

Haven't a clue as I know our consumption is very regular.  It is the huge price difference that is concerning me.  However, if the meters, or one of them, are inaccurate the charges will be based on the units and readings relayed to the readings control centre.   We have a small unit from which we can watch our own usage on a daily, weekly or monthly basis and can see where and what is using the power over each day.  I was concerned about some of the initial information it supplied but did not worry too much about it at the time.

It may well be that we have actually used what BG say but if so I don't know how!   I'll just leave it to them now and maybe fire up my emergency generator.   ZXZ
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on February 05, 2013, 04:50:12 PM
Consumption figures, whether in Kwh or Units, are all on your Bills - it's an easy way to tell whether the increase is due to extra usage or an increase in the price per unit.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 05, 2013, 09:09:23 PM
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Consumption figures, whether in Kwh or Units, are all on your Bills - it's an easy way to tell whether the increase is due to extra usage or an increase in the price per unit.

I know what you mean 'cos I learnt about it when I did my Engineering studies.  The increase in the bills could be due to a number of reasons, even miscalculation, so I will let BG do the investigations and then challenge if I don't agree with them. I thank everyone for their comments and will let you know the outcome eventually.
 $thanx$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 28, 2013, 08:17:10 AM
Pleased to announce that my complaint received sympathetic hearing and after a couple of e-mails and one telephone conversation, I am receiving the equivalent of approx 10% off the bill in question. 
Mission accomplished!
 $yes$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: martin on February 28, 2013, 10:41:45 AM
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In early November last, I had new Gas and Electricity meters fitted at the instigation of British Gas.  They are the new, so called, Smart Meters, and smart they certainly are!   My first bill has increased by 70% over the same period last year, so that's SMART - especially for British Gas!  Needless to say Yorkie is a bit miffed, and apart from filing a complaint, has stopped the DD until the amount can be justified.

Anyone else had any experiences with BG?
 :rage:
This is an interesting thread as our gas bill has also increased for the last quarter when compared to the same period last year, in fact it has almost doubled.  Being a retired person with time on my hands I always keep a close eye on all of our expenditure, in the case of gas and electric usage, I do my own readings and calculations.  I always break down the consumption figures to show the cost per day for the gas and electric.  For the last quarter the electric usage per day was £1.37 which compares favourably with the corresponding figure last year of £1.32.  At this point I will say that as we are on a fixed term deal, there has been no change to the unit price, etc, over the periods I am comparing, so the electric comparison is as I would expect, almost identical for the two periods, however the gas comparison shows a massive cost increase.  For the period ending in February 2012 the daily cost was £2.12, the same period this year it is £4.10 per day.  Because of this I have just had our boiler checked/serviced, and no problems were found, the engineer also checked for leaks, but again all was in order, so I have no idea why there has been such an increase.  Perhaps the meter has developed a fault, but after reading about Yorkie’s experience of a new meter, I am rather reluctant to go down that road, the only thing I can think is perhaps the weather this year for the quarter ending 8th February was significantly colder than the correspond period last year, does anyone have any thoughts on that please?  (we are on a dual fuel deal with E-On).



Title: WARNING YAHOO MAIL AND ALL EMAIL USERS!!!
Post by: rhos.rover on March 09, 2013, 11:05:59 PM
I thought I would warn any Yahoo mail users of a very nasty virus that is sweeping its system. I’m not sure this has been covered in other posts, but I will post it anyway in the hope it helps someone here.

Yesterday I got a phone text message from a friend who said the mail I sent him had an attachment he could not open. I was surprised as I had not written to him for weeks, and I have never sent him an attachment.

I checked my mail box and sent items when I got home and found that although my sent box showed nothing sent, I had sent mails to almost everyone in the address book…

I have more that one Yahoo account, for different car groups and so on, and checked these. Yep, some of these had done the same. :o

I asked my girl friend to check her Yahoo accounts, and two of hers were hacked and have done the same thing sending out mails.

None of my or her mail accounts were connected by contact lists, or even between our own accounts.

I checked on line and found that Yahoo mail has a serious problem.

Your mail box is hacked, and your contact or address list is plundered. The virus then mails everyone it can (including your account it cane from!) with a blank letter and an attachment.

This mail you receive could be in your name or one of your contacts. It can even be from someone you have once sent or received a mail from, and does not necessarily have to be from someone in your contact/address book.

Once you open the attachment it can releases a virus that can cause your mail box or computer to become infected.

One clue is that you may receive a (up till now) blank mail from a lot of contacts together, in a form of group email. This will be the same as the mail 'you sent out' without knowing it. It will have an attachment with it.

It started in America in late January and is now spreading to Britain. It appears to originate in India (where Yahoo farms out for cheap labour, ironic isn’t it as this could cost Yahoo dear...), and frozen mail box users in the US (who opened the attachment) received a mail containing notification that they are hacked, and also a telephone number to call to fix it. Once called, people with ‘poor spoken English’ offered an option to have the accounts restored for $100. No doubt you needed to pass over your bank details for this, and end up having your whole bank account emptied.

A video was posted on Youtube by an Indian IT worker, three weeks before this, and showed how easy it was to hack into Yahoo mail accounts, and hundreds of thousands of scammers had seen the video before it was removed.

It has now progressed into pointless hacking for fun, as well as for fraud. Sometimes its advertising, sometimes it is abusive, sometimes it’s a virus that destroys your mail account and there are even reports of damaging your PC. 

I warn anyone who has received a blank letter with an attachment appearing in their inbox to delete it ASAP, EVEN IF IT IS FROM SOMEONE YOU KNOW, as that is the whole point of plundering and using your contacts or names of people you trust.

This virus will spread to other mail addresses, such as Google, and as one computer is much the same as another, a virus opened via the attachment could take over your mail box or damage your PC.

I hope this makes sense. Please reply if you don’t understand and I will go over it again.

Simply, never, never open attachments that you are not expecting in your mail. If it is not accompanied with a letter that you KNOW is from someone you trust, DELETE IT.


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 10, 2013, 08:17:57 AM
"Users of Yahoo Mail are suffering from persistent hacking attempts, says The Next Web. The Internet firm, the third largest provider of email, behind Microsoft and Google, has plugged two security holes already, but has not managed to fix the problem.

While some holders of compromised accounts say that they clicked on an infected link--a fake MSNBC page, apparently--many claim that the first they knew of being hacked was when people in their contacts lists said they had received dodgy emails from them. One user, whose organization appears to have used Yahoo Mail, said that the hack--so evidently a scam--left the account in question unable to send emails or even change the password. For $100, they later discovered, the scammers would return their account to normal."
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on March 10, 2013, 11:04:56 AM
on my windows account I've recently had a lot of e mails from my ex girlfriend - saying stuff like "Hey you gotta see this etc" luckily I haven't opened any of the attachments - I assume it's the same thing, and getting a virus from an ex girlfriend  ??? haha not that uncommon  :P
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Tosh on March 10, 2013, 04:23:15 PM
My e mail was hacked either overnight or early this morning.
A friend mailed me to say what had happened but I realised anyway when I received two e mails from myself.
I e mailed everybody in my contacts list to tell them what had happened and placed the warning in the subject box as well as in the  message.
It is not only attachments some of them show links to be clicked on.
If you are at all suspicious just delete them from the In Box list before you are tempted to click on them.
Tosh
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on March 10, 2013, 05:17:52 PM
Or...get a Mac and avoid all this PC virus nonsense completely.  ;)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: rhos.rover on March 11, 2013, 10:05:09 PM
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Or...get a Mac and avoid all this PC virus nonsense completely.  ;)

I will ask Father Christmas for a Mac, Dave. But I don’t think I’ve been that good.  :(
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on March 11, 2013, 10:24:37 PM
 :D You can but ask....
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 12, 2013, 07:38:43 AM
Don't forget you can get a Mac for comparatively little these days - Mac Mini is about £500 - and you can use your old display, mice and keyboards until you can get new ones.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on July 01, 2013, 07:15:27 PM
Received an e.mail today purporting to come from o2 suggesting that my DD had failed and to call them at a certain number or take a link to another web page in order to pay my bill.   Realising it was a scam I went to the web page out of curiosity and found that it looked very authentic and could fool some people.   I then passed the email to o2 security. 
 :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on July 13, 2013, 07:25:00 AM
Another Scam.

Who on Earth would take this as a genuine mail?

Content-Type: text/plain

Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
=0D
 =0D
Dear PayPal Customer,=0D
=0D
 =0D
On July 13, 2013, We recently have determined that different computers ha=
ve logged in your PayPal account.=0D
 =0D
And multiple password failures were present before the logo's. We now nee=
d you to re-confirm your account information to us.=0D
If this is not completed by ,21, 07, 2013, we will be forced to suspend y=
our account indefinitely.=0D
=0D
Case ID Number : PP-001-544-590=0D
=0D
To restore your account,=0D
=0D
Please download the attached form to verify your Profile information and =
restore your account access.=0D
=0D
Make sure you enter the information accurately, and according to the form=
ats required.=0D
Fill in all the required fields.=0D
=0D
It's usually pretty easy to take care of things like this. Most of the=0D
time, we just need a little more information about your account or latest=
=0D
transactions.=0D
=0D
To help us with this and to see what you can and can't do with your accou=
nt=0D
until the issue is resolved, log in to your account and go to the=0D
Resolution Center.=0D
=0D
=0D
Yours sincerely,=0D
PayPal=0D
 =0D
----------------------------------------------------------------------=0D
Help Center: =0D
https://www.paypal.com/eg/cgi-bin/helpweb?cmd=3D_help=0D (https://www.paypal.com/eg/cgi-bin/helpweb?cmd=3D_help=0D)
Security Center: =0D
https://www.paypal.com/eg/security=0D (https://www.paypal.com/eg/security=0D)
 =0D
Please do not reply to this email because we are not monitoring this inbo=
x. To get in touch with us, log in to your account and click "Contact Us"=
 at the bottom of any page.=0D
 =0D
Copyright =A9 2013 PayPal Inc. All rights reserved.=0D
 =0D
Consumer advisory: PayPal Pte Ltd, the Holder of the PayPal=99 payment se=
rvice stored value facility, does not require the approval of the Monetar=
y Authority of Singapore. Consumers (users) are advised to read the terms=
 and conditions: https://www.paypal.com/eg/sg/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=3Dp/gen/= (https://www.paypal.com/eg/sg/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=3Dp/gen/=)
ua/ua-outside carefully.  =0D
PayPal Email ID  PP076=0D


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 :D :D  :D  :D :D :D  :D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 10, 2013, 06:36:58 PM
Before anyone posts this as a genuine scam, it isn't:


From another forum:

I don't know if you've come across this one:

CHECK YOUR RECEIPTS BEFORE LEAVING THE CHECK-OUT

I bought a bunch of stuff, over £150, & I glanced at my receipt as the cashier was handing me the bags. I saw a cash-back of £40. I told her I didn't request a cash back & to delete it. She said I'd have to take the £40 because she couldn't delete it. I told Her to call a supervisor. Supervisor came & said I'd have to take it.. I said NO! Taking the £40 would be a cash advance against my Credit card & I wasn't paying interest on a cash advance!!!!! If they couldn't delete it then they would have to delete the whole order. So the supervisor had the cashier delete the whole order & re-scan everything! The second time I looked at the electronic pad before I signed & a cash-back of £20 popped up. At that point I told the cashier & she deleted it. The total came out right. The cashier agreed that the Electronic Pad must be defective.

(It goes on at length, claiming this is a deliberate scam).

I've just read about it in my Tyne Buy (the little booklet I get from my local consumer group). I didn't think it sounded plausible, so googled it, and sure enough, it is a hoax. If you're interested, you can read more here. As they say, it's always sensible to check your receipt, but there's no evidence at all that this happens in any supermarket.

I'm afraid that whoever edits my little magazine/booklet is completely credulous in these matters; it's not the first time they've repeated internet hoaxes.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Paulakelsall on August 10, 2013, 07:34:29 PM
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CHECK YOUR RECEIPTS BEFORE LEAVING THE CHECK-OUT


I always check my receipts as a couple of years ago in Tesco I was asked if wanted cash back. I replied no but noticed on my receipt £10 cashback had been added. I pointed it out to the cashier so was not out of pocket but you can never be too careful.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TheMedz on August 18, 2013, 08:03:07 PM
Another nasty one to be aware of.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23717575 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23717575)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: snowcap on August 18, 2013, 10:05:22 PM
could end up were flashing your lights to be polite will become an offence,
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 19, 2013, 07:05:29 AM
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Another nasty one to be aware of.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23717575 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23717575)

All flashing lights show you, is that they are working, and such a signal has never been recognised in the Highway Code.  The answer is don't pay any attention to them.   ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 19, 2013, 07:34:11 AM
I'd second that.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: cygnusx-1 on August 20, 2013, 08:53:33 PM
A flash of lights is a warning that you are there in the dark, as you are not allowed to use the horn after 11.30pm until 7.00am.

It has never been an indication of your right of way.......I passed my test in 1980 and that is what was in the Highway Code then.........should read it again to see if any of that has changed!! 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 20, 2013, 09:25:26 PM
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A flash of lights is a warning that you are there in the dark, as you are not allowed to use the horn after 11.30pm until 7.00am.

It has never been an indication of your right of way.......I passed my test in 1980 and that is what was in the Highway Code then.........should read it again to see if any of that has changed!! 

I think you will find that between dusk and dawn it is recommended that one drives on dipped headlights.   In an emergency there is no reason why the horn cannot be used.  However, if one is driving in accordance with their ability and the prevailing conditions, the use of the horn should not be necessary.

One time when it is possible to "flash" your headlights, is when you are about to overtake on a Motorway at speed and a slower motorist ahead could possibly cross lanes into your path.  This is more for the Police than the normal driver though.

I passed my test in 1957!  And my Advanced Tutor for the I.A.M. and RoSPA a few years ago.
 ^*^0    :D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: snowcap on August 20, 2013, 09:34:06 PM
that makes you a better driver than the rest of us then?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 21, 2013, 07:04:35 AM
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that makes you a better driver than the rest of us then?

  No!

But it doesn't hurt to pass on a little bit of knowledge to help others who want to improve.  I chose to teach Advanced Driving in order to assist in improving road safety amongst all drivers.  Also it was voluntary, in my own time, and done without any payment being received.   ;D
 :P :P :P

And I believe those who passed their Advanced Test were grateful for the assistance.   :D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 21, 2013, 08:06:45 AM
I think the biggest advantage of taking both a course and hopefully then passing the IAM test is that it does make you a more aware driver, plus you inevitably learn many things of which you weren't aware previously. I was lucky, as I happened to have a friend who was a Police driving instructor, and he trained me over a period of three months for the test. It really was a revelation, both seeing him drive and then attempting the same manoeuvres he'd done, in his case with apparent ease.  I also spent three evenings on the Police skid pan, driving a clapped-out Cortina with bald tyres, inflated to about 80psi, and no windows.

If we're debating what makes one person a better driver than another, I'd say there were two things: first is thoughtfulness, which is seriously lacking in many drivers in the area, and secondly is simply skill.  I put thoughtfulness first, as I suspect that's what my better and half and I notice missing the most. Signalling is so simple and easy to do, yet I doubt that 1 in 50 drivers - if that - do it properly on a roundabout. On the skills front, I regularly witness drivers unable to drive in forwards into parking bays. We always reverse in, yet any day you can see hordes of motorists providing the on-street entertainment when they attempt to parallel park, or even simply reverse.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on August 21, 2013, 09:03:21 AM
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that makes you a better driver than the rest of us then?

No, Snowcap... that would be me, I'm probably the best driver in the world, if not the universe.... miles better than you.  :laugh: :laugh:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 21, 2013, 12:55:38 PM
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that makes you a better driver than the rest of us then?

No, Snowcap... that would be me, I'm probably the best driver in the world, if not the universe.... miles better than you.  :laugh: :laugh:

I agree with Fester, there is no-one, absolutely no-one, who can drive people round the bend, as well as he can, and at speed!    _))*  _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: snowcap on August 21, 2013, 10:27:49 PM
Fester i bow down to your superior skills when it comes to driving I only passed my test when I was 17(1st time) a few years ago now but I,m still ready to learn in the cause for safety on the roads, and as soon as I find out that I,v become a danger to any one on the road I,m sure I can come to you or Yorkie to put me in the right direction. As long as you don,t charge to much
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TheMedz on August 21, 2013, 11:13:32 PM
A slightly selective subset of your driving abilities I know but from a somewhat elevated position I've witnessed on many occasions both of your abilities to go down hills and approach traffic lights. 10 out of 10 from me on those.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 22, 2013, 08:01:44 AM
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I,m sure I can come to you or Yorkie to put me in the right direction. As long as you don,t charge to much

Why wait?   I would be delighted to come out with you for an hour or so and give you an assessment (good and bad points) of your driving in today's traffic, and maybe pass on a few tips also.   And it would all be absolutely FREE of any charge.   However, I will allow you to buy the coffee at the debriefing.  :D

Anyone else?   ;)



Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on August 22, 2013, 09:10:20 AM
No thanks Yorkie, I am perfect if you recall.
However, perhaps on that basis I should be assessing you?  8)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on August 22, 2013, 09:23:08 AM
Yorkie, Erindoors and myself would find that interesting! I've been driving for Forty years now!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on August 22, 2013, 09:44:11 AM
Me too ME, more than 40 years in fact in most types of vehicles from a Smart to a Jaguar and I used to drive a meals on wheels Mini van which was an 'orrible thing with gears like stirring a pudding.
But I am always willing to learn !
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: snowcap on August 23, 2013, 10:49:30 AM
well i will not be taking up your offer Yorkie as my wife say,s I'm perfect to, I,v been driving her around the bend for over fifty years and am an expert at it.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 23, 2013, 11:20:37 AM
Quote
I used to drive a meals on wheels Mini van which was an 'orrible thing with gears like stirring a pudding.

 _))* _))* _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 29, 2013, 09:51:34 AM
Today whilst getting my Daily Paper (and the NWWN) the shopkeeper informed me that there were fake £20 notes circulating in the area.


 :o
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on August 29, 2013, 08:46:12 PM
There always is, lots of them... and despite being vigilant they still get accepted.

Luckily the bank tend to accept them too.  ;) ;)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 30, 2013, 06:47:41 AM
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There always is, lots of them... and despite being vigilant they still get accepted.

Luckily the bank tend to accept them too.  ;) ;)

I don't think average Joe Public is particularly vigilant, and so occasionally needs reminding.  All shopkeepers should be aware all the time, which is why they invest in marker pens and other types of detection equipment, some of which works and some which don't!!

Whilst the Banks will (generally) accept them along with other real notes, they can also dish them out again to the poor unsuspecting punter!   ZXZ
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on August 30, 2013, 07:14:01 AM
Sounds like it is now possible to buy counterfeit goods with counterfeit money! So no harm done, possibly?  :laugh:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 31, 2013, 02:25:45 PM
From Which?:

"Around a quarter of adults are at risk of falling victim to a growing telephone scam called vishing, according to Financial Fraud Action UK.

Vishing involves a fraudster posing on the phone as someone from a bank or building society fraud investigation team, the police or another legitimate organisation such as a telephone or internet provider.

They attempt to get financial information which often includes card and bank account details, pin numbers, as well as information about the victim, such as their full name, date of birth and address, which they can then use to plunder the victim's account or commit identity fraud."
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on August 31, 2013, 02:49:28 PM
And, unfortunately, many are daft enough to fall for it after all the warnings in the Media.  :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on September 01, 2013, 09:45:56 AM
<ore scams:

The scam
– Scammers, using stolen credit card details, buy a product and have it delivered to your address. Once you’ve signed for it you’ll get a visit from someone posing as an employee of the company or courier who will say the delivery was a mistake. After you hand over the package the scammers will disappear with the product (that they can then re-sell) and leaving you with eventual demands for return of the product by the retailer once the use of a stolen credit card has been exposed.

Is it legal? – Yes and no. The initial use of a stolen credit card is of course illegal, but the courier scam itself would be difficult to pin down as having broken any law.

What you can do – If you’re not expecting a delivery be suspicious. Remember, you can always refuse to accept it.



Document processing sites


The scam – When searching online for the right website to renew official documents – such as a passport or European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) – you are likely to come across a selection of official-looking websites that offer to process your application for a fee. Sites such as these will claim to offer an automated or superior service to the official sites. What they don’t tell you is the process would be absolutely free on those very same official sites.

Is it legal? – Yes, providing the scamming sites are upfront regarding fees and their service. These sites must also contain disclaimers that explain they’re not officially sanctioned by government bodies for example.

What you can do
– Be wary of sponsored links on search engines such as Google – the links usually highlighted at the top of your search results page – and always check official pages.

The official EHIC application service is at www.nhs.uk/ehic (http://www.nhs.uk/ehic) or on 0300 330 1350, while the official passport site is at www.gov.uk/renew-adult-passport (http://www.gov.uk/renew-adult-passport) or on 0300 222 0000.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on September 17, 2013, 08:19:54 AM
Who on Earth would fall for this, received by me:-

Security Measures    

Dear  Nationwide Customer,

We have reason to believe that your account was accessed by a third party. Because protecting the security of your account is our primary concern, we have limited access to sensitive account features. We understand that this may be an inconvenience but please understand that this temporary limitation is for your protection.
   
How can I restore my account access?    

Click the link Sign In Here
    
    Thank you for your prompt attention to this matter. Please understand that this is a security measure meant to help protect you and your account. We apologize for any inconvenience.

2013 Nationwide bank Plc. All rights reserved.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blongb on September 20, 2013, 11:37:03 AM
My latest

Due to your non response to our email about your delayed money which you are supposed to have received, Mr. Frank Bierhoff is here to officially claim your money total Two Million Five Hundred Thousand United States Dollars, he claims to have your legal backing and support to do so because he claimed you are bed ridden in the hospital and you have few days left to live.

He is ready to complete the legal process and fulfill the necessary obligations required to effect the immediate release of your money. He has been held right away for verification purpose, for us to know if this claims are real. Since the money belongs to you we have to write you to let you know about these, your failure to respond back to this email certifies that what he is saying is true.

Get back to me or text me for further inquiry : +13015315426

Thank You.
Mr. Scott McCoy

I wonder how long I will have to wait for my money   ;)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on September 20, 2013, 12:38:40 PM
Blongb wrote, "I wonder how long I will have to wait for my money?" 

Why don't you phone up and ask?    :D   _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on September 20, 2013, 02:48:49 PM
Scott is obviously not the real McCoy....  :laugh:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blongb on September 26, 2013, 05:14:07 PM
I received an e-mail warning from a colleague today about changing your energy supplier:-

The purpose of my email is to let you know about something that is either a scam or sharp practice that has happened to us this week.

We have had a flood of telephone calls from energy companies about our gas and electric
.
One yesterday purported to be from Eon our existing supplier. The man (from the Asian sounding call centre) said that our tariffs would be going up from the 1st October because our consumption had fallen by 11% this year. I pointed out that we were on a fixed contract and the price couldn't be altered.
 He replied that that the term of the contract was fixed but the rates offered depended on our supply levels and that if we dropped below a certain level then they could impose an increase in the rate charged. He then told me what the new rates would be.

A few minutes after the call ended we started getting calls from all different energy companies offering us cheap deals if we said yes there and then. They are most persistent and trying to pressure you all the time


This morning I have spoken to "Valerie" the lady who I actually negotiated our contract renewal with at Eon. She confirmed that my contract was fixed for twelve months and couldn't be altered.
She informed me that the phone calls were either a scam to get my bank details or more likely an energy broker who will use any means whatsoever to get enough details to enable him to change our supplier and thereby earn a commission.

She seemed to suggest that this is a major problem to all energy companies.

She told me that Eon had a safeguard that we could enable on our account. We could put a password onto our account and that would be displayed on the computer screen of our account within their systems. Whenever anyone ring and says they are from Eon we can ask what the password is and if they are genuine they will be able to tell us the password.

We set up a password on both accounts and within an hour we had the first call allegedly from Eon. My first question was "what is the password?" and as bold as brass she spelt out the name of our hotel. Unfortunately for her it was the wrong answer but I have to say it was a good guess and for many people it could have been right- the name of the business

I hope I have enlightened you and you will be cautious,

They are very clever, The original premise that our consumption had fallen was a clever ploy that we would all struggle to prove or disprove. They listen very carefully to any information you give them. eg We answer the phone "Lansdowne, Bob speaking" all calls from them ask for Mr Bob or Mrs Margaret. Make sure you don't give any information away.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Linda on November 05, 2013, 11:59:41 PM
Talking of Energy companies Scottish Power is my topic.  Three years ago my elderly mother had new meters installed. She is still on two meters ,one for regular daytime and one for her off peak night storage heaters. Recently my sister and i have been dealing with her bills etc and couldnt get our heads around how high her bills were. We at first began to think as my mother is getting increasingly forgetful and suffers sleepless nights, she was leaving too many appliances on immersion, electric fires etc. So we didnt question it immediately .It was when there was a fault with the timing clock switching over to daylight hours, we had an engineer over and whilst he was working on the fault, i asked him to confirm for me which meter was which as i had suspicions the charges per meter were a bit odd. He told me which was which and i said that it didnt tally with her bills. So he and i did a quick reckon up and he said to me that he thought my mother had been overcharged by quite a lot of money. I thanked him and was so glad we had picked up on it i gave him 20quid to buy a drink, it wasnt much but i am so glad i did.
My sister and i have pestered Scottish power to have this checked, at first I was told the engineer didnt know what he was talking about,
ha! by a person just sitting in the call centre. She was quite rude to me. Now we have finally got it sorted and my mother has overpaid her electric for 3 years and they are refunding £1600.00. She is 85 and hasnt a clue how to work these things out. I wonder how many other folk has this happened too and could still be overpaying because of a mistake (ie for us the original engineer who changed the meters over three years ago)If my mother had moved or gone in a home, she or we wouldnt have known and that money would have been lost.
So im just warning others to check or get someone to do it for you if you have separate meters and separate tariffs. I also thank again the young man who dealt with the fault where ever he is.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 06, 2013, 08:10:28 AM
Quote
She is 85 and hasnt a clue how to work these things out. I wonder how many other folk has this happened too and could still be overpaying because of a mistake

Many years ago MANWEB installed a 'brand new' meter for us, which they told us they had to do every so many years. Trouble was, they assumed the meter started from zero, but I'd checked when it was installed, and it already read 900 kw hours on the dial.  Sure enough, the first bill included the charge, which I obviously contested. But many older folk - as Linda points out - are unable to do this for themselves. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on November 12, 2013, 10:22:27 AM
Not a Scam but just a word of caution.

Recently I had a repeat prescription made up by a local Pharmacy.  The medication required me to take three 850 mg tablets a day with meals.  A total of 84 every 28 days.   These normally came in one pack of 56 and the balance in a plain pack.

On this occasion the pack contained 84 tablets and I though, "at last they are packaging to suit the normal usage".   However, some days later I discovered that despite the label with my details and dosage being correct, the pack indicated that the tablet strength was only 500 mg.   So for a period of time I was under dosing by 1050 mg each day.

The packaging had the signature of both the Pharmacist and the person who checked the item.  From now on I will rigorously check each item on my prescription is correct, and would urge others to be just as cautious.    :(

The wrong strength is one thing, but an incorrect tablet could be fatal.   :o
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on November 12, 2013, 02:18:47 PM
Terrible.

Have you ever handed in a prescription at a chemists, waited a while only to be given part of your prescription and a ticket to return tomorrow to collect the balance and, hopefully, if it has arrived by then?

Can you imagine asking somewhere else for fish, chips and mushy peas and being told to return tomorrow for your fish?


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Linda on November 12, 2013, 09:37:53 PM
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Terrible.

Have you ever handed in a prescription at a chemists, waited a while only to be given part of your prescription and a ticket to return tomorrow to collect the balance and, hopefully, if it has arrived by then?

Can you imagine asking somewhere else for fish, chips and mushy peas and being told to return tomorrow for your fish?
_))*  yes that happens to me so often,  part pescriptions that is  :) not fish, then i forget to collect the odd couple of tablets then wonder why iv run out . Also have been given out of date medicine. I had a written apology , though i could well imagine how my OH and i would have been dealt with when we were in catering  if we had served out of date food  :o.. Yes Yorkie it pays to double check i do now before i leave the pharmacy.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on November 13, 2013, 12:43:14 AM
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The wrong strength is one thing, but an incorrect tablet could be fatal.   :o

Or in the case of a contraceptive pill, the opposite of fatal.... life creating! 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on December 05, 2013, 11:38:19 AM
A new scam, or rather a different version of an old one arrived this morning from the Revenue via E -mail. We were due. they said, quite a decent tax rebate. If  we filled the attatched form in with our bank details, it would be forwarded.
 The Inland Revenue do not use the E- mail system--- so BEWARE.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on December 05, 2013, 12:55:29 PM
I've had that one several years ago, I ignored it!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on December 05, 2013, 10:58:06 PM
I get that one several times a month, it's always different amounts.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on December 11, 2013, 11:26:27 AM
The twelve scams of Christmas..

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25200338 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25200338)
Title: Re: Help wanted: Computers
Post by: Nemesis on December 11, 2013, 03:04:04 PM
Someone posing as Fedex are sending out E- Mails asking for details so that they can deliver something to you.

We had 7 the same this morning.
Title: Re: Re: Help wanted: Computers
Post by: DaveR on December 11, 2013, 03:16:07 PM
I use Gmail and I never receive emails like those mentioned in this thread; they all get diverted into the Spam folder so I never even see them.

www.gmail.com (http://www.gmail.com)
Title: Re: Re: Help wanted: Computers
Post by: Fester on December 11, 2013, 03:39:10 PM
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Someone posing as Fedex are sending out E- Mails asking for details so that they can deliver something to you.

We had 7 the same this morning.

I got the same thing, but from Royal Mail Group....with superb logos and graphics...a very clever scam, telling me that there was a parcel trapped needing information prior to delivery.
For someone like me, who sends and receives parcels via RMG, and at Xmas time especially, this is a very intelligent and believable scam.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on December 12, 2013, 11:18:18 AM
Just what I thought when the first one came, as I am in the middle of dealing with sending a box to the family for Christmas.
Having waited all day 8am to 8pm for Parcels2 go to collect the parcel as promised I have now sacked them and contacted another firm.
Probably end up with even more spam mails.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blongb on December 19, 2013, 03:58:13 PM
Look out for scam telephone calls informing you "I am calling you from Windows your windows based computer system is infected". It's a very old scam but because the U.S. has just turned up the heat against the Companies based in India who are behind this fraudulent practice, they have now turned their attention to the U.K.  We have received 3 calls in the last 2 days. :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on December 19, 2013, 05:10:04 PM
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Just what I thought when the first one came, as I am in the middle of dealing with sending a box to the family for Christmas.
Having waited all day 8am to 8pm for Parcels2 go to collect the parcel as promised I have now sacked them and contacted another firm.
Probably end up with even more spam mails.

I also waited for P2G to collect a parcel and the chap finally arrived at 9.30 p.m.  What a useless organisation it is   :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TheMedz on December 19, 2013, 10:25:15 PM
We have used collect + website a few times for eBay stuff. You go to website pay on line with PayPal or credit card. They generate you a label to print off and stick to the parcel. Take it down to Londis on Gloddaeth street,  hand it in and off it goes.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on December 20, 2013, 10:48:03 AM
I used Interparcel eventually, suited me better as the collection window was shorter ( morning or afternoon). The young man arrived, very pleasant person, we had attatched our print off label, so off he went. This was Friday, just after lunch and the parcel arrived on Monday, just after lunch. You can also track the parcel which I did.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on December 26, 2013, 09:26:34 AM
One of the usual, unannounced, regular scams.

Daily Express has increased its price by 5 pence to 55p.  M :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on January 16, 2014, 05:08:12 PM
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Look out for scam telephone calls informing you "I am calling you from Windows your windows based computer system is infected". It's a very old scam but because the U.S. has just turned up the heat against the Companies based in India who are behind this fraudulent practice, they have now turned their attention to the U.K.  We have received 3 calls in the last 2 days. :rage:

I was by the telephone today when it rang and answered it in English even though the caller display said "international"    I should have known better as it was a heavily accented Asian on the line teling me the same story as Blongb had.  After he had his say, I just said that I didn't have a computer and just hung up.  Next time I look at the caller display and it says "international" then I'll deal with it differently.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bellringer on January 16, 2014, 09:24:15 PM
Yes me too yesterday - I also told them I did not have a computer!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: wrex on January 17, 2014, 06:36:33 AM
YOU WILL NEVER GO TOO HEAVEN LOL
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bellringer on January 17, 2014, 01:42:23 PM
 ;D Maybe not Wrex. I usually tell them that we are registered with the Telephone Preference Service (and we are), but that doesn't seem to stop the 'foreigners'.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on January 17, 2014, 03:57:38 PM
Try talking Welsh to them, Stan.  $walesflag$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on January 17, 2014, 05:02:07 PM
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Try talking Welsh to them, Stan.  $walesflag$

I have a Nuisance Call Blocker on the home phone which is pre programmed with many known outfits.  As you receive others one press of the button and that number is put into memory and also blocked.  The calls do not come through so you are not disturbed.

On my mobile I put the calls into memory under the Heading Nuisance.  When it rings if it comes up as Nuisance I switch the call off, or if I want a good laugh, I will answer the call and keep them talking and answering daft questions for as long as I wish to be amused. 

 _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bellringer on January 17, 2014, 10:16:21 PM
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Try talking Welsh to them, Stan.  $walesflag$

Apologies - my Welsh is a bit limited.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Michael on January 18, 2014, 10:57:20 AM
 If you think you have trouble with unwanted phone calls/text I can tell you, you,ve heard nothing compared to what u get here in Goa.
  I've got my usual uk mobile but I don't answer it unless I know the number. Because of the absolutely sky high cost of answering a call, something around £5 a minute.
  I've also got a mobile with a Goa SIM card in it, which I use a bit to keep in touch with my family in uk.
   On average this receives, eight calls and six texts EVERY DAY inc weekends. I don't answer them but I save the numbers and I know them. Sometimes I read the texts but mostly just delete.
  The calls arrive with a noisy bit of Indian so called music. I find that I am automatically charged for this bit of music, not much but in future I am going to find out how or if to stop it.
  Every message text is selling something, even to paying for ladies, presumably young, to call you up at breakfast time .  Thanks, I,d rather enjoy my lie in by myself thank you
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on January 18, 2014, 11:45:54 AM
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Try talking Welsh to them, Stan.  $walesflag$

Apologies - my Welsh is a bit limited.

Have a go Stan, my Welsh is very limited too but they give up long before I do.         $walesflag$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bellringer on January 19, 2014, 05:17:31 PM
You're right Hugo, I could just keep reeling off words like:-

bore da, prynhawn da, noswaith dda, Cymraeg, or in my case, dim Cymraeg, diolch, croeso, hwyl, and the numbers, and when I have said that, I could repeat them in a different order!!

Thanks for the suggestion Hugo
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on January 19, 2014, 06:10:19 PM
It's worth a try Stan, but don't say any English words and see how long they last.     $walesflag$

Try adding this to your repertoire  Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch,  it works every time!       ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Quiggs on January 20, 2014, 01:46:06 PM
I have just received an 'e-mail' warning of a Phone scam.  You receive a call saying sorry that they missed you as they have something important to tell you and to call them on a No. with the area code'0809' This is apparently is the code for the Dominican Republic and you will be charged £1,500 per minute with a long recorded message to keep you on line as long as possible.  If you challenge the Phone bill the phone company will not reinburse you as you have phoned the No. yourself.    :(
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 20, 2014, 02:01:52 PM
Lots about this here,

http://www.hoax-slayer.com/area-code-809-scam.html (http://www.hoax-slayer.com/area-code-809-scam.html)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: systema on January 20, 2014, 06:49:43 PM
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If you think you have trouble with unwanted phone calls/text I can tell you, you,ve heard nothing compared to what u get here in Goa.
 

When we lived there we used to get it all the time - we went into the shop (Babutes if you know it) and he put a number in it to stop them as we were charged 1 or 2 rupees even when we did not answer them.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Michael on January 21, 2014, 08:32:17 AM
Thanks
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If you think you have trouble with unwanted phone calls/text I can tell you, you,ve heard nothing compared to what u get here in Goa.
 

When we lived there we used to get it all the time - we went into the shop (Babutes if you know it) and he put a number in it to stop them as we were charged 1 or 2 rupees even when we did not answer them.
systema. Thanks a lot. No, I don't know Babutes. Which town is it in?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: systema on January 21, 2014, 08:52:05 AM
Sorry - I thought afterwards you may be in South Goa and it was too late to alter it.  It is in Calangute on the road going towards Candolim just past the church in the middle of the road. (St. Anthony's Chapel).
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Michael on January 22, 2014, 10:30:46 AM
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Thanks
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If you think you have trouble with unwanted phone calls/text I can tell you, you,ve heard nothing compared to what u get here in Goa.
 
i

When we lived there we used to get it all the time
systema. Thanks a lot. No, I don't know Babutes. Which town is it in?
thanks again. I know just where you mean, indeed I went past there only last week
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 02, 2014, 11:41:29 AM
If you have a PC back up your data.  Almost one third of those infected with Cryptolocker paid up to save their files:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/02/28/cryptolocker_victims_pay_up_survey/ (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/02/28/cryptolocker_victims_pay_up_survey/)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 02, 2014, 11:43:42 AM
If you often forward jokes and cartoons to other folk, remember not to leave any addresses on the emails.  In fact, it's better never to use the CC line on emails. Always use the BCC line or simply copy and past the text.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on March 02, 2014, 06:12:31 PM
That's sound advice Ian.      $good$     
I often receive e-mails that that have several other addresses on them but always make sure that I delete every one before passing it on to others.
I just hope that those that I do pass the e-mails on to do the same as me.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blongb on April 03, 2014, 03:31:57 PM
A couple of months ago, I was so feed up with hearing and reading about British Gas exorbitant profit making that I decided to do something about it. Quite coincidently a very nice lady from U-Switch appeared on BBC Breakfast TV and confirmed I’d be silly not to switch suppliers.

So using U-Switch they came up with N-Power as being my best option. Checked my prices and although their standing charge for Gas was very high it was definitely a better deal than staying with BG, so I swapped.

A month later I got my first bill from N-Power which surprised me as I was supposed to be on quarterly billing. In the cold light of day their Bill was almost the same as I would have expected to pay BG.

Pity for them as now  I’m in the  switching mode and because of my experience with U-Switch  I used the Experian web site and this time was advised to switch to Ecotricity, a small independent supplier the U-Switch site  didn’t even bother to list.

I talked to a friendly young operator at Ecotricity this morning, who apologised for keeping me waiting. He told me they are currently being swamped with requests from new customers wanting to switch

The moral of this tale is don’t believe a comparison site will give the best deal for you and don’t give up keep looking.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 03, 2014, 03:56:10 PM
About 6 weeks ago we switched from BT and Scottish Power to Utilities Warehouse, all seems fine, phone and broadband is about half the price, not had power bill yet. They are a Which recommended supplier so I thought I would give them a try! Only downside is the almost evangelical enthusiasm of the nice lady who signed us up, they want you to give them lots of names and numbers to sign more up, not my thing so I ignored that part!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on April 03, 2014, 10:41:19 PM
Give them my name and address ME, because I'm already with them.... that'll teach 'em!   $good$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 03, 2014, 10:59:09 PM
Like it!  :laugh: how do you get on with them?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on April 03, 2014, 11:33:14 PM
Don't have much to do with them.

All on Direct Debit.... they bill me....they get paid...... we rub along quite nicely.


UNTIL.... a huge old bloke came to read the meter under the stairs, (first time in 6 years), his arthritic knees meant he could hardly kneel down, so he used my door as support to get up..... and wrenched the damn thing off its hinges on Xmas eve!

I lost my temper with the idiot, and he promised to return to repair it, but in the 'season of goodwill' I fixed it myself, and put it down to experience.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Michael on April 03, 2014, 11:43:21 PM
  Fester I don't believe you. Its not you to loose your temper with some old bloke, so don't give me that
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on April 04, 2014, 08:05:52 AM
Today I received what seemed to be a perfectly normal communication from Apple, saying that my Apple ID had been used to sign into iCloud on an iPhone 5, yesterday.  As it happens, my wife took her iPhone to Wilmslow yesterday, so the email had a ring of authenticity about it.

As with all such emails, it helpfully provided a link to check you were not being compromised, but this link - when I examined it - went to a Russian server. So best to treat all such messages with extreme caution as always.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Neil on April 04, 2014, 10:52:36 AM
Thanks for this tip Ian, I've got all Apple equipment and it's scary to hear about this type of attack!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on April 04, 2014, 11:25:27 AM
It's the first I've seen, Neil, so still hopefully rare.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on April 04, 2014, 12:25:21 PM
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  Fester I don't believe you. Its not you to loose your temper with some old bloke, so don't give me that

I'm only suprised Fester didn't beat him. Bad apple that Fester  ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on April 14, 2014, 09:20:42 AM
This morning, I received this e-mail with the latest BT logo.


Service Cancellation Notice.
     
Dear Customer,

This e-mail has been sent to you by BT to inform you that we were unable to process your last payment of bill.This might be due to either of the following reasons:

1. A recent change in your personal information. (eg: billing address, phone)
2. Submitting incorrect Payment information during bill payment process.

Due to this, to ensure that your service is not interrupted, we request you to confirm and update your billing information today.
Confirm your account by clicking here.

Regards,
BT Billing Department



Normally, I would delete this type of e-mail, for quite obvious reasons, but this e-mail was from ebilling@bt.com which is the usual email address that BT always uses to write to me.

Even when I hovered my cursor over the email address is still showed up as ebilling@bt.com

I phoned BT on 150 to check and was informed it was a scam.

So beware.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on April 14, 2014, 11:59:41 AM
You may find the Sender is actually ebiling@bt.com (only 1 L)?

https://community.bt.com/t5/Bills-Packages/Email-scam-warning/td-p/1158926
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on April 14, 2014, 01:09:32 PM
In my case, DaveR, it was definitely ebilling@bt.com (copied and pasted).

The email has since been forwarded to abuse@bt.com

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Gwynant on April 14, 2014, 04:43:42 PM
              Bri, I have received numerous e-mails from "e-billing@bt.com" (all with 2 l's in the e-mail address) in the last few months, some very similar to the one you received today and others reporting that they have detected some abnormality or other in my account or that t are hey carrying out a pre-planned software upgrade and always requesting that I confirmed my details, (bank a/c, passwords etc) and I have always forwarded them to abuse@bt.com at the time with a request that they confirm that they are scams. I have never ever had any reply about any of them. They do look very convincing, but they let themselves down in the earlier ones by opening with "Dear Valued Customer"! Every time I receive one I change my password immediately.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on April 14, 2014, 07:04:36 PM
Thanks G.  $thanx$

In the circumstances, I have changed my password as recommended.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on May 15, 2014, 07:09:16 PM
This is a nasty scam on the lines of the Courier scam, but more sophisticated.  Worth listening to.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01z2ntt (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01z2ntt)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on May 15, 2014, 11:27:49 PM
A very elaborate, but obviously effective scam.   The lengths that these crooks will go to beggars belief.

It is at saturation point now, as I get at least 3 scam phonecalls per week on the landline, (easily batted off by the Mrs usually), plus about 20 email type scams per week.     The world is indeed a scary place.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on July 08, 2014, 06:36:38 PM
If you use an ATM, just make sure the Keyboard is the real one!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on September 15, 2014, 02:25:39 PM
These scams are getting everywhere now.  What will they try next?   ZXZ

Dear account holder,

Online access to your Tesco account has been suspended. due to invalid account information provided.
To have your online account reinstated, you need to verify your online service access.

Click here for verification

Please note that accounts not verify within 24HRS of
suspension are subject to termination.

Regards
Tesco
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on September 15, 2014, 03:00:48 PM
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These scams are getting everywhere now.  What will they try next?   ZXZ
Dear account holder,
Online access to your Tesco account has been suspended. due to invalid account information provided.
To have your online account reinstated, you need to verify your online service access.
Click here for verification
Please note that accounts not verify within 24HRS of
suspension are subject to termination.
Regards
Tesco

It's scary, especially for the unwary, I had a call from my bank, couple weeks ago, which I cut short, saying I would call in, it was genuine, but we are getting "jumpy" with the likes of the above.           $angry$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on September 15, 2014, 03:32:18 PM
The thing is, the message is so daft that I would think only and idiot would be fooled.  I was close to it!   :D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on September 15, 2014, 03:41:20 PM
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The thing is, the message is so daft that I would think only and idiot would be fooled.  I was close to it!   :D
Years ago an "intelligent" friend of mine had someone visit his house checking the area for rising damp, he let him in, and complied when asked to go into the next room and knock on the walls, he could not believe how stupid he had been. minus wallet and watch.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on October 14, 2014, 08:37:10 AM
What will they try next? 

From: "MasterCard/Visa"<info@matvis.com>
Date: 14 October 2014 00:32:43 BST
Subject: End of Year Reward
Reply-To: <sharon.drake1sharon.drake1@aol.com>

MasterCard/Visa
MasterCard International Global Headquarters

2000 Purchase Street, Purchase,

New York, United States of America

Congratulations

Dear Customer

MasterCard in Partnership with Visa is saying a BIG THANK YOU to all our Customers and Clients by providing them a chance to Win the sum of One Million Two Hundred Thousand United State Dollars as part of our 2014 End of Year Thank You Cash Reward Promo.

This Offer is Exclusively open to only Active Master or Visa Card Holders WORLDWIDE who usually conduct in Store or Online Payment Transactions with Card Number beginning from 5 or 4, if you are not an Active and Current Card Holder of Master or Visa Card in any Bank of the World & if your Credit/Debit Card Number didn't begin with 4 or 5, Please IGNORE/DISCARD This Message

Contact: customerservice@mastervissa.com with the Following

Full Name,

Address

Occupation

Last 6 Digit Debit/Credit Card Number

for more information and stand a chance to Win the Cash Prize of One Million Two Hundred Thousand United States Dollars.

Thank you for Using Master/Visa Card.

Customer Service.

MasterCard in Partnership with Visa

Note: Due to the large image size embed on this message, Your Email Service provider might not deliver to your inbox, so if you find it in your spam/junk/ folder, move it to Inbox for a Clear view
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on October 14, 2014, 09:42:13 AM
They keep trying, so they must be fooling some people  $angry$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 02, 2014, 04:21:40 PM
This a warning to anyone considering having a slate house sign made not to use a company calling itself Premier Slate (http://www.premierslate.co.uk/). This company operates out of Cardiff and have been the subject of so many complaints there are entire forums dedicated to them. Suffice to say you should avoid this company. Their details, trading as Keybee enterprises, since their original firm was liquidated in February, are as follows:

Keybee Enterprises Ltd.
Unit 4,
The Quarry,
Pentrebach Road,
RCT,


Specifically, they claim they sell two types of sign: Standard and Premier. On the site itself (the full details of which I saved as HTML pages) they claimed the 'Standard' signs were 20mm approx thickness and the 'Premier' signs were 20mm+ thick. The one they sent us was 8mm thick. 

The problem is that their site looks very impressive and they do just enough to stay out of serious trouble, especially if customers eventually receive their signs but think it's not worth the trouble to pursue them.

Paypal launched an investigation and decided in our (my wife and my) favour and refunded the money. However, they are still in business and should be given a wide berth. If you want a reliable slate house sign company then use these:

Atlantic Signs, Unit 1 Pentire Workshops, High Street, Delabole, Cornwall  PL33 9BA

Meanwhile Trading standards are now actively investigating Premier Slate.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on November 26, 2014, 10:53:55 AM
Owl Messaging

We would like to make you aware of the below scam.  With the run up to Christmas many of you will be ordering items online for delivery and we want to make sure you do not fall victim to this scam.

Reports advise that a card is posted through your door purporting to come from a company called PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) suggesting that they were unable to deliver a parcel and that you need to contact them on 0906 6611911 (a Premium rate number).

If you do call the number and you start to hear a recorded message you will already have been billed £315 for the phone call. Anyone receiving a card with these sort of details should call Royal Mail Fraud on 020 7239 6655 or Crime Stoppers UK on 0800 555 111. It's also really important that people are aware that the premium rate number may change so please do not call any number stated on a card from PDS.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on November 26, 2014, 11:06:49 AM
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Owl Messaging

We would like to make you aware of the below scam.  With the run up to Christmas many of you will be ordering items online for delivery and we want to make sure you do not fall victim to this scam.

Reports advise that a card is posted through your door purporting to come from a company called PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) suggesting that they were unable to deliver a parcel and that you need to contact them on 0906 6611911 (a Premium rate number).

If you do call the number and you start to hear a recorded message you will already have been billed £315 for the phone call. Anyone receiving a card with these sort of details should call Royal Mail Fraud on 020 7239 6655 or Crime Stoppers UK on 0800 555 111. It's also really important that people are aware that the premium rate number may change so please do not call any number stated on a card from PDS.
http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/hoax-email-from-pds-parcel-delivery-service-nov12 (http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/hoax-email-from-pds-parcel-delivery-service-nov12)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 26, 2014, 11:15:06 AM
'Fraid it's a hoax...

http://www.hoax-slayer.com/pds-phone-scam.html (http://www.hoax-slayer.com/pds-phone-scam.html)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 26, 2014, 11:16:02 AM
Ah... Great minds, apparently :-)))
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on November 26, 2014, 01:10:36 PM
Owl Messaging - Update

Please accept our apologies, our previous email in relation to a Delivery Scam contained out of date information.  please be aware that the PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) scam is no longer in existence. The service is NO LONGER running  and you do not need to contact PhonepayPlus, or the Royal Mail, about this service as it was stopped. All information can be found on the below link. http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/hoax-email-from-pds-parcel-delivery-service-nov12 (http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/hoax-email-from-pds-parcel-delivery-service-nov12)

We would like to thank anyone who has responded to our messages and apologise for the confusion.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on November 27, 2014, 09:05:53 AM
Some of the things that they send are most odd !
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on November 27, 2014, 09:10:07 AM
First time I've heard of this OWL service, seems like a good idea, it should be publicised a bit more widely.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on December 02, 2014, 07:40:57 AM
BBC1 has run a news item this morning warning people to take extra care regarding the ubiquitous 'phone scams. This is part of their annual pre-Christmas warning broadcasts  (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-30279582)but many are falling for these scams, which have become increasingly sophisticated.

Those most at risk are people whose number is not ex-directory and who use landlines.  It seems the scammers are using two techniques: the first is to ring pretending to be your bank's security department and ask you for your PIN.  The second involves subsequently arranging for a courier to collect your cards, on the pretext they've been compromised. Both techniques, however, depend on people not following basic rules: never, ever give out your entire PIN over the 'phone, never, ever believe anyone who tells you that they'll send a courier round to collect your cards (banks will only ever ask you to cut them up and destroy them) and always refuse to deal with anyone who 'phones out of the blue claiming to be the bank's fraud department until you've 'phoned the bank directly from a number you already have and 'phone someone else before you do.

The last precaution is because increasingly cunning spammers will often ask you to 'phone the bank immediately to confirm that it's a legitimate call. By not cutting off the line at their end, and by sometimes playing the sound of a ring tone they can dupe you into believing the line is clear for you to ring out, when in reality you're simply talking to the same sneaky Spammers.   
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on December 27, 2014, 07:18:29 AM
Is this the latest scam?  A clever way to get at a lot of info!   ZXZ
   
Dear Customer,   
Your Apple ID was used to sign in to iCloud on an iPhone 6.   
26 December, 2014
Operating System: iOS;8.0.1
To verify this email address belongs to you, click the link below and then sign in using your Apple ID and password.

Verify Now >

Why you received this email.
Apple requests verification whenever an email address is added to an Apple ID. Your email address cannot be used without verification.

Apple Support
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on December 27, 2014, 07:52:11 AM
Yes, it is. Apple routinely warn you when your Apple ID is used or changed, but they never request verification. It's very sneaky,. though, and could catch a lot of newcomers to the platform out - especially over Christmas.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on December 27, 2014, 09:29:06 AM
What is your opinion please on this email from Mail Delivery Service?

When I hover of the sender it does read: postmaster@btinternet.com

Subject: Delivery Status Notification
     
  - These recipients of your message have been processed by the mail server:
bri.roberts@btinternet.com; Failed; 5.3.0 (other or undefined mail system status)
 
    Remote MTA mx-bt.mail.am0.yahoodns.net: network error
 
  - SMTP protocol diagnostic: 250 recipient <bri.roberts@btinternet.com> ok
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on December 27, 2014, 10:11:55 AM
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What is your opinion please on this email from Mail Delivery Service?

When I hover of the sender it does read: postmaster@btinternet.com

Subject: Delivery Status Notification
     
 


I get a similar one from AOL when an e-mail fails to deliver for whatever reason.
Sometimes it's because their Antivirus doesn't like an attachment, especially if it's to their work e-mail, or the e-mail address is no longer valid.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on December 27, 2014, 11:51:23 AM
Similar.

I often get things returned or refused which have an attachment.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on December 27, 2014, 11:58:44 AM
Thank you for your replies but on this occasion, and unlike me, I was tempted to click on the attachment and it read as follows.

Shouldn't this form of e-mail automatically go into my spam folder instead?

From: Les Daley
Date: 19/12/2014 09:51:54
To: Undisclosed recipients:,
Subject: Help........Les Daley
     
I'm so glad to read from you,I need £2,300 . but if the whole amount can't be covered, I would gladly appreciate any amount you can put in to help. you can have the money wired to me via Western Union. Have it wired to my name and present location, here are the details you need to have it wired to me..

Name: John Burrow
Address: Tarasa Shevchenka Blvd, 37/122, Kiev, Ukraine
City:  Kiev
Country: Ukraine
 
I still have my passport here with me to claim the funds.Once you are done with the transfer at the western union e-mail me the Confirmation details(MTCN) for the pickup of the funds.

Waiting to read from you soon.

Regards,
 
Les Daley,
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on December 27, 2014, 04:47:24 PM
I don't have any idea where the nearest Western Union Office is!  Just wondering what would happen if I sent a similar plea to my address book list!  A big fat Zero, I reckon.   :D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on December 27, 2014, 07:35:48 PM
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I don't have any idea where the nearest Western Union Office is!  Just wondering what would happen if I sent a similar plea to my address book list!  A big fat Zero, I reckon.   :D


They're usually located within another business in the smaller towns & villages.
Possibly travel agents or small private stores like Spar etc...
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on January 09, 2015, 02:41:08 PM
Anyone else getting regular emails telling them their latest BT bill is unpaid and asking to resubmit details.
All a scam of course !
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 09, 2015, 03:45:41 PM
Yes, but they never use your name, I get fake PayPal messages too, saying a payment has gone out, but will not show on my account yet!  :rage:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on January 26, 2015, 08:45:55 AM
Over the past week there has been a marked increase in the number of 'nonsense' emails being received. These often contain meaningless phrases and poems but don't seem to have any attachments.

If you receive one of these, obviously don't respond to it but delete it immediately. There are several theories as to what's behind them and none of them is good:

1.  The use of the poems, etc. is to defeat the Bayesian filters employed by ISPs to block SPAM. They may not appear to have anything other than a poem on but they may be carriers of the 'single pixel' attack (http://stopmalvertising.com/malvertisements/usfunvideos-a-case-of-single-pixel-advertising-fraud.html)

2.  If you get large numbers of this type of email, it may be being used to distract you from serous warning messages sent legitimately.  Check all your email carefully.

3.  The email might depend on your email setting (like Outlook) to generate a response.  It might be worth setting the program to "Ask me before sending a response".

4.  The most likely theory is that someone in the criminal community has bought a new botnet and is trying it out. The 'proof' of that could be that in a few days we can all expect a whole barrage of SPAM.

 



Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on January 26, 2015, 12:07:57 PM
Use gmail and spam is not a problem. I've had maybe 2 spam emails get into my inbox in the last year.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: OrmeMac on January 27, 2015, 11:03:26 AM
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Use gmail and spam is not a problem.

However you are giving Google the right to access all your messages and can't delete any of them.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on January 27, 2015, 12:05:15 PM
That's the other side of the coin.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on January 27, 2015, 12:09:11 PM
Google are welcome to look at my emails, I doubt they'll find anything of interest in them.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on January 27, 2015, 12:29:13 PM
Oh, you never know...   

$hands$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 10, 2015, 12:35:53 PM
It seems that it is my lucky day!  Link removed.



Tax Refund Notification

After the last annual calculations of your fiscal activity, we have determined that you are eligible to receive a tax refund of 358.50 GBP. Please submit the tax refund request and allow 6-9 days in order to process it.

Note: A refund cand be delayed a variety of reasons, for example submitting invalid records or applying after deadline.

Yours sincerely,
HM Revenue & Customs
Refund Department
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on February 10, 2015, 12:45:15 PM
 _))* _))* _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 18, 2015, 10:47:14 AM
Here is today's scam.

ATTN ;Dear Friend

How are you today? Hope all is well with you and your family? My name is ALHAJI SANUSI LAMIDO THE FORMER GOVERNOR CENTRAL BANK OF AFRICA BENIN REP hope this mail meets you in a perfect condition. You may not understand why this mail came to you. But if you do not remember me, you might have receive an email from me in the past regarding a business proposal which we never concluded.

I am happy to inform you about my success in getting those funds transferred under cooperation of a new partner from Dominican Republic. Presently I'm in Dominican Republic for investment projects with my own share of the total sum meanwhile,I didn't forget your past efforts and attempts to assist me in transferring those funds despite that it failed us some how. Now contact my REV FATHER in Benin rep Africa, his name is REV FATHER JOHN WATSON

EMAIL:revphilipwatson200@gmail.com
ALTERNATIVE EMAIL : revjohn20044@yahoo.fr
TELEPHONE :TELEPHONE :+22998797889 or +2347030614433

Ask him to send you the total cash check of $1.2 million dollars which I kept for your compensation for all the past efforts and attempt to assist me in this matter. I appreciated your collective efforts at that time so feel free and get in touch with my Rev Father  john and instruct him where to send the amount to you. Do it fast before the CASH CHECK EXPIRED.

Please do let me know immediately you receive it so that we can share the joy after all the sufferings at that time. In the moment, I am very busy here in Dominican Republic because of the investment projects which I and the new partner are having at hand without confrontations,Finally, remember that I had forwarded instruction to the secretary on your behalf to receive that CASH CHECK, so feel free to get in touch with REV JOHN WATSON my secretary he will send the CHECK to you without any delay

ALHAJI SANUSI LAMIDO
THE FORMER GOVERNOR CENTRAL BANK OF AFRICA BENIN REP
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 23, 2015, 02:34:50 PM
For all you Frenchspeakers, here is today's scam.    _))*  Any takers?     L0L


Mes sincères salutations et mes excuses à votre égard. Je voudrais m'excuser de mon intrusion dans votre vie privée. Je me nomme Mme Patricia Konan , Cadre au Département de la Comptabilité à Ecobank Côte d'Ivoire. Un compte a été ouvert au sein de notre banque en 2005 et depuis 2011, aucune opération ne s'est effectuée. Ce compte présente à ce jour dans nos livres, un compte créditeur de Huit Millions Cinq Cent Mille €uros ( 8.500.000 €). Après avoir consulté tous les dossiers relatifs à ce compte, je me suis rendue compte que je pouvais disposer aisément de cet argent si je réussissais à le virer sur un compte à l'extérieur donc je suis à la recherche d'un partenaire serieux et honnête.
Le possesseur de ce compte feu Mike Patrick, un expatrié de Petrol-Technical Support Services Inc, décédé suite à un accident de la circulation. Personne ne sait à ce jour l'existence de ce compte.
J'aimerais que vous m'aidiez à transférer cet argent pour investir dans votre domaine. Après le transfert je vous offre 50% pour votre aide. Soyez sûr que c'est une véritable opportunité que je vous offre.
Je reste dans l'attente de votre réponse rapide que j'espère favorable.

Fraternellement
Mme Patricia Konan
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Michael on February 23, 2015, 06:32:28 PM
 of course it would help if you could read french as well as speaking it
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: white rabbit on February 23, 2015, 08:10:59 PM
Not good French anyway  :)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Yorkie on February 27, 2015, 10:10:47 AM
You always have to be careful and remember that something that seems too good to be true, probably isn't!     _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 12, 2015, 04:50:23 PM
List of bogus HMRC email addresses. If you ever get an email with one of these on, forward it to HMRC fraud department at phishing@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk:

• reve.alert@hmrc.gov.uk
• services@hmrc.co.uk
• noreply@hmrevenue.com
• service@hmrc.gov.uk
• service.refund@hmrc.gov
• secure@hmrc.co.uk
• hmrc@gov.uk
• taxes@hmrc.co.uk
• taxrefund-notice@hmrc.gov.uk • taxrefund@hmrc.gov.uk
• refund-help@hmrc.gov.uk
• service@online.com
• email@hmrc.gov.uk
• refund.alert@hmrc.gov.uk
• refunds@hmrc.gov.uk
• srvcs@hmrc.gov.uk
• alertsonline@hmrc.co.uk
• info@hmrc.gov.uk
• rebate@hmrc.gov.uk
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 23, 2015, 08:24:43 AM
If you're a Talk Talk customer, Security specialists are warning that you should think very carefully if you receive any emails apparently from Talk Talk asking you to take any action whatsoever. The attack currently being mounted against the company seems to have been instigated in order to steal information.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on October 23, 2015, 10:38:09 AM
It seems that the hackers may have taken all the personal info, including bank details too !  :o
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on October 23, 2015, 11:29:28 AM
I was a Talk Talk customer until I terminated my contract with them this month because of their charges for phone calls but I've had an unusually large increase in bogus e-mails recently.
I put them all into junk mail and then delete them, but the bank details info is another matter and is serious
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 23, 2015, 11:35:09 AM
Providing you're banking with a company that uses a discrete keypad, you should be fine, but they can use your details to sign you up to things - that's the real problem. A decent company shouldn't accept any orders without the correct address, but some are more eager to get their hands on your hard earned.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on October 26, 2015, 01:29:13 PM
On TV today it said that Talk Talk will  not be phoning their customers today but then  I received a phone call today from a heavily accented Asian man saying that he was from Talk Talk and wanted to talk about my reuter.
I just told him to put it in writing and hung up and promptly put a call blocker on the number he was phoning from
The trouble is that they seen to be generating different phone numbers and the call blocker doesn't stop the overseas numbers from coming through.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 26, 2015, 03:22:40 PM
PHS has been hacked.

http://sanesecurity.blogspot.co.uk/2015/10/phsonline-your-new-phs-documents-are.html (http://sanesecurity.blogspot.co.uk/2015/10/phsonline-your-new-phs-documents-are.html)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on October 26, 2015, 06:36:32 PM
What is PHS?  ???
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 26, 2015, 06:46:06 PM
https://www.phs.co.uk/ (https://www.phs.co.uk/)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on October 26, 2015, 09:45:53 PM
Never heard of them before?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on April 27, 2016, 10:58:35 PM
I was having a meal with some friends today and stood up to get my wallet out of my back pocket when one of my friends made a remark that I found difficult to believe at first.
He said that a lot of men carry their wallets in their back pockets but now it is possible for people to go closely behind them and by using scanners can extract the bank details from the person's cards which are contained within the wallet.   It seemed far fetched to me but he then said that nowadays people are having wallets fitted with a metal lining as this was the only way they could ensure that the cards in their wallets were not been scanned.
Just to prove it to me he pulled out his wallet and showed me the metal lining inside of it.    Is nothing safe nowadays?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on April 28, 2016, 07:50:41 AM
Not quite true, Hugo. It essentially refers to NFC cards (active swipe to pay) and it's easy to fool them if you carry two cards.  It's been demonstrated under laboratory conditions that the RFID signal emitted can be read as long as the reading device is no further than 5 cm away and so long as it's the only card you carry, so they have to contact you to do it. Even then, it's very hard to do, so I wouldn't be unduly alarmed. The makers of foil-lined wallets are doing well, and I suspect they also have a line in tin foil hats...
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 28, 2016, 08:36:28 AM
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The makers of foil-lined wallets are doing well, and I suspect they also have a line in tin foil hats...

They make no money from me, I make my own tin foil hats!  D)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on April 28, 2016, 08:40:30 AM
Thanks for all that info Ian, but it's still frightening to think that modern technology is so advanced that that type of thing could happen.   My friend who is from Australia did say that there had to be close contact with the victim and that type of contact  does happen especially in big cities.
It wasn't that long ago that people who were drawing money from cash machines in Manchester were targeted by crooks.   After the money was drawn out the crooks would have close contact with the victim and would put a chalk mark on that victim's shoulder.      An accomplice of the crook would be waiting and the victim would be mugged and the cash stolen.
This new technology just means that the victim can be mugged in a different way
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on April 28, 2016, 09:29:12 AM
Couple of days ago had a phone call from Talktalk - or so the Asian gentleman named "David" told me.  Before he started his spiel I said I wanted to talk to him as there are sometimes problems with incoming e-mails - any that are form talktalk address won't come in - this temds to happen mid or late morning.  If I just stop the send/receive then the messages will come in later - some have taken a few days.

Anyway, he said he would look into it for me and send me a new router, but first wanted me to press the Windows button on my keyboard, which I did.  That brought up another window to login a code, which he gave me.  Then asked me to confirm something so I refused as I was getting very suspicious.

I asked him to prove he was from talktalk - he knew my name, address and post code, and obviously my phone number.  I said I was not going to continue further without proof.  He told me to get one of the latest talktalk bills and confirm the account number.  I took some time finding one and he was getting rather impatient.

Having found a bill he asked me for the account number.  No, I said, you tell me - and he was able to give me the account number, although I said it wasn't correct.  After more dialogue trying to persuade me to continue, he hung up - obviously upset at having wasted about 20 minutes of his life.

His phone number was shown on my phone - so I googled it (01773 STD code) and it came up with a name and address in Witney, Oxfordshire.  I googled the post code and the address was a private house in the middle of a very large housing estate.  I googled the name of the person and that came up with a different phone number (0870 code) so could have been a business number.

I then rang talktalk, using the number that was on the bill for customer enquiries.  They had no record of anyone ringing me and were grateful for all the info I gave them about the alleged caller (phone number, name, address) and the woman there said she would pass it on to their fraud department.

The first guy sounded really genuine other than he gave his name as David - my name is David but I don't think I'd get away with calling myself by an Asian name!  Getting my name, address and phone number would be relatively easy - but how did he get my talktalk account number?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on April 28, 2016, 10:05:17 AM
DVT, the lady on the news who lost £15k said her scam began just like that.
They are eventually after your bank details, through some confidence trick where they are pretending to credit your account.
Don't forget, it was TalkTalk who were hacked last year, and lots of customer information was stolen.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on April 28, 2016, 12:01:35 PM
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  It seemed far fetched to me but he then said that nowadays people are having wallets fitted with a metal lining as this was the only way they could ensure that the cards in their wallets were not been scanned.
Just to prove it to me he pulled out his wallet and showed me the metal lining inside of it.    Is nothing safe nowadays?

Hi Hugo, Last week I was in the Neighbour Hood watch shop, Market St. llandudno  and was offered a "Card Minder" for 50p

on the basis of better safe etc. I got one.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on April 28, 2016, 02:34:08 PM
I don't blame you Steve as it's better to be safe than sorry.       Your investment of 50p may save you a lot more than that in the long run.
To be honest I had never heard of that scam before but it does make you think what's next.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on May 09, 2016, 10:46:39 AM
I received another scam this morning and this is just an extraxt from it

Open your M&S Complimentary Prizes

Last March 14, we informed you that you were selected as a potential winner.
So far, we have still not received your confirmation. Arent you interested anymore?

Note: Unclaimed prizes will be re-distributed on 04/31/2016
 

It looks like I wouldn't have had a prize anyway!         :(
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blongb on May 09, 2016, 03:53:01 PM
If you had used the link Hugo the most likely outcome would end up with all your data being encrypted and a fee demanded to get it back. Well done you for not falling for it.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on May 28, 2016, 11:10:46 PM
Just had another scam supposedly from Amazon saying that my password was entered incorrectly three times and my account has been suspended and to restore access please click here and a link was added.
I just delete rubbish like that as I know that they are scams
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on May 29, 2016, 08:28:56 AM
Indeed, and the main issue that lets the scammers down is their lamentable use of English. But they're definitely getting better and nastier and these 'drive-by' infections are next to impossible to defend against.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on May 29, 2016, 11:08:04 AM
I received an e-mail today from a friend who lives abroad and he often sends me e-mails with a link to a video.   It seemed genuine and was written in a style similar to his, so I had no reason to believe that it was from anyone else.
Before I opened it however, I checked the e-mail address and it wasn't my friends so I didn't open the link.

These saddos seem to be getting better at sending scams so it's always best to check every thing before opening up the e-mail
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on May 29, 2016, 02:24:42 PM
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I received an e-mail today from a friend who lives abroad and he often sends me e-mails with a link to a video.   It seemed genuine and was written in a style similar to his, so I had no reason to believe that it was from anyone else.
Before I opened it however, I checked the e-mail address and it wasn't my friends so I didn't open the link.

These saddos seem to be getting better at sending scams so it's always best to check every thing before opening up the e-mail

I've just had an e-mail back from my friend in Spain and he confirmed that he did send it.    No harm done then, but if in doubt then check it out would seem to be the safest option
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on June 27, 2016, 06:49:03 PM
Another scam I received today was supposedly from HM Revenue & Customs which went on to say what is shown below and a link was attached for me to click on:-     I hope that no one is taken in by such an obvious scam


Our records show that you are eligible for a tax refund of:
£469.00

Please fill in the form before 29-07-2016.
The fastest and easiest way to get your refund is a direct deposit to your credit card/savings account
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 02, 2016, 01:06:53 PM
Advisory notice.
We have been made aware of a social media scam offering free tickets to Alton Towers Resort that is currently circulating on Facebook. This is NOT an official offer or affiliated to Alton Towers Resort in any way. Whilst action is taken to remove the scam, we would strongly advise against sharing your details or the post.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on September 10, 2016, 11:25:51 AM
Phone scam by callers posing as HMRC

The scam works with a robotic voice telling the victim that he or she owes HMRC money and to press one to speak to a case worker.

“We suspect that once you press one you’re charged,” a spokesman for Mr Elmore said.

He added: “HMRC would never contact anyone by telephone unless it was requested.”
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/victims-left-tears-over-phone-11867539 (http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/victims-left-tears-over-phone-11867539)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on September 10, 2016, 11:42:01 AM
And the world continues to get nastier.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on September 10, 2016, 03:33:43 PM
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And the world continues to get nastier.

Are we going back to medieval behaviours Ian?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on September 10, 2016, 03:58:00 PM
Not sure we've ever moved beyond them, sadly.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on September 10, 2016, 05:06:17 PM
I think there has been several pretences Ian, but usually after major wars when the population is either shocked or needs to work better together to rebuild.
At times of economic downturn, the world does indeed tend to turn nasty.
It's all about resources, the lack of them and the perception that someone else has them!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on October 01, 2016, 09:13:54 AM
I've had trouble with one of my e-mail addresses this last week and a couple of days ago I received a telephone call supposedly from Talk Talk.    The caller had a very heavy Asian accent and said that someone had hacked into Talk Talk and they were intent on creating damage which was much worse than any virus could do.
He said that he would help me to sort out the problem and to put my computer on and we would work our way through it to sort out the problem.
I asked him again why had he phoned me and he repeated what he had already said.
I told him that I was not in Talk Talk and this seemed to confuse him and he hesitated before saying that BT  and Virgin are members of Talk Talk.
I had already sussed out the scam before he said that, so I just put the phone down on him.   
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on October 01, 2016, 10:33:46 AM
I received the same call this week, as you did I put the phone down, but a few choice words just before hanging up  $angry$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on October 01, 2016, 11:53:19 AM
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I received the same call this week, as you did I put the phone down, but a few choice words just before hanging up  $angry$


Good on you Steve     $good$         The sad thing is that some people may have been taken in with the scam, but the unusual thing when it happened to me was that a phone number was left on my caller display phone but I never tried to phone the number  back.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on October 01, 2016, 12:53:28 PM
I've just had a chat with my friend Tellytubby and he's aware of that scam too.    Apparently he has some facility that gives him an automatic notification from the Police when these type of scams are going round.
His comments on the scam though are unprintable!         ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on October 01, 2016, 03:51:43 PM
I had the same type of call a few weeks ago only the caller was "representing" Windows. I decided to play along with him for a while, played stupid and put on a show of apparent co-operation until I dumfounded him by saying I couldn't open Windows. He tried his best to help explain how I should do it by which time he must have been convinced his luck was in with this simpleton.
That's when I dropped the news that I have an Apple Mac and that he was a worthless maggot who should go and dig himself a hole, climb in and have it filled in with him in it. Didn't swear once either which surprised me.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on October 01, 2016, 10:43:21 PM
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I had the same type of call a few weeks ago only the caller was "representing" Windows. I decided to play along with him for a while, played stupid and put on a show of apparent co-operation until I dumfounded him by saying I couldn't open Windows. He tried his best to help explain how I should do it by which time he must have been convinced his luck was in with this simpleton.
That's when I dropped the news that I have an Apple Mac and that he was a worthless maggot who should go and dig himself a hole, climb in and have it filled in with him in it. Didn't swear once either which surprised me.


I had exactly the same thing happen to me a few weeks ago but the cheeky sod said 'Oh, we do Macs too!'  I did swear, quite a lot actually!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 02, 2016, 08:23:18 AM
The Co-op has recently re-launched its Co-op card scheme, and it's being heavily promoted in-store. Sadly the scammers have already moved in with a very legitimate-appearing email that contains links to 'reset your account'.  The links don't resolve to anywhere known.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on October 09, 2016, 12:40:47 PM
I have seen these vans around Llandudno, using the "local hotel is selling them after ordering too many" ploy,
please be wary.

Councils are warning people not to buy mattresses from door-to-door sellers.
The Local Government Association - which represents councils in England and Wales - said some "scam traders" were selling dirty mattresses that had been thrown away.
Others were importing them without the proper safety certificates. The mattresses are then repackaged - often in branded wrapping.
Some sellers pretend a local hotel is selling them after ordering too many.
Councils across England have dealt with mis-sold mattresses:

Simon Blackburn, the chairman of the LGA's safer and stronger communities board, said: "These fly-by-night sellers don't care about the risks these mattresses pose, they just want to make a quick buck and leave you with phoney details so they can't be traced.
"These mattresses may be described as memory foam but are carefully wrapped so you have no idea what you are buying.
"They generally fail fire safety tests and are often worn-out, dirty and unhygienic items destined for the tip.
"Anyone offered a cheap mattress on their doorstep should not buy one."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-37579587 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-37579587)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: peterh on November 04, 2016, 08:10:54 PM
Hi all. I have just received a text to my mobile with the following message:-

Following our previous correspondence this is confirmation of the repossession of your property tomorrow Saturday 5th November 2015. Attending at 08:30 am.

Whilst I am not worried about this I was wondering if anyone has seen this before. It can only be they have got the wrong mobile number as they are not asking for anything, but I can see for some people it could well be very worrying.

Text was from +44 1392 984037 and if Googled this number shows no ref to scams etc.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: hollins on November 04, 2016, 08:15:18 PM
I looked it up on "who called me" and these are the results.

http://who-called.co.uk/Number/01392984037 (http://who-called.co.uk/Number/01392984037)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: peterh on November 04, 2016, 08:19:12 PM
Thank you Hollins so kind these people are just scum. Much appreciated.
Cheers
Peterh
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on November 05, 2016, 08:00:11 PM
Just received an email with the heading below  from pay@pal.com

Upldate Your Account Securite

As if you would with spelling like that.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on November 23, 2016, 10:36:07 AM
The phone rang earlier and my wife picked it up as she was expecting a friend to phone.    When she picked it up there was silence for a short while and then a female voice just said goodbye and hung up.
I then phoned the number back   01143 3601005 and again there was silence before what sounded like an automated voice said goodbye and hung up.

01143 is a Sheffield number but  Google did not recognise the full number of 011433601005

Some type of scan but any ideas why?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on November 26, 2016, 09:44:18 AM
Rogue traders could take advantage of residents who suffer storm damage, a neighbourhood watch group is warning.
They are advising anyone who comes across anyone suspicious to contact North Wales Police on 101 with a description of the rogue traders and their vehicle.
The alert said: “Due to the severe windy and blustery weather conditions, residents may notice an increase in trader’s cold calling and/or leafleting for work. We would therefore like to remind residents to be especially careful if they need remedial work doing on their homes such as gutters, drainpipes and roof tiles may have been damaged by the heavy winds and garden jobs.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/north-wales-weather-rogue-traders-12210525 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/north-wales-weather-rogue-traders-12210525)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on December 14, 2016, 02:54:13 PM
This via Tom Davidsons blog........
The Internet hoax, centred around fake Aldi vouchers, is currently circulating on social media sites and is said to con unwary users into handing over their personal details.

The social media post tempts unwitting users with free coupons worth up to £85.

In each of the fake vouchers, fraudsters claim that shoppers can use the vouchers in Aldi, which has stores in Llandudno , Old Colwyn , Rhyl , Bangor , Prestatyn , Llangefni and Flint .
More...... http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/aldi-customers-north-wales-warned-12319446 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/aldi-customers-north-wales-warned-12319446)


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on December 14, 2016, 03:13:48 PM
Thanks for posting that Steve, it's good to make people aware of this type of scam especially at this time of the year.      $good$

I've had loads of them from various businesses but they all get deleted straight away.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on December 22, 2016, 08:18:06 PM
ASDA CAR PARK SCAM       
Asda car park. Please BE WARNED! Over the last month I have become a victim of a clever 'Eastern European' scam whilst out shopping.  Simply dropping into Asda's
supermarket for a bit of shopping turned out to be quite an experience. Don't be naive enough to think it couldn't happen to you or your friends!   Here's how the scam works:   
    Two very good-looking 20-21 year-old girls of eastern European origin come over to your car as you are packing your shopping into the boot. They both start cleaning your windscreen, their breasts almost falling out of their skimpy T- shirts.  When you thank them and offer them a tip, they'll say 'No' and instead they ask you for a lift to another supermarket, in my case, Tesco. You
agree and they both get in the back seat. On the way there, they start undressing, until both are completely naked.Then, when you pull over to remonstrate, one of them climbs over into the front seat and starts crawling all over your lap, kissing you, touching you intimately and thrusting herself against you, while the other one steals your wallet!         
 I had my wallet stolen on October 4th, 9th, 10th, twice on the 15th, 17th 20th, 24th and 29th. Also on November 1st, 4th, 6th, 9th and 10th and twice yesterday. So please warn all
the older men you know to be on the lookout for this scam.  The best times seem to be just before lunch and about 4:30 in the afternoon.     
 P.S.  Aldi have cheap wallets on sale for £1.99 each but Lidl wallets are £1.75 and look better!! 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on December 23, 2016, 08:46:20 AM
 _))* _))* _))* _))*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on January 01, 2017, 09:40:51 AM
Today 00:40

Norfolk Trading Standards have just released a warning on two new cold-calling scams purporting to come from BT. In the first the caller states that telephone bills have not been paid, or the last direct debit has failed, and they then request immediate payment by credit or debit card. In the second. the caller states that an account is in credit which they are wishing to refund and they then request debit card details in order to process the refund.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: hollins on January 10, 2017, 03:53:46 PM
My mum has just had a nasty scam come up on her computer. Fortunately she is staying with us at present.
She was on her facebook page when a pop up came on purporting to be from Microsoft and saying that the computed had been infected and to call this number 0800 086 9834 for help to sort it out..
The only way out was to force a shut down of the computer which I did immediately.
I put the number into "Who called me" and lo and behold it is a nasty scam.
So lucky I was with her to intervene. Some sad people out there, beware!

http://who-called.co.uk/Number/08000869834 (http://who-called.co.uk/Number/08000869834)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on January 10, 2017, 03:55:59 PM
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My mum has just had a nasty scam come up on her computer. Fortunately she is staying with us at present.
She was on her facebook page when a pop up came on purporting to be from Microsoft and saying that the computed had been infected and to call this number 0800 086 9834 for help to sort it out..
The only way out was to force a shut down of the computer which I did immediately.
I put the number into "Who called me" and lo and behold it is a nasty scam.
So lucky I was with her to intervene. Some sad people out there, beware!

http://who-called.co.uk/Number/08000869834 (http://who-called.co.uk/Number/08000869834)

Well done H, and please give my best regards to your delightful Mum.
Not seen her recently.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: hollins on January 10, 2017, 04:03:04 PM
Thanks Fester.
I'm afraid she had a fall just before xmas and dislocated her shoulder so she is in a sling for 4-6 weeks and is a bit curtailed!
She says, "Have you got a cure for that Fester?"
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on January 10, 2017, 04:47:03 PM
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Thanks Fester.
I'm afraid she had a fall just before xmas and dislocated her shoulder so she is in a sling for 4-6 weeks and is a bit curtailed!
She says, "Have you got a cure for that Fester?"

Apart from Arnica, prevention is best... keep safe and stop falling!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on January 10, 2017, 04:52:07 PM
Best wishes to your Mum, hollins..... $good$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on January 10, 2017, 04:58:55 PM
Sorry to hear that news about your Mum Hollins, hope that she has a speedy recovery
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on January 10, 2017, 07:38:36 PM
Indeed. we'll send healing thoughts and hope she'll be back kayaking in no time :-)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on January 10, 2017, 08:28:52 PM
Best Wishes to your Mum. :-*
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: hollins on January 10, 2017, 08:58:55 PM
Many thanks everyone for your good wishes for my mum.
The messages have kept her going today and good advice Fester, try not to fall!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on February 03, 2017, 02:22:44 PM
If you are phoned by this number - 01492 574455 - you could be victim of a scam

The Daily Post has received hundreds of calls from concerned people who have been contacted.
Many of them have returned the call to the number and come through to the Daily Post as the number was formally used at the office in Llandudno Junction.
So far several hundred people have been in touch over two hours to say they have been called from this number with staff in the office in Llandudno Junction explaining the situation and advising those contacted not to give out any details and to end the calls.
http://www.dailypost.co.uk/business/business-news/you-phoned-number-01492-574455-12552018 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/business/business-news/you-phoned-number-01492-574455-12552018)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on February 04, 2017, 10:46:04 AM
Not so much a scam but a warning..........

Gwynedd gran's staggering £600 BILL for just four Mrs Brown's Boys tickets
Angela Evans devastated after controversial site Viagogo ramps up cost of tickets with normal face value of as little as £25.
“Unfortunately though, whilst looking at the tickets on a genuine website where the seats were £33 each, she somehow ended up being redirected to the Viagogo website - a known marketplace where tickets are sold for way over the going price and are littered with lots of pop-ups telling you to be quick.
http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/mrs-browns-boys-rhyl-tickets-12554653 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/mrs-browns-boys-rhyl-tickets-12554653)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on February 04, 2017, 11:57:14 AM
I'm fairly sure tickets are covered under the Distance Selling Regulations, so she can return them for a full refund within 14 days of receiving them.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on February 04, 2017, 01:04:23 PM
Ian, I had never heard of Distance Selling Regulations before, now changed to Consumer Contracts Regulations...
http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/advice/i-want-to-return-something-bought-online (http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/advice/i-want-to-return-something-bought-online)    and it would appear they should not have a problem other than the hassle of chasjng them up, but being a pencil and pad type  myself   :(    I can understand their frustration.





Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on February 04, 2017, 03:03:21 PM
Sorry, Steve;  I knew it was now the Consumer Contracts Regulations but I'd known it under the previous title for so long I forgot :-)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on February 04, 2017, 03:41:52 PM
Ian,  What I should have said, I have not heard of either DSR  or  CCR,  I should really try and catch up... :-[
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on February 10, 2017, 01:08:38 PM
I've just had a phone call from a man calling himself Michael but in a very heavy Asian accent.   He said he was from Microsoft securities and was phoning about my computer.
When I told "Michael" I hadn't got a computer he just put the phone down.    I wonder why he did that?      ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: BMD on February 10, 2017, 02:12:50 PM
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I've just had a phone call from a man calling himself Michael but in a very heavy Asian accent.   He said he was from Microsoft securities and was phoning about my computer.
When I told "Michael" I hadn't got a computer he just put the phone down.    I wonder why he did that?      ;D

That's interesting, Hugo - I got a similar call on my phone today. A man with a foreign (Asian-sounding) accent claiming to be with Microsoft. I wonder if they just target a different area-code each day.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on February 10, 2017, 02:13:24 PM
Yesterday, I made a complaint to sky.

Sky acknowledged my email and asked me to provide the first and last letters from my password, which I did.

Later, I received a telephone call from a lady saying she was from Sky.

To proceed, she asked me to give her my password in full.

For security reasons, I refused and she couldn't understand why when I explained why.


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on February 10, 2017, 03:03:15 PM
I have developed the habit of being totally gormless ( If you know what that is), with these people. I pretend that I am someone there doing some job, or whatever and deny any knowledge of the house and the people there. Usually they come to the conclusion that I am talking rubbish ( Which I am) and ring off.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on February 10, 2017, 05:28:19 PM
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Yesterday, I made a complaint to sky.

Sky acknowledged my email and asked me to provide the first and last letters from my password, which I did.

Later, I received a telephone call from a lady saying she was from Sky.

To proceed, she asked me to give her my password in full.

For security reasons, I refused and she couldn't understand why when I explained why.

SKY are evil when it comes to customer service.
However they always ask for my password in full when I have the misfortune to call them.
These days, instead, I use their online chat for help, much quicker, cheaper and less stressful.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: PhilMick on February 10, 2017, 06:41:58 PM
If I'm not gormless then I must be able to describe myself as gorm.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on February 10, 2017, 10:50:33 PM
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I've just had a phone call from a man calling himself Michael but in a very heavy Asian accent.   He said he was from Microsoft securities and was phoning about my computer.
When I told "Michael" I hadn't got a computer he just put the phone down.    I wonder why he did that?      ;D

That's interesting, Hugo - I got a similar call on my phone today. A man with a foreign (Asian-sounding) accent claiming to be with Microsoft. I wonder if they just target a different area-code each day.

I checked my caller display afterwards and it was an international call
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on February 15, 2017, 06:13:46 PM
I received another International phone call today but this time a number was also left.   When I picked up the phone the caller had a heavy Asian accent so I immediately hung up on him

I put the number into Google    0012393079799   and this came up

These scammers called me today, but I was in the shower, but I've had similar calls. These people want your name, and will likely ask for your bank details so that they ''can give you your compensation.'' In my humble opinion, they will call on another day and use this to try and scare you into moving money into their account, by pretending to be your bank.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on March 20, 2017, 12:41:56 PM
Not in the three towns area yet, but be aware ...Public Protection officers are warning consumers across the county to beware of fish salesmen trying to persuade householders to buy fresh fish.

Trading Standards and North Wales Police in the last week of traders selling door to door, asking residents, including older people, if they would like to buy fish. Dates and quality in question.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on March 20, 2017, 11:21:02 PM
But I like fresh fish!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on April 11, 2017, 11:50:19 AM
Alert as hyper-real bank text message fraud detected
Increasingly sophisticated fraudsters have a new bank scam that is costing customers thousands of pounds

Fraudsters are using spoof mobile numbers to con bank customers into handing over their account details.
The increasingly sophisticated scam sees text messages being sent to people's phones - using the SAME thread as used by their real banks.
http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/alert-hyper-real-bank-text-12877126 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/alert-hyper-real-bank-text-12877126)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on April 11, 2017, 12:03:43 PM
Does anyone else have problems with the Daily Post website - almost every time I click on it the amount of adverts and crap on there causes my browser to crash (I'm using google chrome)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on April 11, 2017, 12:09:09 PM
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Does anyone else have problems with the Daily Post website - almost every time I click on it the amount of adverts and crap on there causes my browser to crash (I'm using google chrome)
DaveR mentioned this before, my home computer gets all the adverts yet my tablet does'nt, I'm on chrome too.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Nemesis on April 11, 2017, 02:13:39 PM
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Does anyone else have problems with the Daily Post website - almost every time I click on it the amount of adverts and crap on there causes my browser to crash (I'm using google chrome)

Recently the speed of download from the Daily Post has speeded up, also the same from another Trinity Mirror site which I use regularly. It used to take hours because of all the adverts.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on April 24, 2017, 05:09:41 PM
I received an automated  phone call this afternoon but I hung up before it ended.   I then had a look at the caller display and checked it out on Google
The number  07953966066   turned out to be a scam so I'm glad that I checked the number out before phoning back

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjeotSgvr3TAhWBF8AKHfyWDVgQFggoMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fforums.moneysavingexpert.com%2Fshowthread.php%3Ft%3D3313610&usg=AFQjCNGW-pB68k5XufwrNjf3tycl3CWktQ (https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjeotSgvr3TAhWBF8AKHfyWDVgQFggoMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fforums.moneysavingexpert.com%2Fshowthread.php%3Ft%3D3313610&usg=AFQjCNGW-pB68k5XufwrNjf3tycl3CWktQ)


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on April 25, 2017, 03:53:22 AM
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I received an automated  phone call this afternoon but I hung up before it ended.   I then had a look at the caller display and checked it out on Google
The number  07953966066   turned out to be a scam so I'm glad that I checked the number out before phoning back

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjeotSgvr3TAhWBF8AKHfyWDVgQFggoMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fforums.moneysavingexpert.com%2Fshowthread.php%3Ft%3D3313610&usg=AFQjCNGW-pB68k5XufwrNjf3tycl3CWktQ (https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjeotSgvr3TAhWBF8AKHfyWDVgQFggoMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fforums.moneysavingexpert.com%2Fshowthread.php%3Ft%3D3313610&usg=AFQjCNGW-pB68k5XufwrNjf3tycl3CWktQ)


According to the link it isn't a scam but T-Mobile's Text to Landline service. If someone texting you chooses the landline number by mistake instead of your mobile this is a service that will convert the text into a computer generated voice message so you can still retrieve the message.



Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on April 25, 2017, 07:44:31 PM
Thanks SDQ      $good$
 it shows you how much I know about modern technology.    It was an e-mail from a relative I found out afterwards and it was the first time I had ever received one but I wasn't taking any chances and even when I Googled the number I believed it to be a scam.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on April 25, 2017, 08:13:48 PM
 :-}}}     there I go again with the technology!   It was a text message apparently not an e-mail but thanks again SDQ
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on April 26, 2017, 08:19:45 AM
It's not hard to become confused. In a relatively short time - around 15 years - the world has been changed to the extent that someone arriving here from the 1970s would hardly believe it was the same planet.  Texting is a prime example. The early texting was in the form of truncated alphanumeric shorthand characters, designed to be sent and read on a screen slightly larger than a postage stamp. Apple simply reinvented all that with astonishing ease and now we have Facetime, iMessage and the Android equivalents, all capable of sending small books in an instant or allowing us to communicate through video and audio with friends and family on the other side of the planet.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on April 26, 2017, 10:33:31 AM
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It's not hard to become confused. In a relatively short time - around 15 years - the world has been changed to the extent that someone arriving here from the 1970s would hardly believe it was the same planet.  Texting is a prime example. The early texting was in the form of truncated alphanumeric shorthand characters, designed to be sent and read on a screen slightly larger than a postage stamp. Apple simply reinvented all that with astonishing ease and now we have Facetime, iMessage and the Android equivalents, all capable of sending small books in an instant or allowing us to communicate through video and audio with friends and family on the other side of the planet.
Very true, but I think we're coming to a point where we need to ask...is all this constant communication a good thing? Some people appear to live their lives on Facebook, instead of getting out into the real world and talking to real people. Others remain glued to their phones all day and night, terrified that they will miss a text message. Initially, it all seemed fantastic, but is it the case that the dream of instant communication is quickly becoming a nightmare?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on April 26, 2017, 11:09:57 AM
You're right Dave!
All these kids glued to their X Boxes and mobile phones, hardly moving apart from their index fingers.
When I was there age, I'd be hanging around outside the off license, hoping someone we could cobble together enough for a bottle of cider between us.
Then we'd climb on the school roof, break off some slates and throw them at rival groups of kids.
Later, there was always the obligatory fight with kids from the adjoining street, and if that didn't transpire we could always persecute the elderly woman from Poland, or the old man who twitched a lot and shouted in the street.....or knock on people's doors and run away.
Come on kids, live a little!! 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on April 27, 2017, 07:16:02 AM
With technology changing so fast in the world today I can't see why anyone would want to go through the Cryonic process.   I know I wouldn't as it would be like waking up in an alien world.



http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/science/0/23695785 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/science/0/23695785)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on April 27, 2017, 07:29:56 AM
There's a nasty and potentially dangerous scam around (http://thehackernews.com/2017/04/unicode-Punycode-phishing-attack.html) which affects Chrome, Firefox and Opera. What it does is to spoof the URL address of a link;  okay - nothing new there, then, but the nasty bit is so long as you watched your URL bar across the top you could see if it was misdirecting you to a spoof site.

What this scam does is disguise your URL to make it look genuine. This is a very sneaky and nasty scam.  Now, I accept this is a bit technical, but the cure for Firefox users, anyway, is straightforward:



1.  Type about:config in the address bar of Firefox. Ignore the warnings about dragons :-)
2.  Search for network.IDN_show_punycode
3.  Set to 'True'
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TELL on April 27, 2017, 08:25:16 AM
Hello Ian,
I am aged, and a technology "back of the class" type. I use Chrome, can you tell me what I should be looking out for and trying to avoid.
Thanks.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on April 27, 2017, 08:31:33 AM
Sadly, Tell, there's no easy fix for Chrome or Opera at the moment. I would strongly urge you to switch browsers and download Firefox or Safari.  This is a particularly nasty trick which, in due course, the browser people will fix themselves, but at the moment Chrome and Opera are extremely vulnerable.

The real problem is that you won't be able to tell if you're taken to a faked page. It will look like the real one but it will have a 'payload' which could cause you a lot of trouble. Normally, all we had to do was check the address in the bar across the top of the browser, but the nasty aspect of this attack is that it fakes that address. Safari isn't affected, so the easy option for you is to switch to that until the other Browsers sort this out.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on May 09, 2017, 04:45:28 PM
Police internet safety warning, over John Lewis free £75 voucher, advise do not click on any links.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on May 09, 2017, 06:59:59 PM
Pretty good advice for just about any email from any source these days, sadly.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on May 12, 2017, 11:13:51 AM
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Police internet safety warning, over John Lewis free £75 voucher, advise do not click on any links.
Always bear in mind that 'you don't get owt for nowt'....
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on July 08, 2017, 12:28:24 PM
A Facebook virus is circulating in the North Wales area.

Users of the social media site are receiving a seemingly innocent message from people on their friends list with a video link attached, which claims to be about the receiver.
But when opened, the video redirects to a false YouTube page where the user is prompted to download a file to view the video.
However, there is no video.

This malware can post your profile picture along with a URL and a video in a message making it look like your friend has spotted a video of you.
Instead those who do follow the instructions and complete the request unwittingly download a virus which in turn spams the users friends list with the same link.

Although it is unclear exactly what this virus can do, it is thought that cyber criminals may also use this or similar hoaxes to trick people into downloading malware or installing malicious apps and browser plugins.
There have been reports that some users have been unable to log out of their accounts after mistakenly downloading the virus.

But there are steps you can take to avoid being compromised.
If you receive one of these messages, DO NOT OPEN it and inform the friend who appeared to send the video that their account has been hacked.
http://www.dailypost.co.uk/whats-on/facebook-video-messenger-virus-malware-13299113 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/whats-on/facebook-video-messenger-virus-malware-13299113)


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on July 20, 2017, 02:19:00 PM
Had an Email, from Inland revenue, advising tax refund, asking for card details etc. so they could transfer refund,
NO CHANCE, We advised I.R., who confirmed the scam, and advised they do not ask for personal details by Email.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on July 21, 2017, 12:16:52 PM
Just had a phone call from 02031296401 it was a recorded message something a about criminal charges to do with tax and HMRC,  I knew it was a scam so did not ring back! 

http://who-called.co.uk/Number/02031296401 (http://who-called.co.uk/Number/02031296401)

21/07/2017
Attempt at HMRC-related scam

21/07/2017
Scam about criminal filings, wants you to call them back. I didn't call back but I did check with the real HMRC. Its a scam!

21/07/2017
Scam about criminal filings from HMRC, Avoid, ignore!

21/07/2017
Supposed to be from tax office message to phone them back

20/07/2017
HMRC scam, recorded message. Just hang up, they are fake NOT HMRC.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on July 28, 2017, 10:31:51 AM
Police are warning people not to take part in an online survey supposedly from Tesco but actually the work of online fraudsters.
link is circulating offering people the chance of winning free shopping if they take part.
But the link takes people to a malicious website operated by scammers looking to get into their mobile phones and computers and potentially to access their bank accounts.

Action Fraud, the national anti-fraud organisation, said there had been a number of reports about the latest sophisticated scam.

Tweeting an image of the scam link out this morning, it wrote: "Reports of these fake Tesco emails have been flying in. The plausible survey link will lead you to a malicious website."


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on July 28, 2017, 11:08:38 AM
As I always say... "you don't get owt for nowt'.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 09, 2017, 02:50:53 PM
Royal Mail are warning of a new "missed delivery" scam that is duping householders into calling premium rate phone numbers.

Gangs are targeting homes by sending convincing red cards very similar to those used by posties stating that the addressee was out.
Recipients are told to call a number to rearrange a delivery time.

However when they ring the number, which begins with 0208 (which is the code for outer London),
Those calling the number are then put through to an automated message where they are asked to leave their details and a ‘consignment number’.

Victims have claimed that calling the number - which is not registered to Royal Mail - has cost them £45.

A Royal Mail spokesperson said that it was looking into the scam as a “matter of urgency”, adding that people receiving missed delivery notes should be vigilant and ensure that they contain the Royal Mail’s logo.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/royal-mail-warn-fake-delivery-13451935 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/royal-mail-warn-fake-delivery-13451935)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 17, 2017, 01:15:37 PM
Family's car stolen from unofficial Manchester Airport meet and greet service and home burgled while on holiday
Thieves who broke into Penrhyn Bay home thought to have used keys and address in family's stolen Audi.

“What’s even worse is that we have to use our own insurance to pursue this, as Car Park Manchester are saying they are only insured when driving the vehicle from the airport drop off/pick up to the compound.”
http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/holiday-familys-car-stolen-unofficial-13485484 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/holiday-familys-car-stolen-unofficial-13485484)



Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 21, 2017, 08:57:54 AM
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Family's car stolen from unofficial Manchester Airport meet and greet service and home burgled while on holiday
Thieves who broke into Penrhyn Bay home thought to have used keys and address in family's stolen Audi.

“What’s even worse is that we have to use our own insurance to pursue this, as Car Park Manchester are saying they are only insured when driving the vehicle from the airport drop off/pick up to the compound.”
http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/holiday-familys-car-stolen-unofficial-13485484 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/holiday-familys-car-stolen-unofficial-13485484)
Why would you leave your house keys and your address inside your car like that? Did they also leave a note saying 'please feel free to burgle my house whilst I am out of the country'?  &shake&
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 21, 2017, 09:09:28 AM
Manchester used to have the most secure, long-term parking for cars in the UK. They used a hangar on the airport itself, and you drove into it and were taxied back to your terminal. But then they built the new terminal, and that was that.

I can only imagine the car owner has become confused because, as you say, leaving keys inside any car is asking for trouble. It's odd they believe they can't claim against the company, though; any company looking after your vehicle for two weeks has a 'duty of care' in law, so I'd be interested to read the booking Ts and Cs. Even if they say something like 'we take no responsibility for your car' I would suspect that could be challenged under the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977, because it sounds very far from reasonable to me.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 21, 2017, 09:48:32 AM
I believe the car parking used was not an official Manchester Airport one?

We've used the official Meet & Greet service at Manchester several times and found it very good. Have to say though, the best way is to book a door to door Transfer - costs more but is far more relaxing!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 21, 2017, 10:45:14 AM
I agree. We have a relative who operates a service for that.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 21, 2017, 02:00:21 PM
The company the family used was Car Park Manchester.  On their website they claim "your car will be kept ensuring your car will be kept in a secure and safe carpark.".  Syntax error aside, I suspect that translates to a secure location.  That's also stressed on the website (http://carparkmanchester.co.uk/)

In the tiny Ts and Cs, it states "Our insurances cover our legal liabilities and vehicles and contents are left at owners’ risk.
No liability for loss or damage to your vehicle including tyres, trims, wheels, alloy wheels, windscreens, mechanical and structural failures will be considered."

but I would think that any judge would rule that out given their website which states "Secure - Affordable - Professional" on the basis of misleading or false advertising at the very least.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on August 21, 2017, 03:09:33 PM
Agreed Ian, that disclaimer surely won't stand up to any kind of challenge.

For what it's worth, I use Jet Parks or FSS, on a regular basis.  They are about £5.50 a day generally and it's never necessary to leave any house keys or other information.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on August 21, 2017, 05:05:47 PM
You'd be surprised how many people programme their full postal address into their satnavs.
You know where you live so just the town would suffice to get you home without revealing your address to any car thieves.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 22, 2017, 09:09:57 AM
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The company the family used was Car Park Manchester.  On their website they claim "your car will be kept ensuring your car will be kept in a secure and safe carpark.".  Syntax error aside, I suspect that translates to a secure location.  That's also stressed on the website (http://carparkmanchester.co.uk/)

In the tiny Ts and Cs, it states "Our insurances cover our legal liabilities and vehicles and contents are left at owners’ risk.
No liability for loss or damage to your vehicle including tyres, trims, wheels, alloy wheels, windscreens, mechanical and structural failures will be considered."

but I would think that any judge would rule that out given their website which states "Secure - Affordable - Professional" on the basis of misleading or false advertising at the very least.

I love this line on their website:

"our trained staffs are fully aware of each and individual drive of every model of vehicle."

 ?{}?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on August 22, 2017, 10:11:11 AM
I used to use off-site airport parking until I returned from the far east in the winter and was left freezing and shivering by FSS outside the terminal for an hour waiting for their shuttle bus.  Then Watchdog did an article on off-site airport parking and owners that had received parking and speeding tickets whilst their cars were supposedly in a 'secure compound'. They actually followed and filmed one of their cars fitted with a tracker that had been booked in for 'off-airport parking', and it was used and abused and left in a variety of locations over the two weeks. Ever since I've used the official 'meet and greet' which is superb and now I won't use anything else.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 23, 2017, 09:02:40 AM
This is their 'secure facility', basically leaving the cars in the back car park of a hotel:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 23, 2017, 09:11:39 AM
More than 130 car keys stolen and four vehicles taken from unofficial Manchester Airport meet and greet firm.

Other companies are also believed to have been hit, bosses at the firm claim.

Car Park Manchester, which offers a meet and greet-style service, is not affiliated with Manchester Airport.

Bosses said keys were stolen from the firm’s depot in Altrincham, Trafford. Four cars have since been taken.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/more-130-car-keys-stolen-13514942 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/more-130-car-keys-stolen-13514942)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 23, 2017, 09:28:44 AM
I suspect they won't be trading for a lot longer.  The problem is, of course, that even if they become bankrupt from claims the directors can simply start a new company. We've seen this with the cold calls companies, who've been fined millions, yet simply declare insolvency and then start up new companies. The law needs to deal with individual directors.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on August 23, 2017, 10:00:22 AM
If people go to CC to make their own claims they can do it for the individual as well as the company so they can be tracked down and made to pay these claims can then be escalated to high court writs.

Can't pay we'll take it away is a good show on channel 5  $good$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 23, 2017, 11:06:21 AM
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If people go to CC to make their own claims they can do it for the individual as well as the company so they can be tracked down and made to pay these claims can then be escalated to high court writs.
I'm not sure that's the case, sadly? A company is a separate legal entity and the person's contract is with them, rather than the director.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on August 23, 2017, 11:19:35 AM
All I can say is I've definitely seen bailiffs go to the person's home because they had a business debt but the writ was made out in the name of the individual rather than the business. So it must be possible although I don't know the inns and outs.

I think you should stop watching that awful game of thrones programme and watch channel 5 instead!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on August 23, 2017, 12:14:57 PM
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If people go to CC to make their own claims they can do it for the individual as well as the company so they can be tracked down and made to pay these claims can then be escalated to high court writs.

Can't pay we'll take it away is a good show on channel 5  $good$

I wish it were true BTR but as far as I'm aware debts owed by the Limited company can only be collected from the Limited Company.    The directors cannot be taken to the CC to reclaim a debt owed by their company.
It's wrong but that's the law and over the years, I've seen so many individuals form companies and then put them into liquidation and start another company.     It's not just Bob the Builder who has done this but solicitors, accountants freemasons and many others who claim that they are the pillars of the community.

Now in a partnership, each partner is liable for a debt incurred by the partnership should the other partner(s) default in making payment.     If the law applies to the partnership you would think that it could apply to the directors of limited companies but sadly it doesn't.     

You're spot on with "Can't pay we'll take it away is a good show on channel 5  $good$"    it's well worth watching and a bit of an eye opener too.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on August 23, 2017, 12:17:36 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4815870/130-cars-keys-stolen-airport-meet-greet-firm.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4815870/130-cars-keys-stolen-airport-meet-greet-firm.html)

The couple from Penrhyn Bay have even made the pages of the far right!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on August 23, 2017, 12:20:36 PM
On a similar line

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4814606/800-000-families-face-crisis-sub-prime-loan-firm-tanks.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4814606/800-000-families-face-crisis-sub-prime-loan-firm-tanks.html)

Although I don't see why this is bad for their lenders. Surely it's great for them?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on August 23, 2017, 12:34:59 PM
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All I can say is I've definitely seen bailiffs go to the person's home because they had a business debt but the writ was made out in the name of the individual rather than the business. So it must be possible although I don't know the inns and outs.

I think you should stop watching that awful game of thrones programme and watch channel 5 instead!

I watch that show B2R, and you're right in what you saw, but in a different way.
The bailiffs are following up a business debt, often at the home of the Director of the business...because that address is listed as the registered business address.
If the man pays up, (from his business account), then fine... but usually they can't or won't.
Then the bailiffs have the job of trying to seize assets, such as cars or computers that are part of the business asset.
The crooks are usually too clever for that, and the cars are in 'their wife's name' or suchlike, and can't be touched.  It's a great show, a little frustrating sometimes.


Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 24, 2017, 09:12:12 AM
I've seen 'Can't pay etc etc' quite a few times and it is very entertaining. It's a sad fact that there are a few people out there who make a career of running up bills and then refusing to pay them.

When you run a business, you can either do it as a Sole Trader or as a Ltd Company. If you're a sole trader, then you can have a separate  business name, business bank account but you are responsible for all debts etc incurred in the name of the business. If you set up a business as a Ltd Company, then it is completely separated from you with its own bank account etc. For the person setting up the Ltd Company, the key phrase is 'limited liability' - they can only lose the amount they invested in shares in the company and are not liable for any debts incurred by the company itself etc.

Doubt I've explained that very well!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 24, 2017, 10:59:57 AM
That's exactly my understanding, Dave. Limited companies are set up to shelter the owners and directors from financial liabilities. There have been some slight moves to change things but the majority of MPs being lawyers and businessmen haven't exactly put a lot of effort into sorting the law out.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 28, 2017, 02:11:16 PM
It would appear this one is set to run and run:

Car Park Manchester blames mother (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/penrhyn-bay-mumat-centre-airport-13492830)

In their statement they say "We have 24/7 CCTV and at least 12 members of staff on site at all times. The compound is gated and lit with floodlights and is also Park Mark Awarded by the BPA".

I still think their biggest blunder was in so quickly attempting to repudiate any suggestion of liability.  Obviously nowhere is completely secure 100% of the time, but would it not seem appropriate for them to carry insurance to cover the potential risk?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 29, 2017, 09:40:55 AM
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It would appear this one is set to run and run:

Car Park Manchester blames mother (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/penrhyn-bay-mumat-centre-airport-13492830)

In their statement they say "We have 24/7 CCTV and at least 12 members of staff on site at all times. The compound is gated and lit with floodlights and is also Park Mark Awarded by the BPA".

I still think their biggest blunder was in so quickly attempting to repudiate any suggestion of liability.  Obviously nowhere is completely secure 100% of the time, but would it not seem appropriate for them to carry insurance to cover the potential risk?
Interesting comment on the Daily Post article:
"Should have done their home work. This business has NO reputation to defend! Plenty of bad reviews on various websites, and plenty of previous coverage in the Manchester Evening News as well. Car Park Manchester is a trading name of Manchester Meet and Greet Ltd who operate TWO meet and greet websites. I wouldn't describe the grounds of Davenport Green Hall, a Grade 2 listed building on Shay Lane in Hale Barns, a suitable car park for cars. Indeed, that's what the local Trafford Council think, who have an enforcement notice issued against the property owner. The business should be off the land by now I think, having just lost an appeal. As for security, other than a DIY camera kit fitted to a building, there are no cameras actually covering the cars, and the gates are always left open. They also used to leave vehicles off site on a private road with public access. They can't dispute that, as it was in the planning inspectorates report. Dealing with these people always seems to leave people in tears."
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on August 29, 2017, 04:46:48 PM
"The Firth family, from Penrhyn Bay, booked their vehicle with Car Park Manchester, on July 31, at a cost of £82, before they jetted off on a two week holiday to Menorca"

£82 - seems a bit steep to me as well. How much is a taxi to Manchester?
If you could time your bookings so that you were picking someone up in Manchester shortly after you were dropping someone off then you'd think there would be good money to be made.

Even if you only charged £50 E/W. Making two round trips a day would make you £200 a day - or £1000 for a five day weeks. That's only working 4/5 hours a day as well, I know some taxi drivers work a lot longer for a lot less.
 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 29, 2017, 05:16:15 PM
I pay about £80 one way for a private hire car, recently the price has risen because of bridge toll and airport drop off charges,.....yes you have to pay, just to drop off at Liverpool airport, not sure about Manchester.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TheMedz on August 29, 2017, 09:53:44 PM
With Quidco and also Holiday Extras 15%?discount for less than the cost of a return taxi/private hire car to and from Manchester or Liverpool airport I have been able to book a combined hotel room on the night before the flight and a week or even two weeks parking in a park and ride car park.

I totally avoid "leave the keys with us" parking ever since the suspension coils on a reasonably new car we had stangely all collapsed at the same time on the way back from the airport car park.

A family with 2 children would I imagine be possibly cheaper to go with a hire car.

Last time I even considered the return train journey to and from Manchester airport but that was prohibitively expensive.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on August 30, 2017, 08:31:44 AM
We paid £150 for the last trip to Manchester Airport. As the return flight was delayed and we arrived at 4 in the morning, it was a pleasure to be able to snooze all the way home instead of having to drive.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on August 30, 2017, 12:02:41 PM
Alternatively, fly Business Class.

Chauffeur service both ways. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on August 30, 2017, 10:21:08 PM
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Alternatively, fly Business Class.

Chauffeur service both ways.
To Tenerife ??  :laugh:
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 31, 2017, 07:42:34 AM
Oh. yes;  someone else flies the plane...
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: hollins on September 01, 2017, 08:50:08 AM
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Alternatively, fly Business Class.

Chauffeur service both ways.

Only Emirates and Oman Air now as far as I am aware. Etihad have stopped their chauffeur service even for first class passengers except for travel in UAE.

We use the car parks at Manchester and Liverpool regularly and the prices had become quite reasonable. That is until a few months ago at Manchester who have racked their prices up recently and changed the rules of the multi storey.
We have used the multi storey in the past few years paying between £60 and £80 for between 7-10 days but when we tried to book for 9 days recently it wouldn't come up with the option of the multi storey, only the long stay for £80. So, I phoned up and was told that if the stay is over 8 days now the multi storey is not offered. I was told I could book for 8 days at £85 and pay the extra daily rate of £25 at the exit gate! The long stay is only £5 cheaper for the same 8 day period.
In contrast the last time we parked at Liverpool we only paid £49 for 8 days in the old Ipark, now called Cheap parking on the right of the roundabout as you go towards the airport.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on September 01, 2017, 09:14:02 PM
I went business class with Emirates a few times.
It's actually quite abusive to be honest.
Door to door limo service is all very nice, but I never managed to control myself with the colossal amounts of food and booze they assaulted me with, constantly.
Looking back, the comfort was excellent, but the damage to my health was greater.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on September 06, 2017, 11:32:12 AM
BT customers in the UK have been targeted by scammers (https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/06/bt_call_scam/) in India – with one person reporting they were defrauded for thousands of pounds this week.

The twist is that they've got hold of registered addresses, etc., so know all the details and sound fairly convincing.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DaveR on September 06, 2017, 11:37:02 AM
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BT customers in the UK have been targeted by scammers (https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/06/bt_call_scam/) in India – with one person reporting they were defrauded for thousands of pounds this week.

The twist is that they've got hold of registered addresses, etc., so know all the details and sound fairly convincing.
I had one of these calls last year and I let the caller witter on for ages about how my pc had a virus, then politely told him I had a Mac.  ££$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on September 06, 2017, 12:46:02 PM
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BT customers in the UK have been targeted by scammers (https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/06/bt_call_scam/) in India – with one person reporting they were defrauded for thousands of pounds this week.

The twist is that they've got hold of registered addresses, etc., so know all the details and sound fairly convincing.
I had one of these calls last year and I let the caller witter on for ages about how my pc had a virus, then politely told him I had a Mac.  ££$

Exactly what I did!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on September 06, 2017, 07:00:50 PM
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BT customers in the UK have been targeted by scammers (https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/06/bt_call_scam/) in India – with one person reporting they were defrauded for thousands of pounds this week.

The twist is that they've got hold of registered addresses, etc., so know all the details and sound fairly convincing.
I had one of these calls last year and I let the caller witter on for ages about how my pc had a virus, then politely told him I had a Mac.  ££$


I did exactly the same and he had the audacity to say "Oh, we do Macs too!". Unbelievable!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on September 07, 2017, 09:07:58 AM
Reading this thread about the cost of parking at Manchester airport being on the rise I decided to book now for early next year. I didn't need to look far to find APH park and ride was £42 for 15 days. That doesn't seem to have gone up much at all. In June we paid £52 for 10 days using Jetparks, and this autumn we have 30 days at Hunters, a first for us, at £71.
With a round trip of 180 miles using a maximum of 4 gallons of petrol at say £20, it's a lot, lot cheaper than any alternatives.
My advice though is book well ahead and shop around.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on September 21, 2017, 12:16:56 PM
Beware you good Samaritans .....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XHQFjYiOw4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XHQFjYiOw4)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on October 14, 2017, 04:33:41 PM
Another piece of confidence boosting about parking at Manchester airport.

Rogue airport meet and greet parking boss jailed
Brian Pearson ran an operation looking after cars of tourists using Manchester airport

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/rogue-airport-meet-greet-parking-13762177 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/rogue-airport-meet-greet-parking-13762177)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on October 15, 2017, 03:18:41 PM
I see a little pony is back in Llandudno along with a woman and a collection bucket.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on November 10, 2017, 09:13:25 AM
Victims across the North Wales area have been receiving telephone calls from people claiming to be from the Met Police or high street bank fraud depts reporting suspicious activity on their bank account flagged for investigation. https://www.north-wales.police.uk/news-and-appeals/fraud-awareness?lang=en-gb (https://www.north-wales.police.uk/news-and-appeals/fraud-awareness?lang=en-gb) …
8:00 AM - Nov 10, 2017
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on November 10, 2017, 10:45:28 AM
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I see a little pony is back in Llandudno along with a woman and a collection bucket.

I have actually contacted CCBC about them. The Duty Officer was most helpful and stated that the lady, Mrs Davis-Black is collecting as a 'street entertainer',  or busker to you and me, (over which, the council have no powers) had been has been categorically informed that if she suggests or indicates that she is collecting for a charity or charitable purpose, she would be committing an offence.

The pony has been checked out and is fit and well and properly looked after.

The Council Officer was most helpful and obviously has full knowledge of the situation.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on November 10, 2017, 04:17:28 PM
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 as a 'street entertainer',  or busker to you and me, (over which, the council have no powers)

As far as I understand it, councils do (or can) have powers. Busking itself is legal but councils may have their own by-laws.  see https://www.dittomusic.com/blog/a-guide-to-uk-busking-laws (https://www.dittomusic.com/blog/a-guide-to-uk-busking-laws) for example.

Mostyn Street in Llandudno for example might add other complications, I'm not sure but I was once informed by a policeman that the area of the pavement under the verandas in front of the shops is private property?

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on November 10, 2017, 06:47:38 PM
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 as a 'street entertainer',  or busker to you and me, (over which, the council have no powers)

As far as I understand it, councils do (or can) have powers.

I posted what I was told by a CCBC officer, who, as I said in my post, had full knowledge of the situation. Perhaps you should contact the Licensing and Legal Departments of CCBC and give them the benefit of your 'understanding'. I'm sure that they would be most grateful.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on November 10, 2017, 06:54:42 PM
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I posted what I was told by a CCBC officer, who, as I said in my post, had full knowledge of the situation. Perhaps you should contact the Licensing and Legal Departments of CCBC and give them the benefit of your 'understanding'. I'm sure that they would be most grateful.

I'll leave any conversation with them to you, thanks.

In the meanwhile here is the UK page about busking licences:  https://www.gov.uk/busking-licence (https://www.gov.uk/busking-licence)

I'll include some text in it here:

Quote
Restrictions

Busking is not illegal but your council will tell you about byelaws or rules you must observe, such as:

    not making too much noise
    not blocking public highways (footpaths, pavements, open pedestrian areas)
    not displaying notices asking for payment
    not carrying out street trading (you need a street trading licence for this)
    only busking in certain parts of the town or for a limited period of time

Children under 14 aren’t allowed to busk.
How to apply

Contact your council to see if you need a busking licence. You may have to pay a fee when you apply.

You might be able to apply through your council’s website.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 10, 2017, 07:13:56 PM
Llandudno had local regs that prohibited busking, etc., which had been formulated in the Victorian era, but they expired - I think around 1990.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on November 10, 2017, 07:23:32 PM
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Llandudno had local regs that prohibited busking, etc., which had been formulated in the Victorian era, but they expired - I think around 1990.
I have in the very dim and distant (80s) past had a go or two at busking in Llandudno. I don't remember hearing about then, although I do remember the copper's friendly advice (above). Of course that doesn't mean they didn't exist...  The only thing I can vaguely think of though is were there some restrictions on the prom?

Whatever, I believe different councils operate different rules.  I did hear tale from someone living in Coventry at the time (agains 80s somewhere) than not only did you have to get a licence, you had to pass some audition first!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on November 10, 2017, 07:36:09 PM
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I posted what I was told by a CCBC officer, who, as I said in my post, had full knowledge of the situation. Perhaps you should contact the Licensing and Legal Departments of CCBC and give them the benefit of your 'understanding'. I'm sure that they would be most grateful.

I'll leave any conversation with them to you, thanks.


Thanks, I will speak to the relevant authorities when I feel that there is a particular issue that needs to be resolved, but I do understand that it's easier to anonymously post generalities on blogs than actually do something practical to resolve a situation that gives cause for concern.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on November 10, 2017, 07:45:36 PM
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Thanks, I will speak to the relevant authorities when I feel that there is a particular issue that needs to be resolved, but I do understand that it's easier to anonymously post generalities on blogs than actually do something practical to resolve a situation that gives cause for concern.

1. Only responding to a comment you made  ("busker to you and me, (over which, the council have no powers)") as I believe the situation with buskers is largely regulated by local/byelaws.  Living in Norfolk, while I remain interested in your area, it's unlikely I'd be getting involved with your council...

2. I'm not really that anonymous here.  Hugo for one could identify me or at a minimum pin me down to 1 of 4 boys.  Where I've lived in Pydew is well known here...
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on November 11, 2017, 05:31:26 AM
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Thanks, I will speak to the relevant authorities when I feel that there is a particular issue that needs to be resolved, but I do understand that it's easier to anonymously post generalities on blogs than actually do something practical to resolve a situation that gives cause for concern.

1. Only responding to a comment you made  ("busker to you and me, (over which, the council have no powers)") as I believe the situation with buskers is largely regulated by local/byelaws.  Living in Norfolk, while I remain interested in your area, it's unlikely I'd be getting involved with your council...

2. I'm not really that anonymous here.  Hugo for one could identify me or at a minimum pin me down to 1 of 4 boys.  Where I've lived in Pydew is well known here...

For the third time, the statement that 'the council have no powers' was made to me by the CCBC Duty Officer. I was merely reporting on here for those concerned to reassure them that the CCBC were fully aware and were closely monitoring these people following the issues last year with the illegal collection for a supposed but non-existent military charity by a man with a small horse. 

As your understanding of the legislation appears to differ from that of the Licensing and Legal Departments of CCBC who I have spoken to, why not contact them and give them the benefit of your 'beliefs'. You don't have to live in the area to give them your advice and legal expertise on the matter and point out their failings and I'm sure that they would be most grateful.

So, apart from your rhetoric on this blog, your actual contribution in doing something practical regarding this social issue and peoples concerns about it  -  is what?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TELL on November 11, 2017, 08:58:31 AM
Enough please boys, you are getting boring.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on November 11, 2017, 11:01:40 AM
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Enough please boys, you are getting boring.

Thank you Tell, for your interesting and stimulating comment, to this and all the other topics that you have contributed to.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on November 29, 2017, 02:00:43 PM
Police are urging people to be alert to a growing scam where criminals are posing as police officers and asking their victims to take part in a fake undercover operation.

Fraudsters are contacting members of the public, usually by phone, purporting to be from the police, or in some cases the fraud team within their bank.

The criminal claims they are investigating a fraud at a local bank branch where staff are suspected of being complicit, including issuing fake bank notes, and asks their target to help in the operation.

As part of the scam, the individual is requested to visit the branch and withdraw a substantial sum, often thousands of pounds, of the supposedly counterfeit cash to hand over to the ‘police’ for ‘analysis’.

In another version of the scam, the criminal convinces the victim to transfer money to a so-called ‘safe account’ to protect their funds from the ‘corrupt’ bank staff. However, the account is in fact controlled by the criminal.
http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/bogus-cops-steal-thousands-fake-13970180 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/bogus-cops-steal-thousands-fake-13970180)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: systema on November 30, 2017, 08:44:34 PM
What !!!  - who on earth would fall for a scam like that, even my MIL who is 95 and not internet savvy would not fall for that one.  She would ask them, as policemen, to come to her house in civvies and take her with them to the bank and would check every identity they had with them with her local police station.  She lives in Nottingham and they give old people a number to ring if they feel in fear so would check with this - she also has the number of the community police who will answer the phone. 
It is good the Police are pointing this out for people to be aware but common sense should prevail.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on December 01, 2017, 07:17:38 AM
Many have, in fact. It's now a very old scam and I'd thought we'd hear no more about it, but presumably new criminals are still trying it. It seems a lot is down to the way in the which the con artist does it; they make it sound very urgent and warn them not to check with the bank or police station, since they fear there might be a breach of security.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on December 01, 2017, 10:41:17 AM
Yesterday, I received a telephone call from a very helpful individual informing me that he is in a position, thanks to our government, to recover all the bank charges I have been paying over the years.

All I had to do is give him my bank account number and sort code and he would do the rest.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on December 01, 2017, 11:01:44 AM
Sounds a good deal, have you got his contact details ?                                                                       WWW
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on December 01, 2017, 02:09:47 PM
I am afraid not but if it is any help it was international.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on December 01, 2017, 02:39:13 PM
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What !!!  - who on earth would fall for a scam like that, even my MIL who is 95 and not internet savvy would not fall for that one.  She would ask them, as policemen, to come to her house in civvies and take her with them to the bank and would check every identity they had with them with her local police station.  She lives in Nottingham and they give old people a number to ring if they feel in fear so would check with this - she also has the number of the community police who will answer the phone. 
It is good the Police are pointing this out for people to be aware but common sense should prevail.
I think the fact that the police are pointing it out indicates some have fallen for it. Your MIL may be smart but. as a generalisation, older people in particular may be more trusting, and to get them thinking they are helping may (in a nasty way) be a good tactic.  I believe when my mother was in the day hospital in Llandudno quite a few years back, they used to have a police officer visit occasionally to advise over scams and on how to avoid becoming a victim. I hope they still do that.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2017, 02:57:47 PM
I'm afraid that there are some vulnerable people out there who will fall for scams like that and a person I know was taken in by a similar scan in recent months
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on December 01, 2017, 03:07:21 PM
Over the past 12 months, I have received several telephone calls to my mobile about the motor accident I was involved in.

Initially, I used to say I hadn’t been involved in a motor accident but now I find it is much quicker to close the conversation by saying there must be a mistake because I haven’t driven a motor car for years.
Title: Re: Consumer news
Post by: SteveH on December 20, 2017, 05:26:16 PM
As an avid tea drinker I was surprised to read the following, and have signed the petition mentioned.......

A self-employed gardener and environmentalist, from North Wales, has launched a campaign to stop plastic being used in teabags.

Manufacturers have admitted that as much as 25% of the bags can be made up of polypropylene - a plastic - making them impossible to fully compost.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/teabags-plastic-pollution-environment-tea-14060850 (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/teabags-plastic-pollution-environment-tea-14060850)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on February 05, 2018, 03:30:41 PM
If you received an official looking email from BT telling you to register your email addresses against your Broadband account by the 9th of February or risk loosing them it's a scam!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on February 12, 2018, 07:52:22 PM
Distraction burglary - Glan Conwy
Police are appealing for witnesses after a distraction burglary in Glan Conwy on Friday.

Three men claiming to be from the Water Board entered the elderly victim’s property and stole a quantity of cash before making away from the property on foot.  Ref DP
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on March 02, 2018, 04:27:59 PM
Please be aware that this company is putting these ‘charity’ envelopes through doors locally, there’s plenty in the media about their dubious nature of their 'charity'. 

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/mar/30/clothing-collection-bags-recycle-proline-asa (https://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/mar/30/clothing-collection-bags-recycle-proline-asa)

http://www.southwalesargus.co.uk/news/10470662.Clothes_collection_licence_revoked_after_charity_donates_less_than_5_/ (http://www.southwalesargus.co.uk/news/10470662.Clothes_collection_licence_revoked_after_charity_donates_less_than_5_/)

http://more-anon.com/charity-collection-bags-winners-and-losers/ (http://more-anon.com/charity-collection-bags-winners-and-losers/)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on March 02, 2018, 06:47:29 PM
Mine went into the bin this morning.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on March 09, 2018, 02:36:44 PM
Santander alert over sophisticated smishing scam
Thousands of Santander customers are being told NOT to click on a text apparently sent by the bank within the past few days. Staff are warning it is a scam even though the message which claims that they have detected “suspicious activity” is appearing in the bank’s own feed on people’s phones. The message appears to be genuine since the scammers are carrying out “number spoofing”. The text reads: “We have detected suspicious activity on your account. Please verify via the secure link to prevent account lockout.”

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Meleri on March 23, 2018, 03:26:46 PM
Beware of telephone numbers 01497554461 & 01494032626 it's a scam. They have been telephoning people in the Conwy area over the past few days saying their IPS address has been compromised from several countries and then ask you to press 1 on the keypad to talk to an operator  &shake&
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on March 23, 2018, 05:03:31 PM
For the past few days, I have been receiving telephone calls to our landline and my mobile claiming to be from HSBC and before they can speak to me I must answer a few security questions such as complete the remainder of my LL30 postcode and which month was I born in.

I always refuse to reply because I do not expect my bank to phone me and first go through security but today I called into the local branch of the HSBC and they checked their system and would you believe it, it has been the HSBC phoning me?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 23, 2018, 06:20:46 PM
Indeed, they've been doing that for some years. If you don't speak to them, eventually they lock your account.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on March 23, 2018, 11:20:11 PM
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For the past few days, I have been receiving telephone calls to our landline and my mobile claiming to be from HSBC and before they can speak to me I must answer a few security questions such as complete the remainder of my LL30 postcode and which month was I born in.

I always refuse to reply because I do not expect my bank to phone me and first go through security but today I called into the local branch of the HSBC and they checked their system and would you believe it, it has been the HSBC phoning me?

That's outrageous if they lock your account for not responding to their demands.What a stupid way of doing business when banks and customer accounts are being scammed left right and centre.
You did the right thing in refusing to speak to them if the call is unsolicited.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 24, 2018, 07:41:05 AM
The HSBC dept that normally does this is their fraud department, and their argument (tenuous in the extreme) is that they're trying to ascertain if your accounts have been compromised and if you don't respond they have to lock the accounts concerned.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on March 24, 2018, 10:20:24 AM
On this occasion, Ian, they wanted to gather additional personal information about me to help with their security.

e.g. - the value of our home and my personal income.  :o
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on March 24, 2018, 11:05:52 AM
Interesting - and none of their business, I'd have thought.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on March 24, 2018, 12:30:25 PM
Barclays are currently carrying out a similar exercise.

It is not just for the bank but it includes their insurance and investment divisions.

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on May 09, 2018, 10:31:40 AM
Quite often I get calls from "London" numbers such as

020 3009 2114

Always different numbers, If I answer it's silence if I ring back number is not recognised.

What kind of scam is this?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on May 09, 2018, 11:55:02 AM
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Quite often I get calls from "London" numbers such as

020 3009 2114

Always different numbers, If I answer it's silence if I ring back number is not recognised.

What kind of scam is this?


https://www.lovemoney.com/news/28892/0203-code-phone-number-scam-cost-who-owns-this (https://www.lovemoney.com/news/28892/0203-code-phone-number-scam-cost-who-owns-this)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on May 09, 2018, 12:10:05 PM
But why when I answer it's just silent? They need to up their game a bit if they want to make some real money!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on June 01, 2018, 06:47:58 PM
Current scam: some folk are getting emails that seem to come from a marketplace trader in Amazon. It's not certain what this is about as yet, but best not to click on the links in the email. Or on any links in emails, frankly.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 01, 2018, 09:51:59 PM
I have a car for sale on eBay at the moment, had a message last night saying ' will pay your asking price if you will take my item in exchange' , some strange wording like that anyway. I asked what the item was, but could not send the reply. I knew it was a scam from the odd wording , the link supplied was to a eBay log in page which of cause would be fake! The odd wording gave it away, but when they use normal language such as ' hi, I'm interested in your car...' that's when it will be easy to fall for it!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: hollins on June 02, 2018, 09:43:38 AM
We recently sold a car on Ebay and had the same text message after it was sold.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on June 02, 2018, 01:28:31 PM
Andy,  one of my neighbours listed their car on eBay for something like £3,000
It didn’t sell, but eBay sent them a bill for £500 due to the reserve not being met.
It’s in their terms and conditions apparently,  what’s all that about?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 02, 2018, 03:40:11 PM
No idea, sounds extremely unfair though! Was it a genuine eBay request? Mine is a classified advert, costs about £15 for a month, not much good though, only one spammer reply!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on June 14, 2018, 02:30:27 PM
A bartender “suckered” by a brazen fake money scam has warned others to be vigilant against similar cons.

The 18-year-old had just finished a shift when he was approached by a young woman in Llandudno .
He recognised her as somebody he’d given £2 to for a bus fare just two weeks earlier.

“She approached me, saying that she was thankful for me giving her money and wanted to give me £5 for my help and to repay the favour, but unfortunately she only had a £20 note,” he said.
“I originally told her that it was fine and that I didn’t need the money, but she wanted to repay it.

“I eventually decided to get the money from the cash machine, but she said she needed to go and would just give me a £20 note that she had in her hand for the £10 I was going to get.
“I gave her the £10 note and she gave me the £20 note, then she made a run for it.”

To his horror, the note was fake and the scammer even had the gall to leave a message on the reverse that read: “Ha Ha!!! Sucker” alongside a smiley face.

He said: “A taxi driver has seen it happen before where people have been drawing money out of the machine and she’s snatched it.
“A few people have messaged me on Facebook and said it’s happened to them as well. A couple have even been in touch identifying the woman so I’ve told the police.

https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/fake-money-llandudno-scam-note-14783580 (https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/fake-money-llandudno-scam-note-14783580)

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on June 14, 2018, 02:40:54 PM
I've just read that article too Steve, let's hope that they catch the pair asap
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bosun on June 21, 2018, 04:14:52 PM
Two men were outside M & S on Mostyn Street today selling copies of 'The Veterans Journal'. Just in time for Armed Forces day.

The details of Wayne Kirtley's charity and his connections with previous dubious armed forces charities are outlined in this report https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/big-issues-veterans-journal-magazine-11947089 (https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/big-issues-veterans-journal-magazine-11947089) and make for uncomfortable reading.

They were reported to the Police who have passed all the details on to Trading Standards.

Quite frankly, I find these cons and scams (for that is all they are) on the insinuation that they armed forces charities sickening.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 01, 2018, 12:05:57 PM
It's not a scam but it certainly is a con as I found out when I checked my BT telephone bill for May.

My wife needed to contact me when I was having a coffee morning at the Queens Hotel Llandudno and unfortunately my mobile phone was not working.     She couldn't find the Queen's Hotel in the telephone book so tried the directory enquiries at 118 500

BIG MISTAKE     
At the first attempt they couldn't find the number and the duration of the call was 43 seconds and cost £5.63
The second call a few minutes later resulted in the telephone number being found and the duration was 2 mins 11 seconds and cost £9.09

Don't ever use 118 500 for finding out a phone number as it's just daylight robbery      >:(
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on July 02, 2018, 11:04:49 PM
That’s a shocker Hugo!
No doubt they always manage to NOT find the number on the first attempt, this should be illegal.
If they fail, they should pay you!!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on July 04, 2018, 12:21:40 PM
I have had 2 more scam emails purporting to be from BT in the last two days. They warn you that you will lose your email addresses if you don't log in to your account.
Ignore the links on them them and any other emails from BT. Go to your account via the web whenever you need to check anything.
I have reported things to BT in the past and they say that they can't stop them as soon as one BT account is shut they open another. That sounds odd to me too! Surely to have an account you must have to pay and if so leave a trail?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on July 13, 2018, 12:08:37 PM
North Wales Police together with Trading Standards are warning the public to be alert to a scam that is instigated by a telephone call.
A telephone call from a person purporting to be from the Inland Revenue demanding payment.

North Wales Police Designing Out Crime Officer, David Williams said:
The nature of the message is always that the victim owes money for unpaid taxes. There is then a warning that they will be arrested unless the money is paid.

This is a telephone scam and under no circumstances should anyone enter into conversation with the caller, let alone provide any personal details. If you receive a recorded message asking you to ring a particular phone number, don’t call them back. Never follow their instructions. You will not face any court proceedings as claimed by the scam callers.

Anyone concerned about such calls can speak to Trading Standards on 03454 040505 (Welsh language) 03454 040506 (English language).
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on July 14, 2018, 11:14:26 AM
There's a nasty scam doing the rounds where the perpetrator emails you to say they've infected your computer and made a video of you self-pleasuring while watching pornography.  Some of these show you an old password you may have used at some point in a forum elsewhere. They demand around $3000 dollars or they say they'll send the video to your friends and family.

Most of us now routinely cover our cameras with card or sticky tape and have done for years, but if you don't do that it's worth considering.  As a further precaution use long passwords - short ones can be broken with brute force attacks.  But this is just another scum-created scam. Nothing to worry about.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/07/13/hacker_extortion_scam/ (https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/07/13/hacker_extortion_scam/)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on July 14, 2018, 02:18:45 PM
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There's a nasty scam doing the rounds where the perpetrator emails you to say they've infected your computer and made a video of you self-pleasuring while watching pornography.  Some of these show you an old password you may have used at some point in a forum elsewhere. They demand around $3000 dollars or they say they'll send the video to your friends and family.

Most of us now routinely cover our cameras with card or sticky tape and have done for years, but if you don't do that it's worth considering.  As a further precaution use long passwords - short ones can be broken with brute force attacks.  But this is just another scum-created scam. Nothing to worry about.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/07/13/hacker_extortion_scam/ (https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/07/13/hacker_extortion_scam/)
I have no need to worry about that one then!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on July 14, 2018, 03:56:10 PM
My friends and family are pretty used to me behaving like that, so I’m not motivated to pay up.
In fact, they can put it on the BBC Cymru News at 10pm if they like.
I’d say the 6pm news, but there’s the watershed of course. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on July 15, 2018, 09:10:44 PM
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My friends and family are pretty used to me behaving like that, so I’m not motivated to pay up.
In fact, they can put it on the BBC Cymru News at 10pm if they like.
I’d say the 6pm news, but there’s the watershed of course.

Tut, tut. Dragging the tone down again!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: TheMedz on July 16, 2018, 07:57:22 PM
Just received an email from PayPal saying they have suspended my account until I resupply my bank account details. They have provided me with a handy link  to click on to supply said details. On clicking on the senders URL it came up with support@ibuymyhousesnow. Sounds  reasonable must get to it immediately.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on July 17, 2018, 07:03:38 AM
 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 21, 2018, 01:50:04 PM
NW Police............

Reports of a prank caller claiming to be conducting a telephone survey for a  toiletries company offering free products . Please do not give any personal or medical  details to anyone unless their authenticity can be confirmed.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: born2run on August 22, 2018, 12:20:45 PM
How is that a prank? Beadle would turn in his grave.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: snowcap on September 11, 2018, 12:01:22 AM
International Postcode Online Lottery Notified me today that i have won £900,000.00 with my lucky numbers   in their Tax Free Draw and they have given me the Tel. No. to begin my claim. How lucky is that especially as i haven't bought a ticket. Might just bye myself a blue or red Jaguar or maybe one of each on the strength of it, Yippee.
PS=This information must be kept away from public to avoid unwarranted abuse of the program or fraudulent acts from criminal minded and unauthorized person(s). So don't tell anyone please
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on September 11, 2018, 08:05:49 AM
 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on October 20, 2018, 09:31:05 AM
Some online sellers are offering people free goods in return for positive product reviews, an investigation by consumer group Which? has found.
Its investigator joined several "rewards for reviews" groups and was hired to write high-rated reviews in return for free items.

Paid-for, or fake, reviews flout rules set by platforms such as Amazon and Facebook.
A similar investigation by BBC 5 live uncovered the trade in false reviews.

Fake five-star reviews being bought and sold online
The Which? investigator found five sellers who gave instructions to order an item through Amazon, write a review and share the link, with the promise of a refund.

The investigator gave an honest review of the items, but in three out of five cases was not refunded because the reviews were not positive enough...... Continued     https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45916368 (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45916368)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 20, 2018, 09:35:00 AM
I think we have to treat this with caution.  Reviewers are not paid as such;  they're offered free stuff and have the option to ask for them to be sent free of charge, so no money is involved. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on October 20, 2018, 06:51:55 PM
Perhaps don't know enough (including paid or free samples) to comment that much but I think if you are looking for something on Amazon where you want to find how others have found it,  click for and read the negative reviews as well as the positives. Either may have bias and some negatives (eg. "they sent me the wrong item") may be nonsensical for a product review.  But try, as best you can, to get a balanced opinion from varoius sides.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on October 20, 2018, 07:01:01 PM
Yep; that's exactly the right approach.  Same with Trip Advisor.  The sites can't control negative reviews so it's always worth reading the 2 and 3 star reviews to get an idea of any potential issues.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on October 21, 2018, 11:25:02 AM
I've been having a few calls from Talk Talk and the heavily Asian accented person has informed me that my internet service will be terminated on that day and requested that I press button 1 on my telephone to stop the termination so I just hang up as I'm not with Talk Talk anyway
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on November 07, 2018, 12:26:33 PM
Just had a phone call, computerised voice, saying our BT broadband was being cut off today - press 1 for this, press 2 for that, confirmed by BT as fake.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Meleri on November 07, 2018, 05:12:00 PM
I have had the same Steve, so have blacklisted the number.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on November 07, 2018, 10:19:26 PM
I had the same sort of call only mine was from Talk Talk
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on November 08, 2018, 08:54:10 AM
Blocking the number won't have any effect as it shows a different number each time they call.

I've received a few recently and the numbers do not correspjnd to where the caller is ringing from - always try and google the number as I'm speaking to the person who calls me!

Had one last week, allegedly from talktalk (who I am with) saying there was a problem with my system sending out messages ... but the number showing on my phone was a Barnstaple STD code, so I asked the caller what the weather was like in Devon!  He couldn't understand why I was asking, so I persisted as he was trying to do his spiel.  He obviously wasn't in Devon so I ask where he was, and he told me London.

So, I asked him to explain how it was that my phone was displaying a Devon phone number.

His comment was that there must be something wrong with my phone.  I replied saying there must be something wrong with his as it has just dialled a number which was on the Telephone Preference Service list.

He hung up!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on November 08, 2018, 09:36:34 AM
Wonderful!  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on November 23, 2018, 06:32:23 PM
I see that prices at the pumps have come down this week which is great news but filling up at Asda today I notice that the difference per litre between unleaded and diesel is now about 12p a litre, far greater than it used to be. Is this a deliberate green initiative?
Diesel owners are being punished through no fault of their own in my opinion.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blongb on November 24, 2018, 11:10:10 AM
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I see that prices at the pumps have come down this week which is great news but filling up at Asda today I notice that the difference per litre between unleaded and diesel is now about 12p a litre, far greater than it used to be. Is this a deliberate green initiative?
Diesel owners are being punished through no fault of their own in my opinion.

They are being punished for using a dirty polluting fuel to power there cars. There is some justification in using Diesel power to drive large commercial vehicles but none whatsoever in putting it in small family cars. The Public were coned by the motor industry into thinking it was cleaner and less polluting than Petrol. Anyone with any knowledge of the workings of the internal combustion  engine knows that's not true. I've had cars since my RAF aero engine fitter days in 1967 and have never considered or owned a Diesel Powered vehicle. 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Neil on November 24, 2018, 10:27:50 PM
Anybody who has spent any time in their life being transported in a diesel powered taxi would not contemplate buying a diesel car for any reason, they are junk!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on November 25, 2018, 11:03:02 AM
Whereas I totally disagree that diesel cars are junk, I have been very impressed with all the ones I have owned,I also now realise the polluting side is a health risk, particularly in populated urban areas.
We were lied to in emission ratings, and in previous years gone by actually encouraged to buy diesel rather than petrol cars.Having done so suddenly we are the pariahs of the road and we are being punished by road tax increases, fuel price increases and consequently loss of value of the cars we own.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Neil on November 26, 2018, 12:28:28 AM
My dislike of Diesel engines goes back to the early 60s when a friend of mine was driving a Ford V8 Pilot, his dad had taken out the V8 engine and replaced it with a Perkins bus engine, much better economy but disgusting to be inside, but it was a good laugh when we went round a corner and people at bus stops were very disappointed not to see a bus!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on November 26, 2018, 11:23:29 AM
I think the 60s outlook towards diesels is rather dated.  They did move on from there and become practical cars, perhaps more for fleet owners but you can count us in as using them in the household for home use. Mum had 2 Citroen ZX in a row and liked them both round local town and for a longer Norfolk to N Wales run when she took on that route.

Emissions do seem to be a problem with them but my limited understanding is that depends on the emissions we are looking at.  I believe they do outperform petrol cars on CO2 which seemed to be all the rage some time back  but fail badly on the toxic Nox stuff?  See this for example. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-43204734 (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-43204734)

I'm far from clear on this, am not sold (not that I drive) on electric vehicles yet but, probably, and ultimately, the move has to be away from either fossil fuel for driving?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on November 26, 2018, 11:47:48 AM
I think the simplified version, as I understand it,  Diesel affects our health due to poor air quality, and the lead in petrol affects the ozone layer, resulting in contributing to global warming.   
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: squigglev2 on November 26, 2018, 11:57:41 AM
I think the lead aspect of petrol (see eg. here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetraethyllead
) has gone Steve.  But otherwise what the two fuels may produce is probably reasonable...
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: andyCYD on November 27, 2018, 11:37:47 AM
It is very difficult to find any reliable information about which is best for the environment, petrol or diesel?  They have different impacts and technology is changing continually.  There were benefits of diesel over petrol a few years ago which are not so clear now because the design of petrol engines has improved so much.

My conclusion is that if you want a small car for driving around town you should select a petrol engine.  This is because it will emit less particulates.  However, if you want a larger car for driving on open roads you want a diesel engine because you will use less fuel, emit less CO2 and particulates are not such a concern. 

There are so many other factors to take into consideration.  For example, how much energy does it take to produce a litre of petrol vs diesel?  If we only look at the emissions from the car we overlook the full impacts.  Also, how much energy does it take to manufacture the engine and how long will it last?  From what I can see diesel engines seem to outlive petrol my quite a margin, which is significant.

Another factor is the real life experience.  I know diesels are not great to drive in slow and stop-start traffic.  But small petrol engines are not great on open roads.  Large petrol engines use so much fuel that it is hard to see any environmental justification.

I am a bit bemused by Steve's mention of lead.  This was removed from petrol about 20 years ago because it was causing brain damage.  I am not aware of it having any effect on the ozone layer (that was CFCs).
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on November 27, 2018, 12:10:26 PM
Sorry Andy, that's what I get for not putting brain in gear, I was thinking generally in terms of exhaust emissions, carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide,  :-[   

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 27, 2018, 12:16:50 PM
We are car enthusiasts so have several cars, a Fiesta with a tiny 1.4 petrol engine, ideal for local stuff, easy to park etc, a Mercedes estate which is a 2.7 turbo diesel for longer runs and carrying bulky items, does about 48mpg on a long run, then the 3 hobby cars, all Mercedes-Benz,  a 2.3 petrol saloon, a SL320 sports car 3.2 petrol,  and the big one is a CL55AMG which has a 5.4 litre V8 petrol engine. Think that just about covers every variation lol.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on November 28, 2018, 11:28:05 AM
'Rip-off' 118 calls spark price crackdown

The price of a call to directory inquiries will be capped at £3.65 for 90 seconds.
Phone industry regulator Ofcom said it is responding to a "steep" rise in prices.
The most popular service, 118 118, charges £11.23 for a 90 second call, the regulator said.

The number of calls being made to 118 services has been falling by 40% a year, but more than a million people a year still use the service.
Many of those using 118 services are elderly, Ofcom said.

People aged over 65 are four times more likely to call 118 numbers than those aged between 16 and 34. They are also "significantly" less likely to have internet access, meaning they cannot search for a number online.

"Directory inquiry prices have risen in recent years, and callers are paying much more than they expect. Our evidence shows this is hurting people, with some struggling to pay their bills," said Jane Rumble, Ofcom's director of consumer policy.

The regulator found that some providers are charging almost £20 for a 90-second call.

Although there are cheaper services, customers tend to call the numbers they can most easily remember, Ofcom's study found.                     
  More    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46369401 (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46369401)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on November 28, 2018, 01:02:26 PM
Thanks for bringing that to our attention Steve.     It's a complete rip off and I did post something on here earlier this year about the directory enquiry 118 call
My wife tried to contact me by phone but couldn't as my mobile was not working and in a panic dialled the 118 number.    It cost her over £9.00 for a short duration phone call and in the end the 118 operator said that they couldn't find the phone number!

She was looking for the phone number of The Queens Hotel  Promenade Llandudno and the operator couldn't find it.     >:(

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on November 28, 2018, 02:12:14 PM
I was just reading this out loud to my other half and added "just realised we haven't had a new phone book recently" to which she added " no, we haven't had one for years".
As an over 65 I haven't phoned a directory enquiry service either.
Google is so much quicker!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on January 08, 2019, 11:11:21 AM
Police warn Facebook users over holiday park scam
Police have warned social media users to beware of online scammers posing as a well-known holiday park brand.
A post on Facebook which claims people can win a Center Parcs holiday if they share it is not genuine,
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on January 31, 2019, 07:21:09 PM
Residents have been warned not to give money to a potential fraudulent caller pretending to be working on behalf of a charity.

Earlier this week police urged members of the public to stay alert following reports of a Flintshire resident being scammed out of £15,000 over the phone by a person purporting to be working for BT.

Now the Wales Air Ambulance Charity has stated: "We have been made aware of a potential telephone scam where somebody is trying to gain money from people under the guise of Wales Air Ambulance.

"Individuals/organisations have been contacted via phone by a man selling advertising for the 'Wales Air Ambulance magazine’.

"He describes himself as a 'fundraiser' for our charity and indicates that the money would go towards our lifesaving work.

"The telephone number from which the call is made is flagged as being from Liverpool.

"We do not believe that this is a valid fundraising exercise on our behalf and we have made the police aware.

"If you have received this call, please contact the Wales Air Ambulance PR team on 0300 0152 999 (option 1) or email media@walesairmabulance.com."                ref Pioneer

     
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on February 07, 2019, 05:09:18 PM
A cunning new text message scam is making the rounds in the UK, with those behind it pretending to be from Tesco.

It comes just days after some customers reported receiving another scam, about a fake Tesco prize draw, which promised £500 or an iPhone.

However, unbeknown to the recipients, they actually get charged a staggering £4.50 of they respond to it.
The suspicious text messages have continued into the week though, with one targeted shopper warning others about the latest scheme.

Posting to the company's Facebook page, one women shared a screenshot of the message, as reported by Essex Live .

The confused customer fortunately realised the text wasn't all that it seemed, posting: "I'm guessing this is a scam text?!" along with a screenshot.

But it's not just one customer who's received the suspicious message, with others sharing their own screenshots to social media of similar scams.

Targeted customers are then being asked to confirm the details, in order to secure a prize, by clicking on a link within the text message.

Scams of this kind are typically known as phishing scams, which allow hackers to steal personal information from unsuspecting victims.

Harvested information and date can then be used by scammers to defraud the victims of money, potentially even stealing their identities.

The recent scam has now been confirmed by Tesco, who have assured customers that the company is looking into the matter.
A spokesperson for the supermarket explained: "I can confirm this is a scam and our Phishing Team are aware and currently investigating.
"Our customers' security is extremely important to us and I'd like to assure you that we would never send any of our customers a message which asks them to input any personal or security details."

They advised anyone who receives a suspicious text claiming to be from Tesco to email phishing@uk.tesco.com before deleting the message.
"We thank you for your patience while we look into this," they added.
https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/sly-tesco-text-scam-using-15795992 (https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/sly-tesco-text-scam-using-15795992)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on February 11, 2019, 03:45:24 PM
Conwy and Denbighshire Councils are warning the public to beware of potential phone scams from individuals reportedly selling telecare equipment.

A number of complaints have been received by both councils with some residents reporting they have received cold-calls from individuals selling telecare equipment, but also requesting personal bank details over the phone.

Galw Gofal / Care Connect, the North Wales Regional Call Monitoring Service, does not sell telecare equipment and does not cold call to sell equipment.

Both Councils are urging residents never to provide bank details to anyone, unless you are completely satisfied the individual is genuine and works for a legitimate organisation.

The authorities are also reminding people about the North Wales Buy with Confidence scheme, established in response to worries about rogue traders.
The scheme provides a list of local businesses, that give their commitment to trading fairly.

Buy with Confidence is the largest scheme of its kind and continues to expand its geographical coverage.
For more visit your local Council website.
ref Pioneer
 
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on March 21, 2019, 10:55:40 AM
A phone and text scam is sweeping across Wales and Conwy residents are being urged to be vigilant.

A number of incidents have been reported across Wales where text messages or callers claim they can help the householder get a council tax refund, they then go on to ask for personal bank account details.

Conwy County Borough Council (CCBC) said residents are advised to never give their personal banking details over the phone unless they are 100 per cent sure they are speaking to a professional individual working on behalf of a recognised organisation.

A CCBC spokesperson said: "If in any doubt, take the caller's number and check it’s valid. Anyone working in a professional capacity won't mind you doing this.

"It’s also worth regularly reminding elderly relatives and friends to be cautious with their personal and bank details."

Conwy residents can get free help and advice on council tax and benefits direct from CCBC by phoning 01492 576 607, by emailing ctax.enquiries@conwy.gov.uk or online at www.conwy.gov.uk/council-tax (http://www.conwy.gov.uk/council-tax).
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on March 25, 2019, 10:43:28 AM
Two attempts to scam me about my BT broadband by what seems like an organisation rather than an individual. You are greeted by a pre recorded message which is extremely poorly spoken telling you you are about to be cut off, press 1 to speak to someone,2 to terminate your line. Press 1 re-directs to an American accent who put you through to what sounds like India but it could be anywhere.

On the second call, just for a change I told the "BT" man that I had Sky broadband to which he replied BT handle their accounts too.

You can guess my response but at least he hadn't hung up when he got my outpouring unlike the first one who was quick to cut off at his end when he knew his cover was blown!!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on May 18, 2019, 08:43:03 AM
I'm posting this in here as it's extremely relevant to anyone who does online shopping.  The links are somewhat technical, as they're links to the actual legislation, but it's very much worth reading.

Some online retailers are using the letter of the law to muddy the waters with regard to returns.
Recently, women ordering clothes from Boohoo.com and Missguided.co.uk have continued accepting returns but not refunding the delivery charges.

This is contrary to Regulation 34(2) of the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2013/3134/regulation/34/made) Regulations 2013.

The small print

The problem is that simply using the using the prominent returns procedures on the retailers’ web sites doesn't cancel the contract. In order to receive a refund of the original delivery charge, one additionally has to cancel the contract pursuant to Regulation 29 of the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013 (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2013/3134/regulation/29/made), which involves a separate procedure such as e-mailing a special e-mail address or even printing a PDF form, filling it in and sending it back by post.

Most consumers don’t understand the difference between the standard returns procedure and cancelling the contract, mainly because most decent online companies don't attempt to confuse the issue.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on June 13, 2019, 01:20:46 PM
I am looking into changing my energy supplier, after receiving a leaflet from Octupus energy, https://octopus.energy/  a Which magazine recommended company, this company is offering very good deals, much better than we are on at the moment.

Would be grateful for any information, good or bad...............  Ta.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on June 18, 2019, 08:33:54 PM
I have a caravan for sale and got a sales enquiry asking if it was still for sale. I replied yes it was and got the following reply.

Thank you for the Response,I am okay with the condition Likewise your
asking price is quite reasonable and affordable considering others
I've seen lately , I'll have it for the  price . I'm interested and
consider it sold as seen am buying it as a surprise Birthday gift for
my son. Are you assuring me i will not be disappointed? I work with
the Military and presently in camp serving the nation which is
strictly no calls. My Mode of payment is PayPal because i don't have
access to my bank account online cause am out of town on job duties,
but i have it attached to my PayPal account. Since I'm requesting this
transaction to be done via PayPal, I will be responsible for all the
PayPal fees/charges on this transaction, if you don't have an account
with PayPal, it's pretty easy, safe an secure to open one. Just log on
to www.paypal.co.uk . I hope we can complete this transaction as soon
as possible. Less I forgot,I wll not be able to view due to nature of
job but I have a Mover that will come for pickup once payment is
cleared in your PayPal account and they will be handling the title for
me. I look forward to hearing from you with your PayPal information as
requested below.

Your PayPal e-Mail Address :
Full name:
Firm Price:
Address for Pick Up:
Phone Number:

Awaiting your response asap.

Thanks

I was a bit taken aback that someone might buy the van unseen but despite the mail sounding a bit dodgy I went ahead and gave him the details he asked for. I then wondered where the scam was if indeed there was one. I do want to sell the van!
Then it dawned on me.He was hoping I didn't have a Paypal account and would open one using the link he'd included in the email. After that who knows what it might have cost me when he went on a spending spree.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on June 19, 2019, 08:09:40 AM
That's been doing the rounds for a few years, now.  I thought I'd posted it in here but I can't find it.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on June 19, 2019, 08:34:52 AM
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That's been doing the rounds for a few years, now.  I thought I'd posted it in here but I can't find it.

I thought it was a reasonably good attempt at a scam and worth sharing the content of the reply he sent. Someone might get a similar themed message with different content but once again look out for the link!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on June 19, 2019, 09:26:35 AM
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That's been doing the rounds for a few years, now.  I thought I'd posted it in here but I can't find it.

I thought it was a reasonably good attempt at a scam and worth sharing the content of the reply he sent. Someone might get a similar themed message with different content but once again look out for the link!

I think it shows that sharing is good, and no harm in being reminded, and with that in mind....... A legal scam ?     recently we had to change our address for our TV licence, due to predictive searching, we hit a site, very similar to the real one, however at the end it asked for a service  charge payment of about £17 for the change, we paid it, but very quickly realised, you do not pay fees to change your details, surprisingly, after getting in touch with them, they refunded the fee, as we were not happy with their service, but it just shows that even the most cynical of us can be CONFUSED  :o                     
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on June 19, 2019, 10:26:27 AM
Indeed.  Google has a lot to answer for.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on June 20, 2019, 08:46:26 AM
There are very, very good reasons not to tell folk you're going away for a couple of weeks. In one horrendous case that's seeing a huge rise at the moment, a woman came home to find her house had been stolen (https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/article-7155387/I-came-home-house-stolen-fraudsters-intercepted-mail.html).

In other cases insurers have started to check social networking sites and refuse payment for robbery incurred while you were away if you posted online that you were going. The current concerns centre around using that bastion of dubiousness - Facebook - and its other tentacles, Instagram and Whats app to mention but two.

It seems it's not even a good idea to post pictures from the airport, although sending them via iMessage on Macs seems fine, as iMessage is heavily encrypted and generally secure.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on June 20, 2019, 09:11:45 AM
Exclusive police data from Action Fraud, the main reporting body for scams in the UK, and Office for National Statistics (ONS) crime survey data reveals overall levels of fraud have soared by more than 12 per cent in a year but it is also a crime that is also massively under-reported.

While the crime survey shows there were more than 3.6 million cases of fraud in England and Wales in 2018, only 276,129 fraud and computer crime reports were made to Action Fraud in the 12 months to April 2019. That suggests fewer than 10 per cent of offences are being recorded by Action Fraud.

 London is the capital of online shopping and auction fraud – with 17 reports per 10,000 people, against a national average of 13. It also has the highest reported rate for ticket fraud (4.5 cases per 10,000 people against an average of 2.2) and investment scams (1.9 per 10,000 people against an average of 1.3).

Warwickshire has the highest reported rate for advance fee fraud, in which victims are asked to pay for goods or services that are never delivered – for example the ‘foreign prince’ who needs a small loan to help unlock untold riches or a fraudster posing as an estate agent who needs a deposit for a non-existent property. The rate of reports there is 15.8 per 10,000 people, against the national average of 11.9.

Dating scams, which typically see people duped into transferring money linked to a fake romance, is most reported in Sussex. The rate of 1.9 reports per 10,000 people is higher than the national average of 1.1.

People in Norfolk were most likely to report computer fixing fraud, with a reporting rate of 10.3 per 10,000 people, compared with the national average of just 5.9.

Of the reports made to Action Fraud in the past two years, nearly half (239,206) fell into four categories. Online shopping and auctions fraud is the biggest reported type of fraud with 86,127 cases. This was followed by advance fee fraud (78,686); computer fixing fraud (38,891); and cheque, plastic card and online bank fraud (35,502).

The analysis also reveals how different types of fraud are more likely to affect older or younger consumers – with 49 the average age for victims filing a report with Action Fraud over the last two years. Rental fraud – where prospective tenants are typically tricked into paying a deposit – was most likely to affect younger people, with 33 the average victim age. The average age of victims of both ticket fraud and online shopping or auction fraud was 37. Older consumers were more likely to be targeted by bogus investment schemes (average victim age 64) or fraud recovery fraud, where victims are tricked by criminals claiming they can help recover lost funds (average victim age 65).

The ONS’s Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimates that there were 3,648,000 cases of fraud in England and Wales in 2018 compared with 3,241,000 in 2017 – an increase of 12.6%.

On the surface, Wales (56 reports per 10,000 people) seems to be off the fraudsters’ radar: there were fewer Action Fraud reports per person in Wales than in all the English regions for the majority of the most common fraud categories. However, the ONS’s Crime Survey for England and Wales estimates that fraud is more prevalent in Wales than in the North East and the North West. We believe this proves fraud is under-reported to a greater degree in Wales than elsewhere.

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Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: mondie on June 23, 2019, 12:22:11 AM
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I am looking into changing my energy supplier, after receiving a leaflet from Octupus energy, https://octopus.energy/  a Which magazine recommended company, this company is offering very good deals, much better than we are on at the moment.

Would be grateful for any information, good or bad...............  Ta.

Octopus are highly recommended by me, Steve. Been with them for probably 18 mths and find their website easy to use and customer service spot on.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on June 23, 2019, 09:46:40 AM
Many thanks Mondie, we are going to give them a try, they do have the best offer at the moment.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on June 23, 2019, 12:08:54 PM
I've been looking around for another provider too so I'll look into this and thanks for the tip Mondie      $good$


I'm also looking around for another broadband and phone provider so any tips would be appreciated
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Robbie G on June 23, 2019, 06:31:50 PM
Hugo
Try Avro Energy and for your broadband and phone Direct Save Telecom ,they both seem to have good deals .
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on June 24, 2019, 03:08:26 PM
Hugo,  Re. Octupus energy, can you PM  me please.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on June 24, 2019, 04:15:55 PM
Thanks very much for your feedback Robbie and Steve and I'll follow them up

Steve, I've just sent you a PM
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on June 27, 2019, 03:25:26 PM
I've now changed my energy supplier so thanks very much Mondie and Steve for the tip

I'm now going to change my broadband and phone supplier from BT   as I feel that I'm getting mugged every month and have been looking around for something better and have come across a firm called Now Broadband
It is offering Broadband with a speed of 11mb and unlimited downloads and costs £18.00 per month.   with a set up of £24.99
It also offers free anytime phone calls included

Does anyone know anything about this company as the price seems too good to be true ( it's nearly a quarter of what I'm paying to Bt )
Any information would be appreciated
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on June 27, 2019, 05:16:29 PM
Hugo, have you tried phoning BT and renegotiating a new deal?

I pay BT around £46 per month for unlimited broadband with a speed of about 60 Mbps, BT Sports Pack HD, unlimited anytime calls and BT Cloud storage.

I bet I have been a loyal BT customer for just as long as you.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on June 27, 2019, 06:24:20 PM
Thanks Bri for your suggestion but i'm not that good a negotiator.   

My package for Broadband and calls is £47.49   but with other add on's came to £74.08 in March 2019   and  roughly the same amount in April and May when I didn't even have a computer!
My latest bill was £78.00 plus so that has prompted me to look elsewhere

I'm sure that I don't need the Superfast Fibre 1  50GB that they say I'm getting so I'll look around for a cheaper option and then it won't be such a drain on my OAP.        :).   
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: rhuddlan on June 27, 2019, 06:30:28 PM
I'm with BT and I pay the line rental upfront as it's cheaper that way, and at the end of the contract year I always phone them and tell them I'm
thinking of moving as I'm a pensioner, even saying to their employee " imagine i was your grandfather, can you recommend something
that he would want". I'm not guaranteeing anything but they tried to sell me fibre by saying " wasn't I worried about buffering". I replied
" the wife does the polishing" and the girl absolutely lost it laughing! Once you get a bit of sympathy* you might get  the best quote.
Remember too that other companies might not quote the landline costs and  finally reliability....I must say I've had great responses when there has been a problem.....ie we had a lightening strike which fried the hub....one phone call... replacement next day!

* there is no point in saying I've been a loyal customer since the dark ages/since before you were born etc..they have heard it all before!!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on July 06, 2019, 09:58:31 AM
There are a rash of new entries I've posted in the "All Sorts of Useful Links" (http://www.threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,325.0.html) topic. The most recent are links that will help you work out which Chinese company on Amazon makes which product, how many are identical and where they're registered to avoid VAT.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on July 06, 2019, 10:00:04 AM
I update that page frequently, so it's worth bookmarking it if a change I make doesn't cause it to appear in the 'Recent Unread Topics' listing.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 11, 2019, 03:03:55 PM
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I've been looking around for another provider too so I'll look into this and thanks for the tip Mondie      $good$

I am now with Octopus Energy and have given my meter readings to the new company but out of the blue I've just received a phone call from SSE offering me a new deal to try and persuade me to return to SSE.      I very politely told him that there  wasn't a hope in hell of me doing that and ended the call
I've written to SSE often enough for a low tariff so even if they were lower than the Octopus Energy  (  which they won't be )  there's a matter of principle involved and they like a lot of other firms should treat loyal customers better
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on July 11, 2019, 03:46:22 PM
Agreed Hugo, well done, they should give the best price up front, but it seems a number of companies, make more money from those who are unaware of how these things work.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on July 12, 2019, 03:25:18 PM
Not sure if this is the right place to post this ... but does anyone know how to stop nuisance calls, even though we are registered with TPS?

Today, so far, we have received 13 separate calls - most have simply been blank and then hang up, some have been a recorded message saying our Talktalk connection is about to be cut off if we don't press 1 (or 2 if we really want to leave them).  It is obvious these are bogus calls even though the caller number is displayed on our phone.

So far, we have had calls from Aberdeen, Birmingham (5 different numbers) Bude, Bridlington, Brentwood, Brighton, Berwick, Chppenham and one which didn't show a number ... I hope they're not working their way through the alphabet.

I have to answer them as I could be getting calls from people enquring about something I am involved in.

Any suggestions, please?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on July 12, 2019, 03:45:12 PM
The very best way is to buy one of the call-blocking phones that BT now flog. I have a Panasonic which allows me to send any number to a block registry, so they can never get through again.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 12, 2019, 03:58:01 PM
We bought a CPR Call Blocker and it worked, it blocked everything, but the downside was that even friends couldn't get through so in the end I had to pull  the blocker  out
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Meleri on July 12, 2019, 04:07:46 PM
We have also had 12 calls today, so they must be targeting our area  :(  All the calls were different numbers but my phone has registered they are all International too. There is a facility for blacklisting numbers online if you wish at no extra cost if you are with BT, so I have done all 12, but what's to say they don't call from other different numbers. You would think in this day & age we would be allowed to block all International calls if we wished then this problem wouldn't occur, but apparently we can't.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 12, 2019, 04:14:08 PM
Meleri, when we were pestered by these calls I used to speak a bit of Welsh to them and then they soon hung up, but I did notice the same type of calls that didn't say international on them but in fact they were.     They had 12 numbers instead of the normal 11 and each time I blocked them they generated another number.
That's when I got the call blocker
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on July 12, 2019, 05:03:17 PM
Thanks for your help, but I don't think they'll work!!!

Blocking the number probably will have no effect, as all 15 have been from different numbers ... all bar 1 which didn't show a number have been what appear to be ordinary UK numbers - i.e. 11 digits, and the codes translate as I posted before, plus another Birmingham one and also one from Coventry (which is where they should be sent!!!).  Checking on "who called me" shows so no reports but if they use a different number each time then there wouldn't be.

Of the ones that didn't hang up straight away they are all a recorded messaqge (the same one in the same accent) saying Talktalk will be switched off, and to stop that happening I should press 1 - don't know what happens if I do.

I am with Talktalk, so I doubt BT would help.

I suppose I could disconnect the phone and rely and those who know me using my mobile number!

Hopefully, as suggested by Meleri, they are just targeting 01492 numbers for today - just hope they don't ring when I'm asleep!!!

Don't know if anyone has noted the numbers but I suspect they won't be the same as this list.
01201 233091 - no such code
01277 847170 - Brentwood
01244 332929 - Chester (that one might have been genuine, I was out at the time!)
01645 433823 - no such code
01291 060123 - Newport, Gwent
01288 240267 - Bude
01262 406375 - Bridlington
0121 103 2215 - Birmingham
01273 005474 - Brighton
01249 805817 - Chippenham
01289 349222 - Berwick
0121 344 2537 - Birmingham
01291 428112 - Newport, Gwent
0121 957 9481 - Birmingham
0121 424 5035 - Birmingham
01224 812451 - Aberdeen
01203 721912 - Coventry
0121 811 5463 - Birmingham
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on July 12, 2019, 06:31:52 PM
There's been a significant rise in PPI calls recently, as the deadline for making claims looms.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on July 12, 2019, 09:26:02 PM
I'll say this very quietly - the phone hasn't rung since 5 o'clock!!!

... as for PPI I keep getting pestered with text messages from one of those companies who will check it out for you.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 13, 2019, 04:56:29 PM
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I'm now going to change my broadband and phone supplier from BT   as I feel that I'm getting mugged every month and have been looking around for something better and have come across a firm called Now Broadband
It is offering Broadband with a speed of 11mb and unlimited downloads and costs £18.00 per month.   with a set up of £24.99
It also offers free anytime phone calls included

Does anyone know anything about this company as the price seems too good to be true ( it's nearly a quarter of what I'm paying to Bt )
Any information would be appreciated

The old saying " if it looks too good to be true, then it probably is"   and I found that out today when I tried to change my Broadband and phone package.           I tried Now Broadband and they have three offers so I went for the lowest as it suited what I needed , then they did the check your broadband speed etc and only the middle and top offer came up so I just came out of the application

I've heard good reports about Plus Net so again I tried to sign up with them and again went for the lowest offer and went  through the same checks again to find out that the lowest offer was not available for me.   I then went on line and asked for the lowest offer but was told that if I went for that they would have to change my existing landline number which I don't want to do so I closed down on the dearer options

Feeling rather disgruntled I'm still looking for a new internet and phone provider     >?>??
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: OrmeMac on July 13, 2019, 05:17:50 PM
Now Broadband is from Sky: PlusNet Broadband is from BT.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 13, 2019, 05:58:18 PM
Thanks for that info OrmeMac,     I am with BT at the moment but feel like I'm getting mugged each month by them so I'll change provider asap
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 14, 2019, 11:30:33 AM
This morning I bit the bullet and went with Plus net on an 18 month contract with unlimited broadband at a good speed and unlimited phone calls too.   The package is £31.99 per month and I'll be saving at least £40.00 per month on my current package with BT,  just wish that I'd have done it a lot sooner
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on July 14, 2019, 12:03:39 PM
I am curious, Hugo, did you also telephone BT this morning to inform them what you intended to do?
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 14, 2019, 01:12:43 PM
No Bri,  I didn't bother to phone BT.            As part of their customer service I feel that they should be contacting me to offer me the best deal, after all I have been with them for a while now and why should new customers get a better deal that existing customers.
In any event BT couldn't match the package I've got with Plus Net.     
My last bill with BT was about £78.00 for the month whereas with Plus net it'll be just £31.99 each and every month so it's a no contest

On a different topic but the same type of thread, I've been with RAC recovery since 1971 and have the full package there but I can't remember the last time I have had to use them, it's many years ago
So as a loyal customer of nearly 50 years, I was more than a bit miffed when I had my last renewal notice and found out that a new customer would get a better deal than I was offered.
Loyalty counts for nothing with these big firms,  so it's best to shop around for the best deal you can get.   With my phone call to the RAC    I made it quite clear how I felt and gave them the option to match the new customers deal or I would be off elsewhere.     They did match the offer so I am still with the RAC for now anyway.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Fester on July 14, 2019, 03:35:17 PM
Interesting Hugo.
I’m paying Sky about £65 a month, and that includes the sports channels.
But I’m also paying about £40 a month to Talk Talk for phone and WiFi too.

It’s about time I got a better deal for the whole lot.
The service from both companies is pretty terrible.
Sky are simply evil when you try to deal with them for any reason.
Talk Talk broadband speed is simply rubbish.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: OrmeMac on July 14, 2019, 03:41:33 PM
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Interesting Hugo.
I’m paying Sky about £65 a month, and that includes the sports channels.
But I’m also paying about £40 a month to Talk Talk for phone and WiFi too.

It’s about time I got a better deal for the whole lot.
The service from both companies is pretty terrible.
Sky are simply evil when you try to deal with them for any reason.
Talk Talk broadband speed is simply rubbish.

We are with Sky and need to phone them every year to try and get discounts and deals. You usually have to threaten to leave and/or quote prices available from other companies but you can usually get them down to around half the full price.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 14, 2019, 11:10:08 PM
It's the same with energy costs and when people start complaining about the cost of energy the Government simply says "you should switch your energy supplier."
That's not the answer people are looking for, why should loyal customers have to switch.   It's up to the energy supplier to reduce their rates and if they can do it for the new customers then they should also do it for existing customers.
I've stayed with the same firms for years but am no better thought of so I'm switching them all now.         The RAC will be my next change  if that situation I had happens again and there are a number of recovery services I can go to that are cheaper.


Just an add on since the above posting,  I've just opened an e-mail from BT  and the bill  for  broadband and unlimited phone usage this month is  £75.29.     Plus Net are giving me the same package for 18 months at a cost of £31,99  so that represents a savings of £43.30 on average each month
I could kick myself for wasting my time and money with BT for so long   
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on July 15, 2019, 05:19:44 PM
Interesting Hugo.
I dislike BT with a passion at times, the way they do business is irritating. They offer you something free as a sweetener to keep you then charge you the following year!
The one big drawback to leaving is that you lose your email addresses unless you pay them £5 per month to retain them but perhaps you can tell me if that's the case with PlusNet if they are part of the same group? In many ways I wish I'd just used a g.mail address from the beginning and that you can continue with no matter where you go.Mind you they may well start charging too in due course.
The other drawback/advantage to BT is their sport coverage which in my case is largely limited to watching Liverpool FC so I get pretty good value the longer they stay in the Champions League as well as some other matches televised too. Mind you as a ticket holder it's also annoying when matches get switched for TV, particularly on a Friday or Monday night.
Anyway, back to my contract which currently costs me £53.50 per month for which I get BT Sport HD (£13.50 per month), unlimited mobile calls and texts to normal priced mobiles and landlines plus 500mb of data per month(£7.50),Infinity Broadband and free weekend land line calls (£32.50).
I also pay my landline upfront in one go to get a 10% discount. That's another £19.99 per month usually but saves £2.
The total still comes to a rather staggering £71.50 per month which is well over double what I was paying just a couple of years ago.

I think I'm right in saying that no matter who you choose as your supplier and the deal you take the line rental charge is still applicable.

The one thing that is a benefit to me though is that as we can't have a satellite dish, the phone line is used and a BT thingamy ( I'm very high tech) receives the signal that runs through the electricity cables to the plug by the TV which presumably allows me to watch NOW TV and YouTube.
The other good thing about BT is that every scammer in the world seems to have turned their attention to it so it's easy just too delete all those emails as fakes!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on July 15, 2019, 05:46:57 PM
On the email address side of things, I (and I think Dave R, too) buy my own domains, so the email costs are small and just the annual renewal cost.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on July 15, 2019, 05:49:32 PM
Hi Dave,

This is the package I get with Plus Net:-         Unlimited broadband     £5.00
                                                                   Anytime calls in UK
                                                                   LANDLINE & MOBILE     £8.00
                                                                   Line rental                   £18.99
                                                                   Total per month            £31,99

I still keep my e-mail address  ( G MAIL ) & now have a Plus Net e-mail address too.       No TV package at this price 
I admire your taste in Football teams     $good$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 01, 2019, 09:40:18 AM
Yesterday morning and again this morning, I received a recorded telephone call from an individual claiming to be from BT informing me that my broadband was about to be switched off unless I spoke to their technician by pressing button number 1.

Fortunately, my internet stayed on yesterday so I am hoping for the same today.

Initially, the telephone call appeared to be a local call except for one additional digit.

It was 01497259302.

By coincidence, I have also received an email this morning purporting to be from BT informing me:

Dear User,

Our security team received your request to delete your account, we will process your request within 24hours.

Security code: 1842

If you didn't request this code, you can safely cancel request Someone else might have typed your email address by mistake, kindly cancel request to continue using our service.log in email and password to cancel Powered by Microsoft Excel

Cancel Request


Thanks for using BT!
Nick Lane
Managing Director, Customer Care
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 01, 2019, 10:07:25 AM
This is a popular and frequent scam, Bri.  Don't follow the links in the email, but go directly to your BT account on the internet and check there.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Meleri on August 01, 2019, 12:30:44 PM
I have received the same calls as well Bri. I answered the 01492106723 thinking it was local, plus 12 International calls yesterday & 2 so far today. I'm really getting fed up with this  :(
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 01, 2019, 02:11:29 PM
Hi Melerii. Yesterday, the telephone call was from 01495214450.

Our evidence appears to confirm our 01492 theory
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 01, 2019, 02:26:47 PM
On an associated note I've renewed the ban on all registration applications for any Russian email addresses and I'm also considering making new applicants apply via a secure email address. In recent days we've been inundated with SPAM applications to the forum.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 01, 2019, 03:44:15 PM
Just to keep everyone in the loop, last week we had a plethora of spam applications to join the forum.  As a short term measure I disabled registration completely, but today when I switched it back on there was an immediate flurry of new and false registration applications.

What had happened was the hackers had discovered how to answer the two security question we use to identify genuine Llandudno folk and had been using them in an automated bot attack on the forum.

I've now changed the questions and - for very obvious reasons - if you discover those questions, please never reveal them in the forum itself.  If you lose your password and/or user name then you can email me directly so I can reset your account. 

Sorry about this but it's something of a never ending battle to keep ahead of spammers and their ilk.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 01, 2019, 04:47:31 PM
 $thanx$   Keep up the good work.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 01, 2019, 06:56:46 PM
Warning from Cheshire Police.

“If you receive an automated telephone call claiming that your broadband connection is about to be cut off or money is about to be taken out of your bank account, hang up the phone. DO NOT follow the caller’s instructions of pressing ‘1’ on your keypad. It is a scam operated by people trying to steal your money.”
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on August 01, 2019, 10:06:11 PM
Been getting lots of these calls recently - the phone codes generally start with 012 but some are 013 and range from Cornwall to the Scottish Isles - places starting with A, B or C ... seems they're working their way through the alphabetical directory!!!  If we don't recognise the number showing on the phone then we don't answer - if the caller is genuine they can usually find me by other methods!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Meleri on August 02, 2019, 04:12:27 PM
Further to the 12 calls we had on Wednesday we also had 8 Thursday & 2 so far today. The ones today had codes 00126 & 07378  &shake&
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on August 02, 2019, 04:34:48 PM
Since my laptop crashed and it's been updated I have been inundated with loads of unwanted  e-mails from everywhere.     What is worse is that there is no way I can unsubscribe to any of them nor can I see a way of putting them to Spam.
The only thing I can do is delete each one individually and it's driving me crazy
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 02, 2019, 05:08:38 PM
Have you got access to the email server? If it was using IMAP, then you will get all the mail sitting on the server as it will believe your machine is a brand new one.  If you can get onto the server you can usually filter from there, so nothing will reach your inbox.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on August 05, 2019, 10:07:51 AM
I have just spent the last 15 minutes in discussion with a lady in India.  She rang me on my house phone so it showed up the number she was ringing from - the code was that of a town in north of England.  I asked where was she ringing from and after some questioning she said she was in India.

She started by saying she was ringing reference my BT interest connection - but my internet supplier is not BT - and that my computer is sending out all sorts of error messages.  She would be closing my connection for 29 days (?).

Unusually, she did not hang up when I said it was a scam, so I carried on the argument with her.  She was quite adamant that there was a problem, but could not understand why my phone was showing a UK phone code.  Eventually,  she said that because she was working for BT then they would be using UK phone codes but she could not tell me what UK number she was ringing from, or even which town.

Googling the number produced nothing - they do seem to change numbers all the time nowadays so as to avoid the number showing up as a scam, I guess.

I said it was a scam call but she said she would tell me the licence number so that I knew it was genuine - how would I know?

She wanted to know the licence number of my computer so she could confirm it was correct!  I asked her to tell me the number she had but she refused (and I wouldn't have known how to find my number anyway).

As I had spare time I continued the discussion with her, almost 15 minutes before she eventually gave up.

So, if I'm not here for the next 29 days you know why!!!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on August 05, 2019, 03:26:16 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Have you got access to the email server? If it was using IMAP, then you will get all the mail sitting on the server as it will believe your machine is a brand new one.  If you can get onto the server you can usually filter from there, so nothing will reach your inbox.


Thanks Ian, I'll have a look into that and see what happens         $good$
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 06, 2019, 02:41:12 PM
The Barclays, Natwest and Halifax bank text scam doing the rounds - how to protect yourself
Victims have received suspicious messages claiming to be from some of the UK's biggest banks    ref  DP

Action Fraud, the national reporting centre for fraud and cybercrime, is now warning the public over the prevalence of such scams.

https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/barclays-natwest-halifax-bank-text-16687073 (https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/barclays-natwest-halifax-bank-text-16687073)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on August 09, 2019, 06:12:28 PM
Grrr! I hate being duped!!! I have renewed my car tax online several times and never with a problem so I guess I was a bit relaxed about doing so again today. I just googled road tax renewal and as you can see the options are listed on the screensaver shot below. I stupidly clicked on the first option which isn't the DVLA but looks like them when you go to their website. OK, cost just 50p to find out that you have road tax, but your credit card will be debited £5.99 a month there afterwards. It's a really clever little con because you think you are paying 50p credit card cost on renewal which of course is no longer legal. The minute you click on it the payment is taken when what I was actually clicking it for was to see what the 50p charge was for. Anyway, I immediately realised my mistake and blocked the payments.
Thought I'd share to save you the same trouble!
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Ian on August 09, 2019, 07:48:48 PM
A nasty one, and Google has to share some of the responsibility for putting it at the top of the results.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on August 10, 2019, 02:40:13 PM
That's annoying for you Dave and thanks for posting that scam on here.

It's probably my fault as I'm not very good on the computer but over the years I have ordered a lot of stuff from Amazon UK without any problem
Now though, even when I carefully check everything before placing my order,  I later receive an acknowledgement e mail thanking me for becoming a Member of Prime
I have never requested or will ever want Prime so each time I have to e-mail them and point out that I didn't want or requested Prime and to cancel my subscription
They always do cancel it and refund the 99p that they have deducted from my account in the first place but it's so annoying that I have to do it every time
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Blongb on August 10, 2019, 02:42:40 PM
It's at the top of the search page because it's a paid for advertisement and they always appear at the head of the list. On the next line under the Blue Header is a green box with Ad in. There are often 6 or 7 such listed at the top of your search results. My best advice is to avoid them entirely and scroll down to the genuine results below
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Dave on August 10, 2019, 02:54:30 PM
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
It's at the top of the search page because it's a paid for advertisement and they always appear at the head of the list. On the next line under the Blue Header is a green box with Ad in. There are often 6 or 7 such listed at the top of your search results. My best advice is to avoid them entirely and scroll down to the genuine results below

Yes, We both know that paid for adverts come first but the point is that you can easily be fooled if you are too complacent. My eyes simply homed in on the CAR ROAD TAX and "renew car tax online" which was nicely placed at eye level. Someone I know has since told me they fell for it and didn't realise they had signed up for a monthly charge until they got their credit card bill.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: mull on August 10, 2019, 05:42:22 PM
So annoying.

Trying to book a hotel is as bad. Usually I try to use the hotels own website but this morning whilst trying to book a hotel in Glasgow, for a hospital appointment next week, a number of agencies came in over the top of it. Hard to pick out the correct website.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on August 19, 2019, 11:15:46 AM
I was sick and tired of getting monthly bills of over £70.00 from BT for my phone and broadband so I switched to Plusnet and get the same service for just £31.99, a saving of over £40,00 per month

Last week, I unexpectedly received a prepaid card from Plusnet and had no idea what it was for and read the small print at the bottom of the letter and it said that the Plusnet reward card is managed by Hawk Incentives Ltd.     There was no mention of any APR rate but I don't trust anything like this  so today I phoned Plusnet and spoke to an adviser and asked him why I had received the card and what was it for.

The reply I got was that it was a reward for me as a new customer of Plusnet.    The card had been set up with £65.00 which I was free to spend anywhere.      So where is the catch I asked and how much APR  is charged on the £65.00.   He repeated himself again and said that it was a goodwill gesture by Plusnet and there is no APR involved, the money is simply a gift from Plusnet.   I did ask him why can't it go into my Plusnet account so it can pay my monthly charge and he said that it can but that I must go to the bank with that card and arrange the transfer

This conversation was then sent back to me by e-mail so I have that info in writing but I am still suspicious of getting something for nothing.          I'm not stupid but the fact that the card is managed by Hawk Incentives means that there is an alternative reason behind this

Before I go and cash my new found money has any other Plusnet  forum member had something similar happen to them?

Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SDQ on August 20, 2019, 11:11:47 AM
Sounds like a bonus for switching where in the past you would have received high street vouchers but now they give you a pre paid card.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Hugo on August 20, 2019, 12:02:14 PM
I've set up the account and activated the card so I'll be off to the bank soon to collect my £65.00  but I'm keeping my fingers crossed until I get the cash in my hand.
I've just had an e-mail about the Mastercard and here's the catch
"You can use your Plusnet Rewards Card in the same way as any other Mastercard® debit or prepaid card, as long as there is enough money on it. There are a couple of restrictions - you can't use it to withdraw cash, get cashback at a store, or to pay for fuel at self-service pumps"

That's not what I was led to believe by the operator I spoke to, but we'll see how we get on when buying any groceries etc




Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: DVT on August 24, 2019, 09:51:57 AM

Hang on to items delivered "by mistake" ...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49450485 (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49450485)
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 24, 2019, 10:28:35 AM
Yes.

Once upon a time, a courier would arrive in a Courier branded vehicle but not any more.

These days, one answers the front door to an individual you do not know with a private car parked outside so I can understand how easy it is to scam somebody.
Title: Re: Consumer news and scams
Post by: SteveH on August 31, 2019, 10:58:16 AM
People are being warned about a bizarre new scam where callers are saying they are wanted by police.

North Wales Police are asking members of the public to be aware of a scam where people are phoned and told that police are after them.
They are told that a warrant has been issued for their arrest.

A police spokesman said: "We are aware people are being called and advised that a warrant has been issued for their arrest and to "press 1" in order to avoid this action.

" North Wales Police will never call you in this way and be aware this is a scam."

On their website, they said: "Fraudsters often try to trick older or vulnerable people out of their money by telephoning them at home and pretending to be someone trustworthy.
"Fraudsters often claim to be officials and can seem very genuine. But you should always remember that callers may not be who they claim to be, even if they already seem to know details such as your name and address."

Their advice includes never giving out your PIN number, avoiding people claiming to be calling to fix your computer and being aware of anybody asking for money in advance.

The most common type of fraud in impacting older people in North Wales is "safe account" fraud, where fraudsters persuade victims to transfer money into accounts that the fraudsters provide, claiming that will protect the victim’s money from fraud.

They added that people should never be afraid to put the phone down, be sceptical of all callers and never give out personal information to unexpected callers.