Three Towns Forum - Talk about Llandudno, Colwyn Bay & Conwy

The Local => Walks in North Wales => Topic started by: Ian on September 03, 2010, 11:10:43 PM

Title: Walking
Post by: Ian on September 03, 2010, 11:10:43 PM
Been on any good walks?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 05, 2010, 08:28:11 PM
Went on a pleasant walk today, not too strenuous.  8)

We started out at the Pensarn Beach car park and headed along the cycle/footpath that runs along the sea towards Llanddulas. Was a slight shower of rain  as we started out but it soon cleared up and, after about 20 minutes, we arrived at the Tides Cafe Bistro on the beach at Llanddulas. After a very pleasant coffee and bara brith, we headed up under the railway line/A55 and up to the crossroads with the old Abergele Road. Straight across at the road junction and after a couple of hundred feet, through the gap in the wall onto one of the old paths in the Gwrych Castle Estate. Following the main path for about a mile or so, we eventually came out at the Castle itself and had a little look around. I was pleased to see that owners had sealed up the building itself, as it was very dangerous for children etc inside. Back down the castle driveway into Abergele and along Sea Road back to the beach and a Cornetto, followed by Crazy Golf and Air Hockey in the little arcade there.  D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: craigollerton on September 05, 2010, 08:29:04 PM
Worth mentioning a walk up Nant-y-Gamar is good this time of year. Plenty of sloes, highland berries about around now. The best berries are the low-laying ones in the grasses which are particularly sweet. Then there is the views of course.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 06, 2010, 04:11:46 PM
After a strenuous walk on the Carneddau on Wednesday, I had hoped for a leisurely stroll on Saturday again on the lower Carneddau.  I should have known better with my friend Geraint who tends to add on bits to the walk!
We met at the Pinnacles Cafe in Capel Curig and had intended to walk from there to Llyn Crafnant then to Gerionydd and back but while munching away at a big breakfast (while. I was just having a coffee) he found a brochure on Capel Curig Walks. Anyway we had all day so we decided to give it a go.
Leaving the cafe we crossed the road and went on the well marked route past the church and before long came to the head of the beautiful Crafnant valley. We stopped there and had some more refreshments  Z** and just admired the scenery below us. On our way down to the path around the lake we passed a couple of the Carneddau ponies just munching away and were not too bothered about our presence. Carrying on down the lake we resisted the temptation of the cafe but took time to watch a man fly fishing from a boat on the lake. We carried on down and turned by the mine workings to cross over to Llyn Geirionydd. At the Taliesin Monument we stopped again and watched the water skiers and canoeists making the most of the good weather.
The water of Geirionydd has been poluted over time by the lead mines further up the lake as Dave pointed out recently but Geraint and my friend Ian had fished a few years ago at a spot on the roadside about 100 metres from the Dam and they caught 6 and 12 trout respectively at that point. All the fish were released back into the lake as I don't think that they fancied eating any, just in case.  From there we carried on along the road until we came near to the Ugly house and then took a right turn and walked through a narrow and poorly signposted track until we were above the Bryn Tyrch and dropped down there for a quick drink before returning to the Pinnacles and our cars.  Hope to post some photos of the walk asap.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 06, 2010, 05:35:16 PM
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Carrying on down the lake we resisted the temptation of the cafe but took time to watch a man fly fishing from a boat on the lake.
Fabulous location for a cafe to sit out overlooking Crafnant...but food/drink was a little disappointing. If they ever have any competition around the lake, they will be in trouble.  Z**

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4117/4752403497_3d0a70d1fb.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/4752403497/)
Cafe (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/4752403497/#) by SnakeCorp (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 07, 2010, 02:38:28 PM
Pinnacles Shop and Cafe with Snowdon in the background.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 07, 2010, 02:52:00 PM
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Pinnacles Shop and Cafe with Snowdon in the background.

How are you attaching the photo, Hugo?

This is a good a place as any to explain how to upload photos to a post.

1) After writing your post, underneath the message box, click on Additional Options.
2) Next to Attach, click on the 'Choose File' button.
3) Select the photo file you want to use from my computer's hard drive (it must be less than 300k in size).
4) If you want to add another photo, click on (more attachments) and repeat the procedure.
5) Click on Post and the message & photo should be displayed.

Dave
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 08, 2010, 10:54:00 AM
Pinnacles shop and Cafe with Snowdon in the background
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on September 08, 2010, 10:55:08 AM
Excellent, Hugo;  I see you've conquered the upload image thing?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 08, 2010, 11:04:38 AM
Yes, I particularly like the 2nd and 4th photos, Crafnant looks so different from that angle. Job well done, Hugo.  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 08, 2010, 11:12:34 AM
Mine ruins and water sports on Llyn Geirionydd
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on September 08, 2010, 11:18:45 AM
Here's a couple more of Crafant:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 08, 2010, 11:19:51 AM
What's that white house used for, Ian? Holiday home?

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4139/4749015471_edae3e7cc1_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/4749015471/)
House in the Hills (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/4749015471/#) by SnakeCorp (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on September 08, 2010, 11:21:25 AM
AFAIK, it's a holiday home.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 08, 2010, 11:29:07 AM
Lovely photo of Cornel in the snow.  :) Those bins could do with being hidden away a bit though...I noticed them when I walked past last time.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on September 08, 2010, 11:32:16 AM
The bins are a problem.  They have to be relatively close to the accommodation  and camping field, and the only place that Conwy can access them for most of the time is there.  So moving them presents problems, not the least of which is that Conwy environmental services often don't bother emptying them, which - in high summer with the numbers  staying there - means full bins and smells...
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2010, 10:23:13 AM
The weather forecast for Snowdonia on  Monday wasn't very good and when we arrived in Capel Curig to do the Moel Siabod walk it was absolutely horrendous!   So we reverted to plan B,  go to the Pinnacles Cafe and have a nice warm coffee. :)
As we had come all that way we then decided on an easy riverside walk from the Ugly House to the Miners Bridge and return through the Forest.  We parked our cars in the Ugly House car park (making a donation to the Trust) and then walked along the riverbank. Even there you have to be careful how you walk as the tree roots are on the surface of the ground and the rocks can be quite slippy because of the damp conditions. The recent spell of wet weather has provided ideal conditions for the moss and funghi to grow and this was evident all along the bank of the river. Along the river the Dippers were flying past all the time and a Merganser followed us  for about half a mile before returning back.
Soon we had reached the opposite side to the Swallow Falls and this side has definitely got the best view of the falls and what's more it is free. ;D   It'll be even better in the Winter when the leaves have gone and the volume of water increases.  Not much further along and we reach the miners bridge and then make our way upwards to the Forest road and return along it to our cars.
It's not the walk we wanted but at least we enjoyed it and the day wasn't wasted. Another coffee in Betws Y Coed followed and then we came home.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2010, 10:26:01 AM
Ugly House Riverside Walk continued.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 21, 2010, 01:14:04 PM
I have just had a few days away in Tenby so no energetic walking while I was there  I did have a stroll around this beautiful little resort.   The Hotel was on the North Shore and we had very impressive views over the beach and harbour and castle area.  The steps were very steep to the beach but once down there the walk is on the level.
We walked past the harbour with its little church and then walked around the castle and lifeboat house before sitting down and admiring the views across the beach to the Fort Island and Caldy Island.  The weather was hot and sunny and we took our time just enjoying the views and the delicious crab sandwiches.  Just enough time to eat the carrot cake too and then we walked along the clean, soft sand of the South Beach before climbing up the steep steps up to the Esplanade,
We returned through the narrow old streets of the town and then had a ride in the carriage pulled by Mr Ed the 18 hands high Shire Horse.  A nice way to finish the day but the good weather made all the difference.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 21, 2010, 01:25:22 PM
Looking over the Island Fort and Beach
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 21, 2010, 06:05:31 PM
Never been to Tenby but it looks very pleasant judging by your photos.  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on September 21, 2010, 09:49:43 PM
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Never been to Tenby but it looks very pleasant judging by your photos.  :)

You may want to move this one to the 'Travel' section, as Hugo mentioned he didn't do much walking.  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 22, 2010, 03:52:36 PM
Don't knock it Trojan,  it was hard going walking up all those steps when I had just eaten crab sandwiches and carrot cake.     ;D
 Anyway I've now  posted some other pics under travel.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on September 22, 2010, 10:50:01 PM
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Don't knock it Trojan,  it was hard going walking up all those steps when I had just eaten crab sandwiches and carrot cake.     ;D
 Anyway I've now  posted some other pics under travel.   

 $welsh$  Nice one Hugo!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 28, 2010, 07:18:40 PM
My favourite walk this year has been the one I did on Bardsey Island.  The weather was ideal but it was the overall experience I had of walking on this historical site.  I've reposted some photos as the others were lost on the previous forum
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 28, 2010, 07:22:13 PM
More photos of Bardsey
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 28, 2010, 07:25:56 PM
Bardsey Island
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on September 29, 2010, 09:50:08 PM
Despite the grey, dank morning we had a really nice afternoon stroll in warm sunshine round the Anglesey Coastal Path near Penrhos Country Park. This little chap came within 6 inches of the camera lens in the wooded area near the beach.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on September 30, 2010, 01:35:34 AM
I'm never quite sure if its a Robin or a Redsart.
I get both in my garden.... they come very close to us to.
I reckon that one is a Robin,  a little chubbier, and less pointed,  what do you reckon?

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on September 30, 2010, 07:35:29 AM
I'm going with Robin. As we were leaving it was on "Twitter" talking to it's agent about Christmas card deals so I assume it must be.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on September 30, 2010, 10:20:57 AM
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I'm going with Robin. As we were leaving it was on "Twitter" talking to it's agent about Christmas card deals so I assume it must be.

There's nothing like a cheep Christmas card deal, to keep the bill small.  :-X
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 01, 2010, 03:33:40 PM
Took advantage of a break in the weather yesterday and went for a walk up Cadair Idris by way of the Minffordd Path.  The path is close to the Nant Cadair Stream and climbs steeply through woodland until you reach Cwm Cau and Llyn Cau which lies below the steep cliffs of Pen Y Gadair.  We stopped at the lake to admire the views and also for refreshments and then continued on our way upwards with spectacular views in all directions.
At the summit (2929 ft) we sat in the shelter there and finished off our refreshments before  heading to Mynydd Moel and the very steep and rocky route down. This was the worst and most difficult part of the walk and to top it all a raincloud came down and drenched us before we could get the waterproofs on! 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 01, 2010, 03:36:37 PM
Cadair Idris
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 01, 2010, 05:45:40 PM
Some great photos there, Hugo.  *&(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 03, 2010, 06:52:14 PM
Weather was rubbish first thing but I'd promised to go for a walk with a friend, so we left it to late morning and then headed down to Betws Y Coed. Paths were very muddy, so we restricted ourselves to a walk along the riverbank up to Miners Bridge (by which time the rain had stopped and the sun come out) and then back down into Betws Y Coed and a great coffee at the Caffi Caban Y Pair (the old Milk Bar). Bit of a wander around the shops and Station area and a strawberry Cadwaladars ice cream to finish off - delicious!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on October 04, 2010, 01:34:22 AM
Superb pictures as always  .. but I'm never quite sure, Robin or Redstart Dave?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on October 04, 2010, 07:41:06 AM
There's been a lot of money spent on the walkways around Betws over the past few years.  Nice place for a ramble and growing steadily into the Tourist Hub apparently feared by the local NIMBYs.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on October 04, 2010, 08:53:07 AM
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Superb pictures as always  .. but I'm never quite sure, Robin or Redstart Dave?


Definitely a Robin, Fester.  Redstarts are quite rare, although North Wales is one of the better places to see them, they prefer oak woodlands and are not often seen on the ground unlike robins.  Also redstarts are Summer migrants to the UK so are only seen from about April to September.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on October 04, 2010, 09:49:48 PM
Thank you Jack,
I will bow to your superior ornithological knowledge.
Although, I usually see both around the trees and bushes above the Grand Hotel near the Camera Obscura, even up to this week!

If its rounded and podgy its a Robin,  if its thinner and more pointy, its a Redstart . that is my usual naive rule of thumb.

But I could be wrong?


Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 04, 2010, 09:57:51 PM
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There's been a lot of money spent on the walkways around Betws over the past few years.  Nice place for a ramble and growing steadily into the Tourist Hub apparently feared by the local NIMBYs.
The character of Betws has been affected by the ever growing influx of tourists. I remember it back in the days before there were all those shops at the Railway Station and before the Royal Oak Hotel was doubled in size. Was much better back then, now the place is littered with chip shop cartons and cans, coaches trying to negotiate the narrow roads and endless shops full of the same tat. I doubt David Cox would approve....  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on October 04, 2010, 10:08:00 PM
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There's been a lot of money spent on the walkways around Betws over the past few years.  Nice place for a ramble and growing steadily into the Tourist Hub apparently feared by the local NIMBYs.
The character of Betws has been affected by the ever growing influx of tourists. I remember it back in the days before there were all those shops at the Railway Station and before the Royal Oak Hotel was doubled in size. Was much better back then, now the place is littered with chip shop cartons and cans, coaches trying to negotiate the narrow roads and endless shops full of the same tat. I doubt David Cox would approve....  :o

Last time I went, all I could see was endless shop selling tents, backpacks and stout walking boots!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on October 04, 2010, 10:11:09 PM
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There's been a lot of money spent on the walkways around Betws over the past few years.  Nice place for a ramble and growing steadily into the Tourist Hub apparently feared by the local NIMBYs.
The character of Betws has been affected by the ever growing influx of tourists. I remember it back in the days before there were all those shops at the Railway Station and before the Royal Oak Hotel was doubled in size. Was much better back then, now the place is littered with chip shop cartons and cans, coaches trying to negotiate the narrow roads and endless shops full of the same tat. I doubt David Cox would approve....  :o

Last time I went, all I could see was endless shop selling tents, backpacks and stout walking boots!

Stout walking boots.....were they made by Guinness?  D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 04, 2010, 10:15:09 PM
Seems a good opportunity to post this photo of Betws y Coed Railway Station from 1976 - how quiet it all was back then!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on October 05, 2010, 08:59:42 AM
Quote
The character of Betws has been affected by the ever growing influx of tourists.

This is the eternal conundrum, of course.  Tourism is the bread and butter of the area, but the tourists come because the place has 'character', the very nature of which can so easily be rapidly eroded by the businesses attracted there by those very tourists. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 05, 2010, 09:22:20 AM
Indeed, it's a very fine line and I think the balance has tipped a little too far in the case of Betws. Unfortunately, just like Pandora's Box, we can't really go back to how it was.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 05, 2010, 03:47:52 PM
The leader of our retired walking group was a Head Forester during his working career and told us on one of our walks in that area that about 50 years ago they had a petition in Betws to stop the planting of trees for the coniferous forest
In more recent times when there has been a threat of chopping down these same trees there has been a petition to stop that to!
the nice thing about Betws though is that it is still a beautiful and popular village.
I'm glad Dave made the most of it and enjoyed the walk along the river in Betws, we did the same a few weeks ago when it was raining and also ended up in the same cafe.    :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 06, 2010, 02:03:31 PM
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we did the same a few weeks ago when it was raining and also ended up in the same cafe.    :)
Great minds think alike, Hugo.  ;D Hadn't been to that cafe since it was the Milk Bar with its steaming mugs of coffee on a cold Winters morning - a welcome sight indeed.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 06, 2010, 03:28:18 PM
The first time I went there was many years ago when they had special train rides from Rhyl for 50p!    We ended up in that cafe and had the most delicious Blackberry pie and ice cream.  ;D
Nice to see that the place is still busy and going strong today.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2010, 08:33:12 PM
Today was such a lovely warm sunny day that I thought I;d make the most of it and walk around the Orme.   It was T-shirt weather all day and dozens of people were on the Orme doing the same thing. Starting from the West Shore I walked up the Monks Path and just stopped long enough to watch the work going on in Abbey Lodge.  It seems that the foundations for the new building were well underway. Then downhill to the Rest and Be Thankful for a coffee and cake before setting off again for the Summit.  I hadn't seen a goat until reaching the Cottage Loaf area and there I met a herd of about 40 of them just lying down in the sunshine. The Summit was busy and it was nice to see so many taking advantage of the good weather.  Downhill from there to look at the Bronze Age Copper Mines,then the Cromlech Llety Y Filiast.  I could see some activity going on at Mike's Golf Course so I went down the path to see him.
When I got there Mike (on L in photo) was legging it up to the top of the course and my knees wouldn't allow me to catch him up. Sorry Mike but I'll call again. 
Down through the old terraces in Haulfre and only two Billy Goats there and still no sign of that brown one!
Back to the car along Invalids Walk and the only blot on the landscape was the building site where Penmorfa once stood, :'(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2010, 08:37:17 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2010, 08:39:58 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on October 15, 2010, 09:59:16 PM
Really pleasant easy circular walk from the "Walking in the Conwy Valley" book by Carl Rogers went round Moel Trefriw starting out from Capel Garmon.  Excellent views over Llanrwst and the Conwy Valley. Didn't see a single person from start to finish. Plenty of local wildlife though. Surprising number of woodpeckers and nuthatches noticeable by the really loud tapping noises as they went to work on the upper trunks of the trees.  Lots of Goldfinches on the feeders on the bunglalows in Capel Garmon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 16, 2010, 11:32:53 AM
Sounds like a nice walk Medz,  which one was it as there are two (17 and 18) that go to Capel Garmon?
I've done No 19 in that book and part of the route is on Walk 17. From Fairy Glen to the Fairy Falls Cafe.  That part of the walk covers the old stage coach route prior to Thomas Telford building the A5 and it's a lovely walk with great views.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on October 16, 2010, 02:48:50 PM
Hugo
  the book I picked up at the 2nd hand book shop in Colwyn Bay has only 15 circular walks (ISBN 0 9522409 7 1) . The walk starts at the White Horse pub and goes up towards the ruins of Pen-y-ffridd continuing on up the slope to the high point where you get views of mountains of Snowdonia and a little bit further on the valley containing the original coach road from Nebo to Lllanrwst. You then go down an extensive track where at the lower end you get a full view of the whole of the Conwy Valley opening up in front of you. Through a kissing gate directly across a couple of fields to Belmont, a large farmhouse which appears to have been totally refurbished as one or several really nice looking holiday cottages. Onwards through another couple of fields to a large farm house with the amazing sight to the right  of a hillside of hundreds of free range chickens running about all over it.Must be an absolute hell of a job picking up the eggs. You then continue on through three gates and several fields back to the starting point. About 2.75 miles in total.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 16, 2010, 03:27:25 PM
Medz
It's a different book to the one I've got but that walk sounds really nice and I'm glad you enjoyed it.  It sounds similar to the walk No 18 in my book although that one  starts at Garthmyn and then goes up to Capel Garmon. It mentions Pen Y Ffridd and the old coach road and the dramatic views you get from up there.
I'd also like to do the one from Capel Garmon that goes down to the Neolithic Burial Chamber  and then down to the old stage coach road that goes past the beautiful Fairy Glen. Then it returns uphill to Capel Garmon, that walk is 4 miles.
There are so many nice walks in the area that it's just impossible to do them all but you have to make the most of it and do what you can.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 18, 2010, 11:09:11 AM
Sunday was a dry sunny day so my friends and I set off to do the Llangollen History Trail walk and drove past the Ponderosa Cafe and down the beautiful Horseshoe Pass for the start of the walk. The Sun was shining but the mist still hung over the old Abbey. We parked in the Eisteddfod car park and made our way to the canal for the start of the walk.   We walked along the canal passing some nice properties and after a short while came to the Horseshoe falls.  These falls were designed by Thomas Telford and feeds 12 million gallons of water per day from the River Dee into the Llangollen Canal.    When Telford did this it reduced the river flow so much that it could no longer power the mills downstream!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 18, 2010, 11:19:48 AM
 $cool$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 18, 2010, 11:32:32 AM
After admiring the falls and the surrounding beauty we made our way up to Llantysilio Church and turned right to follow the path towards the Abbey, just stopping to look back on the falls.  We picked up the footpath on the left by the car park but then made a deviation to the left so that we could climb up the steep slopes of the Velvet Hill.   The views from the top were superb and no wonder it has been described as one of the prettiest walks in North Wales.     We stopped there to have our sandwiches and drinks and looked down on the Abbey and across to the Castle Dinas Bran which was perched at the top of a hill across the valley.
After a short while we made our way down the other side of the hill and walked through the caravan park to have a closer look at the Abbey.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 18, 2010, 11:54:43 AM
We had a closer look at the Valle Crucis Abbey that was founded by the Cisterian Monks in 1201 and it became the second richest monastery in Wales after Tintern.  The monks were forced to leave after Henry VIII dissolved the monastries in 1537.   At the back of the Abbey in the Caravan Park we came across these unusual Pods.  They are actually for campers and replace having to bring your tents along.    After inspecting them we crossed over the wooden bridge and walked through some ancient Oak woodland towards our final destination of the day Dinas Bran ( Fortress of the Crow)     There were thousands of acorns lying all over the place so it's no wonder the Squirrels looked so well fed here!
After about 2 miles we reached the start of the steep zig zag path up to the castle and after huffing and puffing our way up we reached the top. No wonder the castle was built here with its commanding views of the area,
The Castle was built in the 1260's by the Welsh Prince Gruffudd ap Madoc to guard the route into Wales along the Dee Valley. It was abandoned to the English forces of Edward 1 in 1277.
We finished off what food and drink we had before heading back to the car park but stopped at the Wharf Cafe for a nice cup of coffee to finish of a very enjoyable walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on November 19, 2010, 09:21:47 PM
After all the winds and rain in the last week my wife and I decided  to make the most of the good weather today to go and have a walk along the coast line near South Stack on Anglesey. On arriving at the RSPB centre at Ellins Tower we decided to go on up towards the summit of Holyhead mountain. We'd been up there from the country park in Holyhead before but not approached it from South Stack. It was a really easy and pleasant walk with a bit a climb towards the end but well worth the effort and the views from up there included the Irish mountains. (NB turn your mobile phone off when you go anywhere near South Stack because according to my roaming profile I was somewhere in Southern Ireland and picking up O2.IE phone signal. at £2.40 per minute)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on November 19, 2010, 09:28:45 PM
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(NB turn your mobile phone off when you go anywhere near South Stack because according to my roaming profile I was somewhere in Southern Ireland and picking up O2.IE phone signal. at £2.40 per minute)
That's a common problem on Anglesey and has caught many an unwary user out!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on November 19, 2010, 09:30:14 PM
I bought the 'Walking in the Conwy Valley' book recently and am hoping to give one of them a try on Sunday if the weather holds.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 23, 2010, 11:45:34 AM
I've got that book by Carl Rogers although it seems to be a different edition to the one the Medz has.    The are some nice walks there and not too long which make them ideal for the Winter.
A friend came over last night and we hope to do another one of them soon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 23, 2010, 02:39:05 PM
I enjoyed a nice short walk last Tuesday with the retirement group.  We met at the Forestry Commission car park in Aber and had a delightful woodland walk leading up to the waterfall.  It was a lovely Autumn day, cool but dry and sunny and as we walked along this beautiful valley we could admire the lovely Autumn colouring of the leaves.
Before long we reached the falls and they were very impressive following the recent spell of rain. There was so much water flowing in the river above the falls  that there was a second but smaller waterfall flowing nearby.
I resisted the temptation to have a look for Trout in the pools below the falls as I had done on a previous visit as the rocks had become so slippy I didn't want to temp fate and fall in!
We retraced our steps back to the car park and although the walk was not strenuous I still enjoyed a coffee and a slice of double chocolate nut cake in the cafe in Aber.     D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 23, 2010, 02:42:04 PM
Aber Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 27, 2010, 04:48:39 PM
I was due to go on a long awaited walk on the Halkyn Mountains yesterday and was looking forward to the walk.  However when I woke up there was a blanket of snow on the ground and the car was frozen over.
A quick phone call to my friend in Prestatyn and I found out that conditions were even worse there and he had heard that conditions in the Halkyn area were even worse so we called it off.
There's always another day and it would have been silly to chance driving in those conditions. I saw the area on the Welsh news later in the evening and was glad that we did the right thing by calling off the walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on November 27, 2010, 08:26:15 PM
The area behind Holywell is very prone to snow problems. I lived there for five years and there was never a winter I didnt have to get my snow boots out. A big shock coming from Rhos on Sea.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on November 27, 2010, 08:56:10 PM
Nice walk and photos, Hugo. is that cafe in Aber the one in the middle of the village, a sort of community venture? I recall some very good lemon cake from there about 4 years ago.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 28, 2010, 11:14:10 AM
Yes, that's the one Dave.   It's a nice cafe and the cakes that they have there are very moorish!
I made a mistake about 4 years ago when I was doing the full valley walk there with the retired group.  They were going very slowly up the slope below the pylons and I had to leave the group as I had a 5 aside football match in Bangor a short time later.
I ran down the slope where the trees in the shape of a cross where and by the time I got to the road I  realised that I had damaged my knees.
After that I had to pack in football a few months later.   Getting older doesn't always give you common sense.
I've been told to keep off the mountains for a while now to rest the knees but with the weather we have at the moment there is no chance of me going anyway! 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on November 28, 2010, 05:25:18 PM
Ahh, Hugo.. I sympathise with you in the 'knees' department.
Us humans are badly designed and it always seems to be the knees that pack in first as we grow older.

Like you I had to pack in football about 3 years ago, as my knees were in pain during and after every match.
It was no great loss to the game, although I played thousands of times I was never actually any good.

In terms of walking, as arthritis takes its toll, its always the downhill walk that causes pain because of the constant impact going down through the joint.
Uphill walking is fine.   well.....its fine for now.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on November 28, 2010, 05:32:36 PM
The weather was great this morning, a beautiful crisp sunny Winter's day. Headed up for a short walk on the Orme, just a light dusting of frozen snow up there, and then back down the tramtracks towards Kava and a hot lunch.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on November 28, 2010, 07:26:42 PM
Could you hear the bells? In clear weather ie without wind, I often have people tell me how far away they have heard the bells from eg West Shore, Craigside and Anglesea Road (on the Orme for those who don't know) to name just three places.

Stan
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on November 28, 2010, 07:41:37 PM
I think I would probably have been a bit late today, as it was gone 11am before I was heading up the Orme. I do usually hear the bells in town every Sunday.

ps. Hope your wife is feeling better soon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on November 28, 2010, 07:43:35 PM
Thanks Dave, so do I. As I posted elsewhere I am on a limited menu!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on November 28, 2010, 08:01:18 PM
The bells were coming over loud and clear from here this morning. Mrs Medz and I  went for a walk through town on Friday evening at about 7:30 ish and both the sound of the bells and the sight of seeing the bell ringers in action(through the windows of the bell tower) was so atmospheric. It's just a pity there were so few people about to enjoy it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on November 28, 2010, 08:21:26 PM
It was a cold night so presumably people had stayed where it was warm ie at home or in their hotels etc.

Next time you are walking by on a Friday night why not pop in and up the stairs to see how we actually do ring them. You and anyone else are welcome to come and see - who knows, you might be inspired to have a go!

Stan
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 06, 2010, 11:27:10 AM
Yesterday, my friend and I decided to have a coastal walk on Anglesey and drove to Trearddur Bay for a circular walk to Rhoscolyn.  We walked through the caravan park and along the path following the coast, the conditions underfoot were quite wet and we hadn't gone far before a big black cloud came over from Holyhead but we were prepared for all conditions and got our waterproofs out. The hail and rain didn't last long and after that it became very warm.  We passed Bwa Gwyn (White Arch) and saw a lot of canoeists enjoying the choppy seas and there were dozens of Oystercatchers standing on the wet grass nearby. A bit further on and we came to Bwa Du  (Black Arch) and when I asked my friend jokingly to pose for a photo on top of the natural sea arch his comments were unprintable!
About 100 yards after turning left at Rhoscolyn Head we came across St Gwenfaen's well which has stone steps,corner seats and may originally have been roofed. Apparently in the Middle Ages it was a site for pilgrimages and the water from the well was believed to have the power to cure mental illness. (should have tried some myself to see if it works)
From there we headed to the disused Coastguard Lookout where we enjoyed our sandwiches and coffee and sat there looking at the beautiful coastline and magnificent snow covered mountains. We continued on to Porth Wen walking past some idyllically situated property and then walked along the narrow lane past the White Eagle Hotel only stopping there to look at it's fantastic menu . We took the lane past the church and made our way back to the start over open countryside and along the way we saw many rabbits running about in the Autumn Sun.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 06, 2010, 11:43:34 AM
Trearddur Bay to Rhoscolyn Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 06, 2010, 11:54:05 AM
Trearddur Bay to Rhoscolyn Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 14, 2010, 05:12:16 PM
This is not a walking video but more of a climbing video 

 

Would you do this for a living - I don't think so,  nor me!!!. Just wait for the cartoon intro to finish, then hold on to your seat!



http://www.liveleak.com/e/07b_1284580365 (http://www.liveleak.com/e/07b_1284580365)
 
 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on December 15, 2010, 08:37:53 AM
What they don't really show, there, are the two main dangers involved with climbing those towers.  One is radiation from the various microwave dishes, but the second is the rather alarming swaying that occurs as you near the top.  The towers themselves are not substantial and are designed to sway, but they don't feel safe when you're atop one - even a much smaller one.  And when you look down, the human propensity for making any height seem lethal really kicks in, and the diminishing size of the tower below you makes it feel as though you're standing on a needle.  Not nice...
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on December 15, 2010, 10:42:22 AM
For my sins, I have been involved with the building crane and access equipment business for a lot of my career.  I have had the pleasure of going up very high tower cranes and also radio masts.   The tower cranes one had to climb but the radio masts had a small petrol powered passenger hoist operating on a rack and pinion basis.  These had been adapted from "raise climbers" used in the mining industry and supplied by the Swedish company for whom I worked.  Fantastic experience in all instances but certainly not for the faint hearted or those suffering from vertigo!    D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 17, 2010, 10:40:27 AM
We were due to do one of the Carl Rogers Walks in Betws Y Coed today followed by a meal in one of the hotels but at 7.45am I got the first phone call.  A friend in Anglesey phoned to say that the snow was horrendous, about 5 inches deep but another who lived in the Caernarfon area said that it was even worse there and a lorry had already jack- knifed on the main road.
It wasn't too bad here about half an inch but we called it off as there is always another day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 10, 2011, 04:55:28 PM
Yesterday a friend and I decided to do the Benllech Circular walk on Anglesey. We had never been on it before but it was described as a very gentle 5.5 miles country walk along newly opened footpaths around Cors Goch Nature Reserve.
Although we had the map and directions, I must admit that the marker postings were extremely poor and the paths were not readily visible and in addition Cors (bog or marsh in English) should have given us an indication of the wet ground underfoot.  I was also surprised at the rights of way through three of the properties we had to walk through. The first was a private house with the front and side garden done in brick paving and we had to trapes across it in our muddy footwear, secondly was a farm where we had to walk over the horses feed of hay and then go through a corridor between bales of hay and then passing through the farmyard. The third right of way was over someone's immaculate front lawn.
We made the most of it though and it was a dry sunny day and not too cold.  Along the way we saw some very large Buzzards and partridges and pheasants and a lot of ruined property.  We made an error of navigation during the walk and ended in the village of Brynteg nowhere near where we should have done so we had a long walk back to Benllech along the main road. It's not a walk I would recommend and one that I don't think I'll ever do again. There are many more better walks in the area.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 16, 2011, 05:27:35 PM
Was in Betws Y Coed today. This is how the Pont Y Pair Falls usually look:

(http://farm1.static.flickr.com/6/76877123_ae7a47488b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/76877123/)
Falls, Pont y Pair, Betws-y-Coed (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/76877123/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

This was how they looked today. Extensive flooding all along the Conwy Valley too. B5106 closed between Trefriw and Llanrwst.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 16, 2011, 05:52:56 PM
..and some video footage courtesy of my mobile phone:

Betws Pont Y Pair Falls in Flood.mp4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybnr1CzzX14#ws)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 16, 2011, 06:34:24 PM
The photo and the video are really impressive Dave,  I've never seen so much water flowing in the Llugwy before.   Apparently Capel Curig had 7 inches of rain yesterday and that will account for the torrent of water.
I wonder if there has been any flooding in the Conwy Valley as a result of the deluge?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 16, 2011, 06:38:41 PM
The valley was badly flooded all the way down from Betws to about Tal Y Cafn. Water was right up against the A470 for most of the way up to Llanrwst.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on January 16, 2011, 06:58:53 PM
The waters had receded substantially, this morning, but were still pretty high
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on January 16, 2011, 07:00:13 PM
They'd dropped about 1.5m from their previous height.  The cafe and bench looked rather forlorn
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 16, 2011, 07:07:48 PM
I see the the Riverside Cafe is living up to its name.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 21, 2011, 10:18:52 AM
Yesterday was a cold but very sunny day and I didn't realise just how cold it was until I got in my car to drive to Halkyn.   I had icicles hanging inside my car!   :o  (leaking sun roof}
By Llanddulas I could see a white mist hanging over the vale of Clwyd with the tops of the Clwydian range peeping out of them.  After a spooky drive through the mist we took the back roads to Halkyn as there had been a serious accident on the A55 by Caerwys.
We parked the car on Halkyn common and made our way to the iron age hillfort passing the many disused mineshaftes on the way. The mine shafts were capped with beehive shaped stones for some reason. The views from there were great apart from when we looked at the Power Station in Connah's Quay.  We then retraced our path and took the lane to Midlist Farm where they have the Water Buffalos and took the footpath through the farm and then we walked through the woods where the paintballing fights take place and ended up by the Church in Halkyn.   It was a short but enjoyable circular walk on a lovely cold Winter's day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 21, 2011, 10:21:15 AM
More photos of the Halkyn Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 21, 2011, 11:36:02 AM
On Tuesday the Retirement group enjoyed a nice circular walk in the Old Colwyn area. We parked up in the Berthes Road car park and walked down Beach Road, after a few yards we crossed the fast flowing stream and doubled back to go through the underpass to Fairy Glen.  We then followed the woodland path and the stream until we came out in Coed Coch Road and then crossed the Old Colwyn Golf Course very carefully watching out for any wayward golf balls before reaching Peulwys Lane.
It's a bit of a pull up the Lane from there so we took our time and then followed a footpath that took us on the edge of the quarry and past the infants school.  From there we took the road down Miners Lane to where the Hotel 70 Degrees once stood and then walked down numerous steps, (over 250} until we came to the Rainbow Bridge where we crossed over and followed the footpath back into the village.  We walked back through the park above the stream and admired the wood carvings made in a dead tree stump and then it was back to the car park.  There was no coffee and cake after this particular walk but at least we did enjoy a nice meal in the Afon Conwy beforehand.   :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 21, 2011, 11:46:57 AM
Old Colwyn walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on January 23, 2011, 12:39:00 AM
I got the "Walks from Colwyn Bay" book as a Christmas present and went on the Playhouse and Picture Palaces walk on Friday. It's the first time I'd been inside the Weatherspoon's that used to be the  Princess Theatre and was amazed to find  that, like our own Palladium, there was a wonderful interior  to the building.  I did however have problems in finding a "hardware shop on Abergele Road that was the site of the old Colwyn Bay Cinema". Is there any evidence of this still remaining today or has it been demolished or built over?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on January 23, 2011, 08:41:52 AM
I'm not sure, but could this have been what was the A&A shop? It has/had a lovely dome inside.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 23, 2011, 08:59:31 AM
The Cosy Cinema (as it was known) was across the road from HSBC, a few doors down from the Carlton pub. You'll see a tiny old newsagent that was on the right hand side of the entrance, whilst the entrance itself was through what is now Matthews & Son Hardware store. You can still see the auditorium round in the alleyway at the back. I think my Dad once told me the layout was a bit odd in that you entered the cinema under the screen.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: poppy on January 23, 2011, 11:47:33 AM
 The Central ? :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 23, 2011, 03:06:55 PM
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The Central ? :o
yes, sorry, it was the Central I meant!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 29, 2011, 11:52:19 AM
Yesterday some friends and I drove to the Fairy Glen car park to start a walk that I had been hoping to do for ages.   It was the Capel Garmon-- Fairy Glen walk in Carl Rogers' book on the Conwy Valley walks.
We changed the starting place from Capel Garmon to Fairy Glen for two good reasons,  the parking is easier there than in the village (nominal fee £1.00 entrance to the Glen  50p  pp.) and also we wanted to get the most strenuous section out of the way first.
From the Fairy Glen we made our way to the A55 crossing it directly and then going up a very steep zig zag path through the trees, stopping just to get our breath and watch the Nuthatches and Greater Spotted Woodpecker on the trees.  We then came to a forest track and the slope then eased. This lead to a lane that went into the village and we followed it and all the time the views were getting better and better. It was a cold day, but there was no wind and last nights snow and ice could be seen on the peaks of Tryfan, Pen Yr Ole Wen, Carnedd Dafydd and Carnedd Llewelyn that could be seen in the distance.
In the village we watched a beautiful Bullfinch by a cottage before making our way past the White Horse Inn and looking in the Churchyard.   We sat on a bench to have our refreshments and then made our way along a lane to the Capel Garmon Burial Chamber. This walk is also called Capel Garmon-- The Tomb with the view and you can see why as you get a splendid view of the Cnicht, Moel Siabod, Yr Arran and Snowdon from here.
The ground was frozen and it was just as well because I should imagine that downhill from here to the A5 and Conwy Falls could get very boggy at times.  At the falls we walked carefull along the A5 for a short while and then took a path to our left which followed the River Conwy down to Fairy Glen.  This pleasant path which is high above the river is actually all that remains of an old toll road built in the opening of the 19 th centuary. It became redundant when Thomas Telford built the A5 above it but was still in use many years later.        We walked as far as Fairy Glen and then followed the path to the gorge and then continued on the riverside walk past where the Afon Conwy and the Afon Lledr meet and then returned to our car to carry on to the Royal Oak where we enjoyed a meal of fish and chips. A fantastic walk that I hope to do again soon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 29, 2011, 12:01:42 PM
Capel Garmon - Fairy Glen Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 30, 2011, 06:05:30 PM
Very pleasant walk today. Although cold (only about 2 degrees), it was quite warm in the sunshine, so we headed over to Betws Y Coed for a trek up and round Llyn Elsi. Took the path that leads up from behind the Church, bit of a pullup for the first 20 minutes but quite welcome in that it got us warmed up quickly! After exploring a long abandoned cottage in the woods, we arrived at Llyn Elsi and I was surprised to see that the entire lake was frozen solid! After skimming rocks across the surface and listening to the odd pinging noises that they made, we headed round the bottom end of the lake and then took a forestry track across to join the old Sarn Helen Roman Road, which we followed downhill back to the A5, pausing only to stop and take photos of the frozen waterfall on the Afon Rhiwddolion. A steady stroll back along the A5 and back in Betws Y Coed for coffee and hot chocolate muffins at the Royal Oak Hotel.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 02, 2011, 03:44:29 PM
A nice way to finish off a good walk Dave, I just wish that I'd have known about those chocolate muffins when I was in the Royal Oak last Friday!    :)
I came across a book in the Conwy Archives called "County Borough" and it normally retails at £9.99 but was on offer at £5.00 so I bought it.    Inside on pg74 is a photo of the shop and cottage at Rhiwddolion, together with the shopkeeper and 3 others.  It's the only photo I've seen of the village prior to it becoming abandoned.  There are lots of other old photos of Conwy County too.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 05, 2011, 05:01:07 PM
I've just enclosed some more photos of the Gapel Garmon walk, it's a nice walk of just about 4 miles with some stunning views.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 06, 2011, 04:41:31 PM
 $cool$ Is that Moel Siabod above Hugo?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 06, 2011, 05:08:07 PM
After the photo of the Peregrine Falcon the mountains are:-
1)  Tryfan
2)  That's Siabod
3)   Above the farmhouse are L to R      Pen Yr Ole Wen, Carnedd Dafydd, Carnedd Llewelyn.

I've posted some photos again of my walk up Moel Siabod on 24th Feb 2010 so if you fancy a walk up there I'll take you.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 06, 2011, 05:14:05 PM
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I've posted some photos again of my walk up Moel Siabod on 24th Feb 2010 so if you fancy a walk up there I'll take you.

I'll take you up on that offer next time I'm over Hugo.

It's been a while since I've been up in the Carneddau.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 05:22:55 PM
My Dad has always been a keen mountain walker. He'd disappear every Sunday for most of the day kitted out with all the essential gear from walking boots to maps.  When I was 5yrs old I had my own walking boots and a small blue leather trimmed rucksack with all my essentials like my spare socks, a packet of polos and a wagon wheel.  I used to go with him on some of his shorter treks which could sometimes be 5 miles or more.  Sounds great doesn't it..........well let me tell you .... it wasn't.  Five miles is a hellova long way to a five yr old.  I can remember him laughing at me 'cos I was knackered, arm in the air hanging onto his rucksack strap getting dragged up the hill.  Moaning as you do "are we nearly there yet Dad" every now and again he'd give me one of those Dextrose tablets to give me energy. He still takes the mick now lol.  The best part was at the end of the walk we'd always go to the pub and get coke in a real coke bottle and a packet of KP cheese and onion crips.
Untill today I never really appreciated why he'd want to go up the moutain and I'm going to shock him this week and phone him and ask when he's going next.  If I promise not to hang on to his rucksack moaning, I reckon he'll be quite chuffed.

These photos were taken on the sychnant pass.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 05:33:18 PM
I went up by where the ice cream van parks on the pass to look at what I thought were old hom steads but unless trolls lived on them there hills they were probably animal sheds on closer investigation.  The door way looks fit for the vertically challenged.  Ah but I might be right after all.........isn't that a bed in the last photo  :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 05:37:25 PM
These photos were taken just off the pass (climbed over a fence sssshhhh) I always thought trees looked really plain in winter, not so my friends.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 05:39:57 PM
Are you bored yet?  A couple of Socs. Beautiful dog.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 11, 2011, 06:04:06 PM
nice photos Angie  $cool$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 06:09:04 PM
Thanks Brumbob.  I had the camera as a present for helping organise a friends wedding. Its a finepix Z. Cracking little camera to be honest.  I was fiddling about with it last night so I can sort the settings out now.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 11, 2011, 06:13:35 PM
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I was fiddling about with it last night

Yes, me too.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 11, 2011, 06:35:55 PM
Lovely pics Angie, I just wish I could walk far enough to get to these places now.
We used to picnic up the pass 40 years ago when our daughter was small and my Dad used all the little lanes to avoid the traffic hold ups before they built the new Conwy bridge.
He used to come up the Bangor Road, over the pass and through the lanes to cross the river at Taly Cafn and back up to the 'digs' in Rhos.
 OMG I sound like a dinosaur !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 06:38:14 PM
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I was fiddling about with it last night

Yes, me too.
Now why doesn't that suprise me  :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 06:42:13 PM
Hey Trojan Nemises is selling an electronic organ...............might save you some time  WWW
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 11, 2011, 07:26:20 PM
Great to read about your walk and see the photos, Angie. Whereabouts is that pond in the trees?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 08:00:02 PM
Just past the cattle grid on the pass by the entrance to the old farm on the right.  I jumped over the fence. I've never noticed it before. I bet you could take some cracking photos there Dave. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 11, 2011, 08:11:55 PM
I know where you mean, thanks. Never knew that pond was there.

There's a good circular walk from Conwy up the Conwy mountain side, cutting across through Oakwood Park grounds, then round and down along the country lanes into the Gyffin valley and back into town.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 08:34:42 PM
Aah I might just do that one tomorrow.  I fancy going up to the old church. (Llangelynin) it's one of my favourite places.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 11, 2011, 08:43:40 PM
You've gone walking crazy!  :P
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 09:29:26 PM
I've certainly got the bug.  Thing is when the dog goes i'll look a right plank walking round on my own. 8)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 11, 2011, 09:30:55 PM
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i'll look a right plank walking round on my own. 8)
It's never stopped me...  :(  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 11, 2011, 09:39:11 PM
I rest my case Dave  _))*

Only joking I'll probably just stalk you  :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 11, 2011, 10:37:31 PM
we like walking all over the place and we've never had a dog, yesterday we were round the back of Llandudno station looking at whats left then down Builder Street, but we stand looking at any old details from years ago and this chap walking past asked us if we were lost! We explained..... _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 11, 2011, 11:28:24 PM
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I was fiddling about with it last night

Yes, me too.

Was it the Orbs again mate?    The mystery of the gloryhole and sililar search terms is solved !!!   L0L L0L L0L
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 12, 2011, 01:34:05 AM
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I was fiddling about with it last night

Yes, me too.

Was it the Orbs again mate?    The mystery of the gloryhole and sililar search terms is solved !!!   L0L L0L L0L

Thanks Fester, Dave very cleverly changed the subject, with some outstanding moderating, but now you've unearthed it again.  :-[
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 12, 2011, 06:01:53 PM
Today Socs, my lad and I went right the way along the beacons.  Its a nightmare trying to walk in the sand as it just sinks beneath your feet.
There were a number of stranded Jellyfish strewn all over the shore, some quite large.  Did you know: Jellyfishes have no brain, heart, blood, and no nervous system they can sense food and danger but its a mystery how they process this information with no brain?
We also came across a huge float kinda thing, made from polystyrene and covered in fibre glass (I thought it was rock) not a clue what it was for.  I'll page the Oracle.........Dave do you know what it is?  

Tomorrow I'm going to go up to the roman fort on the mountain behind Conwy, got basic directions.  I want to go over towards Llanfair to see the old world war 2 plane crash site. As I remember the fusilage was still there I remember my Dad taking us all up there when we were kids. You watch I'll get there and find nothing but bits of metal, things always seem more interesting when your young.

Also bumped into Oscar, he's a very tall man. _))* I included a photo at the bottom  :D (sorry Oscar could't resist mate) Funny he looks "camp as a row of tents" with his hand on his hip.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 12, 2011, 06:10:07 PM
Angie, you're OSCAR!!!!!!!!!  ;D

That floaty thing is....a floaty thing. They use them in harbours and suchlike to make things like pontoons float. Maybe not the greatest explanation in the world.  :(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 12, 2011, 07:23:10 PM
Angie, you might not be Oscar.... but you are the funniest and most interesting contributor to this Forum,  (in my humble opinion)

Love reading your posts...
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 12, 2011, 09:30:16 PM
Went on a pleasant walk around Penmaenmawr this afternoon. The sunshine came out halfway round. Went along the main road, past the Red Gables Hotel (ok, my main reason for going was to see this), then down past the old Grand Hotel site through the tunnel onto the beach, then back up Paradise Road (laughs) for a coffee at the Big Rock Cafe on the main road (which is highly recommended, by the way).

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5138/5439777126_b149ee5443_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5439777126/)
Red Gables Hotel (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5439777126/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5100/5438941343_f888b546da_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5438941343/)
Brookes Tarpaulins (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5438941343/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5095/5439907832_d67911f7b0_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5439907832/)
Beach Cafe (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5439907832/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5060/5439919504_fe9d87cb6e_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5439919504/)
Tunnel Project (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5439919504/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 12, 2011, 09:37:24 PM
The sausage sarnie and the coffee, was better than BUS RIDE, wasn't it mate???

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 13, 2011, 10:31:24 AM
Very bumpy on those buses over the humps in Llandudno Junction!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 13, 2011, 12:41:47 PM
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Love reading your posts...
Aah thanks Fester. What a nice thing to say. you darlin. That's made my day. We'll have to make an arrangement to go for a walk one day with a few of us. God I am getting old, never in my life did I ever imagine I'd be asking to arrange a rambling club.  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 13, 2011, 01:37:58 PM
There used to be a walking group on the original Llandudno Local forum.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 13, 2011, 01:40:36 PM
Remember the debate about Grandmother's Chair?

and Judy's Historic Walk-- that was good.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 13, 2011, 06:20:49 PM
Afternoon peeps, well I went up Conwy mountain today in search of the Roman fort. Took some photos of the view from the top, y'see this is why I love Conwy, never again will I take such beautiful surroundings for granted. Socs has really opened my eyes.  It's a very steep climb, I think I must have broke the pain barrier a 100 yds up. I've always thought I was quite fit, how wrong was I.  I remember my Dads advice "breathe in through the mouth and out through the nose" or was it the other way round? Well I tried both and I'll tell you now, neither makes any difference. I was still gasping for breathe, my nose running a half marathon due to the cold and didn't see any signs of a piggin' Roman Fort. My thoughts then turned to my son and how I was going to render him homeless when I got home for it was him who told me "No really it's not that far up honest". He must be laughing his pants off now I thought.
I finally dragged my sorry ass to the summit, virtually on my hands and knees, red in the face, exhausted, and due to the blustery wind looking like the Wild man of Borneo. 
As I stood at the top, panting like a dog, I admired the view and I thought so what if there's no Roman Fort  the sense of achievement I had made it all worth while.  Well it did until I turned round and to my horror there was a guy waving at me, who the hell was he?  I'll tell you who, only Nicky Mod (Jones) I had a crush on Nicky all the way through school. He was the best looking lad in Aberconwy I kid you not Adonis galore. The one guy you don't want to see on the top of a mountain, looking like you've just been dragged through a bush backwards, that's who :o
To be honest we've always been really good mates, he was up there with his Dad, my Dads best mate.  He's just come back from Scotland and he's staying at his Dads in Llandudno for a month or so. Its always a pleasure to see him.  I told him my aim was to find the Roman Fort but had given up and was probably a bit lost :roll: Laughing he said: "that's it there" pointing towards a pile of rubble a 100 yds away. Now don't get me wrong it's not like I was expecting statues of Nero or anything but to say I was disappointed was an understatement. We said goodbye and off I went to take some photos.  I hope your more impressed than I was. Well at least my lad was forgiven I've decided he can stay put for now :D


Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 13, 2011, 06:37:06 PM
Angie..

While you have this temporary hiatus from full time work,  I think you should write a book.
Perhaps your autobiography?  I would buy that!
Your writing style, imagery and humour are superb... and I end up reading out everything you write on here to Mrs F.

Descriptive and hilarious......always



Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on February 13, 2011, 10:35:02 PM
I agree, great stuff Angie!  I like "the rough guide"  style  $3towns$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 13, 2011, 10:51:40 PM
yes it was rough  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 13, 2011, 11:08:29 PM
Hey Bob as I explained earlier it was no walk in the park mate  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 13, 2011, 11:17:42 PM
I like "the rough guide"  style 
Oh let me tell ye now it was rough, came home lookin like a bag of spanners  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on February 14, 2011, 12:42:05 AM
reminds me of the time I walked up Moel Arthur to watch the sunset, it too kme so long to go up, it was pitch dark by the time I got there :(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 14, 2011, 01:14:54 AM
J'know I didn't say earlier but when I was walking up the mountain today I could see a woman walking towards me on crutches and I thought "your havin a laff lady, what kind of a person walks up and down a 1 in 4 hill on crutches for gods sake, tut tut" as she got closer I realised she had those power walking stick thingys.  :roll:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 14, 2011, 02:36:46 AM
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Remember the debate about Grandmother's Chair?

and Judy's Historic Walk-- that was good.

Yes, My Grandmother's Chair. Remember RetroRoxxme, or Kate? She posted the walk on her blog, which is still in existence, however, there's been no activity for some time so I copied a part of it in case it disappears.

http://llandudnowalks.blogspot.com/ (http://llandudnowalks.blogspot.com/)

As it nearly killed me walking up the second part of Nant-Y-Gamar Road the first and second time ( despite being thoroughly shamed by a more mature lady who whizzed up the steep hill like she had wings on her heels ). I took the executive decision to start the walk in reverse.

Rightyho, here we go....

Start the walk from Fferm Lane off Fferm Bach Road, the entrance to the lane is next to the rear access of Lady Forester's ( North Wales Medical Centre).

Walk up the lane and onto the footpath that will take you to a stone wall stile. For the less agile, you can slip around the edge of it, ( I can't, my bum's too wide and my belly's too big lol) follow the footpath onwards, and you will come to a farmhouse on your right. To the left of this is a stone structure which is, or should I say was, a Lime Kiln and next to it is an old limestone quarry that is partially railed off and is known as the Donkey Pit, because of the awkwardness of its site, Pack animals were used to load the lime and one poor beast actually fell into the quarry workings, hence the name.

Keep following the path and you will see the farm - Fferm, which dates from the 17th century, and is connected to the house you have just passed.

When you get to a fork in the path, go left up the hill, part way up on the right next to the wall,is an old stone water trough, which my dogs thought was FAB! and they dived in for a slurp and a paddle.

Follow the stone wall on your right, up the incline and head towards the iron kissing gate at the top, go through this and you are now on the footpath that runs around the edge of Gloddaeth Woods, now known as Coed Gaer.

A little further up, on the right you will see a black & white house, this was the laundry house for Gloddaeth Hall (now St.David's College) and although it looks Tudor, it is in fact Victorian. Carrying on along the path, you will come to one of the entrances to St.David's College (formerly Gloddaeth Hall) parts of the building date back to 1584 and was for 500 years, the residence of the Mostyn's. The motto of the family is "Heb Dduw, he ddim, Duw a digon" which apparently translates to "Without God, without all ; God and plenty." Sadly the house and grounds are no longer open to the public.

The old stone wall that runs along the outside of the college has been witness to many a tryst between local lads and lasses.

In the woods on your left you will see, covered in ivy, a tower, this was the water tower that supplied Gloddaeth Hall and held spring water before the Hall was connected to Llandudno's water mains in the 1880's.

Moving on, at the end of the path you will come across another gate at the end, go through the gate and out into an open field. Keep to the left following the line of the woods til you reach another gate, that will take you into Gloddaeth Woods, the variety of flora in here is wonderful at this time of year.

At the end of this path you will reach the open grassland of Nant-Y-Gamar, so through yet another gate and from here you can either go straight up the hill toward Hen Dwr or around to the right towards the rocky limestone outcrop that looks out over Craigside , you can quite clearly see Villa Marina (Condover House) in the background, which was built by Birmingham architect Harry W.Weedon in approx.1936 and the Little Orme. It was on top of this hill that we (Craig, my OH and myself) sat and had our lunch in the blazing sun, wafted by a gentle breeze, and discussed where exactly we thought My Grandmother's Chair was. Craig had several ideas as there were plenty of rocky outcrops to choose from and also a couple of dips in the grassland in front of us. I however, wandered around the back of Hen Dwr to discover what I thought was MY version of MGC, a wooden bench situated right at the top lol :oD

The views from up here are absolutely out of this world, and on a clear & sunny day everything stands out in all its glorious, natural beauty. The sky was the brightest blue with only the occasional wisp of white cloud, whilst the Little Orme stood out proudly in its coat of beiges, browns, greys and vivid greens surrounded by the deep blue of the sea.

On this, towards the sea is a limestone ledge which i spent a fair bit of time trying to leap around like a mountain goat in my quest, and found that below this rests My Grandmother's Chair , hidden away from prying eyes. This is the PROOF !!! The views as you sit on the chair are superb, you can see both Ormes and have a clear view of the North Shore, Llandudno and its Pier.

Heading back towards the top of the rocky Limestone outcrop you should be able to eventually see Hen Dwr, which has a tower like structure to the far side. This was originally a windmill and was built for Sir Roger Mostyn in the first half of the 17th century, the mill house that was attached to the windmill was demolished when the tower was renovated. Head towards the house and you will find the roadway that will take you back towards the tarmac road of Nant-Y-Gamar.

Confusingly there are two buildings named Nantygamar, and I took the one mentioned in my book as Nantygamar Farm to be the one closest to Hafod-y-Bryn, this farm dates from 1870 and was originally known as Quarry Cottage, as the earlier residents worked the quarries near by.

Further on down the road on your right, you will see two more stone structures, these two lime kilns date from the early 18th century. The signs of past quarrying can also be seen. Work at these quarries started around the middle of the 19th century and continued until 1953.

Moving on you will reach Nantygamar Cottage, parts of which date to around the 1850's and also Tegfryn, which started life as an army hut in Kinmel Camp near Prestatyn. Tegfryn was moved, which saved the building ,as the other huts at Kinmel were smashed and burnt by Canadian troops, when they mutinied and rioted in 1919, and erected here in about 1920.

Just before the junction of Nant-y-Gamar,Tan-y-Bryn and Bodafon Road crossroads, there is on the right set into an old stone wall a beautiful wrought iron gate, blink and you'll miss it as its already being claimed by the ivy. Is this an old forgotten back route into Tan-y-Bryn ? I wonder...

Past the gate you come to a row of cottages on your left. These are Quinta, Rose Cottage and Trevena and were converted from a Coach house, stables and grooms dwelling that were built near the end of the 19th century by Charlton Hall, but more from him shortly.

Turn left at the crossroads and immediately right, on the corner is Bryn Gwynedd, i've not managed to find anything out about this building yet but it does have a rather interesting plaque on the front. A short walk on from there you will reach Tan-y-Bryn which was originally run as a boys school by Charles Felix Visnier Hall. Charles Hall was actively involved in the research, exploration and mapping out of the legendary lost lands of Llys Helig. At the entrance to the drive, one of the pillars has a plaque in memory of the old Tan-y-Bryn boys.

Amble gently down the road back towards Lady Forester's, to the gates and gardens of Rapallo House, a beautiful black & white building, which for more than 60 years was the site for Llandudno's local museum ( until the museum was moved to Gloddaeth Street in November 1995 ). Started by Francis E.Chardon, who was apparently a enthusiastic collector by all accounts, he left his home and entire contents to Llandudno Town when he died aged 60,in 1925. "Rapallo" was the maiden name of his mother after who, the house is named. Sadly this building too is no longer available for members of the public to view.

My partner and I, not forgetting our two dogs, were much relieved to reach the "ole Mint Imperial" ( my aging white Peugeout ) to collapse in various heaps as we recovered before setting off for home. It was a wonderful walk and one no doubt I shall repeat again as the scenary constantly changes and the views I never tire of, there is always something new to see.

And so ended my quest for My Grandmother's Chair.

  
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 14, 2011, 10:38:39 PM
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J'know I didn't say earlier but when I was walking up the mountain today I could see a woman walking towards me on crutches and I thought "your havin a laff lady, what kind of a person walks up and down a 1 in 4 hill on crutches for gods sake, tut tut" as she got closer I realised she had those power walking stick thingys.  :roll:

My other half uses those (cheap on Ebay) and I always wonder where the skis have gone!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 14, 2011, 10:48:47 PM
I honestly think if I was to use them I would break my neck  :roll:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 14, 2011, 10:53:15 PM
they seem to help her in keeping up with me to some extent, although I still have to wait for her to catch up  :laugh: I found using one of them a big help when we had all that ice on the pavements!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 15, 2011, 11:56:52 AM
I'm going to walk round the cycle path today all the way to town.  If by then I have lost all feeling in my legs I may even go round the Orme. I was going to get the bus over to Aber and go up to the falls but I woke up this morning and realised in this weather I'd have to have a death wish.   ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Paddy on February 15, 2011, 01:53:31 PM
Just over 13 miles if you manage it Pendragon. Enjoy.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 15, 2011, 03:41:15 PM
Thanks for that Trojan-- Yes I do remember RetroRoxxme, her dog was attacked and she posted warnings about it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 15, 2011, 04:16:27 PM
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Just over 13 miles if you manage it Pendragon. Enjoy.
Ha ha needless to say I didn't manage it.  I walked all the way to west shore and then turned back.  That was far enough for me Paddy. :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 15, 2011, 05:30:29 PM
Always make sure to have a good cafe as a destination for a walk - gives you something to look forward to at the end of the walk!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on February 15, 2011, 05:31:54 PM
I've done that walk in reverse, but tend to be a fair weather walker - Summer months only!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 15, 2011, 06:30:24 PM
Had a really nice walk today from Conwy, all the way along the cycle path to West Shore.  I spoke to two lads clearing the ivy on the "turret toilets"  I asked if they were going to repair the broken drain pipe at the side and was assured there's another work force coming soon to carry out the work.
I took a photo of the tunnel under the road.  It seems to serve no purpose at all to be honest.  It has no access doors for maintenance and is full of rubbish, even a cycle helmet.  I wonder if it belongs to the scooter tossed over the wall featured in my earlier post?
As I approached Llandudno there was sign "beware of Golfers" I had to laugh, as I imagined some rabid middle aged man, frothing at the mouth, wearing a pringle jumper , jumping out from the bushes wielding a club.  :o. but then due to throwing Socs' ball incessantly along the path I now had one arm like Popeye so I would have put up a good fight  ;)
I also took a photo of what we as kids used to call sleeping beauty mountain, if you look at the silhouette you can see her head, nose, boobs and skirt outlined on the edge of the mountain.  That's what my Dad used to tell us anyway but then for years I truly believed a haggis was a bird with one leg longer than the other enabling it to run round the mountain faster.  
I took a picture of a shelter on Deganwy beach, it could do with a lick of paint but I have to admit I much prefer the old versions to the anti vandal painted, breeze block ones the council erect nowadays.  
The Orme looked really impressive in the distance but it was then that I decided it was a bit too far, not to mention ambitious to even think of tackling the hike around it today.  Who am I kidding? It's a bit too ambitious to think I'll tackle it tomorrow either.
On my arrival back in Conwy I took the photo of the old stables (I think they're stables) tucked round the back of the bakery just up the road from the Legion.  Lovely building I thought.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 15, 2011, 06:35:33 PM
Bah! Nice walk and pics, Angie, but your last pic I had saved up myself as a 'where is it?' quiz question!  :rage:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 15, 2011, 06:38:53 PM
Dave, you can still use that pic we'll pretend we don't know  :D

Angie, Fester is right about your writing, it's great to read and the pics are good two, perhaps you could do some sort of guide book for the area, just a thought!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 15, 2011, 06:43:26 PM
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Bah! Nice walk and pics, Angie, but your last pic I had saved up myself as a 'where is it?' quiz question!  :rage:
Your kidding me!  It would have been the only quiz question I could have got correct.  I've all but given up on that topic now.  I do remember you saying some weeks ago (Fester is my witness) that you were going to put an easy question on there especially for me but it has yet to surface Mr Man.  :roll:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 15, 2011, 06:45:13 PM
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Angie, Fester is right about your writing, it's great to read and the pics are good two, perhaps you could do some sort of guide book for the area, just a thought!
I can see it now....The 'Pendragon© Guide To Conwy'.

What Conwy has always lacked (besides a Pendragon Guide) is a street by street history, and that's amazing for the most historic town in the area. Llandudno has Queen of the Welsh Resorts and Colwyn Bay has Colwyn Bay: Its Origin & Growth but Conwy has nothing comparable....
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 15, 2011, 06:46:11 PM
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I do remember you saying some weeks ago (Fester is my witness) that you were going to put an easy question on there especially for me but it has yet to surface Mr Man.  :roll:
Did I say that? I'll do one for you right now....
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 15, 2011, 07:03:26 PM
I've walked from the North Shore, then along the cycle track but only got as far as Deganwy and my feet were killing me after the walk back, so well done.
We don't walk in Birmingham.

Stopped to look in the antique shops in Deganwy, why are there none in Llandudno?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 15, 2011, 07:13:40 PM
Your havin a laff Brumbob there's loads of antiques in Llandudno.  Maybe not in the shops though as they tend to congregate on the prom  ;D

 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 15, 2011, 07:31:36 PM
where on earth did you find that piccy of me and 'er indoors  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 15, 2011, 07:32:51 PM
you never said Angie, did you walk back?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 15, 2011, 07:47:43 PM
where on earth did you find that piccy of me and 'er indoors  Shocked

Mingers.com  _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 15, 2011, 11:56:13 PM
Yes I walked back Bob.  No idea how far it was.  Took me over 3 hrs mind.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 17, 2011, 12:04:16 PM
Yesterday we had another walk to the summit of the Little Orme, it's not too hard to get up there and the views are great!

 looking towards Rhos on Sea
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f295/AustinRover/Feb%202011/DSCF1405.jpg)

we saw and heard this Raven
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f295/AustinRover/Feb%202011/DSCF1401-1.jpg)

near the summit on these rocks is a small plaque
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f295/AustinRover/Feb%202011/DSCF1410.jpg)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f295/AustinRover/Feb%202011/DSCF1411.jpg)

and the best view of all
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f295/AustinRover/Feb%202011/DSCF1407.jpg)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 17, 2011, 12:25:40 PM
Some good pics, and a nice day for a walk up there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 17, 2011, 07:22:42 PM
GREAT pictures Andy ...   By the way, did you see The One Show on BBC tonight? 

They had a tame starling (called Arnie interestingly) ... and a lot of tame starling friends.

If you didn't see it,  look it up on BBC iPlayer .... you will LOVE it.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 07:27:00 PM
I started reading a book last night called "Famous Welsh Battles" by Philip Warner.  I read about Llewelyn ap Iorwerth and how he had rebuilt Deganwy castle in 1213 after it had been destroyed as part of the "scorched earth policy" due to threats from King John.  Apparently it 's said that Llewelyn imprisoned one of his sons in the tower at Deganwy.  When Llewelyn died in 1240, the English were advancing and arrived in 1245 expecting to conquer the castle once again, however Llewelyns sons were not as brave as their father and in anticipation of the English army and their imminent defeat they had demolished the castle.  The English on arrival in Deganwy were forced to shiver in tents.
The English, under the reign of Henry III rebuilt the castle between 1245/54 but it was never completed.
The Welsh Prince Llewelyn ap Gryffydd (ap means son of) was growing in popularity and in 1263 he recaptured the castle and consequently demolished it again.  These are the ruins visible today.  It is also said that the stones were plundered and used in the construction of Conwy Castle.
I have never been up there before.  To be honest I didn't think there was much to see but my visit was made all the more interesting having read the story.  I took photos of the gatehouse, remains of the towers and the formidable front elevation over the rock and sheer cliff face.  It must have been one hellova sight to behold for an invading army especially if they were as knackered as I was once they got up there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 08:13:40 PM
Here are some random photos taken today.  The first is All Saints Church in Deganwy.  I think this is a beautiful church.  The church was built as a memorial church by Lady Augusta Mostyn designed by John Douglas of Chester with a fantastic view of the Conwy estuary.
The second is a small cave I found down a pit near the Castle.  Probably used by sheep.  Looks too uniform to be natural though.  Could have been the Castle fridge maybe.
The third is a hole I discovered in the ruined wall.  It's unusual because it seems to be there on purpose.  Notice the white cement clumps at the back, the same cement used for the walls.  I'm no Tony Robinson but I wonder if it was an ancient safe.  Imagine the enemy rising over the hill, you need to hide the valuables and gold, where better than to hide them in one of the walls then block up the void with stones.  No swag in there today I'm afraid.  :o
The fourth is some wild flowers I noticed poking up from the flattened ferns.  I have not a clue when it comes to their proper names as I'm no Percy Thrower either I'm afraid.  Nemesis you'll know.  Y'know there's something really satisfying about walking on ferns, it's like the crunching sound of hundreds of crisp packets under your feet.  I was careful not to trample the wild flowers I promise  :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 17, 2011, 08:32:56 PM
The pit may well be an ''oubliette'' .... which translates roughly from ancient French as 'Forgotten'

It was basically a deep, narrow pit (with an iron grill over the top) where they would throw prisoners which they couldn't be bothered releasing, nor had they decided to sentence them.
So, they chucked you down a hole ... and you were ''forgotten''
Basically you were left to starve to death in abject misery.   (A bit like Wetherspoons in Rhyl on a rainy day)

Most Oubliettes were inside castle walls though.   So maybe not.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 08:36:32 PM
Looking at the terrain and the location of the towers Fester, the pit was more than likely within the walls.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 17, 2011, 08:52:33 PM
There's a pit at Deganwy Castle, that was once the castle dungeon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on February 17, 2011, 09:21:20 PM
The flowers look like crocus and I think that most of the leaves are unrelated to the flowers.

Looking at the pic again you can see 3 crocus leaves, they are the long thin ones with a stripe.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 09:52:08 PM
What do you mean by "unrelated to the flowers?"  I don't understand.I know naff all about flowers I'm afraid.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 17, 2011, 10:08:32 PM
there are two plants, one the crocus with the flower and the thin striped leaves and the other with fatter leaves is a totally unrelated plant
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 17, 2011, 10:08:53 PM
Think Stan means that the leaves don't look to be joined to the flower stems because of the ground cover plants. They look like crocus to me too, the leaves are striped as well.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 17, 2011, 10:11:24 PM
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GREAT pictures Andy ...   By the way, did you see The One Show on BBC tonight? 

They had a tame starling (called Arnie interestingly) ... and a lot of tame starling friends.

If you didn't see it,  look it up on BBC iPlayer .... you will LOVE it.



I've just watched it on iplayer and I thought where are the birds? then I realised I was watching last nights progamme  :rage:  _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 10:12:08 PM
Sorry mostly today I'm doing Dim  ???  I understand now, you mean the leaves don't belong to the flowers.........got it
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 17, 2011, 11:52:56 PM
I really must take a walk up the Vardre next time I'm up that way, is All Saints Church car park the best place to access it?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 11:59:27 PM
Yes the path starts at the car park.  It's a nice walk Bob and you can see for miles once at the top.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 18, 2011, 06:12:25 AM
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Yes the path starts at the car park.  It's a nice walk Bob and you can see for miles once at the top.

How do you know what Bob's eyesight is like Pen D?  ???
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 18, 2011, 06:51:08 PM
Being the enlightened employer that I am, I gave myself the day off today and The Festers set off round to Anglesey for a days exploring.

We kind of got a bit lost, but Red Wharf Bay sounded nice so we dropped by for a walk around.
Anyway, its rubbish, and there is nothing to do or see and you can't actually walk anywhere...

So, we headed through Beaumaris to Penmon,  which I have seen described on this thread before.
We parked up near the sea, and I dragged my arthritic knees up to the priory, and St Seriols church.
I took pictures inside of the 10th century crosses, and the stained glass windows etc... and lit a candle for Aunt who is gravely ill at the moment.
I won't bother to post the pictures (unless asked) because either Dave or Hugo posted far superior ones a few weeks ago.

Feeling brave, and after consulting my knees, we headed further up the road, and kept walking until we encountered Puffin Island lighthouse.
We had a little stroll around, took a few pictures... then headed back to the car.

Now, all this walking is OK, but you have to plan things better than we did.  You see there were no cafes or suchlike open, and therefore nowhere dignified to take a leak.
So, we drove into Beaumaris, did the necessary and then sat on the pier to polish off the flask and the sandwiches.

Any more walking will need to be better planned, or I must have a colostomy bag fitted.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 18, 2011, 07:06:56 PM
Was the Red Boat Cafe not open?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 18, 2011, 09:34:08 PM
Glad that you finally made it to Penmon Fester, it's quite tranquil there especially by  St Seiriol's well.  Hope that the candle helps with your concern for your Aunt.
I'd like to see your photos as it's an area I like very much.
I know exactly how you feel about nowhere dignified to take a leak as I was walking along the disused railway track in Dyserth on Tuesday with a retirement group and that was the same. Only a quick dash into a pub saved my blushes.    I just couldn't face walking past Dyserth waterfalls as that would have finished me off!!   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 18, 2011, 10:38:13 PM
Beaumaris is a lovely place.  Excellent gift shops.  Did you go in the Old Gaol.  That is well worth a look.  A few years ago  you would get a pair of head phones and a tape recorder which enabled you to have a guided tour.  We went last year and were told they no longer supplied them.  A girl who worked there was very informed and explained everything we wanted to know.  I notice that she was the only one walking round and so in the height of the summer I doubt she's have chance to talk.
We used to go Penmon as kids, school trips to the lighthouse. Picnics with the family.  I remember it as being really windy there too.  Newborough beach is nice, have you been there?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 18, 2011, 11:30:37 PM
Today Socs and I went on the bus over to Penmaenmawr.  We were off to meet Ali Gugs one of my closest friends and go up the mountain to see if we could find the world war II plane crash site.  
We decided to begin our walk at Plas Mawr once a large hall within landscaped gardens, home of the Darbyshire family.  The house was demolished and the once landscaped gardens left to overgrow when the last of the family left.  Now all that remains are the footings which present landscapers have preserved.  (pic 1)  These woods have been, as much as possible  kept in their original state.  All the old pathways though over grown when I was a kid remain.
Darby's is a fantastic place.  We used to play in these woods 30yrs ago.  Making dens and looking for the hidden cellar said to be full of wine.  We used to climb the Heaven tree (pic 2) the most beautiful tree I've ever seen.  From certain vantage points it looks like an angel with her body leaning into the wind. (Titanic style) My god I sound like a tree hugger  :o   
Then there's the umbrella.  We used to clamber up on top of this and another 2 kids would turn it round it only ever went really slowly.  As kids we used to camp out in Darby's and at night we'd climb on the huge metal umbrella and look at the stars. (pic 3)  We were now heading out of the Plas Mawr park passed the carved Stone Hand on the right,(pic 4) upwards to the Penmaenan woods.  I threw another pic of the Heaven Tree at the bottom, it looks straight out of a painting.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 19, 2011, 12:04:23 AM
As we walked up beside the little stream we soon entered Penmaenan woods.  There was the old fallen tree trunk we used to sit on.  Another 30 years had passed and there it was still holding out at the bottom of the woods (pic 4)
This is "Our Nains Chair" (pic 1) so called because?.................well because you have a "Grandmothers Chair" and I hate missing out so we in Pen now have a welsh "Nains Chair."  I'm happy with that, it was my walk, I'm telling the story: The End.  
Further up we passed the old Quarry gate. No longer in use.  (pic 2) We headed towards a tree that holds a very special memory for me.  Y'see it's where when I was 8, I married Kevin Roberts.  We stood under the bow of the tree and Josephine Jones said the words and married us. (pic 3)  Our friends threw fox gloves as confetti.  Happy memories.  Kev and I still laugh about it now. Out of the woods heading up to the old  quarry and the site of the 1901 Old Mill as we used to call it.

Got a little muddled with the pics sorry.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 19, 2011, 12:05:05 AM
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Newborough beach is nice, have you been there?
It's a lovely walk around Llanddwyn Island  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 19, 2011, 01:04:39 AM
First of all I want to show you "chipping Mountain" (pic 1) I don't know if you can appreciate the steepness and height of this hill.  As kids we would collect corrugated tin sheeting and curl up the front of it, hold on, get yer mate on the back and down you would hurtle with only the cast iron gate or the fence at the bottom to bring you to an abrupt, sometimes painful halt.  Then we'd leg it back to the top and take it turns to go again. I would never risk it now!  Even If I did I'd only get the one chance as I wouldn't be able to run back up  the chipping mountain without suffering a cardiac arrest.
The Red Mill so named for its red brick structure is situated at the lower part of the quarry  (pic 2) These buildings were always dangerous and we didn't venture in them very often.  The sheds across to the right were our haunts.
As you head on the old path round toward Llanfair, if you look up you can see the remains of ancient walls and pathways  (pic3) belonging to the Briton Fortress of Braich Y Dinas (the largest of it kind in Britain at the time) I am going to write about this fortress in full when I get chance. Its fascinating you can see as you walk the remains of buildings.  A fantastic view over Penmaenmawr from the top of the path. (pic 4) It's said that Llewelyn and his men made their final stand amongst the ruins of the fortress and tried to build it up again at one time. This has never been proved though. You know it's funny but I always remember the story of Helygs Castle and how it fell into the sea.  It must have seemed like that to the people living here,(pic 5)  you can see in the sea below huge stones that look like they've fallen down the mountain and into the sea.  We went upward again onto the old quarry truck tracks.  By now we were tired.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 19, 2011, 01:33:13 AM
This is the huge Alter stone.  It looks like its been purposely cut from the rock. (pic 1) You can actually lie on the stone and its spookily flat.  It was also too far off the path to get a closer look today.  We managed to climb and I mean climb, clinging to the heather as we took one small step after another up to the higher level and towards another large winch structure (pic 2) as you walk under the huge wooden hoist you enter a clearing which is absolutely breathe taking.  The huge rock face an expanse of multi coloured solid jagged rock (pic 3)  It was on this level I expected to see the plane but it wasn't to be found.  I did however find a distinctive clearing amongst the thick heather where I remember the plane situated (pic 4)  By this time we'd walked 3 miles up hill.  How do I know because I've got an app on my phone and it tracks your position by GPS.  It was now dawning on us that if we didn't go up yet another level we'd have to decent down the way we came up and that was out of the question (pic5)  So after a short "catch our breathe" rest we began to climb again................  
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 19, 2011, 01:40:10 AM
This little hut was half way up the climb to the next point (pic1)  I had to laugh when Ali reached there before me and stuck his head out of the window, silly grin on his face and shouted in a stupid voice "cup of teeee"  In fact I was laughing so much I couldn't start climbing again.  he's funny as you like. Love him to bits.  
At the top there was still more old sheds I took a photo from the window over Llanfair towards the sea.  Now this photo proves this is Gods country (pic 2)
This is interesting as this tunnel looks like it has been cut out from the rock hundreds of years ago (pic 3) but look how the stones have been shaped round the entrance.  It was a dull day and so my pics are not as clear as I had hoped (Dave I'll drag you up there on day, you'll do these sights justice)
To our utter despair Ali and I realised once again we had to walk up further again but as we turned the corner for the final last leg of our by now nearly 4 mile trek,  though thankfully not as the Romans did.  
We came to a clearing and there were the wild ponies in what I can only describe as one of the most perfect settings I've ever witnessed. (pic 4)  Counting around 8 ponies gathered on a small grass clearing with a small pond with reeds in it. Perfect and well worth the climb.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 19, 2011, 02:21:59 AM
You have to follow the old path round to your right, if you walk any further you'll be at the top of the crater where they still collect granite.  An awesome sight from the edge.  By now my battery was going flat.  I had to take this photo of Ali and the huge Tetra truck.  We've all got similar photos from when we were kids.  Childish but fun. (pic 1)  We were now to our relief on the way down.  I don't know what a dowty road is?  All in all it was a 7 mile walk by the time we got to Alis for a cup of coffee and toast.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 19, 2011, 08:21:55 AM
Looks like a great walk, probably your best yet! Lots of hidden places, I love that lake with the horses around it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 19, 2011, 10:37:00 AM
If you want to go Dave I'l take you.  I want to go up there again and take more pics of the ruins.  I played up there as a kid and never really took any notice.  It rivals Deganwy.  Look at this tower in the rock.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on February 19, 2011, 10:42:50 AM
As our grandson says "that's awesome" Angie - bring on the next installment.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 19, 2011, 10:49:38 AM
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If you want to go Dave I'l take you.  I want to go up there again and take more pics of the ruins.  I played up there as a kid and never really took any notice.  It rivals Deganwy.  Look at this tower in the rock.
Yes, that would be interesting. Looks to be a great place for photography.

When I was in Pen last Saturday, I had a quick look round the Plas Mawr park you went through and liked the wildlife pond that's at one end.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 19, 2011, 12:33:33 PM
Angie, you must have legs like Xena with all this walking  ;D

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 19, 2011, 12:39:40 PM
Ew that's horrid Bob.  I've never understood women body builders.  It's just not a good look  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 19, 2011, 02:50:00 PM
Makes your eyes water !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 19, 2011, 03:52:44 PM
Some great photos there Angie and it must be quite a hike getting up there to see those stunning views.  Years ago they had one day in the year when the quarry was open to the public and people would be taken up to the top of the quarry and the money raised was then donated to charity.
Sadly that stopped some years ago as I'd have like to have gone up there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 05:21:47 PM
There are public footpaths all over the Quarry Mountain.  The walk we did would have been much easier had we approached it from the Llanfair side.  We can organise a walk up there maybe.  
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 09:04:50 PM
Today Socs and I went 5 miles round Conwy mountain.  As soon as we walked up the first hill we saw the wild ponies. (pic 1) I don't think they're the ones we saw in Llanfair.  The ones in Llanfair seemed in better condition to the ones I saw today.  I enlarged this picture so you can see the marks on these ponies (pic 2)  There was a white one that looked like is had mange.  Big bald patches on it's back.  It could just be that the pony was old.
I wonder how many ponies in total are up the mountain?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 21, 2011, 09:31:11 PM
Last time I saw the wild horses was when I walked up Tal-y-Fan. They seemed quite timid and we couldn't get very close to them before they galloped away.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 21, 2011, 09:36:31 PM
Coming back to Penmaen Mawr, it amazes me just how much granite has been blasted from the top of the mountain.

Compare the old B&W view from Haulfre Gardens to the recent colour one.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 10:18:26 PM
We carried on up the hill and soon passed the Caer Seion hill fort then on up and over the hill.  Socs was doing my head in with her ball on a rope, constantly wanting me to throw it.  I don't know where that dog gets her energy from maybe it should be me eating the dog biscuits?  ;D   I had an idea, if I threw her ball down the path she'd have to run back up the hill and that in turn would make her tired.  So that's exactly what I did.  It was a good plan until the ball bounced off a rock and landed in the gorse  :roll:  She stood at the bottom of the hill looking at me, then into the gorse and back at me.  So guilt ridden, back down the hill I went to fetch her ball from the gorse. It served me right but with my ankles stabbed to bits, I managed to get it in the end.
I think this is one of the sites where people learn to rock climb.  It's not that high but it's very steep (pic 1)  As we passed over the top I noticed some buildings on the side of the mountain.  They looked similar to the quarry buildings over in Pen but I don't know what they were for maybe someone on the forum will.(pic 2/3)   as I looked down from here I could see what looked like old farm buildings and an old reservoir.  I had to go down there. (pic 4)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 10:23:10 PM
yes your right Trojan theres a hellova difference.  I don't think they still blast up there today certainly not on the scale they did when I was a kid. We could hear them blasting at play time in Pencae. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 10:39:23 PM
As I came round the hill it was obvious the sheep path through the ferns and  down to the old reservoir were far too steep for us to tackle so we had to go the long way round.  I lost sight of the target when we walked round the first hill.  We came back round the other side which took a lot longer than I had anticipated to be honest.  We got to the reservoir and something was different, this seemed to be larger with more trees round it (pic 1/2)  lovely views from there too.  It's hidden from the road.  It would make for a lovely picnic with the fallen tree at the back.
Again does anyone know what these building are?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 10:48:35 PM
I sat by the reservoir and had a rest, then we followed the path back towards Conwy.  I found the original reservoir further along.  I think they were reservoirs?  I took photos but I was glad I'd overshot it and stumbled across the other as it was much more picturesque. (pic 1/2)  Another fantastic view over Conwy. (pic 3)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 10:54:25 PM
We came down the mountain and over the stile by the caravan park and walked back towards the White House.  From the road I noticed the old buildings in the Park Hall hotel.  So I walked up the path and asked if I could take some photos.  The buildings are probably not as old as they look.  They look the part though, I don't think anyone lives in them? Look at this press.  A columbian Eagle sits on the top with fish on the sides.  A work of art.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 21, 2011, 10:54:40 PM
The buildings.....they could be old quarry buildings like the Victorian ones above Pen..
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 21, 2011, 10:55:11 PM
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Coming back to Penmaen Mawr, it amazes me just how much granite has been blasted from the top of the mountain.

Compare the old B&W view from Haulfre Gardens to the recent colour one.
Not only that, they've also blasted away the houses and Haulfre Gardens  :laugh:

nice photos Angie
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 11:03:04 PM
Thanks Bob  :-*
Trojan I noticed they were like the ones in Pen.  Was that quarry closed in favour of the one in Pen then?  What was the stone, was it granite?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 21, 2011, 11:04:33 PM
Yes Granite. Most of the cobbled streets of Lancashire was quarried in Pen

The granite was lowered from the quarry by self-acting inclines to the 3 ft (914 mm) gauge tramway which ran to jetties from where the setts were loaded into ships. After 1848 the majority of the quarry output was sent by main-line rail, although the quarry and its internal narrow gauge railway continued to thrive through the nineteenth century.

Have you seen the remains of the old steam loco Penmaen built in 1878?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 21, 2011, 11:19:47 PM
No I haven't, I must have missed it?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 22, 2011, 12:34:56 AM
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No I haven't, I must have missed it?

It's a DeWinton - built in Caernarfon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Winton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Winton)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 22, 2011, 12:38:40 AM
I'll have a look next time I go up.   *&(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 22, 2011, 12:51:20 AM
Rumour has it that it was to be donated to a railway museum and 'airlifted' off the mountain by a RAF helicopter.

However, this was deemed to be too dangerous.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 22, 2011, 12:32:29 PM
Socs goes home in an hour.  It won't be the same going for a walk without her.  How will I write an interesting story about my journey from Spar and Georges.  Dave get your walking boots on matey were "ganning oot"
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 23, 2011, 09:14:54 AM
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Dave get your walking boots on matey were "ganning oot"
:o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 23, 2011, 11:22:08 AM
I phoned my Dad this morning and in a couple of weeks were going up the old disused Llanfair quarry.  Apparently he says there's an old steam powered engine up there still in the shed, can't wait to see that.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on February 23, 2011, 04:34:27 PM
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I phoned my Dad this morning and in a couple of weeks were going up the old disused Llanfair quarry.  Apparently he says there's an old steam powered engine up there still in the shed, can't wait to see that.

Can't wait to see your pics!  X:((
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 24, 2011, 04:48:54 PM
It was a dry sunny day so I thought I'd have a walk on the Great Orme. I decided to walk along the beach to the gunsite first of all as I hadn't done that for about 50 years!  Keeping a constant eye on the incoming tide I walked along the sand and over the rocks and near the cliffs. The first thing I came to was a tunnel under the Marine Drive but don't know what purpose it was for. It had steps going up at one time but they have long since gone and I couldn't see inside it.   St Petrocks was nearby with it's disused Summer House what a beautiful location and such a waste of a unique property.   Just around the corner were the posh houses on the Marine Drive and a little further on were the ruins of the Bishop's Palace. It's hard to imagine but when the Palace was built 700 years ago it was one mile inland from the sea.  With the coastal erosion I could see, the ruins won't be there in another 700 years.
The cliffs got higher the further you went and the erosion problem was evident everywhere.
I came across the tower that Frank Tyldesley built.  In it's heyday there was a walkway from the garden and a hydraulic lift down to the beach. Frank even had a path cleared through the rocks for his boat, but sadly the tower has been neglected.  As I approached the Gunsite I could see the three lookout buildings all tilting now in the direction of the sea and were occupied by a couple of men who were camping inside.  The concrete steps from the Gunsite had gone so I made my way up to the Gunsite and on my way up could see the evidence of a serious landslip to come.  Then it was up to the Rest and be Thankful for a coffee and piece of chocolate cake after passing another lookout place on the way.   From there it was over the limestone pavements to the summit and then testing my knees out as I walked down the tramtrack. The house that was hit by the car this Winter was looking worse.  I had the pleasure of meeting the Medz and his wife and having a having a chat while admiring the wonderful views from his house and then it was time to head for the West Shore via Haulfre Gardens. I'm glad I did the walk that way but won't be doing it again in a hurry!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 24, 2011, 04:56:55 PM
Great Orme walk 24th Feb 2011
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 24, 2011, 05:04:06 PM
Great Orme walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 24, 2011, 05:07:04 PM
Great Orme walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 24, 2011, 05:10:15 PM
Great Orme walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 24, 2011, 07:51:47 PM
Super pics Hugo--- hope I'm nowhere in the vicinity when that lot comes tumbling down!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on February 24, 2011, 11:28:22 PM
 $cool$ Hugo
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on February 25, 2011, 08:54:08 AM
The lookout posts have certainly slumped a lot in the past 20 years.  I doubt they'll make it anywhere near another 700...
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Quiggs on February 25, 2011, 10:18:36 AM
Thanks for that Hugo,    it brought back a lot of memories, as I spent my youth living on the Gunsite after the War. Some of the happiest days of my life with the freedom to roam on the Orme, fishing on the shore, raking for crabs under the rocks, collecting Periwinkles, Seagulls eggs on the cliffs, snaring Rabbits for Sunday dinner. The kids of today miss so much being cocooned from all kinds of fun and risk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 25, 2011, 10:29:11 AM
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It was a dry sunny day so I thought I'd have a walk on the Great Orme. I decided to walk along the beach to the gunsite first of all as I hadn't done that for about 50 years!
What a good idea, I've never done that yet. Will give it a go soon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 25, 2011, 01:14:57 PM
It was an interesting walk for me with the memories flooding back but you had to be careful how you walked over the rocks.  A lot of erosion has gone on since I last did this part of the walk to the gunsite some steps led to nowhere now and also some unusual stones that must have a history but what purpose?
Hundreds of Oystercatchers about but I would have needed one of Dave's cameras to capture them by the waterside.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 25, 2011, 02:12:27 PM
Great Orme walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 26, 2011, 10:28:03 AM
Those photos are brilliant Hugo.  I have to confess I've been on the Orme, been to the gun sites, the elephant cave and walked round the copper mines.  I've even been on the cable cars although I will never go on them again.  Kids think it's funny to rock the cars..............it's not funny at all! 
Now I realise after reading your post, there's a lot more there I have never seen.  So I intend to go and have a wander within the next couple of weeks.  Is it dangerous to walk round the rocks Hugo?  I mean will I get cut off by the tide? 
I've never been on the little Orme either and having seen Andy's photos it looks interesting up there too.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 26, 2011, 11:22:27 AM
Last week I took some photos of the coach houses in the Park Hall, Conwy grounds.  While there I noticed an old press.  I remember thinking how beautiful it was with the bald eagle and fish embellishments.  Out of interest I did a bit of research.  To  my amazement it turned out to be a rare Colombian Press first built in 1813 by George E. Clymer, . "It was designed to allow a whole newspaper page to be printed in a single pull. The press worked by a lever system, It is sometimes, incorrectly, referred to as the 'Eagle' press due to the characteristic bald eagle counterweight which usually sits on the top lever."
Apparently these presses are in high demand in America and worth in excess of £10,000 in pristine condition.  The bald Eagle counterweight alone was sold in Christies, London in 2001 for $3,500. 
I didn't want to do a write up on the press until I had first had a word with the Trudy the owner.  Just in case in the middle of the night a van turned up and the press was nicked, especially as it would be my fault having featured it on my earlier post.  The fascinating point to mention is the rattle snakes entwined on the side of the press which signify the fact this is in fact an original.  Later ones were built in the UK but without the rattle snakes.

written by V. C. N. Blight CBE and taken from his publication entitled ‘The Colombian Press’, first published in 1962.

In the United Kingdom most of the embellishments were retained – the New South Wales Government Printing Office Colombian, built in London in 1849, has them all except the rattlesnake – but some manufacturers substituted a globe or a lion standing on a laurel wreath for the eagle.

Trudy is going to restore the press and sell it, with the proceeds going to much needed repairs on Park Hall.  The press has now been moved to a much safer location I'm pleased to say.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 26, 2011, 11:31:22 AM
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Just in case in the middle of the night a van turned up and the press was nicked
Who'd do a thing like that?! *phones up to cancel van hire for tonight*

Great find, Angie. Wonder how it found its way to Conwy - could there be any connection with the old R.E Jones printers on the Quay?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 26, 2011, 11:33:05 AM
A few more pics of the press.  Apparently most presses of this type were fixed to the floor.  The Colombian however had four sturdy legs.  It weighs a ton, not literally.  Trudy says it took four lads to move it to it's current location. I couldn't even turn it round.  So the picture of the badge is not that clear.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 26, 2011, 11:39:43 AM
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Just in case in the middle of the night a van turned up and the press was nicked
Who'd do a thing like that?! *phones up to cancel van hire for tonight*

Great find, Angie. Wonder how it found its way to Conwy - could there be any connection with the old R.E Jones printers on the Quay?
Ha ha I was tempted to offer her £20 and say it would make an unusual door stop. (only joking)
According to Trudy it was found in a pit in one of the stables/cottages with all removable parts laid beside it. It would be interesting to find out how it got there?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on February 26, 2011, 12:05:01 PM
On my last walk with Socs we went down to the beacons.  I was looking at some of Hugos pics on strange stones and remembered I'd taken this photo of a carved rock on the shore.  I'm no Tony Robinson but I reckon this is part of Llys Helyg   :o (if only)  it does look really old though doesn't it.  I wonder how it got down there?  My Dad says Mike Senior (I'd love to meet him) proved that Helygs Castle never existed.  I feel as disappointed as I did when I discovered Bedd Gelert was just a story conjured up by a local landlord to attract travelling Victorians to his pub.  The boat pictured is the Edward Birkbeck.  now moored next to the Grey Lady in Conwy.  It looks in dire need of repair too.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 27, 2011, 09:24:54 AM
Hi Angie, The walk along the coast to the Gunsite isn't dangerous at all but there is no path and sometimes you have to hop from one rock to another so you have to be careful where you go.
The sea does lap the bottom of the cliffs in places so I'd always go at a low tide and don't walk on wet rocks with seaweed as you could come a cropper as I nearly did. I soon came off that stretch!
The Little Orme walk is different as there are marked paths and on a high tide you may well see the seals around the Angel Bay area and the views are stunning from the top. It's a short walk and with little effort you are rewarded with great views and don't forget to take your camera there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 27, 2011, 09:47:02 AM
I enjoyed a nice walk yesterday starting from Porthmadog where we walked around the lagoon and watched the West Highland Railway train as it departed on it's journey to Caernarfon.  As we crossed over the bridge into Porthmadog we kept a lookout for the otters that swim around there but today unfortunately we didn't see any.   Along the harbour then to the quieter village of Borth Y Gest and then along the coast to Morfa Bychan.
There were stunning views looking back with the peaks of Cnicht and Moelwyn Mawr and Moelwyn Bach standing out. Across the Estuary we could see the woodland walks of Portmeirion and the peaks of the Southern Snowdonian mountains in the distance.
At Morfa Bychan we crossed the Golf Course and made our way up to the top of Moel Y Gest but the path up to it was just like a river flowing as a result of last night's rain.  At the top we were rewarded with panoramic views over Greenacres caravan park and most of the Llyn Peninsula.
Then it was a steep descent over a very muddy and slippy path down to Portmadog. One guy had a tumble and was covered in mud so it was a good job that he had a change of clothes handy because we were then off to a friend's house for a lovely meal and drinks.
We were lucky with the weather today, sunny spells but a cool wind blowin on the higher ground.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 27, 2011, 09:49:14 AM
Porthmadog walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 27, 2011, 09:50:55 AM
Porthmadog walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on February 27, 2011, 10:10:20 AM
The causeway shot is very evocative, Hugo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 27, 2011, 02:32:31 PM
Great pics, we used to live near Porthmadog so know that area well. in this pic you've captured Blanche and Merddin Emrys  D)
http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33.0;attach=3852 (http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33.0;attach=3852)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 27, 2011, 06:29:04 PM
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Great pics, we used to live near Porthmadog so know that area well. in this pic you've captured Blanche and Merddin Emrys  D)
http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33.0;attach=3852 (http://threetownsforum.co.uk/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33.0;attach=3852)

You're lucky to have lived in that beautiful area and now moved to another beautiful location.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 02, 2011, 09:41:40 PM
I had to get the ice off my car before I could drive to Capel Curig to start the walk up to Moel Siabod (2862 ft), but the weather for the rest of the day was perfect for walking.  We parked the car at Pont Cyfyng and crossed the bridge then followed a steep track uphill until we came to the dilapidated building near the style. It's quite a pull to there but the next bit along the disused track was easier and we carried on until we came to the ruins just below the water filled quarry. After a drink and a bite to eat we carried on and decided to take the direct route up the quarry face which took us about 45 minutes to climb. It's a steep scree slope and at times it's two steps forward and one back as the scree is so loose now due to erosion but we made it.   At the summit we finished off the rest of the food and drink and the Ravens were grateful for the morsels we gave them.   The views from this peak on a good day are stunning and today was no different.  An unusual cloud formation covered southern Snowdonia and only the peaks of the mountains were visible but my photos don't do it justice.  After about 30 minutes we made a quick decent down the path to Plas Y Brennin probably too quick because I had a nasty tumble on some ice but my only injury is a sore thumb, thank goodness.  From Plas Y Brennin we followed the River Llugwy as far as Pont Cyfyng and made our way back to the car and then back home. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 02, 2011, 09:46:25 PM
Moel Siabod
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 02, 2011, 09:49:28 PM
Moel Siabod
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 02, 2011, 09:54:11 PM
Moel Siabod
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 02, 2011, 10:06:53 PM
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Hi Angie, The walk along the coast to the Gunsite isn't dangerous at all but there is no path and sometimes you have to hop from one rock to another so you have to be careful where you go.
The sea does lap the bottom of the cliffs in places so I'd always go at a low tide and don't walk on wet rocks with seaweed as you could come a cropper as I nearly did. I soon came off that stretch!
The Little Orme walk is different as there are marked paths and on a high tide you may well see the seals around the Angel Bay area and the views are stunning from the top. It's a short walk and with little effort you are rewarded with great views and don't forget to take your camera there.
We did the walk today, managed to time it so the tide was going out. Called in at Angies Special Place as well, Angie was thrilled to see it:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 03, 2011, 12:56:33 AM
 :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 03, 2011, 01:24:55 PM
Found this info about the Tower:

"Imagine sipping a Sea Breeze in your own unique tower - which comes complete with a cocktail bar and a lift to take you down to the boathouse and beach - while watching the crashing waves below and admiring panoramic views of the North Wales coast.
It's no wonder that local master builder, Frank Tyldesley, who built Bryn-y-Mor in exclusive Llys Helig Drive in Llandudno in 1938, lived here for 60 years.

The tower itself is totally unique and the only one of its kind along 'Millionaire's Row' - a name aptly coined by locals for this stretch of exclusive houses along a private access road with beach frontage "


Totally unique...and now a complete eyesore.

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5253/5492391497_bc80ba6889_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5492391497/)
Tower Of Mystery (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5492391497/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 03, 2011, 06:42:14 PM
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It was a dry sunny day so I thought I'd have a walk on the Great Orme. I decided to walk along the beach to the gunsite first of all as I hadn't done that for about 50 years!  Keeping a constant eye on the incoming tide I walked along the sand and over the rocks and near the cliffs. The first thing I came to was a tunnel under the Marine Drive but don't know what purpose it was for. It had steps going up at one time but they have long since gone and I couldn't see inside it.  

Snippits from a book which I have only got bits of, suggests that the tunnel  was connected to an old jetty and a quarry.
I too walked on there yesterday, as far as the tower, alot of the sea defences look a little precarious.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Paddy on March 04, 2011, 01:41:08 PM
I wonder if any of the regular contributors to this thread would fancy taking this on?

Mountain trail in Spain
The entrances for this trail are closed but not policed. It was built in the 1920's for hydro workers. There is no rail, but there is a chain to hold onto, but it doesn't hold much weight and several people have fallen to their deaths. This is an amazing walk. It's 6 minutes long and should be watched till the very end.

 

http://www.angelfire.com/ak2/intelligencerreport/scariest_path.html (http://www.angelfire.com/ak2/intelligencerreport/scariest_path.html)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on March 04, 2011, 02:34:02 PM
That's a great video, I've sent it to many people in the past.
There's no way you'd get me up there with my head for heights, even if it was made safe.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 04, 2011, 02:48:24 PM
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It was a dry sunny day so I thought I'd have a walk on the Great Orme. I decided to walk along the beach to the gunsite first of all as I hadn't done that for about 50 years!  Keeping a constant eye on the incoming tide I walked along the sand and over the rocks and near the cliffs. The first thing I came to was a tunnel under the Marine Drive but don't know what purpose it was for. It had steps going up at one time but they have long since gone and I couldn't see inside it.  

Snippits from a book which I have only got bits of, suggests that the tunnel  was connected to an old jetty and a quarry.
I too walked on there yesterday, as far as the tower, alot of the sea defences look a little precarious.
That's interesting Nemesis because when I looked at the 1872 map of the proposed Marine Drive it shows the jetty and quarry in the exact same position of the tunnel.  This photo was taken of the wall just bellow the tunnel and there are the remains of some iron rods and steps that may have had something to do with the works
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 04, 2011, 03:03:58 PM
Ah ! missed those as I kept on the sand, thought the rocks were a bit rough for Frizzy's legs and my knees !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 04, 2011, 05:13:35 PM
Yesterday my sister Llinos and I went up Graiglwyd mountain in Pen.  It's a steep climb but well worth a visit.  This mountain is the site of the Stone Age Axe Factory which sits on the slopes, Druids Circle on the summit and a WW2 crash site just off the track. 
Although a sunny day, it was still very cold.  I'll tell you a bit about the crash site first. (some facts might not be exactly right as my Dad is on holiday for two weeks so I can't check, you know me  ;) )
On January 7th 1944  the American B-24j Liberator Bachelors' Baby was flying over Penmaenmawr.  It was extremely misty and due to navigation equipment at the time not being as advanced as it is today the 11 crew and Booster the dog thought they were flying over the sea.  Unfortunately their mistake was realised too late and they crashed on Graiglwyd Mountain. 
Suffering a broken leg one of the survivors struggled in great pain down the mountain to Penmaenmawr to raise the alarm.  A rescue party was organised and the group made their way back up to the crash site in the freezing January conditions.  Unfortunately 5 crew members and Booster the dog were killed. 
Some years later a survivor from that crash accompanied by a vicar and some local people returned to the site and erected the memorial we can see today.
When I was a kid I remember large parts of the plane were still there but over the years people have removed bits and pieces as mementos, small bits of debris such as screws and bits of metal can still be found there,   people have more respect nowadays and they tend to leave them around the memorial.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 04, 2011, 06:11:35 PM
Llinos and I also took a look at the Neolithic (new stone age) axe factory. 
This site was discovered at the beginning of the last century by an archaeologist and his wife while walking on the mountain. 
Axes made on this site were used to chop trees so land could be cleared to grow crops and have been found as far away as South Wales and Yorkshire.   There is still lots of half finished and broken axes scattered around.  The axes were taken over to the Llanfair side of the mountain to be polished then exported all over Britain. The site was excavated in the 1920s but no complete axes were discovered.  You can see where the scree has been cut from the rock and a small plateau where the men would have worked.  It's odd that no dwellings were ever found for the people working on these slopes, unless their houses or shelters were made of wood and animal hides which would explain no traceable remains (a theory put forward by Alwyn S Evans) I also took a photo of a stone shaped like a set of stairs, it was the colours in it I found fascinating and the last photo is of a rock found at Druid Circle.  Notice the cut marks on the surface?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 04, 2011, 07:04:42 PM
I have been reading a book called Populating the Past by Alwyn S Evans.  A fascinating book based on the history of the mountains above Penmaenmawr.  From Braich Y Dinas to Druids Circle.  It has left me with more questions than answers to be honest.  It was reading this book that spurred me to visit Druids Circle.  Although called Druid Circle it has nothing to do with the Druids as the circle was constructed 1000 years before they came here? 
I visited the site a few times as a child and I remember the stones being a lot larger.  In his book a theory is put forward (not by him) that suggests the circle could have been a type of ancient building which at one time could have been covered in wood.  Having been there yesterday I tend to think this makes more sense as the site is situated on an ancient pass which travels from Braich Y Dinas across the mountain to Druid Circle then on to Caer Seion a fort above Conwy.  You expect from the name a vision not unlike Glastonbury.  However this is a circle made up of relatively small stones.  If you place stones in a circle one will be facing the rising sun won't it?  Notice the other smaller circles across the path from Druids Circle.  It would also make sense of the fact only 2 children and one woman have been found buried within or near the stones.  Could these people have just lived there? as apposed to being sacrificed. If there was sacrifices here then why only 3 bodies found?  I'd love to get Time Team up there.  As far as I'm aware the last excavation was done in 1958.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 04, 2011, 07:11:44 PM
There is also other large stones around the site.  They seem to have been purposely placed in areas rather than being naturally apparent.  The last photo looks like an old monument but I think it's probably the site of someones dead dog  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on March 04, 2011, 08:37:11 PM
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I wonder if any of the regular contributors to this thread would fancy taking this on?

Mountain trail in Spain
The entrances for this trail are closed but not policed. It was built in the 1920's for hydro workers. There is no rail, but there is a chain to hold onto, but it doesn't hold much weight and several people have fallen to their deaths. This is an amazing walk. It's 6 minutes long and should be watched till the very end.

 

http://www.angelfire.com/ak2/intelligencerreport/scariest_path.html (http://www.angelfire.com/ak2/intelligencerreport/scariest_path.html)


Jeezus H Christ Paddy!
I have no problem with heights, but I do have a massive problem walking on wafer thin, or disintegrated concrete half a mile above a rocky death.
Utter madness.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 05, 2011, 09:52:55 PM
Called in at Angies Special Place as well,

Had to laugh Dave,  Gez thought we'd spray painted the walls  :roll:

Good job he didn't see what was written inside  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 05, 2011, 10:06:00 PM
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Called in at Angies Special Place as well,

Had to laugh Dave,  Gez thought we'd spray painted the walls  :roll:

Good job he didn't see what was written inside  :o
L0L

What do you mean....  8)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 05, 2011, 10:08:34 PM
Very good Smarty pants.  Shame the council couldn't do the same!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 10, 2011, 07:40:44 PM
Walk around the Orme today, weather was beautiful in town and along the main part of the Marine Drive. Got to just past the entrance to the Lighthouse and the mother of gales arrived. Had to take refuge in the Rest & Be Thankful - wind was so strong that it was practically impossible to stand up at times outside and the rain was almost horizontal. Had a pleasant coffee and teacake, and a nice chat with the man running it. Took this pic, which nowhere near illustrates how rough it was up there...
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on March 10, 2011, 07:53:52 PM
Hilarious!
You had to take Refuge in the R&BT?? 
As if you weren't always intending to go precisely there ... and SEE the nice man who was running it.    _))* _))* _))*

A very nice man!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 10, 2011, 08:03:46 PM
Would you have carried on walking in that weather?  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on March 10, 2011, 08:22:15 PM
I often go up there on a Thursday and it certainly is a very,very nice man who looks after it.   I do believe that he will soon be moving a Baby Grand Piano in there and giving Lunchtime Recitals!      ¢¢##
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: born2run on March 10, 2011, 10:38:20 PM
Went for my usual walk along the Marina in Conwy today - Weather possibly the worst it's been this year! Hailstones absolutely battering me (This was about 1.15pm) and the Marina absolutely deserted, not even anyone around the Mulberry or dog walking (people obviously have more sense than me L0L) Nice walk though, the tide was in so had a nice close up view of the water and there were even a couple of Swans messing about dipping their head in the water, Rather them than me!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 11, 2011, 09:35:54 AM
I had my shortest and quickest walk on the West Shore yesterday.   I had only gone about 200 yards when the rain,hail and the sand lashed across from Anglesey.
It was just long enough for me to get thoroughly soacked to the skin and I had to go home to get changed!    :(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 11, 2011, 10:06:40 AM
Mrs Fester, Llinos and I went up Penmaenmawr mountain yesterday.  It wasn't hailing thankfully but the rain lashed down and it was really windy especially as we turned the corner on the Llanfair side but we persevered (quick flick of the hair) So its true then men do melt in the wind and rain?   :o  :D

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 11, 2011, 10:30:20 AM
I'd like to see how long you lot would have persevered for if you had come to a cafe with hot coffee and toasted teacakes like I did!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 11, 2011, 10:53:12 AM
You got me there Dave...............unfortunately if your up the quarry, your only choice is to shelter behind a rock and share a lorry drivers butties or persevere.  No contest I suppose
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 11, 2011, 03:11:34 PM
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Walk around the Orme today, weather was beautiful in town and along the main part of the Marine Drive. Got to just past the entrance to the Lighthouse and the mother of gales arrived. Had to take refuge in the Rest & Be Thankful - wind was so strong that it was practically impossible to stand up at times outside and the rain was almost horizontal. Had a pleasant coffee and teacake, and a nice chat with the man running it. Took this pic, which nowhere near illustrates how rough it was up there...

I feel dreadful now-- we drove past you after our dog walk, somewhere before the lighthouse, it was fine then, so we decided not to disturb your walk.  :(
Sorry Dave, we could have saved you a drowning, but I suppose you would have missed your refreshments. Z**
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on March 11, 2011, 05:17:46 PM
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Mrs Fester, Llinos and I went up Penmaenmawr mountain yesterday.  It wasn't hailing thankfully but the rain lashed down and it was really windy especially as we turned the corner on the Llanfair side but we persevered (quick flick of the hair) So its true then men do melt in the wind and rain?   :o  :D


Mrs Fester says she enjoyed the day, loved the history lesson.... and she says it was very kind of you to invite her.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 11, 2011, 07:23:18 PM
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I feel dreadful now-- we drove past you after our dog walk, somewhere before the lighthouse, it was fine then, so we decided not to disturb your walk.  :(
Sorry Dave, we could have saved you a drowning, but I suppose you would have missed your refreshments. Z**
Quite alright, I got to the cafe before it started raining - others walkers out on the Orme were not so lucky, with several 'drowned rats' arriving whilst I was there!  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on March 11, 2011, 08:39:37 PM
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Mrs Fester says she enjoyed the day, loved the history lesson.... and she says it was very kind of you to invite her.
It was a pleasure.  Caroline is ace.  We've arranged to go for a walk once a week if possible.  We had a laugh.  Or rather they did 'cos I fell in the stream twice.  If I was trying to look like the professional guide I failed miserably.  I should have taken a canoe mate  :roll:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 11, 2011, 09:58:59 PM
(http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-sport036.gif) (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on March 12, 2011, 07:42:58 AM
You really should have an "observer" in the boat as well as the driver when water skiing!     $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 13, 2011, 03:54:26 AM
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You really should have an "observer" in the boat as well as the driver when water skiing!     $walesflag$

Why is that Yorkie?

Maybe for the driver to read whilst waiting for the skier to get back on his/her skis?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 19, 2011, 11:51:53 AM
On Thursday we set off down to the Llyn Peninsula to have a walk up to Yr Eifl but when we drove up the lane leading to the car park at the start of the route, visibility dropped to about 15 yards due to the sea mist. We opted for Plan B and went for a coastal walk from Morfa Nefyn to Porth Dinllaen and back.
It was a pleasant walk along the sandy beach but rounding the point was rocky and you had to be careful on the slippery rocks.   Porth Dinllaen came into view and the first part of the beach was pebbly but the remainder was a nice sandy stretch. On our way we passed the crumbling sandy cliffs which are home to dozens of Sandmartins in the Summer months.  The pub Ty Coch looked inviting as we passed by but was closed so we carried on our way up to and across the Golf Course. For any Golfer that course must be a challenge as the fairways are narrow and there is no room for any wayward shots!    We returned to the car along the road and as we were driving home the mist had cleared a bit on "The Rivals" so we decided to go up to Tre'r Ceiri ( The Giant's Town in Welsh) it is one of the best Iron Age forts in Europe and has the remains of 150 huts within the fort. The location is spectacular as are the views (when it's not misty) and we were glad that we made the effort to go up there as some of the group had not seen the fort before and were very impressed with it.   After looking around the site we made our way back to the car back and as we got there we looked back and the summit was as clear as a bel!!      :(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 19, 2011, 11:53:35 AM
Porth Dinllaen
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 19, 2011, 11:55:15 AM
Tre'r Ceiri
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 19, 2011, 11:56:39 AM
Tre'r Ceiri
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on March 19, 2011, 08:18:34 PM
WOW, great Hugo  $cool$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 19, 2011, 08:19:48 PM
Great walk and photos, Hugo.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 20, 2011, 03:55:58 PM
Decided to venture out for a walk being as the weather was so pleasant today. We parked in the Pen Y Bryn pub above Colwyn Bay and headed round through the network of paths in the Pwllycrochan Woods, then up Nant Y Glyn Valley and back up Honeysuckle Lane . Then across into Hafodty Lane (aka the 'Road to Manderley') past yet another batch of very expensive new houses to 'The View'. Came back round in a circle to end up back at the Pen Y Bryn.

Photo 1 - Looking across to Old Colwyn from Nant Y Glyn Valley
Photo 2 - One of the new born Lambs checks us out
Photo 3 - Road to Manderley
Photo 4 - View across to the Conwy Estuary from 'The View'
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 20, 2011, 05:45:43 PM
Great walk and photos Dave.  I've not done the Nant Y Glyn Valley walk I'm ashamed to say even though I've lived there for 25 years!
You'll remember the house Manderley when it was set in it's own large garden.  It was very impressive then, but those new houses are not selling too well.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 20, 2011, 06:51:11 PM
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Great walk and photos Dave.  I've not done the Nant Y Glyn Valley walk I'm ashamed to say even though I've lived there for 25 years!
You'll remember the house Manderley when it was set in it's own large garden.  It was very impressive then, but those new houses are not selling too well.
I think its a shame that Manderley has had all those new 'executive homes' stuck in its garden. But at least the old house has been preserved instead of being knocked down, I suppose?

I noticed this large new house, 'Moonflower', under construction on Copthorn Road . Great views across to Llandudno:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 21, 2011, 09:00:57 AM
I wouldn't mind that plot of land next to it either.  Great views all around from there now.   Prior to planning application they chopped down the Oak trees at the bottom of the garden and that gave the two plots that beautiful view.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2011, 05:09:49 PM
What a beautiful warm day it was in Llandudno today.It was T-shirt weather and I was in such a hurry to have a walk on the Orme that I rushed out without my map Secrets of the Great Orme.  I had intended to look for some mines on the map but instead I made my own route over it.   Starting from Invalids Walk I noticed what appeared to be a wall at the top of the slope above the path so I headed for it but once up there I couldn't see why it was built unless it was some type of retaining wall. From there I followed the lower sheep track which is just above Cust's Path and made my way along until I came to the Gogarth Tunnel which I was surprised to find completely dry. A few yards further on however water was freely flowing from a cracked pipe probably fed from Ffynnon Gogarth which always seems to have a regular flow of water.  The stone circle was still visible in Abbey Lodge and I think that it is just modern landscaping because the site of the reputed stone circle is about 3 or 4 doors further on.
A quick walk down to the Rest and be Thankful where I enjoyed a lovely coffee and slice of Cherry Bakewell. The cafe and car park were full and it was nice to see so many people enjoying themselves and making the most of the weather.   I  then walked down the Marine Drive to St Tudno's Church and to the half way tram station where I met a friend who was a tram driver. After that it was down to Mike's Golf Course where he was busy getting the course ready for it's opening on 1st April although Mike tells me that people have been playing there already. The course was getting it's first cut and looks like it will be in good condition for it's opening day. Good luck Mike for this coming season.   I then walked to the zig zag path, just stopping to watch the goats eating the Gorse.   The sweet smell of the gorse flowers wafted in the air as I made my way back to the West Shore
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2011, 05:12:55 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2011, 05:14:54 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on March 24, 2011, 05:31:18 PM
Excellent Hugo.
You can clearly see the mist down in the bay,  which hung around all day, it meant that the sun never got too strong today, but was still nice and warm.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2011, 07:39:54 PM
Thanks Fester, there was a heat haze hanging about all day but it was nice just being in the Sun and being warm. Hope that it's a sign of good weather to come.
I posted a photo of Parc Farm that I took when I went past today and have always wondered how they managed to get planning permission to build the bungalow there, bearing in mind the difficulty of getting things past CCBC.  I just assumed that it was because of the agricultural aspect but was surprised to see yesterday that it is a holiday bungalow being let at £896.00 per week in high season and £595.00 per week in low season.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 24, 2011, 09:23:39 PM
Lovely pics Hugo--never got onto the Orme today as I was tied up with other jobs--one of which was taking Frizzy for his first haircut!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 25, 2011, 12:32:22 AM
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one of which was taking Frizzy for his first haircut!

So the coat is no longer frizzy?  ?{}?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 25, 2011, 12:35:56 AM
One day that rock face will collapse and take a chunk of the Marine Drive with it. Hopefully, no one will be walking/driving underneath at the time.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: tonyf on March 25, 2011, 09:57:36 AM
 ZXZ What great photos, especially Hugo's. I'm extremely envious of you guys with all those great walks with great scenery, makes me very home sick. Me and Phil P came up for Ian Haslock's funeral arriving the afternoon before the internment. We had a walk around the town, the prom etc and both felt 'this is where we belong' it's a hard emotion to explain, you have to live away to experience it. We left the following day after the internment with heavy hearts, firstly for Ian and secondly for the leaving of Llandudno. It's nice on the coast down south, it's where the kids grew up and where 'my' family is, so uprooting it all is out of the question on pain of death!!!! I'll just have to be satisfied with my once a year visit. Until then, please keep the photos coming!   
Tonyf $walesflag$ 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 25, 2011, 12:32:30 PM
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Lovely pics Hugo--never got onto the Orme today as I was tied up with other jobs--one of which was taking Frizzy for his first haircut!

I bet he looks cute after his first haircut. Lynda has started giving Marco his Summer cut but it'll take her a while to finish it. This is him this week before the cut.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 25, 2011, 09:28:13 PM
Before and after !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on March 25, 2011, 09:38:57 PM
what lovely dogs don't know which is cutest!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 25, 2011, 09:41:04 PM
Thanks Suepp, mine is only 6 months old--I think Hugo's is a little older.
Still picking up little teeth from the carpet !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 25, 2011, 10:36:49 PM
That's a lovely haircut Frizzy has had, my wife has been nagging me to get another dog for company for Marco and she loves Bishons.
I'd better not show her Frizzy's  photo or I'll get more ear ache!    ;)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 26, 2011, 10:21:20 AM
 _))* _))* _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on March 26, 2011, 12:13:15 PM
You should get one of these Hugo, I hear they're a real baargain
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1369977/Sheep-gives-birth-dog-Chinese-farm-Ewe-got-kidding.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1369977/Sheep-gives-birth-dog-Chinese-farm-Ewe-got-kidding.html)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 26, 2011, 03:31:30 PM
You might even have them in this country Brumbob because one of my friend's had a dog that was last seen rodgering a sheep!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 26, 2011, 04:00:17 PM
It was a bit colder today and there was a sea mist so visibility wasn't so good but at least it was dry for our walk on the Little Orme. We started the walk from the housing estate in Penrhyn Bay and quickly walked to Angel Bay where we saw about 18 seals on the beach with 4 more on a rock in the water and also others swimming about. Spoke to one person who was watching the seals and the most he had seen there were 35 seals!   :)
After watching them we puffed and panted our way up the steep incline to the summit and walked around admiring the views. There was some fresh erosion visible near the housing estate below the Little Orme. From there we made our way through Penrhynside where all the Chapels seem to have been converted into nice private residences. From there we followed the footpath past Pant Y Wennol and the Old Windmill to the cliffs overlooking Fferm Bach Farm.  Shame about the views today but it still looks nice anyway.    We then went through Gloddaeth Woods past St David's College and an old water tower and came out by Penrhyn Old Hall and then stopped at Home from Home Cooking for a delicious Cappuccino.  We crossed the busy roundabout and followed the private road until we came back to the quarry and the start of our walk.  To see the seals was the highlight of the walk and as some of them are pregnant we'll be back there again soon to see their pups.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 26, 2011, 04:02:26 PM
Little Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 26, 2011, 04:04:14 PM
Little Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 26, 2011, 08:56:34 PM
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You might even have them in this country Brumbob because one of my friend's had a dog that was last seen rodgering a sheep!

I have a friend that was last seen rodgering sheep.  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on March 26, 2011, 10:20:33 PM
What's the old blue banger outside Penrhyn Old Hall?

s'ok, its a Ford Zephyr Six MK III Saloon
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 26, 2011, 11:28:28 PM
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What's the old blue banger outside Penrhyn Old Hall?

s'ok, its a Ford Zephyr Six MK III Saloon

Looks like it's been restored.  ^*^0

Can you go back and get a close-up photo Hugo?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 27, 2011, 01:56:04 PM
I'll take a photo of that Zephyr when I'm next there. It was a nice looking car with a front bench seat and a floor gearbox but the twin exhausts on it were weird, never seen anything like it before.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on March 28, 2011, 09:12:31 PM
Today Mrs Fester and I were invited by our friend Mark Jones, to take a walk to his 'hidden gem'.... Aber Falls.

I think its other name is Rheadaer falls, in Abergwyngregan.   It is so close to our doorstep, but without Mark's guidance we would have never found it.

He was kind to me (with my shattered knees) and took us along the gentle path to the falls, but then I became bold, and crossed the stream to take a look at the plungepool below the falls (pictured below)
We had a picnic below the falls, and then set off back via a route through the forest... a bit muddy in places, but beautiful and peaceful nonetheless.
A brilliant day.

Apparently, there is a great cafe in Aber, but maybe Mark is saving that up for us for next time?

Picture 1 is Mark and Mrs Fester below the falls, (not robot dancing, but trying to wave to the camera)
Picture 2 is the plungepool,
Picture 3 is a view back down the valley we walked up, and you can see the Gt Orme in the vee in the distance.







Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on March 28, 2011, 09:55:59 PM
We went up there about this time last year and after your recommendation might give it another go in the next few weeks. Loads of squirrels, rabbits and birds when we went up there. Not the sort of thing I usually notice  thing but I also remember, a couple of years ago, there being a really nice chapel conversion for sale as you walked into the village .
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on March 29, 2011, 08:39:24 AM
Best time to go there is about 0830 on a spring day.  The wildlife you encounter is astonishing.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on March 29, 2011, 11:34:14 AM
last time I was up there I saw a mink
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on March 29, 2011, 11:46:23 AM
We have a few dozen in the house.  Only problem is they are all sew together in the form of a couple of stoles!    $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 29, 2011, 12:58:05 PM
That's always a great walk Fester and I'm glad that you enjoyed it . The falls you went to are called Rhaeadr Fawr and sometimes you get small trout in that pool that you photographed. To the west of the falls is a smaller waterfall called Rhaeadr Bach and another walk on the west of the valley on the higher ground brings you down steeply into the village of Aber and near the nice cafe! ( double chocolate nut cake is delicious)
If I'm not mistaken it is Puffin Island that you've captured in your photo and not the Orme judging from where the photo was taken.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 29, 2011, 01:13:46 PM
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That's always a great walk Fester and I'm glad that you enjoyed it . The falls you went to is Rhaeadr Fawr and sometimes you get small trout in that pool that you photographed. To the west of the falls is a smaller waterfall called Rhaeadr Bach and another walk on the west of the valley on the higher ground brings you down steeply into the village of Aber and near the nice cafe! ( double chocolate nut cake is delicious)
If I'm not mistaken it is Puffin Island that you've captured in your photo and not the Orme judging from where the photo was taken.
It's the coastline of Anglesey itself, I think, between Llanfaes and Penmon.  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on March 29, 2011, 04:22:25 PM
Haven't been to Aber Falls for about 20 years, must go again after seeing your walk Fester.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 29, 2011, 04:41:32 PM
It's difficult to tell from the photo Dave but I think you're correct and that it's Penmon because it looks like a quarry and beach that Puffin Island doesn't have.
Puffin Island would be to the right and just out of sight.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on March 29, 2011, 05:00:43 PM
I've never been up higher than the falls, but am told that if you keep on climbing you get to a lovely spot where there is a lake
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on March 29, 2011, 05:40:40 PM
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It's difficult to tell from the photo Dave but I think you're correct and that it's Penmon because it looks like a quarry and beach that Puffin Island doesn't have.
Puffin Island would be to the right and just out of sight.

I'll have to go again and resolve this mystery... because I was certain it was the Gt Orme, as we drove away I even thought I saw the summit complex.
However I will defer to your esteemed brain-boxes!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 29, 2011, 06:39:48 PM
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It's difficult to tell from the photo Dave but I think you're correct and that it's Penmon because it looks like a quarry and beach that Puffin Island doesn't have.
Puffin Island would be to the right and just out of sight.

I'll have to go again and resolve this mystery... because I was certain it was the Gt Orme, as we drove away I even thought I saw the summit complex.
However I will defer to your esteemed brain-boxes!

But first you said....Picture 3 is a view back down the valley we walked up, and you can see the Gt Orme in the vee in the distance.

Now you're saying you saw the Orme as you drove away......which you probably did.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 29, 2011, 06:41:02 PM
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That's always a great walk Fester and I'm glad that you enjoyed it . The falls you went to is Rhaeadr Fawr and sometimes you get small trout in that pool that you photographed. To the west of the falls is a smaller waterfall called Rhaeadr Bach and another walk on the west of the valley on the higher ground brings you down steeply into the village of Aber and near the nice cafe! ( double chocolate nut cake is delicious)
If I'm not mistaken it is Puffin Island that you've captured in your photo and not the Orme judging from where the photo was taken.
It's the coastline of Anglesey itself, I think, between Llanfaes and Penmon.  :)

I think you're right.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 29, 2011, 06:49:17 PM
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Haven't been to Aber Falls for about 20 years, must go again after seeing your walk Fester.

Must be around the same time frame since I was last up there.

I did walk, however, I also enjoyed taking my dirt bike up through Aber and riding along the old Roman Road, eventually ending up in the Conwy Valley.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 29, 2011, 06:53:13 PM
I hope you didn't cheat and walk up the steep single track lane to the Roman Road!         :cyclist40:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 29, 2011, 06:57:00 PM
Not sure where to post these photos but they are of the Zephyr that I saw by Penrhyn Old Hall
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on March 29, 2011, 07:07:37 PM
a bit of a mess after all  :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on March 29, 2011, 07:49:12 PM
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a bit of a mess after all  :D

I wonder what's under the hood......sorry bonnet?

Yes, an engine I know, but what kind? The Zephyr six had one tail pipe but this has two.

I'm wondering if there's a V8 under there.

Hugo could you go back............. :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 30, 2011, 11:38:39 AM
It's not going anywhere so I may look next time I go to Home from Home Cooking for a Cappuccino.        ;)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 30, 2011, 01:17:20 PM
Looks like a job for restoration !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 02, 2011, 01:32:37 PM
I've recently become fascinated by rocks, predominantly the many standing stones on Conwy and Penmaenmawr mountains.  Used as markers in ancient times, some of them are absolutely huge and can be seen for miles around on the landscape.(pic 1)  Now that I'm looking for these sites I notice large round piles stones which look like burial mounds.(pic 2)  (They will of course more than likely turn out to be the collection place for stonemasons when they built the surrounding walls).
I noticed this huge triangular rock and the one to the side of it built into a wall.(pic 3)  I wonder if they moved the stone to its current location or whether the wall was built around it.
Then in the middle of nowhere I stumbled across this strange little grave stone. (pic 4) It's carved from solid rock and has the initials G L on the front?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 02, 2011, 01:47:50 PM
Here is a photo of another stone formation, this time it's a pyramid shape.(pic 1)  I know the farmer so I'm going to go back for further investigation when his lambs are a little older.
A small pond on the mountain near Alltwen (we're going there Thusday Mrs Fester) looks like a bridge used to cross the water to the middle. (pic 2)  This stone was near Alltwen too, you can tell how large it is in comparison to my lighter on the top (pic 3)  Now does that look carved to you?  It's shaped like a column, rounded and flat on both ends.  Various other large stones scattered around it.  Where was this from?  The last photo is of a stone circle, not like Druids Circle but purposely placed stones never the less.(pic 4)  The farmer uses this area for burning and those are not sticks in there they're branches. Look at the size of the rocks!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 02, 2011, 01:52:59 PM
Situated right by the stone circle is another strange arrangement of rocks (pic 1and 3).  This is a lovely spot (although private, and I saw pheasants so in season you risk getting shot  :o )  Look at pic 2  for picturesque.  Perfect place to clear your head.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 02, 2011, 02:08:42 PM
I love the way nature stops for nothing.  In these pics you can see where the stones have been engulfed by the trees.  One stones even tries to pierce the heart of the tree but inevitably to no avail.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on April 02, 2011, 03:43:20 PM
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Then in the middle of nowhere I stumbled across this strange little grave stone. (pic 4) It's carved from solid rock and has the initials G L on the front?

Nice pics Pen  8)

It's a boundary stone, here's a pic of another one that is located on St. David's Place in Llandudno.
The stone is partially buried with only the upper section being visible. This stone is inscribed with the letters 'E R'.


Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on April 02, 2011, 03:48:01 PM
Think I've just found your actual stone marker (http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMA3PG_Boundary_Stone_Conwy_Mountain_Conwy_Wales)  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 03, 2011, 05:46:32 PM
Thanks for that Bob, do you know what the initials stand for, or when it was put there? Or where I can find out?

Likin the little picture too  :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: brumbob on April 03, 2011, 06:28:18 PM
Haven't got a clue Pen  ???
probably a church parish boundary stone with the C standing for Conwy
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 04, 2011, 10:29:14 AM
I stumbled across this strange little grave stone.

Typical I always get it wrong  ;D  we'll call that yet another Angiegram.  Gravestone tut tut
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on April 04, 2011, 10:35:19 AM
Quote
Angiegram

Love it!  _))* _))* _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on April 05, 2011, 04:41:33 AM
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It's a boundary stone, here's a pic of another one that is located on St. David's Place in Llandudno. The stone is partially buried with only the upper section being visible. This stone is inscribed with the letters 'E R'.

 :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 09, 2011, 04:47:15 PM
It was a beautiful warm day yesterday as we set out to do a walk from Tanygrisiau but before going there we had a trip down the Deep Mine at the Blaenau Ffestiniog slate quarry.  It was an incredible experience to see inside the mine but I'm glad that I didn't have to work in those conditions.
After that we drove up to Tanygrisiau and climbed up the slate track until we came to Cwm Orthin and at the lakeside we had some refreshments and watched the Trout rise in the lake to take the flies that were flying just on the surface of the water. The valley was quiet apart from the sound of four Canada Geese that were at the far end of the lake.  We set again to walk along the lake looking at the numerous ruined buildings all around and the piles of waste slate that was littered everywhere.  In it's heyday it must have been a close and thriving community and the ruins of the Chapel were near to the shore.  The weather was perfect today, sunny and warm with no wind but we thought about the people who must have worked there in the past. This remote location must have been very hostile for most of the time and the conditions inside the mines dreadful.
We reached the end of the lake and started a steep climb to Rhosydd Quarry where the remains of the barracks can still be seen. From there we climbed to the Ridge where we had distant views to Cadair Idris and beyond and to Northern Snowdonia. On our descent to the start of the walk we came across dozens of mines none of them fenced off and all creating a potential hazard to anyone so we didn't venture too far inside.  A tricky slow sescent down the slate scree and we were then back to our starting place and back home.   Another good walk but the weather conditions made all the difference, I wouldn't fancy it on a wet and windy day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 09, 2011, 04:49:31 PM
Cwm Orthin - Rhosydd Quarry walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 09, 2011, 04:52:24 PM
Cwm Orthin - Rhosydd Quarry walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 09, 2011, 04:55:25 PM
Cwm Orthin -  Rhosydd Quarry walk


www.cwmorthin.co.uk/ (http://www.cwmorthin.co.uk/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 14, 2011, 04:58:34 PM
I thought that I'd have a walk around the Great Orme again today and set off from the West Shore around the Marine Drive. The first thing I noticed was by the cattle grid and that the wooden gate on the right was burnt and it looked like it had been done some time ago.  Carrying on I had to take care when a very large vehicle was having to reverse back to the West Shore.
I stopped to take a photo of the steps of Miriam Jones Gogarth Tea Rooms and had a quick look inside the ruins. The waters of Ffynnon Gogarth were flowing freely as I passed by and I stopped to take a photo of the plot of land for sale. (£700K  asking price)    The sound of putting down my rucksac disturbed a young red Fox and it walked quickly down the garden path before I could get my camera out.   :(
I then walked to the far end of the gunsite as far as Hornby Cove and then up the steep slope to the Marine Drive. It's so steep I had to walk on my toes most of the way and it was hot and hard work doing so.
At the Marine Drive I was contemplating going down to "The Hiding Cave"  but a notice said not to go down the cliffs at this point until 31st July because of breeding sea birds.   I could see the Rest and Be Thankful in the distance so it was no contest anyway and I opted for a nice latte and delicious Almond tart instead
After having charged up the old batteries I headed up the concrete road, passing the Monk's Path and taking the next sheep track down on the right.  There has definitely been a lack of rainfall recently as the path was cracked and dry in it's entire length.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 14, 2011, 05:01:35 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 14, 2011, 05:03:08 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 14, 2011, 07:29:14 PM
Some great pics, Hugo.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 15, 2011, 11:22:15 AM
Thanks Dave, it was a fairly short walk but there's always something new to see on the Orme.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2011, 11:58:01 AM
Three Towns Walk

I love walking by the sea and over the years I have managed to walk the whole of the Cornish section of the south west coast path but one day last June I managed to persuade my husband to leave the gardening for a few hours to undertake a coast walk closer to home.
We parked the car at the furthest end of the promenade at Old Colwyn (apologies if I do not get the place names right) with a view to walking to Llandudno.
We only got as far as Fortes cafe in Rhos before succumbing to fish and chips.
Then on past the wonderful St Trillos chapel that neither of us knew about before.
Then we walked through the bungalows and found the path up to the Little Orme where the views were superb looking back the way we had come.
We descended to Llandudno and walked along the promenade hoping to find a taxi to take us back to the start. I suggested the taxi phone at Asda but there was half an hour wait so we walked around to the station and a lovely chap took us back to our car measuring the trip on the way, a surprising 7 miles but a lovely day out.
We couldn’t resist ending a seaside day out with an ice cream soda at Fortes again.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2011, 11:59:45 AM
Part 2
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2011, 12:00:50 PM
Part 3
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 17, 2011, 04:32:14 PM
Nice walks, Hollins and Hugo. 'You've all done very well', as Young Mr.Grace used to say on 'Are You Being Served?'.  $yes$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 17, 2011, 04:51:40 PM
Too nice a day not to go for a walk today, so headed over to the excellent Tides Bistro on the beach in Llanddulas for a coffee, then walked up through the woods along one of the old carriage drives to Gwrych Castle. As Merddin Emrys had said, security had been beefed up significantly there, with lots of shiny new metal fencing and even a security guard on duty. He didn't see me, so I didn't trouble him whilst I had a look around, took a few photos, and then headed back down the other carriage drive towards Abergele. The caravan park by the castle gates now has various rare miniature breeds of pigs, goats and sheep wandering around. The pigs were very friendly and loved having their backs scratched. Then into Abergele itself for a refreshing drink and sandwich at the Coffee Rooms - recommended!

1) Security guard at Gwrych Castle
2) Looking down at Gwrych Castle
3) Looking across the frontage of Gwrych Castle
4) Looking back at Gwrych Castle
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 17, 2011, 04:58:07 PM
Assorted animals, seen at the Farm/Caravan Park at Gwrych Castle Gates:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on April 18, 2011, 12:34:28 AM
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As Merddin Emrys had said, security had been beefed up significantly there, with lots of shiny new metal fencing and even a security guard on duty. He didn't see me, so I didn't trouble him whilst I had a look around, took a few photos, and then headed back down the other carriage drive towards Abergele.

 _))* _))* _))*


Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 20, 2011, 09:29:52 AM
Our retirement group had a short walk yesterday starting at the Junction flyover, we walked along the cob into Conwy and turned left after the Castle and walked through the archway and over the Gyffin stream.  After going past the eyesore that was previously Billingtons we took the public footpath on our left and walked up the steep field to Benarth Woods.  After just that short walk the view was good but the views got better as we travelled through the woods and to higher ground where the mast is.  The woodland was full of flowers and the Bluebells looked nice but had reached their peak and were starting to die out. We did have an expert on flowers with us and he rattled off all the names but I couldn't have been paying much attention because I could only remember one name Blodyn Y Gwynt (Wind Flower)    :-[ :-[
At the trig point we took some photos and then descended past the farm with the mast and down into Gyffin where we took the path alongside the stream to the car park and then through the tunnel into the centre of Conwy. From there it was just a short walk to the Pen Y Bryn to finish the walk with a coffee and a slice of cake.   :)
When we had finished there we all got our bus passes out and caught the bus back to the Afon Conwy where we had left our cars.  It was another pleasant walk on a lovely sunny day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 20, 2011, 09:32:09 AM
Conwy walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 20, 2011, 09:35:11 AM
Conwy walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 20, 2011, 09:39:12 AM
I remember doing that walk, must have been about the same time last year as there were bluebells everywhere in Benarth Woods. I remember that walk up the field from Billingtons to Benarth Woods is a killer on the legs...
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on April 20, 2011, 10:40:43 AM
The bluebells look lovely, Hugo.  I'll put a picture of boldyn y gwynt in the wildflowers thread. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2011, 05:38:27 PM
Today we had three nice and varied walks and we started off going up Pen Y Gaer an Iron Age hillfort high above the village of Llanbedr Y Cennin. After parking the car we crossed the fields and climbed up to the hillfort. The fort has commanding views of the Conwy Valley but today visibility was poor and misty but we could imagine how nice it would be on a clear day.  It was so peaceful up there with only the sound of the Cuckoo and pheasants and skylarks to break up the silence.
We came down to find the style blocked by a friendly pony and after he let us pass we went further down to see an unusual rock formation composed of hexagonal columns.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2011, 05:40:50 PM
Pen Y Gaer walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2011, 05:52:55 PM
We left Pen Y Gaer and headed for the Bwlch Y Ddeufaen car park and then walked over the Roman Road through the pass of the two standing stones.  The wind picked up so we put on our fleeces and continued walking on the road until we were above Llanfairfechan and stopped there to have a drink and eat our sandwiches. The road has puddles in places and you could see the tadploes swimming about in them.
The old Roman Road is just south of the present road and is still visible in parts. We had intended to see the Roman milestone in Llanfairfechan but cut the walk short as it became so cold and very windy.
We then made our way to our third and final walk of the day at Cadair Ifan Goch in Maenan
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2011, 06:10:39 PM
Our third and final walk was a delightful woodland walk where we walked through the heavily scented bluebell woods. After a fairly short walk we reached the the viewpoint of Cadair Ifan Goch (Red John's Chair) which takes it's name from a legendary giant who is said to sat there.  This is one of the finest viewpoints in the area and at almost 500 feet above the valley you are treated to a wide panorama in both directions.
We sat there for a while admiring the view and watching the buzzard fly overhead. There are also Goshawks and Red Kites in this area although we never saw them today.
Retracing our steps back to the car park we were lucky enough to see a small and fairly tame rabbit happily munching away at the grass.
A lovely walk with the Bluebells at their best, well worth a visit now Blodau.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2011, 06:14:16 PM
Cadair Ifan Goch
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2011, 06:17:14 PM
Cadair Ifan Goch
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on April 29, 2011, 07:17:07 PM
Wonderful, Hugo.

Please keep them coming.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on May 02, 2011, 05:35:56 AM
Yes, great Hugo, however, I have a sharp feeling of Hiraeth coming on.  :'(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on May 02, 2011, 08:17:17 AM
Ah!  There's always a Welcome in them there hillsides!    $walesflag$   $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 02, 2011, 10:22:22 AM
You go for some excellent walks Hugo and I love your pictures.  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 03, 2011, 05:53:36 PM
I enjoyed the short walk from the National Trust car park to the viewpoint of Cadair Ifan Goch so much that I did it again today. My wife and I walked through the Bluebell wood and the scent from the flowers was delightful as we made our way to the viewpoint. The visibility today was clearer than before but I couldn't persuade my wife to take in the vista as the height put her off!
The viewpoint is directly above the Plas Maenan Hotel so it gave us an excuse to have a nice coffee afterwards in lovely surroundings.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 03, 2011, 05:55:31 PM
Cadair Ifan Goch and Plas Maenan Hotel
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 04, 2011, 02:36:43 PM
Thanks Pendragon,  I must admit that I've enjoyed your walks and photos too and they have given me a great insight into Pen and Llanfair.  I didn't realise that the towns had so many interesting things to see as my walks were always above the quarries and I missed those things you photographed.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 04, 2011, 06:00:25 PM
Today I was bored so I grabbed my camera and went for a walk around the RSPB nature reserve.   I've never been there before well not all the way round.  I saw lot's of different birds although I have to say I haven't a clue what species they were apart from the obvious ones like Herons and Ducks with their chicks. The chicks made me giggle as the mother had swam upstream round a corner and the chicks were trying to catch up, bless, as soon as she was in sight they rose up in the water and paddled their little feet like mini water wheels as fast as they could to reach her.
The views are fantastic.  It was a perfect day as the sun was shining and the water on the estuary was still, birds of all descriptions flying round and you could hear many different bird songs.  It's quite busy there too, lot's of people with cameras and binoculars milling round.  I must apologize for the photo of the horses I didn't want to distract them from eating, they were a bit close for my liking to be honest, horses don't really like me if past experience is anything to go by, I've never had a safe ride, they either won't go or refuse to stop, I've been kicked bitten and chased by the bloody creatures!   Hubby forgot his sandwiches for work this morning, so I munched them sat on a bench and walked home.  I had a really nice afternoon  ;D

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 04, 2011, 06:05:20 PM
I noticed while walking today these purple plants, they reminded me of when I was a child and we'd sit in the woods at the back of our house in Pen.  We called them sugar thistles as we used to pull on the purple petals leaves? and suck the bottom of the shoots, they were very sweet, I didn't feel the need to have a go today mind.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 04, 2011, 09:26:23 PM
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The viewpoint is directly above the Plas Maenan Hotel so it gave us an excuse to have a nice coffee afterwards in lovely surroundings.
I was so pleased to see what the Plas Maenan was like. I have driven past so many times and wondered about it. The verandha looks so tempting! I looked it up on tripadvisor after looking at your pictures and it gets some good reviews. Thanks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 04, 2011, 10:03:41 PM
Hubby and I went to a wedding reception there and it was an excellent venue.  Really nice place with spectacular views.  I told Hubby next time I get married that's where I'm having the reception  _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on May 05, 2011, 04:51:10 AM
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Hubby and I went to a wedding reception there and it was an excellent venue.  Really nice place with spectacular views.  I told Hubby next time I get married that's where I'm having the reception  _))*

 :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 05, 2011, 09:48:29 AM
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The viewpoint is directly above the Plas Maenan Hotel so it gave us an excuse to have a nice coffee afterwards in lovely surroundings.
I was so pleased to see what the Plas Maenan was like. I have driven past so many times and wondered about it. The verandha looks so tempting! I looked it up on tripadvisor after looking at your pictures and it gets some good reviews. Thanks.

Now you've seen photos, don't drive past but go up the drive and experience it yourself. Hope that you enjoy it there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 05, 2011, 09:52:53 AM
Can you just pop in there for coffee then, Hugo?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 05, 2011, 10:58:24 AM
Yes Dave and I think they advertise it on the board at the bottom of the drive.    Just go into the Hotel and order and you can sit where you want to. We've always sat on the verandah on fine days because of the views.
One time we struck up a conversation with someone there and they showed us around the rooms upstairs and to be honest I wouldn't mind staying there even though it's only a few miles away.
Don't forget your camera if you go because the views are great and if you look over the edge of the circular car park you can usually see Rabbits in the field below. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 05, 2011, 11:03:40 AM
Thanks for the info.  $thanx$  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on May 05, 2011, 01:20:24 PM
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I noticed while walking today these purple plants, they reminded me of when I was a child and we'd sit in the woods at the back of our house in Pen.  We called them sugar thistles as we used to pull on the purple petals leaves? and suck the bottom of the shoots, they were very sweet, I didn't feel the need to have a go today mind.

Red Clover-- They are my tortoises favorite
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2011, 04:07:01 PM
The weather was a bit iffy when I started out today but when I reached Aber it had turned into a fine sunny day. We drove over Bont Newydd and up the steep lane to the small car park at the start of the Roman Road where we started our walk up to Llyn Anafon.  It's a nice track up a deep valley with the river in full flow from the recent rain.
Along the valley floor you can see the unusual sheep enclosures that are around the area. 
After a while we reached Llyn Anafon which was once a reservoir supplying coastal areas but is now just a lake and the water level in the lake was quite low. I know that a few years ago they had reduced the level of the water because of safety warnings with the dam that holds it back but don't know if this caution still applies.
Anyway we stopped there to eat our sandwiches and have a drink but soon we had the hard slog up to the Carneddau ridge through wet boggy ground. We saw several wild ponies on our way up so we stopped to take some photos and at least it gave me a chance of a breather!
It wasn't that long before we reached the ridge and then it was up to Drum and down the track again to reach the Roman Road. The views never cease to amaze me and they were stunning in every direction.  We saw more wild ponies on our way down and on the Roman Road we were rewarded with the sight of a mother and her foel. A lovely end to a very enjoyable walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2011, 04:08:57 PM
Llyn Anafon walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2011, 04:11:38 PM
Llyn Anafon walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on May 08, 2011, 07:07:30 PM
You didn't get as far as Foel Fras then Hugo?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 08, 2011, 07:42:32 PM
Some great photos, Hugo. I've not yet got up there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2011, 07:42:53 PM
No Trojan, we only set out to do Llyn Anafon and Drum so we turned left when we hit the ridge and made it into a circular walk.
We've done Foel Fras before when we did the seven 3000 footers starting from Pen Yr Ole Wen and finishing at Foel Fras. We then came down the Llyn Anafon path and walked back to Aber.
Two cars were needed, one at the Ogwen and the other at Aber because there was no way I was walking back on that route!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on May 08, 2011, 10:33:38 PM
Foel Fras was always one of my favorite mountains. I remember seeing the remains of the Avro Anson aircraft that crashed up there last time I ventured up.

http://geotopoi.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/foel-fras-avro-anson-mk-i-mg804-8-observer-advanced-flying-unit-12-jul-1944/ (http://geotopoi.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/foel-fras-avro-anson-mk-i-mg804-8-observer-advanced-flying-unit-12-jul-1944/)

Here's another that crashed between Foel Grach and Carnedd Uchaf:

Avro Anson engine (http://www.flickr.com/photos/62445171@N00/5298080049/#)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on May 12, 2011, 06:19:38 PM
The photos of the ponies and views are lovely, Hugo.  My OH and I enjoy the walk up to Llyn Anafon and around that area but we haven't been for a while, so it's nice to reminded of it. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 23, 2011, 09:22:32 AM
Yesterday we did a canal walk that took in two aqueducts,two long tunnels and ended up at an Edward I castle. We drove down the beautiful Horseshoe Pass, through Llangollen to start our walk at the Trefor Basin.  It was a lovely sunny day but very windy and we certainly felt it as we walked over the 126 foot tall Pontcysyllte Aqueduct that takes the canal over the River Dee. It's not a place for anyone suffering from vertigo so we held on to the railings as we looked down at a fisherman fishing for Salmon in the river below.  Continuing on our way we passed a number of barges on the canal and loads of Ducks and their Ducklings swimming about on the slowly flowing waters.  Soon we passed Chirk Marina and Chirk Golf Course and then we came to the first tunnel which was 174 metres long. The tunnel is not lit but has a handrail along the side to stop you falling in to the water and you have to walk close to the rail as there is a danger of you banging your head on the roof especially if you are a tall person.   The next tunnel we came to was much longer at 421 Metres so torches are a must in this one. Immediately after this tunnel was the Chirk Aqueduct at 70 foot above the river and alongside it was an even higher Railway viaduct which we crossed over and on the other side was the English border of Shropshire. We continued along the canal for a while until we stopped and had some refreshments. After that we retraced our steps and after going back through the long tunnel we left the canal to walk to Chirk Castle. The Baroque gates were very impressive and we took a short footpath to the Castle. After seeing it from the outside we returned through the parkland and back to the canal and to Trefor Basin. The weather had been kind to us all day and we sat in the sunand had a coffee.It was only then that it started to rain so it was straight to the car and back home safely. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 23, 2011, 09:24:51 AM
Aqueduct Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 23, 2011, 09:26:54 AM
Aqueduct Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 30, 2011, 03:16:09 PM
I was watching Countryfile on BBC 1 last night and Julia Bradbury was doing part of the Offa's Dyke walk.    It also showed people abseiling from Pontcysyllte to look for Bats underneath the Aqueduct.    :o
Chirk Castle was also featured as Offa's Dyke runs through the Chirk Estate, it was nice to watch after doing the walk last week.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 30, 2011, 04:10:11 PM
Hugo, Did you also see the Chelsea flower show programme where they interviewed the designers of "The Postcard from Wales" garden.
It was inspired by the location around Laugharne where you said you were expecting to visit soon.
There is a link to the programme here if you missed it.
http://www.laugharne.co.uk/ (http://www.laugharne.co.uk/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 30, 2011, 05:44:45 PM
I did watch some of the Chelsea Flower Show but I missed the bit about The Postcard from Wales. I've just clicked on the link and watched it. Thanks very much for that Hollins, I enjoyed the garden and also seeing the views of Laugharne.
It won't be very long before I'm there so I'm crossing my fingers and hoping for good weather.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 03, 2011, 12:52:20 PM
Yesterday with a good weather forecast promised we decided to walk up Snowdon (3560 ft) via the Watkin Path.  It's a long walk with an ascent of over 3400 ft. so we knew that we had a long day ahead of us.   We quickly walked through the Oak woodland to the start of the path which snaked its way up the hillside, passing on the way the waterfalls of Afon Cwm Llan, the old watermill and a ruined building and soon arrived at Gladstone's rock where we stopped to read the inscription on it.  From there we carried on to the slate tips of the old quarry.
After that the path steepens quite considerably. We were lucky at this point as the cloud cover above meant that it wasn't unbearable walking up this steep section but at the Lliwedd the cover lifted and it became quite hot.  We stopped there for refreshments and to admire the views before we tackled what was the worst and hardest part of the route.which was the steep,loose and very difficult path to the summit.
We slowly, in fact very slowly walked up this difficult stretch in the baking hot sun and we were glad to get to the top where we sat and had a drink and watched the world go by as it was teeming with people taking advantage of the weather like us. From the ridge, the view to the North was just of white fluffy clouds like you'd see from a plane but the Southern view was clear and breathtaking.
A quick visit to the Summit Cafe to replenish our water and we were going down the ridge to Bwlch Cwm Llan where we descended steeply to a disused railway track and followed it down to the start of our walk. It was then back through the cool woodland to the cafe at the start of the walk and enjoyed a nice coffee there. Coming home we also stopped at the Bryn Tyrch in Capel Curig for a refreshing shandy and drank it by the side of the Afon Lligwy.   A nice end to a great day out on the hills
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 03, 2011, 12:55:24 PM
Snowdon Walk via Watkin Path
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 03, 2011, 01:05:10 PM
Snowdon via Watkin Path
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on June 04, 2011, 04:41:13 PM
There were a lot of cigarette butts outside the cafe last time I was up there. Have they provided ashtray's yet?  8)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 04, 2011, 04:59:03 PM
A great walk and some great photos, Hugo.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 06, 2011, 01:41:10 PM
Yesterday we decided to do the Crowning Glory walk starting from the pretty village of Cilcain.  I hadn't done the walk before so I wasn't sure what to expect. Although it was a cooler day yesterday I had shorts on but I didn't expect so many nettles and stiles on the first part of the route!   I thought that the choice of clothes may have been a mistake but then the walk opened up and we were soon walking through woods and open undulating farm land and seeing ruins of old farmhouses on the way.
Our aim was to go to Moel Arthur, one of the finest hillforts in the area and before too long we reached the hill fort and stopped a while to have a drink and something to eat. Visibility was poor and it prevented us from having the commanding views from this hillside.  We then had a steep descent into the valley and  a steeper ascent up Offa's Dyke Path on the other side of the valley. Once up on the other side it was a level ridge walk until we left the footpath and walked back to Cilcain going past the Reservoir on the way down. There were a number of people fishing there but you could see that the water level was very low for the time of year. We then followed the lane which was steep in places back to the village and ended the walk with a pint in the White Horse Inn before setting off for home. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 06, 2011, 01:43:31 PM
Cilcain Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: llandudnotrust on June 17, 2011, 04:20:49 PM
I had a great walk around the outside of the RSPB yesterday. Not too long quite flat and easy going but great views and free.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 20, 2011, 06:15:18 PM
Went for a wander around Caernarfon on Sunday - it's certainly improved a lot in recent years. I've resisted the temptation to include any photos of the Castle!

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5275/5853097747_9e0e0f6a1b_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853097747/)
Caernarfon - June 2011 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853097747/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5070/5853098145_fc29c6c4de_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853098145/)
Caernarfon - June 2011 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853098145/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5030/5853095677_36bd164c67_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853095677/)
Caernarfon - June 2011 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853095677/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2542/5853648536_0da24b4f18_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853648536/)
Caernarfon - June 2011 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853648536/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3287/5853094179_0ecee5af10_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853094179/)
Caernarfon - June 2011 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5853094179/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 20, 2011, 08:08:04 PM
Some great pics there Dave....all 5 of them.  I especially like the fifth one.  I've been to Caernarfon lots of times and never noticed those buildings before.  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on June 20, 2011, 08:31:45 PM
Yeahh... FIVE photos ...  Strange.  I have been blocked at four in the past.  

Let me see children, Shall we sk the Count? ...
How many photo's?.....ONE, TWO...THREE, FOUR .....FIVE !!   HA HA....


Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on June 20, 2011, 08:46:26 PM
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Yeahh... FIVE photos ...  Strange.  I have been blocked at four in the past.  


It's what you call Admin's priviledge!    :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 20, 2011, 08:55:16 PM
If you lot looked more closely instead of rushing to condemn, you'll see that the photos are just linked to from Flickr, not uploaded to the forum. Anyone can put unlimited numbers of photos in their posts if you link to them from an external website. Apologies all round, please...  :laugh:  WWW
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on June 20, 2011, 08:56:57 PM
I accept your apology Dave.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 20, 2011, 09:19:41 PM
Yep ok I accept your apology too  :laugh:




Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 26, 2011, 05:38:33 PM
It was a cracking day for a walk today so it was shorts and T shirt weather and a walk on the Great Orme again.   Starting from the West Shore, I went along Invalids Walk but only as far as Ogof Arth and then it was straight up there to the sheep track.  Plenty of wild flowers and butterflies (mainly the small blue ones) up there today and I walked along the track passing Ffynnon Gogarth and Ffynnon Llygaid on the way. I was taking a photo of the Gogarth Tunnel when I heard a rumble ( and before anyone can say it, no it wasn't my tum! )  It's strange because that's the third time it has happened to me so it's not a coincidence.  The tunnel was bone dry but water was moving down iron pipes nearby (possibly from the Brammock rod pits ? )
Anyway I carried on to the Marine Drive passing Ffynnon Caseg and by that time the temperature was very hot so I stopped at the Rest and Be Thankful and had a lovely coffee and cake before carrying on across the road and up the slope. I was by Ffynnon Llety Madoc and noticed an enclosure but don't know what it is for unless it has something to do with the goats.
Above St Tudno's Church, I took a short cut through the bracken but had to keep my eye on the ground looking for nettles or anything else lurking there!  I was nearly through it when I noticed a stone with part of an inscription on. I just hope that it's not vandalism. By the Church I took the path past the old reservoir and Ffynnon Powell to the Pink Farm and continued to the Ski Lodge but just before I got there I dropped down to have a look at Ffynnon Gallog.   Returning to the Ski Lodge I walked down Wyddfyd Road with John who was walking his Donkeys down to the Beach as he and his family have done for generations. I crossed over at the Black Gate and visited Mike at his Great Orme Golf Course.  Mike was enjoying the hot weather and looked tanned and fit as usual. After a quick chat it was time to go down the zig zag path back to the car at West Shore.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 26, 2011, 05:41:24 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 26, 2011, 05:45:42 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 26, 2011, 08:42:29 PM
A friend and I did a similar walk on Thursday, apart from we came onto the Orme up through the Haulfre Woods. I was pleased to see that the Roman Well has recently been repaired. Still no water in it though!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: SDQ on June 26, 2011, 10:04:03 PM
The stone with the inscription on it looks like part of a headstone from the cemetery.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 27, 2011, 07:27:54 PM
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The stone with the inscription on it looks like part of a headstone from the cemetery.

That was my first thought too. I did look around for the rest of the stone but couldn't see any other bits. I'll have a better look next time when I'm not wearing shorts! 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on June 27, 2011, 08:39:13 PM
Tanned and fit am I?  If I could walk half as far as you I would consider myself fit.  Nice to see you again even if it was only a brief chat.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 29, 2011, 06:57:15 PM
I was in Chester today, having a wander round with the camera. Very busy with people but there were a noticeable number of empty shops, not so much at street level but lots at Row level where the footfall is much lower. Still, the whole city looked very smart, obviously great effort is made to keeping it looking so. An amazing choice of places to eat and drink, I'm sure it would take a year to get round them all.

Couple of photos:
1) I snuck into City Hall for a look round, fabulous building.
2) The HQ development, which has replaced the rather hideous 1970s Police Headquarters building.
3) Viscount Combermere has been defiled!
4) A pleasant backstreet, that always reminds me of the Hovis advert.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 29, 2011, 07:12:54 PM
Couple more pics:
1) The immaculately maintained Grosvenor Park.
2) There are tame squirrels everywhere in the park, they will take food out of your hand.
3) A stroll along the City Walls is a must for every visit.
4) Looking down at Eastgate Street.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 29, 2011, 07:27:42 PM
Last lot of photos:
1) There was some sort of Giant festival on...
2) A coffee and choc muffin in Starbucks was very welcome. Great coffee, lousy service.
3) Saint Ursula's.
4) Grosvenor Shopping Centre
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 30, 2011, 07:43:50 PM
Some great photos as usual Dave.    It sounds like you had a nice day there     
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on June 30, 2011, 09:20:42 PM
And I think Oscar was there yesterday. If you had known you could have perhaps gone on the same day and shared the travel costs!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on June 30, 2011, 09:50:03 PM
Sorry, looking at Oscar again, I think I might have misinterpreted his topic and perhaps he went somewhere else!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on June 30, 2011, 09:58:43 PM
Thanks, Hugo.  :)

Stan, perhaps he was sitting next to me on the train and I never knew!  8)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Trojan on July 01, 2011, 02:12:40 AM
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Thanks, Hugo.  :)

Stan, perhaps he was sitting next to me on the train and I never knew!  8)

 :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 08, 2011, 12:40:55 PM
Yesterday we travelled to the pretty village of Beddgelert where we met at the Goat Hotel for the start of our walk. We crossed over the railway track and headed uphill to Moel Hebog (Hill of the Falcon)  and followed the rough path up the north eastern ridge. There is some easy scrambling towards the top but the weather had turned and it was misty with a very strong and cold wind blowing directly at us.  Today there was going to be no marvellous view from the summit as the cloud was so low you just couldn't see anything at all.  We sheltered behind a dry stone wall while we had our refreshments but the wind was howling through the gaps in the wall, so much so that I had to put an extra fleece on as it was so cold.
We then descended very steeply down to the col between Moel Hebog and Moel Yr Ogof and then climbed up through a large cleft in the rocks to reach the summit of Moel Yr Ogof.  We resisted the temptation to visit Owain Glyndwr's Cave because of the adverse weather conditions and then set off for another climb to Moel Lefn.   There was an awkward descent down to Cwm Pennant and we had another break there before heading into the forest and following a long walk back to the Goat Hotel and our cars. On the way back home we stopped at the Bryn Tyrch in Capel Curig for a well deserved drink after our 7 hour walk!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 08, 2011, 12:43:05 PM
Moel Hebog walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Barbiroli on July 11, 2011, 08:43:44 PM
Gosh Hugo that fifth pic down makes it look a scary climb.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on July 14, 2011, 01:19:25 PM
Only a short walk with the dog this morning, but the view was amazing.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 23, 2011, 12:01:44 PM
Yesterday afternoon was a nice sunny day so we went for a circular walk from Meliden.   We crossed the St Melyd Golf Course using the Publc Footpath and noticed that the course was looking really good but strangely enough there was not one golfer playing on this lovely course!   At the other side we went into Bishop's Wood and started to climb upwards, The Fish Cave soon came into view and we ventured down it for a long way before coming back out again. The Fish Cave is actually an old Roman lead mine but so called because the spoil from the cave was chucked down the slope and the shape of the spoil resembled a fish!  Further up we came to the ruins of a small cottage with a plaque stating that a lead  miner lived there with his 9 children but sadly met his death when he fell in the nearby mines.    We carried on upwards having a great view of Prestatyn and the St Melyd Golf Course and came to the original well of the pretty village of Gwaenysgor.  We passed the pub The Eagle and Child but resisted the temptation to go inside for refreshments and went to the village pond to feed the Carp and numerous Ducks that lived there.
Then it was down to Dyserth via the Bryniau and Graig Fawr and we followed the river down to Dyserth Falls and on the way passing numerous man made caves and strange vegetation. The smell of wild Garlic was strong and we could hear the Buzzards calling as they soared in the sky above us. The falls are impressive but there was not a lot of water in the river today unlike times past when it has been thundering down and flooded the nearby properties and pubs.   We had a bit of a pull up the lane to reach the old disused Railway track which has now been tarmaced throughout it's length and it makes a perfect cycle and walking track now.   We continued down the track passing the disused lead mines until we reached the Golf Course again and made our way back to the car.  A lovely walk with a lot of local history to absorb.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 23, 2011, 12:04:57 PM
Meliden Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 23, 2011, 12:07:51 PM
Meliden - Dyserth walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on August 04, 2011, 09:22:54 AM
That looks like a good walk, I've often done the one  that starts at the top of Dyserth running towards Prestatyn through an old industrial works, as it's nice and level, wheelchair friendly  and shady on a hot day. The car park is handy and it also has a picnic table.
Where is the starting point in Meliden Hugo?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 04, 2011, 04:21:56 PM
Are you talking about the disused Railway track from Dyserth to Prestatyn?  If you are then if you haven't seen it recently, then you will notice a big improvement as the surface is now coated with smooth wide tarmac. It's great to walk on and would be perfect for prams or wheelchairs too.
The walk we did started from St Melyd Golf Course which has a right of way across the fairways, but we crossed over the Railway track to reach Bishopswood. 
I have done a much shorter walk with a retired group and we got onto the Railway track at Ffordd Tanrallt (just past the bridge) Meliden and headed towards Dyserth passing the lead mines etc on the way.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 14, 2011, 09:29:26 AM
Yesterday we went to the Malltraeth car park to start the 8 and a half mile circular walk to Llanddwyn Island. We had only walked about 300 yards along the forest track when we noticed that there were dozens and dozens of  baby Frogs on the track. They were all no more than half an inch long and hopping everywhere, so for the next mile we had to walk carefully along the track watching out for these little creatures.    We then left the track and went onto the Malltraeth estuary and there we saw groups of Toads but far fewer in number than the Frogs.  The tide was high and on the ebb but the sea was quite rough and soon we reached the sand dunes and Llanddwyn Island with an expanding view of the Llyn Peninsula.  After a while we reached the Island and crossed the pillow lava formations and followed the footpath to the Pilot cottages but unfortunately they were closed today so we couldn't go inside to see the exhibition there. We had our refreshments in the shelter of the old lighthouse and put our fleeces on because the wind had picked up a bit. After that we had a walk around the island looking at the bigger lighthouse and the ruins of St Dwynwen's Monastery.
After we left the Island the tide had gone out so far we could see the wreck of an old wooden boat in the distance on the beach. On my last walk here in better weather conditions, I swam out to another shipwreck nearer the Island. It's a large metal boat in deep water and only the skeleton of it remains. The water was too rough to try it yesterday but I'm older and wiser so I don't think I'll do that again!
Coming off the Island we took the path on the left through the dunes until we came to the Forest track and then made our way through the Forest back to the car park. On the way back we stopped at Llewelyn's old palace in Newborough and then at a nice cafe/camp shop for a coffee and a great big chunk of coffee cake before making our way off Anglesey and to home.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 14, 2011, 09:32:09 AM
Llanddwyn Island walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 14, 2011, 09:34:05 AM
Llanddwyn Island walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 02, 2011, 08:16:05 PM
Today we met at the car park by Pont Cyfyng to walk up Moel Siabod from its south side as two of the group had not done the walk before. It was going to be one of those days we thought when Peter got his boots out of the car and found that the boots were both for the left foot but Geraint came to the rescue with a pair of walking shoes that fitted his feet.
After yesterday's brilliant sunshine we were disappointed to see very low cloud over the peak and just hoped that it would burn off by the time we got there.  We seemed to reach the building that's been under repair for years very quickly and then crossed the style to go on the old track where the gradient eased slightly.  At the old miners cottages we stopped for refreshments before carrying on to the start of the climb.
Here we split into two groups Harry and I going straight up the face of the quarry while Geraint led the others up on the arm of the quarry.  The cloud cover was worse now as we picked our way up the loose scree and finding the path wasn't easy but we seemed to make it quickly to the summit where we sheltered from the bitterly cold winds up there. Visibility was less than 50 yards now and getting worse. As we were waiting for our friends to catch up we sat in the windbreak and chatted to two guys who said that they were trying to get fitter and lose weight and we witnessed the stocky one eating a packet of Jaffa cakes before getting his cigarettes out!    :)
When our friends caught up and had their break we headed back down and followed the river back to the car park.  The annoying thing when we got down was that it was nice and sunny and there were no clouds on the summit. :(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 02, 2011, 08:17:47 PM
Moel Siabod walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 21, 2011, 11:40:33 AM
I enjoyed a short walk with the Retirement group yesterday. We walked along the Promenade in Llanfairfechan passing the lake on the way and we walked along the sea defences until we reached the bird observation huts.
On our way we saw numerous varieties of birds including White Egrets but once inside the hut we saw none,zilch, they must have known that we were arriving and flown away.
We didn't stay there long and made our way back.
It was a pleasant walk though and the streams and river that we crossed along the way were in full flow following the recent heavy rains and once back on the Prom we stopped for our usual coffee etc before returning home.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 21, 2011, 12:39:08 PM
That's always a nice walk, Hugo. I often make it into a circular walk by crossing over the railway line and A55 at the end of the reserve and walking back along the old main road to the traffic lights in the middle of Llanfairfechan, then back down to the beach cafe.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 22, 2011, 12:48:59 PM
I've done our walk a few times Dave but never done the one that you go on.  I take it that you have to go over the road bridge at the far end of Llanfairfechan and then walk on the old road passing Bryn Y Neuadd on the way.
That's a fair old walk and I'm afraid that a few OAP's in our group just wouldn't be able to make it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 30, 2011, 09:45:27 AM
What a difference a week makes.  Llinos and I took a walk up Llanfair mountains last week and although the wind was calm near the foot of the mountain as we climbed higher it became very stong, my ears were so cold I was getting that headachy feeling, we put our hoods up but soon realised our efforts were pointless and so unable to hear a word each other was saying and getting blown all over the show we called it a day and walked back down to the car and decided to go to the Penmaenmawr museum instead.  There is an abundance of information on the Quarry and of course the Graiglwyd Axe Factories, Druid Circle etc and glass cases filled with various finds such as stone age knives and other artifacts but surprisingly scarcely nothing on Braich Y Dinas.  Nobody seems to know where the Urns found by Harold Hughes have been sent and he found over 20 if I remember rightly.   One of the Urns I have since been told was on display for donkey years in a glass case at the Grand Hotel but no sign of it now or where it went sadly.  :-[
An old school teacher of mine Mr Dennis Roberts is the local historian for Penmaenmawr and Llinos and I got very excited when the curator in the Pen Museum informed us that Mr Roberts and fellow historians had rescued old victorian papers relating to the Quarry from a cellar in the old Darbyshires cellar in 2004 all these papers were available to view in the Llandudno Archives.  So next stop the Archives, unfortunately these papers were of no interest to us as they contained information on wages and accounts from that era. 
It's such a shame that such an important structure which covered a vast area over Penmaenmawr and Llanfair has not been documented in full or if it has it's incredibly hard to find.
Below are some old photos taken from an aeroplane in 1924 showing the zig zag path that lead up and through the huge fortress.  The last picture is of Harold Hughes who excavated Braich y Dinas but due to the onset of the Quarry was very pushed for time it was loaned to me by Rob Pritchard who says he has a folder full but is unable to locate them at the moment as he's moving house.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 30, 2011, 10:37:30 AM
Monday of this week Llinos and I armed with "Google Earth" images plotted excactly where Braich y Dinas would have been, we also wanted to have a look at odd little stone walls dotted around the far side of Pen mountain.  It was an excellent day but remembering the change in weather last time we took our waterproof coats (which we ended up carrying as it was sweltering up there).
Judging by our maps we realised that at some point we were going to have to trespass on Quarry land so we practiced our excuses as we walked up they ranged from "oh we do apologise we didn't read the signs" "yes we're here from Bangor Uni" but none sounded convincing so we settled on "I'm sorry has Tony Robinson not rang to inform you of our arrival" if nothing else we'd get our own way by making the Foreman laugh.  We needn't have bothered though we crossed over the Quarry without so much as a glimpse of any Foreman.
The views were breath taking as usual as you can see from the photos below. 
It's only when  plotting the area using old and recent maps and landmarks that you can appreciate just how much of the mountain has been quarried away and as we came over the brow it was blatantly obvious that my Dad was probably right and all traces of the Fort had vanished with the systematic onset of the Quarry, our hearts sank. 
However we weren't about to give up that easily after all there was still the stone anomalies we'd found on Google Earth. 
On the second pic you can see the yellow pin which points out a stone formation around the far side of the mountain we decided to have a walk round and take a look.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 30, 2011, 11:09:09 AM
According to old documents Prince Llewelyn and his few remaining men took refuge up in Braich y Dinas and even rebuilt some of the walls for protection during Llewelyns last stand (how interesting is that)  ;D Anyway back to the walls............It was very steep around the far side and I was glad Gezzy had bought me the walking sticks even if he was only taking the mik.  On the further most point we discovered what appeared to be a look out of some sort built between the bed rock, the wall itself is around 9' tall (that's not including the bottom wall) and 4' thick with a large pit behind it.  Thicker than any other quarry wall we had seen and located right on the side of the mountain, we sat on top of the wall and realised what an excellent vantage point its location was you could see for miles.  Bearing this in mind we decided that this must have been a look out point for Llewelyn and his merryfew remaining men.
I know what your thinking....... it was probably built to shelter quarry workers from the cold harsh winds as they sat eating their lard butties or maybe it was built for protection against rock fall? But as always I prefer my version of events and on Monday this week Llinos and I sat where Llewelyn did many years before and put up his last fight $walesflag$

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 30, 2011, 11:15:58 AM
Just a few more odd photos from the Quarry walk.

The first photo was taken from Llewelyns wall.

The second is of the old quarry conveyor belt buildings.....it look like 2 really tall men having a chat on the top of the structure.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 30, 2011, 11:17:33 AM
Enjoyed reading your articles Pendragon and the views are incredible from up there. Great photos. Thanks!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 30, 2011, 11:24:02 AM
Thanks Hollins.  I love the mountains between Llanfair and Conwy there's always something else to discover up there.  In the 50s a survey was carried out and students located 288 separate locations of interest by 2002 another 283 had been added.  There's some fascinating history up there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on September 30, 2011, 06:08:10 PM
That's really interesting, Pendragon, and the photos are great.  Would Braich y Dinas have been the pointy bit at the top of the mountain which can be seen in old pictures but which has now been lost to the quarry? 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 30, 2011, 08:26:42 PM
The view from the top is fantastic!  $cool$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 30, 2011, 10:11:05 PM
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That's really interesting, Pendragon, and the photos are great.  Would Braich y Dinas have been the pointy bit at the top of the mountain which can be seen in old pictures but which has now been lost to the quarry?
I'll be honest with you Blodyn that's what I think, in Alwyn S Evans book he says that the biggest enclosures were at the top and I always thought he meant the ones you see in photos.  The only thing is I've found a picture which shows quarrying very early on in that area and so now I'm wondering if they are just granite piles or not.  I'll get back to you.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 01, 2011, 02:38:21 PM
I've really enjoyed reading about your walks with all the history involved and the photos are just stunning.  Coming from Llandudno we never knew much about Penmaenmawr other than the quarry clock and the time of the blasting but there's a lot of history there and a lot more to find out.
Looking down from the Druid's circle you realise just how beautiful the area is and how lucky we are to be living in this part of the world.       $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on October 02, 2011, 08:50:51 PM
you only realise the beauty of wales when you move away from it, when your brought up there you take your surroundings for granted
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on October 02, 2011, 09:10:43 PM
  Blodyn mentions the "pointy bit at the top."  As kids riding our bikes along the coast road we always called that "pimple mountain"  For years and years afterwards (from cars) I always used to look up for the pimple but it slowly got smaller and smaller.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on October 02, 2011, 09:19:27 PM
was it you getting taller and taller mike?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 03, 2011, 04:49:17 PM
I have looked at dozens of old photos and paintings of Pen mountain over the years and in some I have noticed a "pointy bit" or "pimple" on the top  ;D. 
Having read Alwyn S Evans book Populating the past I just assumed that the point in question was a Cairn one of 3 large structures situated at the top of Braich y Dinas.  However when you look at old paintings the point is not there and considering its size I can't imagine it having been omitted from all the pictures so I took a closer look at old photos. 
I have now decided that the pointy bit was the last stage on the top of the mountain to be quarried which matches up with what Mike said about the pimple getting smaller and smaller over the years.
You can see from the painting below that the mountain used to be a completely different shape before the Quarry.  The second is a drawing of the plan of Braich y Dinas fort.  In the next photo you can clearly see the "pointy bit" on the top and  in the last photo you can see the perspective and size of the point on the top.....it would be the equivalent size of a skyscraper if it was a Cairn.  What do you think?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Quiggs on October 03, 2011, 05:07:42 PM
When I lived on the Gunsite, we would often hear the 'Blasting' coming from the quarry. My father told me that the pimple on the top could not be removed as it was the ' Trigonometric Point ' which was used to calculate the heights and positions of adjoining peaks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 03, 2011, 05:10:47 PM
Thanks Quiggs....course I never  would have thought of that  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 08, 2011, 07:44:12 PM
Just back from a walking trip on the Pembrokeshire coast path. Here are a few photos of the section between Newport and Cardigan. It is dramatic scenery with a lot of ascent and descent.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 09, 2011, 03:23:29 PM
I thought that I'd have a walk around the Marine Drive today and after parking my car by the Headlands Hotel I walked over Happy Valley to the road.  The machinery for the sea defence looked high and dry but the sea was calm today.   ??? I passed the Rock Studios where several climbers seemed ready to commence climbing and thought rather them than me!
Around the first headland I went to Pigeons Cave where I used to dive off the ledge many years ago and climb back up the metal ladders that went from the beach to the ledge.  The first picture of the cave shows the cave on the left of the ledge the second one is looking down it. Pigeons Cave is a horizontal shaft on the left and there is an opening on the right that once had a ladder down to the beach.
There were quite a few people walking and cycling along the drive and it was nice to see the old Tourist Bus go past full of people.
It didn't take long to pass the lighthouse and I stopped at the cafe for a nice Latte and Bakewell Tart. Before long it was time to go and I hadn't gone far before my cap flew off and I was running down the road after it.  It just confirmed the reasons why I normally walk from the West Shore. The wind is usually on your back and you're never looking into the Sun.  The wind was howling by now so it was up the concrete road and along the wall of the farm until I came to the Church. Then down the tram track TO REACH MY CAR. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 09, 2011, 03:26:11 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 09, 2011, 03:28:05 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on October 09, 2011, 07:26:29 PM
My wife and I went up for a short walk on the North Wales Path above the Sychnant pass this afternoon and I came down feeling as if I'd had my face sandblasted by the really strong winds up there. No real views from the top, as the whole coastline  was shrouded in mis,t but it was just so enjoyable to get out on the hills after a few weeks away.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 09, 2011, 09:38:26 PM
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The machinery for the sea defence looked high and dry but the sea was calm today.   
Must have missed you by only a minute or two, Hugo!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on October 09, 2011, 11:12:19 PM
Hugo, the burger van was in that field yesterday afternoon into which I was manipulated as a spectator for the Cambrian Rally and asked to part with £5 for the privilege.  $booboo$


Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 10, 2011, 09:27:12 AM
Dave, judging from the tides in our photos you must have been there before me.  I was there about 11.10am and the tide was on the turn then.

The Medz, the Orme was just as bad yesterday and when I passed by your place I had a look at that stone in the garden. Have you ever found out what it was and why it was left?    Maybe a present from EmmaP's relation at Rofft Bach perhaps!

Bri, hope you enjoyed every bit of that burger.  I was wondering why it was there and must say that you've been done well and truly. That van doesn't look like it's worth £5.00  let alone the burgers inside.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on October 10, 2011, 09:45:57 AM
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Hugo, the burger van was in that field yesterday afternoon into which I was manipulated as a spectator for the Cambrian Rally and asked to part with £5 for the privilege.  $booboo$

If that was for spectating and not for the burger you were lucky-- the tickets on the booking site were 5 times that amount.!
Looking at Mike's comment about the van--- I dread to think what the inside of it was like !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on October 10, 2011, 10:21:35 AM
Nemesis, I think you are getting confused with the Wales GB Rally next month which will cost £25 per person including processing and booking fees as well as transportation.

Hugo, I did not indulge in a burger but I was certainly well and truly done although I only handed over £3.50 because that is all the money I had on me.

I assume the landowners are aware of all this commercialism.

Nevertheless, I had originally intended to park either at the summit or down by St Tudno’s Churchyard but, obviously, I did neither.

While driving up St Tudno’s Road, about half an hour before the first rally stage started, I was discouraged from driving up to the summit by a few red and white cones spanning the junction in the road leading up to the summit.

There were a couple of individuals in those yellow jackets pointing me down towards St Tudno’s Church with signs showing ‘spectators’ in the grass.

I did just that thinking they were being helpful by letting me know the summit car park was already full.

Upon approaching the twenty or so empty FREE parking places in the picnic area just before the church there were more individuals in those yellow jackets sending me to the left signposted ‘spectators’ because they also had red and white cones in the road.

By the time, I arrived at that field I was asked to pay £5.

I had little choice as I had several vehicles behind me and there was no room for me to turn around.

The young ladies also had no choice but to accept my £3.50.

I watched about half an hour of the special stage and decided to call it a day.

Watching from such a great height was no comparison to watching the Lombard RAC Rally at close quarters during the seventies.

BTW, I could not believe the number of babes in pushchairs in the area and the number of families with small kids making their way down the slippery hill to get closer to the action.

I even witnesses a couple of individuals crossing over Marine Drive to watch from behind the wall after the special stage had started.

Fortunately, I was able to get out of the field without getting stuck in the mud but there were still plenty of cars arriving to get into the official or unofficial car park.

Before coming of the Great Orme I was now able to drive up to the summit car park without any problem.

The summit car park was barely a quarter full and it only cost £1.10 to park for up to 2 hours !!

From memory, I did not notice the names of either ‘Cambrian Rally’ or ‘NWCC’ on any of those spectator direction signs.

Also, the individuals collecting the £5 entry fees had no ID badges and did not issue any paper receipts for the £5 parking fee.

For all I know they could have been anybody.

Before I came home I decided to watch the cars at the finishing line by the Cenotaph and probably enjoyed that more than my earlier experience up on the Great Orme.

There was a chap interviewing the drivers as they each arrived and he was very good at his job.



Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on October 11, 2011, 06:44:49 PM
Here is the car park charging £5 with the summit car park charging only £1.10 behind it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on October 11, 2011, 08:24:35 PM
Just a bloody rip off!   Who gets the benefit of the cash?  The organisers, the farmer, the council?  Or do they divide it up in the pub after the event?  Or do Mostyn have their sticky little fingers in the pie? 

Once upon a time the land was owned by the People.     :rage:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 26, 2011, 11:33:16 AM
Socs and I went for another walk up Conwy mountain yesterday to have a look at the recently discovered Ancient Mine (everything to do with Conwy thread) having located the mine I decided to have a good look round Caer Seion the Roman Fort situated at the top of the hill.  The surrounding area was quite interesting too.  I took a photo of what looked like a stone circle just behind the fort.  This time I did a little research and discovered it was the remains of a round house.  There are lots of sheltered trenches surrounding the fort too maybe people used to live here or maybe they were used for defence.  I find the mountains fascinating and there is always something new to see. Even the large Crows/Ravens enjoy the views.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 26, 2011, 11:36:59 AM
Some more photos of Conwy Mountain.  A large nest site in the rocks pic 1.  Socs patiently waiting while I take photos, the view from the top and of course the wild ponies.  I only saw these two yesterday.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 27, 2011, 09:18:37 PM
I had made plans to call in my sister Jo's house yesterday and so I thought I'd kill two birds with one stone and take Socs for a walk up Marl Hall Woods.   Gez was brought up in Junction and he used to play in these woods as a lad with his mates, he'd told me of "Dead mans cave"  "The Nuns steps"  climbing up the steep rocks and how he was once shot with a 2.2 air rifle and fell out of a tree  :o but we'll say no more about that  :-X
Socs and I walked up through the trees and zig zagged along the various paths me throwing her ball as we went.  It's a really nice place and a lot bigger than I first thought.  The views from the top of the rocks are beautiful, we found Dead mans cave too it's like an open tunnel cut from the bedrock you have to wonder if it's natural or dug out in some way as at one point the rocks form perfect hiding holes with smooth sides and at the other end it looks like an entrance has been blocked by a large boulder.  I think the Nuns steps are the stone ones we saw last but I preferred the wooden steps at the other end of the woods.  It was time we were heading back over to Jo's house so we made our way down the stone steps and back to the reality of the very busy main road below.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 27, 2011, 09:22:32 PM
Some photos of Dead mans cave and the stone entrance at the foot of the Nuns steps.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 27, 2011, 09:30:59 PM
Pendragon, your local adventures are so interesting. I think you should write a book of them. I like the photo of the crow enjoying the view.
 $thanx$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 27, 2011, 10:46:26 PM
Today I thought I'd go up to Llangelynin church after all from what I remember it's not that far from Conwy about 3miles I estimated............well I think we can quite safely say my estimations were monumentally flawed because the road just went on and on, twice I had to ask fellow walkers I met if I was on the right road as according to the app on my phone I had already walked 3.5 miles and the Church was nowhere in sight.  Finally as the road narrowed I recognised the steep track up to the church there was a sign that read Llangelynin Church 1mile  :o Your having a laugh I though I'll never make it.... 1 mile left and it was all up hill.  I hadn't come prepared at all I thought as I realised I had no sandwiches, I'd forgotten my bottle of water and my fold away portable stretcher was still on the kitchen table.  By this time I was no longer walking it was more a kinda vertical crawl you know the one, your still walking but your hands are on your knees willing your legs to carry your body, by now the app on my phone read 4.5 miles and still the hill climbed  I was knackered.  This was ridiculous I thought it's the same distance back home yet   >?>??
I found a wall and collapsed panting for breathe.  Llangelynin church is a very special place to me it's where we scattered my Nains ashes, she spent a lot of her childhood playing up and around the churchyard  it was one of her favourite places.  Sitting on the wall I remembered the day the entire family traveled up the narrow winding track to scatter Nains ashes, I laughed as I remembered my Dad driving his camper van up and this was no little VW camper van it was a full on wide as you like camper van honestly a gnat couldn't have maneuvered around it, all you could hear was his gears crunching and the engine screeching as he kangarood up the road  _))* Dad was getting more and more annoyed as one by one we started sniggering in the back which only drove him on determined he'd succeed to the top.  Apart from the poor beggars behind us the rest of the clan had reached the top and where now watching my poor frustrated Dad navigate the last bend.  I think the funniest part of the whole day though was when my Uncle Graham actually scattered Nains ashes, we decided to go round the side of the church to carry out the ceremony as it was a little windy on the day, my Uncles and Auties said a few words and Uncle Graham began to scatter........ exactly the same time as the wind picked up and so we all got a pebble dashing, as we looked at one another we had to laugh as Nain would have found it hilarious it was like a scene from Only fools and horses.  Ceremony over everyone rushed back to their cars determined not to be behind my Dad on the way back down  :laugh:
Well I'd had my rest now it was time to carry on up the never ending really steep hill.  On the way up we saw this Mine I have no idea what was extracted from it or how old it is but the sign outside it said dangerous and that was enough for me it was onwards and upwards.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 27, 2011, 11:45:03 PM
Socs is a working dog and so she lives for her ball her eyes light up the minute she sees it and believe me she never gets tired of fetching it, as we reached the top the distance the ball traveled with each throw had drastically diminished along with my will to live, it was all I could do just to pick the ball up never mind throw it.  I swear it's only been 4 days and I have a right arm like Geoff Capes.  As we turned the corner towards the entrance to the church I could see a large party of walkers sat on the grave stones eating their sandwiches and drinking their water if you could have seen my face  :'( I had a look round the church, took some photos and sat reminiscing about  my Nain she was an amazing woman. It was time for the trek home as I left the church one of the party approached me and explained that a lady from the group had lost her camera on her way up to the church it was either lying on the path or she may had left it in a cafe called The Pancake House no more than a half hour before......he couldn't get a signal on his phone and so he asked if I was going back down the road toward the cafe.  To be honest I had every intention of returning home the same route I had arrived but the thought of a cafe half an hour away was too much to resist.  I took his mobile number and assured him I would ask at the cafe and keep my eyes peeled on my way down and if I found the camera I would phone him and I started off down the track in search of coffee, ham sandwiches and the toilet the day was looking up.
The road back down to the cafe was a nightmare it looked more like a river bed rough and slippy with big stones and puddles everywhere.  It soon dawned on me as I stumbled down the path with lead filled legs and a mouth like Gandhi's flip flop that the fella I'd spoken to was as bad as me with his estimates he said half an hour away I was 45 minutes in and I couldn't see a cafe  :rage: my phone was now reading just shy of 7 miles that's it I thought if I find his camera I'll stamp on it then  hoof it into a hedge for taking the mic, if he'd reached the church in half an hour from here then he must have legged it!! &shake&  Having asked for directions on the road twice I finally arrived at the Pancake house......that was without doubt the best coffee I've ever had and Socs lapped up a large bowl of water.

 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 27, 2011, 11:50:06 PM
Above is the weird little drawing on the church wall beside the font the big old church door, outside is  the Holy Well said to have cured sick children in past times.  Below is the inside of Llangelynin and a photo of the track down towards the cafe no more than a half hour away yeah right if your names Linford Christy it is!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 28, 2011, 12:16:06 AM
I checked the time it was now nearly 4 o clock definitely time to walk home I had no idea how far away Conwy was I just knew I felt much better having had a rest and a coffee.  It was infact just over 3 miles home.  On my way I happened to notice this sign which doesn't come across as a very polite one does it? I don't really understand what it means either can people literally just come and look round your house and garden then if it's listed?
Just before the old candle factory building on the Henryd road poking through the trees I saw a house up for sale called Plas Iolyn it was advertised as a gentlemens residence? set in 4 acre of land offers over £395k.  I had to take a look it was a huge derelict house.  I took some photos of the exterior.  I looked in through one of the windows into a huge room with a bar in one side and a magnificent old snooker table complete with all the balls this place was awesome.  There were two young lads playing in the garden and one explained it was  his Great Nains house but she was now in her nineties hence the sale.  There was a small court yard at the back with a water pump fixed to the wall.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 28, 2011, 12:23:53 AM
I'd love to have a look round the inside there was a really nice atmosphere to the place.  In one of the out buildings I saw this old tractor.  We made our way back down the drive and continued on past the old candle factory and back into Conwy nearly 5and a half hours and just shy of 11 miles later.  Exhausted but having had a good day.  Tomorrow I'll probably make it Georges shop and back  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on October 28, 2011, 12:54:48 AM
i agree with hollins, you should serialize your adventures they make enjoyable reading.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 28, 2011, 12:57:15 AM
Thank you both I'm glad you like my posts.  I have to get a dog of my own soon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: stephenprudence on October 28, 2011, 11:27:55 AM
I agree with others, definitely book material!

I know how tiring a long walk like that can be, I once did 21 miles from The English side to the Welsh side.. took me 4.5 hours walking fairly fast, to say I was tired would be a horrific understatement
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 28, 2011, 11:47:34 AM
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Just before the old candle factory building on the Henryd road poking through the trees I saw a house up for sale called Plas Iolyn it was advertised as a gentlemens residence? set in 4 acre of land offers over £395k.  I had to take a look it was a huge derelict house.  I took some photos of the exterior.  I looked in through one of the windows into a huge room with a bar in one side and a magnificent old snooker table complete with all the balls this place was awesome.  There were two young lads playing in the garden and one explained it was  his Great Nains house but she was now in her nineties hence the sale.  There was a small court yard at the back with a water pump fixed to the wall.
http://www.robbie-howarth.co.uk/attachment_library/d_3147S_0.pdf (http://www.robbie-howarth.co.uk/attachment_library/d_3147S_0.pdf)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 28, 2011, 04:04:59 PM
Pendragon,I've found the details of your walks quite fascinating and the photos illustrating your walks are great too. I didn't realise how many walks there are in the local area until you started posting them.
When I was in John Bright's School the lads from Pen and Conwy would often talk about their walks on the Carneddau and of the Plane wreckage they used to find up there but I never started walking there until about 15 years ago.
I can't wait to do some of your local walks but at the moment I'm not walking due to a back injury and minor op on the leg. About 18 months ago I got bitten on the calf by a Horse Fly and the little b****** caused an infection and it required 3 stitches when they operated!
 I'll invest in insect repellent in the future.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Welshmunchkin on October 28, 2011, 07:22:03 PM
Pendragon, I too find the details of your walks fascinating, you seem to be very knowledable about the local area. I would like to ask you, can you (or any other members) sugest any local walks of interest that are on the flat? I have a few health problems and find I can no longer walk uphill ( boy, do I live in the wrong place!) I would love to find interesting walks that I can manage, especially if you can advise me of interesting sites along the way.By local I mean anywhere between say Penmaenmawr, Conwy and around Llandudno. :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on October 28, 2011, 08:51:28 PM
Pendragon, I love the story of your Llangelynin walk!  Your accounts are so informative and entertaining - I'm looking forward to hearing about your next walk. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 28, 2011, 11:42:52 PM
My plans for today were to walk over to Penmaenmawr as I haven't seen my mate Ali Gugs for what seems like an eternity.   ZXZ My intention was to walk over the pass to where the ice cream van parks that's where the hill becomes steep on the decent into Dwygyfylchi, then take the mountain path up where the big wooden gate is on the right (through that gate is the most beautiful old woods with a path that leads you down to the reservoir/marsh) then walk over to the Jubilee posts and round the path and take photos of the mine and the cave we used to play in as kids and arrive in Ali Gug's around 4pm then walk home along the cycle path back over to Conwy.
This time Socs and I were prepared I haven't got a small back pack so I improvised with a black canvas shoulder bag, in went Socs shmacho bars, a small plastic bowl, her ball and a bottle of water, with no room left in the bag I settled with a scotch egg (I'm not joking either) and I'd have to share Socs water   ???
We set off around 1ish up towards St Agnes road and headed towards the Sychnant Pass.  As we walked Socs kept turning round and looking at me as if to say "I know you won't throw my ball here"  :( That's when all my plans went out the window, so we took the first footpath just before Pinewood and cut through the field and over the bridge up onto Conwy mountain.  The views from up there are lovely mountains, fields and trees as far as the eye can see.  We'd only just joined the main track when I noticed the wild ponies so Socs ball was confiscated and she was swiftly put back on the lead.  I've never seen the ponies this close before they just stood watching us as we passed, I was quite surprised as they had a foal with them too.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 29, 2011, 12:34:12 AM
Once the ponies were safely behind us the lead was off and the ball returned to Socs we carried on along the NW trail towards Alltwen (the site of an old fortress) there's a marshy area there and I really want to go with the metal detector one day but I'm not sure if it's legal (and you know me  :D) apparently in pre historic times people used to throw artifacts and the like into marshes as offerings to the gods during buriels and other religious ceremonies.  Lots of items have been found in and around marshes and bogs.
We crossed the road at the top of the pass and followed the track up and over towards Pen.  We got most of the way up the hill and decided to sit on the conveniently situated bench.  Socs was making me laugh as she kept dropping her ball and she'd have to chase it back down the mountain again, well it was funny until she became distracted by the shmachos and the water, off it bounced down the track with me going "Socs Socs get your ball" and her sniffing round completely at a loss as to where it had gone, so guess who had to run down the flaming hill and then walk back up with it.....yep this soppy mare!!
I took a photo from the bench where I finally got to eat my scotch egg....well most of it y'see Socs likes Smachos and scotch eggs  :roll: you can see the path way up to Alltwen in the distance. 
We followed a really narrow path round the side of the mountain above Dwygyfylchi then walked up through a road cut between fields towards the higher ground.  Just round the corner I saw the most idyllic little old derelict cottage it was set at the foot of a field surrounded by a solid stone wall you can see the old stone fire place and where the oven was, the remains of out buildings and a perfectly laid out garden with a gap where the gate was.  The cottage was probably one of the nicest sites I've seen so far as this is the first time I've ever been round this side of the mountain.  What I didn't know either is once you walk up the path a little further it all turns to march lands and you haven't got a hope in hell of crossing it without walking most of the way to the top before you can get to dry land.  I know it's tight but I could see two walkers near the bottom trying to cross and each time they returned as the ground got soggier and soggier.  I think they must have climbed on the wall in the end well that or they sank....I never saw them again  ???
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 29, 2011, 12:50:53 AM
Just before the ground becomes marsh there was a clearing behind a huge split stone, in this clearing is a pile of rocks but positioned around it are large flat leaning stones.  In the distance on top of the next hill are even bigger marker stones (they have to have a name Hugo you'll know) this is when I decided to make use of the mini binoculars with night vision  8) I had to have months ago but never used........they were neither use nor ornament rubbish is what they are, I couldn't see properly in the day so what chance have I got in the dark !!  I decided to take a closer look with my normal eyes at the huge rock behind me, it had a deep crevice running across it and each side was lined with quartz? this was a very significant commodity in pre history people used to put quartz pebbles on buriel sites (according to my very good friend Tony............Robinson that is  :roll:)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 29, 2011, 01:16:47 AM
After what seemed like ages we managed to traverse the marsh get back on the track and walk over, down towards the wooden bridge over towards the farm and the stile that joins the road down to the Jubilee Pillars.  This extract taken from the Penmaenmawr and Dwygyfylchi tourism page These pillars were built in 1888 to mark the opening of the Jubilee Path. This is a circular walk opened for visitors staying at the popular Victorian resort of Penmaenmawr to enjoy the panoramic views of the area. more about Jubilee path on the link below.

http://www.penmaenmawr.com/historyJubileewalks.html (http://www.penmaenmawr.com/historyJubileewalks.html)

If you walk around the Jubilee you can see the now almost completely covered entrance to yet another Mine  ;D and I also took a photo of the cave we played in as kids.  I remember once years ago when I was about 13 a group of us were camping and we all congregated up at Jubilee path.  It was really cold so we decided we'd go round the corner to the cave for shelter, it seemed like a good idea at the time until we reached it and realised how dark it was and most of us chickened out and wouldn't go in but there's always one isn't there and he's always called Dave  :roll: he decided he was going in...........calling us all the Mary Ellens as he ventured into the pitch dark cave.  The next thing all we heard was a loud rustling noise and Dave come screaming like a girl from the cave closely followed by the sheep he'd just inadvertently sat on.... _))* proper funny that was.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 29, 2011, 01:18:22 AM
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Just before the ground becomes marsh there was a clearing behind a huge split stone, in this clearing is a pile of rocks but positioned around it are large flat leaning stones.  In the distance on top of the next hill are even bigger marker stones (they have to have a name Hugo you'll know) this is when I decided to make use of the mini binoculars with night vision  8) I had to have months ago but never used........they were neither use nor ornament rubbish is what they are, I couldn't see properly in the day so what chance have I got in the dark !!  I decided to take a closer look with my normal eyes at the huge rock behind me, it had a deep crevice running across it and each side was lined with quartz? this was a very significant commodity in pre history people used to put quartz pebbles on buriel sites (according to my very good friend Tony............Robinson that is  :roll:)

I just hope Hugo doesn't say yes Ang it's called Druid Circle  &shake&
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 29, 2011, 01:25:41 AM
It was time I was getting off the mountain it was nearly half five by now and the sun was disappearing behind Braich Y dinas (the Quarry) I took a photo of my beloved Penmaenmawr from near the cave entrance and walked down Mountain Lane to get a coffee in Ali Gug's house.  The last photo is of Green Gorge a very steep incline on the mountain, believe it or not as kids we used to fly down here on sledges in the snow.  Many a happy time was spent on this mountain it's only when you see them again the memories come flooding back.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: llandudnotrust on October 29, 2011, 11:31:07 AM
Fantastic Pendragon just fantastic.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 09:11:16 PM
I have wanted to go for a walk up the mountains with my Dad for months but with one thing and another it hasn't happened.  I spoke to him recently and he said we'd arrange a walk for this week then last night he phoned and said the best day to go as far as the weather went was today and he was absolutely right.  He picked me and Socs up half 9 this morning and off we went.  ;D
We parked the car by the old school house just up the road behind the Fairy Glen pub at the foot of the Sychnant Pass in Dwygyfylchi.  We crossed the road from the wooden framed school house and walked over the bridge then took the narrow donkey path up onto the mountain.  It's a steep climb, while on the way up Dad was telling me of an old lady called Mrs Cross who lived in the house called Pen Ffordd Goch at the top of the path (pic 1) Mrs Cross would have to trek down the path with her donkey to fetch provisions from the little shop at the foot of the mountain and then trek all the way back up.  Amazing isn't it and there's us complaining of pot holes  :roll:
Just around the corner is the idyllic derelict cottage I was telling you about in an earlier post (pic 2) In the early 1900s this little house was the talk of the village.  There was old bachelor and his maid living there, the man was very religious and would preach the bible in the village and hold bible readings at his house with the local ladies.  As the weeks went by the ladies grew more and more suspicious of the maid and her relationship with the preacher.  Until one afternoon one of the ladies  could bear it no more and she hid the fire iron in the maids bed.  The next week when the ladies returned for their usual reading the old preacher said "do you know since your last visit I have been unable to find my fire iron" thus proving the maid slept in her masters bed....shock horror  :o
 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 09:28:00 PM
We followed the path up a little further and Dad pointed out a house in the distance (pic 1) it was here that years before squatters claimed rights to this house and land as they had lived in the derelict building for more than 12 years without being moved on....incredible.  I don't know who lives there now but extensive restoration work has been carried out on the house since.  Your probably bored with photos of the ponies but these are special ponies........the smaller grey/white one is a rare Caernarddau pony...... how do I know?  Well as always my Dad told me  :D A Caernarddau pony is white/grey, has a much smaller squat nose with an exceptionally long mane and tail.  Many of the ponies are now crossed with the Exmore variety hence the rarity of the thorough bred.  I never knew that. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 09:41:49 PM
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Just before the ground becomes marsh there was a clearing behind a huge split stone, in this clearing is a pile of rocks but positioned around it are large flat leaning stones.  In the distance on top of the next hill are even bigger marker stones (they have to have a name Hugo you'll know) this is when I decided to make use of the mini binoculars with night vision  8) I had to have months ago but never used........they were neither use nor ornament rubbish is what they are, I couldn't see properly in the day so what chance have I got in the dark !!  I decided to take a closer look with my normal eyes at the huge rock behind me, it had a deep crevice running across it and each side was lined with quartz? this was a very significant commodity in pre history people used to put quartz pebbles on buriel sites (according to my very good friend Tony............Robinson that is  :roll:)

I just hope Hugo doesn't say yes Ang it's called Druid Circle  &shake&
The huge stone is called Maen Egsgob and marks the old  boundry for the Bishop of Bangors land.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 10:03:14 PM
We remained on the track up towards Maen Canu (the ringing stone) but just before it on the hill behind a bank of bracken Dad pointed out this stone age Cist. A cist is a stone age grave, as the ground in this area is so hard neolithic man would dig a hole approximately 2' deep and the body along with their possessions would be placed in the fetal position (to save space) in the stone lined grave then a large flat stone covered the top, as you can see from the photos below this grave has long since been robbed.  Maen Canu is the huge quartz lined stone I took photos of on my last visit here a few days before so named because due to the huge crack down the middle of the rock if you take a stone and bang the top of the rock where it overlaps you can hear a ringing sound.  It used to sound a lot clearer years ago but debris has over the years filled the crevis and dulled the sound somewhat.  I left the stone on the top of the rock I think you can see it in the last photo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 10:28:02 PM
Having passed the cist and Maen Canu we took a different track from my last visit and walked up and around Waen Gyrach (pic 1) an old farm that was inhabited up until the 1930s then became derelict.  In the 1940s it was used by the army and the home guard as a firing range and remains of mortar bombs and shells can be found in abundance in the field and around the walls.  My Dad told me of the time he and his friend Dafydd (a staunch Welsh Nationalist in the 1970s) found an intact mortar bomb at Waen Gyrach, my Dad was going to take it home but was a bit concerned as it could be live.  They decided to throw it in the reservoir just to be safe.  Luckily it didn't explode but my dad was laughing today when he remembered Dafydd saying to him "Jesus can you imagine the headlines...Welsh Nationalist charged with blowing up Welsh water supply to village"  :laugh:
Right near Waen Gyrach in the boggy land is this neolithic well (pic 2) I had to take a look but as a rule I do my best to keep away from sodden wet areas such as this because as Mrs Fester will confirm I always end up with one wet leg  :roll: which is another reason I have been promising to buy some gators but as far as my Dad is concerned if your boots are water proof what's the problem.  I don't know if you can see clearly enough from my photo but the walls of the well have been built up with rocks it's quite deep too.  We crossed the marsh with a couple of near misses but I didn't fall in so all was well  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 10:51:02 PM
We walked up to the reservoirs which are thankfully still in one piece  :-X These two reservoirs used to supply the village of Penmaenmawr with water.  The first is a more natural looking site which is now used to rear baby trout (that's not the right term is it?) the other was hand dug in the 1920s and is now out of use.  Kids come camping up here in the summer and it's known as the sheep dip. 
The small stone building in the distance is what's called a Haboti (might have the name wrong and it's a bit late to phone dad now, I'll amend in the morning if it is) Farmers and their families would live in these buildings during the warmer months as their animals grazed on the abundance of food available freely.  When the weather got colder the family would return to their farms on the lower land, a kind of summer house if you like.  Habotis are scattered all over the mountain.  My Dad has a saying "if you find something on the mountain that looks out of place it usually is" in the last photo there is three stones the top one is typical of the stones found in this terrain, the other two are rounded pebbles probably used as sling shot the smaller pebble belonging to a novice and the larger used to kill the game and other wild animals which were found in great numbers hundreds of years ago.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 11:11:13 PM
Before long we arrived at the Tal y Fan slate quarry.  This quarry was only in action for about 20 years.    The slate found here is unique and you can identify it by the brown veins running through it.  As you come round the corner you are greeted with the huge slag pile walk up and around this and you come across the blast shelter, a small solid slate structure used as the name implies by the quarry men during the blasting the photos below are of the inside and entrance.  If you look up to your right there's a fence running up follow this path up the scree and you come to a tunnel go through this tunnel and you come out into the quarry.  This is well worth a visit.  I've posted extra photos as I found the place awesome.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 11:16:08 PM
The first photo is of the entrance to the quarry by the Blast Hut the second is of the tunnel at the top of the fence, the third is the tunnel as you come out and the last is of the quarry itself.
We sat at the end of the slag heap and ate our sandwiches (well Dads) and I shared his coffee Socs gave her ball a rest and drank water.  Now we were off to see the Peat Hut.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 01, 2011, 11:41:52 PM
The good thing with ancient structures up here is that they are made of stone and so different stages of history can be seen all around you such as farm steads and sheep traps and this fantastic peat hut which could have been utilized for hundreds of years and still remains on the whole intact.  A peat hut is identified by its construction as having a narrow oblong shape, having gaps all around it and large slabs of stone placed as a roof first one way then the other to keep the rain out but lets the air in to dry out the peat.  Peat has been dug up here for centuries and used as fuel.  Only the rich could afford coal.
We crossed the bridge and walked down to Jubilee walk and followed the path back round to Dwygyfylchi back to the car.
I have had an excellent day today we've probably covered more than 11 miles in all.  I can't wait to go again.  My Dad has told me loads interesting things today and I've learnt a lot.  ;D

To top it all Gezzy text earlier and said he had a pressie for me.  He'd bought me gators.....chuffed to bits I am, what a Darlin'.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on November 02, 2011, 02:14:43 PM
Thanks, Pendragon, and you your Dad too, I've really enjoyed reading this and have learnt so much.
 &well&
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: suepp on November 02, 2011, 02:27:26 PM
Yes thanks Pendragon, another one to add to my list of places to explore  $thanx$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on November 02, 2011, 03:37:03 PM
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  Your probably bored with photos of the ponies but these are special ponies........the smaller grey/white one is a rare Caernarddau pony...... how do I know?  Well as always my Dad told me  :D A Caernarddau pony is white/grey, has a much smaller squat nose with an exceptionally long mane and tail.  Many of the ponies are now crossed with the Exmore variety hence the rarity of the thorough bred.  I never knew that.

I would never be bored with pictures of ponies especially foals. I love your previous foal photo and I have learnt something about the Caernarddau pony.
Glad you had such a lovely day weatherwise yesterday. Your photos came out well.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Haulfre on November 02, 2011, 04:14:56 PM
Pendragon...i love the stories and photo's from your walks! You have such a good way with words, and given me some laughs too! Thank you so much, and keep them coming....  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 02, 2011, 10:24:32 PM
Ah your all very kind.  Thank you  :-*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on November 02, 2011, 11:14:40 PM
your very kind for keeping us informed on your great walks, thank you
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 05, 2011, 10:42:56 PM
Monday Socs and I walked along the A55 cycle path to Penmaenmawr.  I wasn't going to risk going over the mountain as the weather was looking a bit murky and besides it took me hours last time.  I remember this road as a kid, traffic would wind around the bends on the single file A road and then the four of us kids in the back of my dads Ford Cortina would hassle my Dad to beep his horn in the tunnel he always did and it always made me smile  ;D  It's funny as it seems most people did.  Some people say that the ritual first started as a mark of respect to the men who died building the 1938 tunnel.  We decided to walk along the old Telford road which passes around the tunnel.  When you look down on the rocks beneath you it brings home just how dangerous this road must have been in the past.  I remember the days when we used to walk to Conwy as kids through the tunnel for a laugh  :o it was really dangerous then imagine doing it now.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 05, 2011, 10:56:39 PM
One of my favourite places is along this road just by where the old Ship Cottages used to be before they were knocked down to accommodate the road, now all that left is a small tin shed.  There's a little railway bridge which passes over the entrance to a small beach.  The people living in the Ship cottages must have considered it theirs, it's a lovely place to sit if you want a bit of piece and quiet as nobody ever seems to be there  $walesflag$ I think living in a city would drive me nuts, everywhere you go there's somebody and the only scenery is man made....nah not me at all.  Today was a bit of a disappointment though as the sea couldn't have been any higher and two blokes seemed to be doing my walk at the same time :roll: pic 3 is the view to the right from the tunnel entrance and pic 4 is to the left.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 05, 2011, 11:27:42 PM
We carried on along the road and passed the long since closed Little Chef.  My step mum used to work here years ago and she used to bring home the Little Chef lollies........ah they were great they were orange and white fizzy lollies  D) your tongue would be cut to bits after a couple but you couldn't beat them.  Y'know it makes me laugh when you think when I were a kid Little Chef was considered posh  :laugh:  On we went along the cycle path past the Iron bridge up towards the roundabout where I honestly thought the path would cross the road for some reason best known to myself...I mean as if.....it's a good job I don't work for the Highways Dept $scratch$ anyway we didn't cross, in fact we couldn't cross as by now there was a 5' wall of concrete protecting us from the really busy road.  As we passed the roundabout I began to worry a bit as thoughts like "your joking I'll be in Llanfair at this rate" and  " I didn't see a crossing point"  ?{}? I even contemplated tying Socs to my back and taking a running jump at the 5' wall swinging one leg over commando style and flinging myself over Socs and all....yeah it was a plan..... but a very flawed one as I imagined the reality of my mission would probably end up with me failing miserably  suffering from gravel burn having slid down the wall face first into the hard shoulder or more likely on coming traffic and besides I've never been in the Commandos.  My next plan of action was to walk down the embankment by the side of the railway tunnel a little further up, this would lead me onto what locals call Dog Sh*t path (pic 2) Panic over we walked along towards Pen beach.  What I didn't realise was that the cycle path goes down that way all along  :-[ and I had worried for nothing.  Pen beach used to be lovely it was all grass and sand now it's all concrete and anti vandal paint....such a shame.  The kids love the swimming pool though although it doesn't look to good in the photo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on November 05, 2011, 11:45:04 PM
Great walk and pics, as always, Angie.   $good$ My parents used to take me to that Little Chef when I was a kid - it was considered a treat!  &shake&
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 05, 2011, 11:47:12 PM
We came off the beach and walked up towards the Railway station.  I lived in the flat above here for about 4 years it was excellent...the best parties were there  ;D  If you walk through the car park opposite and up through the trees you'll find yourself in a small wooded area called The Dingle.  As kid's we would all congregate down there you could always evade the police if we were a bit rowdy as there are countless ways in and out.  The Dingle was so special to some of us that believe it or not two of my friends actually got married there  $good$  We would even hide in the two tunnels in pic 3.  One tunnel would lead up to the Mountain view the other to the back of the shops in Glanrafon.  Finally we came out by the doctors surgery and off we went to visit Ali Gugs and my Mother.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 05, 2011, 11:51:00 PM
Thanks Dave  $good$ I never rated Little Chef to be honest...I don't know what they're like now.  I remember watching a documentary and Heston Blumenthal was trying to revamp the brand.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Haulfre on November 06, 2011, 05:38:56 PM
Angie..i remember as a child always asking my dad to beep the horn going through Pen tunnel! Do people still carry on with this tradition or not?
Loving your posts, and i was in stitches imagining you jumping over the wall with socs tied to your back!!!!!!  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on November 06, 2011, 06:54:29 PM
i remember going through those tunels and the horns blasting out back in the early fifties, and there were some strange sounding horns in those days, good memories
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 07, 2011, 09:19:40 AM
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Angie..i remember as a child always asking my dad to beep the horn going through Pen tunnel! Do people still carry on with this tradition or not?
Loving your posts, and i was in stitches imagining you jumping over the wall with socs tied to your back!!!!!!  :laugh:
I think locals do, but we don't pester my dad anymore  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Haulfre on November 09, 2011, 05:58:07 PM
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Angie..i remember as a child always asking my dad to beep the horn going through Pen tunnel! Do people still carry on with this tradition or not?
Loving your posts, and i was in stitches imagining you jumping over the wall with socs tied to your back!!!!!!  :laugh:
I think locals do, but we don't pester my dad anymore  :laugh:
Nore do i! :laugh:
Are you going to get a sheepdog for yourself once you finish 'babysitting' socs? ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 10, 2011, 10:23:18 AM
I would love to get a dog of my own Haulfre.  I'm hoping to get my way after xmas.  I doubt I'd get a sheep dog as I have to hoover twice a day with Socs I'm surprised she's not bald.  I have Socs twice a year for two weeks my mate Mash is quite protective over her as he knows I want to pinch her  :D I've been looking at Jackadoodles.  A small hardy dog crossed between a Jack russel and a Poodle which doesn't molt, makes me laugh these type of dogs used to be called mongrels now they've got a dodgy double barreled name and they cost nearly £300  :o
The picture below is a Jackadoodle and it looks exactly like the little dog I rescued years ago.  We called her Shaggy and she was a proper little sweetheart who would walk for miles, everybody in Pen knew her.  She died 13 years ago and I was distraught, heartbroken and it put me off ever having another one but every time I get Socs I realise how happy I am up the mountains and walking with her.  I just have to convince Gez but I'm sure I'll get round him  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on November 10, 2011, 01:08:53 PM
Life is never the same without a dog to me--in 47 years we have had 2 dog free days, which were last year, after we lost our old girl. Admittedly, latterly she wasn't able to walk far, but there again neither can we nowadays. Having another dog has made us go out and walk more-- even if it is in shorter trips! We have to try and tire the little begger out somehow !! If not this is what happens!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Haulfre on November 10, 2011, 02:06:49 PM
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I would love to get a dog of my own Haulfre.  I'm hoping to get my way after xmas.  I doubt I'd get a sheep dog as I have to hoover twice a day with Socs I'm surprised she's not bald.  I have Socs twice a year for two weeks my mate Mash is quite protective over her as he knows I want to pinch her  :D I've been looking at Jackadoodles.  A small hardy dog crossed between a Jack russel and a Poodle which doesn't molt, makes me laugh these type of dogs used to be called mongrels now they've got a dodgy double barreled name and they cost nearly £300  :o
The picture below is a Jackadoodle and it looks exactly like the little dog I rescued years ago.  We called her Shaggy and she was a proper little sweetheart who would walk for miles, everybody in Pen knew her.  She died 13 years ago and I was distraught, heartbroken and it put me off ever having another one but every time I get Socs I realise how happy I am up the mountains and walking with her.  I just have to convince Gez but I'm sure I'll get round him  ;D
Hi Angie...thats the problem with getting  a dog.... when it dies it breaks your heart! The way i look at it though is that its worth going through the pain, because when we have them they give us such love and companionship its worth it. Awww.... Shaggy sounded like she was a little love...bless her. A Jackdoodle sounds like the perfect dog for you...but omg the price is a rip off! As you say...they where mongrels when we where kids, no fancy names and high prices then! I am sure you will get round Gez ;) Let us know if/when you get a dog after Christmas  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Haulfre on November 10, 2011, 02:12:23 PM
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Life is never the same without a dog to me--in 47 years we have had 2 dog free days, which were last year, after we lost our old girl. Admittedly, latterly she wasn't able to walk far, but there again neither can we nowadays. Having another dog has made us go out and walk more-- even if it is in shorter trips! We have to try and tire the little begger out somehow !! If not this is what happens!
Hi Nemesis...and your dog looks so innocent in the first pic! :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 10, 2011, 02:50:35 PM
Oh don't worry you'll read all about it Haulfre  ;D
Nemesis your dog is ace  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on November 10, 2011, 02:56:16 PM
Hi Both,
Yes (thanks) he is ace and so loveable, but we have never had one as naughty as this. He will steal anything to chew or shred-- toilet rolls are his speciality. House training was fine--but anything else--he does it his way.
Apparantly it is a trait of the breed, just hope he calms down as he gets older.
Good luck with the dog Pen.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 10, 2011, 03:13:28 PM
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Life is never the same without a dog to me--in 47 years we have had 2 dog free days, which were last year, after we lost our old girl. Admittedly, latterly she wasn't able to walk far, but there again neither can we nowadays. Having another dog has made us go out and walk more-- even if it is in shorter trips! We have to try and tire the little begger out somehow !! If not this is what happens!

Frizzy looks like a little angel in the first photo Nemesis but that hole in the 2nd photo's pretty deep!   Hope that he doesn't run through the house after all that digging.
I know how you feel about the pleasure that you get from having a dog and can remember when you spoke to me after just having lost your other dog.  We were so pleased to hear  that you had Frizzy so soon afterwards as we went through the same thing two years ago and know exactly how it feels.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 10, 2011, 03:31:09 PM
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Pendragon, I too find the details of your walks fascinating, you seem to be very knowledable about the local area. I would like to ask you, can you (or any other members) suggest any local walks of interest that are on the flat? I have a few health problems and find I can no longer walk uphill ( boy, do I live in the wrong place!) I would love to find interesting walks that I can manage, especially if you can advise me of interesting sites along the way.By local I mean anywhere between say Penmaenmawr, Conwy and around Llandudno. :)

There aren't all that many walks completely on the flat in this area but you can make them up as we do in a retirement group that I walk with once a month.  Because of their limited mobility we sometimes walk from the RSPB nature reserve in Llandudno Junction along the banks of the River Conwy to the flyover and then on to either Conwy or Deganwy and do the return journey by bus to avoid coming back the same way.
Another nice walk is in Llanfairfechan starting from the Promenade and walking along the coast towards Aber until we reach the bird hides and then returning back in the same direction.
Because we are all over 60 we can get a free train ride to Betws Y Coed and then we walk around the golf course along the banks of the Rivers Llugwy and Conwy returning later by train after having a nice coffee somewhere.
Hope that you can find a walk that suits you. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 10, 2011, 03:39:52 PM
The only walk I could suggest on the flat is the RSPB at Junction don't forget though you can't take your dog. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 11, 2011, 01:33:34 PM
I had forgotten about another flat walk I do sometimes.  It's not strenuous but is easy and enjoyable.   
Starting from Penrhyn Beach East go up the steps and turn right and follow the path to Angel Bay. With a bit of luck you might see seals along the way (the most I've seen was 27) or even the Peregrine Falcons that live by the old quarry.
Retrace your walk and continue ahead past the steps that you came up and continue along the footpath until you come to a private road.  Walk along the road and you come out at the bottom of Penrhyn Hill.
Cross the road carefully and you can then either visit Batty's Nursery or look at Penrhyn Old Hall and the old Chapel or do as I do and go around the corner and have a nice Cappuccino and cake at Home from Home Cooking.   $good$
To return to the start of your walk you can either retrace your steps along the private road or go past the Co-op and walk along the pavement to the start.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Welshmunchkin on November 11, 2011, 07:52:48 PM
Thanks for the suggestions re walking on the flat. Yes I think I'll give them a go. I'd love to go and see the things that Pendragon sees up the mountains, but I think the RSPB walk sounds good too. Thanks for your help! And if anyone can think of any more I'd be glad to hear from you!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 18, 2011, 06:14:44 PM
I've not had a walk for nearly 3 months due to a trapped nerve in my back but yesterday I met up with 5 friends in Capel Curig for a short walk followed by a meal in the Bryn Tyrch afterwards. It was too good an offer to miss so I met up with them and parked in Joe Brown's car park and set off past the Pinnacles Cafe and over the road  past the Church to take the path across the hills to Llyn Crafnant.
It's quite a good clear path normally but yesterday it was very wet and heavy going but at least it was dry.  That was until we reached the viewpoint at the western end of the lake and then the heavens opened, rain,hail and snow all at the same time. Soacked before we could even get our waterproofs on.
Nevertheless we returned back to the cars knowing that we had a change of clothes in the car and a nice hot meal and a few pints of beer were waiting for us in the Bryn Tyrch.    Z**
 It was just nice to get back into the hills despite the weather and catch up with my old mates and plan walks for the New Year.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on December 18, 2011, 07:06:52 PM
Looks a bit nippy up there, Hugo!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 19, 2011, 10:34:56 AM
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Looks a bit nippy up there, Hugo!

It might have been Dave, but I had a base layer, fleece,windproof fleece and a light anorak on and by the time I got to near the viewpoint I was boiling hot. The windproof came off and into the rucksack it went and it was more comfortable afterwards.
Could have done with it in the Bryn Tyrch though as it was a bit cool in there.   ;D   

No problems with the back so hopefully I'll be enjoying some more walks soon.    $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Quiggs on December 19, 2011, 12:55:40 PM
You're making me envious Hugo, I used to enjoy walking on the Carneddau on a Sunday, but I started having trouble with my knees. The last time I ventured up there, I had to walk backwards down the last three slopes. At least I had a last view of the hills that I loved.   :(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 19, 2011, 01:09:41 PM
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You're making me envious Hugo, I used to enjoy walking on the Carneddau on a Sunday, but I started having trouble with my knees. The last time I ventured up there, I had to walk backwards down the last three slopes. At least I had a last view of the hills that I loved.   :(

I'm taking one day at a time Quiggs, last year I had problems with my knees.this year with my back but I'll make the most of it while I can.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 19, 2011, 04:39:43 PM
** Death of walker after avalanche **
A man dies in Snowdonia after snow hanging over a ridge he was walking on collapses, causing an avalanche which also sweeps away a woman.
< http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-16235480 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-16235480) >

Y Garn is notorious for having these cornices at the edge of the cliffs. It's just like a cantilever of snow with nothing underneath to support it.
Snowdon has similar cornices in snowy conditions and I can remember once going up the top part of the Llanberis path near the summit of Snowdon and sticking to the path unlike another climber who veered off the path and walked to the edge of the cliff with his dog. The man and dog were ok because the footprints showed that they had returned back to the path.  Absolutely stupid, they were very lucky as they could have been another statistic!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 02, 2012, 08:35:00 PM
We went to visit some friends today who live near the racecourse in Chester. We had a lovely walk around the walls. Here are a few snaps. Great weather.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 02, 2012, 08:47:52 PM
I always enjoy a visit to Chester, love all that history.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 07, 2012, 05:16:49 PM
Today we set off to the top of Sychnant Pass to start the walk over the Conwy mountain and back again.  Just a short, enjoyable walk to blow the cobwebs away and it did because it was quite windy up there despite the weather forecast to the contrary. We soon reached the ridge and followed it down through the Iron Age hill fort past the herd of wild Mountain Ponies until we found a sheltered place to have our lunch and look at the stunning views all around.
Returning back we had a look at the old quarry workings and what looked like a man made lake or reservoir (Pendragon would know what it was)
We walked along the edge, then past the farm until we got back to our car. A nice easy walk that was finished off with Milk shakes and coffee at the RSPB reserve in Junction.  It makes you realise how lucky we are to live in this area.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 07, 2012, 05:19:03 PM
Conwy Mountain Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 07, 2012, 05:51:48 PM
Lovely to see those great views Hugo. Thanks for posting them.
They make me feel guilty for having a lazy day inside.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: dwsi on January 07, 2012, 05:59:47 PM
A little youtube video about the mountain ponies Mountain - Llanfairfechan (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxngeHsqrmY#ws)

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: CurlyCap on January 08, 2012, 10:45:47 AM
Great Clip of the Ponies DWSI - I wonder how long it took them to round 'em up before the Quad Bikes !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 08, 2012, 10:54:24 AM
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Lovely to see those great views Hugo. Thanks for posting them.
They make me feel guilty for having a lazy day inside.

You're entitled to a lazy day inside Hollins after all your recent jetsetting, I'm having a lazy day myself today,  just putting on my sky blue jersey and watching the TV at 1.00pm with a few beers.      Z**   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 08, 2012, 11:04:47 AM
Sky blue?
 :o
O'h no Hugo. I hope you haven't gone colour blind!
 ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: CurlyCap on January 08, 2012, 11:07:07 AM
Mr CurlyCap has just suggested you might want to go for a walk instead so that you're not disappointed around 1pm Hugo !!  :D (He'll be wearing his red jumper !!!)  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 08, 2012, 11:23:10 AM
I think that I'll have some prawn sandwiches with my beer and then I'll be  impartial.     :D 

six beers and one prawn sandwich should be enough for the game.         $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 22, 2012, 12:14:54 PM
It was a friend's 65th birthday yesterday so 5 of us decided to have a walk in the grounds of the Portmeirion Hotel.  We met up in the Hotel car park and paid the £1.00 admission fee and went through the gates to start our walk. Going through the village we passed the place where Jools Holland stays every time he visits here, it seems rather grand compared to the village rooms I've stayed in when I've been here.  The tide was flowing out very quickly as we walked along the estuary to the lighthouse and along the way there were numerous tree stumps that had money knocked into them and this seemed to happen everywhere in the gardens. What surprised us too was the fact that many shrubs were in bloom already. Camelias, Hebes, etc they were already flowering so the climate there must be quite good.  By the lighthouse we could see the sand blowing across the estuary like it does on the West Shore.  The wind was very strong but once we were back in the woods we were completely sheltered and carried on walking to see the Dog Cemetery and the Japanese Bridge and before long it was back to the village and our cars. We stopped at our friends house for a lovely meal on the way back home and planned our walk for next month.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 22, 2012, 12:18:22 PM
Portmeirion Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 22, 2012, 12:37:10 PM
Very good pics, I love it there, we used to live the other side of the estuary.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 22, 2012, 01:20:47 PM
Lovely to be taken back there via your photos. Thanks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 22, 2012, 03:32:49 PM
 $thanx$  both, while we were in Porthmadog we had a walk down the cob on both levels and at the Minffordd end is a type of railway shed.  I know that you're interested in Railways ME and my friend whose birthday it was, lived in Porthmadog as a boy and can remember going in those sheds years ago and it was full of loco's etc and he expressed a wish to revisit the sheds again.  By pure coincidence another friend who was with us had been inside the sheds some time ago with a camera club so now we are hoping to arrange a visit there in the near future.
It's a beautiful part of N Wales as you well know   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 22, 2012, 04:19:36 PM
Sounds like Boston Lodge, I've been in a few times over the years, not normally open to the public except at special event weekends, special visits etc

 http://www.festrail.co.uk/bostonlodge.htm?mn=18 (http://www.festrail.co.uk/bostonlodge.htm?mn=18)

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 22, 2012, 05:31:15 PM
Thanks very much ME    $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: dwsi on January 23, 2012, 05:58:46 PM
Weatherman Walking tonight on BBC1 Wales 730pm will feature a walk from Penmaenmawr to Rowen http://bbc.in/wyHIQN (http://bbc.in/wyHIQN)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on January 23, 2012, 06:56:49 PM
I read a link to this story on face book.  Very good.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on January 23, 2012, 07:50:38 PM
As the blue skies came over this afternoon we were wondering where to go for a couple of hours fresh air. As Mrs Medz is partial to walking round and informally viewing other peoples houses ( if I did it I'd be a Peeping Tom) especially the bigger ones, we headed up towards some of the larger houses on Colwyn Heights. We parked up on St Andrews Drive and walked up the drive and down following a footpath at the side of the Community Centre. Apart from wishing I had one leg longer than the other we had a nice stroll down the path looking at stunning views of the coast and the river valley. We ended up on Bryn Cadno which gave me a view of The Little Orme I've never seen before.Up there we got talking to a dog walker who said he remembered playing golf on the land which was now partially covered in housing. Was there a golf course up there? if so the views must have been almost as spectacular as those offered by Mike's Pitch and Putt course on the Orme.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 23, 2012, 08:14:07 PM
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Up there we got talking to a dog walker who said he remembered playing golf on the land which was now partially covered in housing. Was there a golf course up there? if so the views must have been almost as spectacular as those offered by Mike's Pitch and Putt course on the Orme.
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Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 23, 2012, 08:31:24 PM
We almost bought a property up there, several roads are named after golf courses, St Andrews, Sunningdale etc.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on January 23, 2012, 08:41:41 PM
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As the blue skies came over this afternoon we were wondering where to go for a couple of hours fresh air. As Mrs Medz is partial to walking round and informally viewing other peoples houses ( if I did it I'd be a Peeping Tom) especially the bigger ones, we headed up towards some of the larger houses on Colwyn Heights. We parked up on St Andrews Drive and walked up the drive and down following a footpath at the side of the Community Centre. Apart from wishing I had one leg longer than the other we had a nice stroll down the path looking at stunning views of the coast and the river valley. We ended up on Bryn Cadno which gave me a view of The Little Orme I've never seen before.Up there we got talking to a dog walker who said he remembered playing golf on the land which was now partially covered in housing. Was there a golf course up there? if so the views must have been almost as spectacular as those offered by Mike's Pitch and Putt course on the Orme.

I often find that when my wife looks around at other people's houses (as wives frequently do), it very quickly starts to cost me a lot of money.
Such phrases as, 'those blinds would look lovely in our windows',  or 'they've got lovely new windows, haven't they?' induce a moderate degree of sweat.
Just over a year ago she she uttered the words, 'look how they've used the space to the side, with that extension' .. and that is when the trouble started!!   :o :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 23, 2012, 08:46:10 PM
I think your house extension closely rivalled the Pyramids for length of construction time....  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 25, 2012, 10:52:37 AM
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Was there a golf course up there? if so the views must have been almost as spectacular as those offered by Mike's Pitch and Putt course on the Orme.

We bought our house up there before the Estate was developed and the Golf Course was behind our house. In fact there was a Green behind the house and my next door neighbour dug it up to use the soil on his garden.
The Golf Course was overgrown when we moved here about 26 years ago but was a handy place to dispose of our grass cuttings.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on February 03, 2012, 03:41:06 PM
I received this info about the opening of the Welsh coast path today.
Sounds like a challenge!


On 5 May the Wales Coast Path, Wales’ newest attraction, will be declared officially open.  At 870 miles (1400km), this is the first coast path to outline an entire country and will run from the outskirts of Chester in the North to Chepstow in the South.

 
The Conwy section of the Wales Coast Path is 34.5 miles and takes in family attractions, seaside resorts and rural country scenes.  The Path is for everyone and gives people the chance to explore coastal Wales, an area voted by The Lonely Planet Guide as “The best region on earth to visit in 2012”.  Visit www.conwy.gov.uk/countryside (http://www.conwy.gov.uk/countryside) for information on the Conwy Coast Path or www.ccw.gov.uk (http://www.ccw.gov.uk) for the full Wales Coast Path.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 03, 2012, 04:26:35 PM
Thanks very much for posting that Hollins, I'll enjoy reading all about it.  Meanwhile I'm keeping off the hills with all the ice about and had another nice walk on the Great Orme.
Starting from the West Shore I walked on the Monk's Path (aka Cust's Path) just above the Toll House. I had intended to see a cave above the path but now another fence on the Orme Side has been added presumably for safety reasons so I couldn't go there. The path passes above St Petrocks and comes out in Pen Y Ffordd Goch and that in turn leads to the Marine Drive. Stopping briefly to look at Miriam Yr Ogof's ruined cottage I carried on up the Marine Drive and went up the Monks Path and walked along to the cafe for a nice coffee and cake.
The cottage near the path is called Swn Y Mor and on the Secrets of the Great Orme Map is shown as the Tom and Jerry House (old pumping station)  I noticed some dressed stone in the garden wall that looked out of place and possibly "recycled" from the Bishop's Palace across the road!
The Monk's Path was slippier than usual due to the melting ice and empty mussel shells littered the path, remnants of a Gulls meal  probably.
After having a drink it was back on the Orme where I passed these iron chains which I think is all that is left of the Semaphore Station that was once there. A brief visit to St Tudno's then down the path by Ffynnon Powell and I returned to my car via Tyn Y Coed Road and the zig zag path.  A fairly quick walk with lovely views all around.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 03, 2012, 04:28:31 PM
Great Orme Walk today
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 03, 2012, 04:30:58 PM
Great Orme Walk today
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on February 03, 2012, 04:53:12 PM
Hugo. You mention St Tudno's Church. Weather permitting etc. it is hoped that work will start at the end of this month to re-roof the Church. The work will take about 10 weeks and for safety reasons etc the Church will be closed during that time.

Enjoyed your pictures.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 03, 2012, 09:33:35 PM
Thanks Bellringer, I'll look for my name on one of those tiles when the Church reopens.    :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on February 03, 2012, 09:37:05 PM
Slates Hugo - you can't put tiles on an ancient Church!!  Tut, tut.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 03, 2012, 10:01:25 PM
Glad the roof appeal was obviously successful in the end!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on February 04, 2012, 01:49:50 PM
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Thanks Bellringer, I'll look for my name on one of those tiles when the Church reopens.    :)

Sorry, Hugo, I'm afraid that you won't be able to see your name.  The names will be on the undersides of the slates to protect them from the elements.  However, the Sponsor-a-Slate with all the names and messages will be bound and will be available in the parish archive. 

Glad you had a good walk. 

St. Tudno's church will be closed from Saturday 18 February, as it has to be cleared for the interior work. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 04, 2012, 03:24:49 PM
Thanks Blodyn for pointing that out. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 04, 2012, 05:24:54 PM
Also Hugo, I'm sure that this will be safer for you than clambering about on the roof, to look for your slate!  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 11, 2012, 03:56:31 PM
The visibility wasn't good but at least it was dry when we set off on our Little Orme walk. First of all it was over to Angel Bay where we saw nine seals on the beach so we took some photos before going up the steep section to the quarry. After catching our breath we walked up on the seaside edge of the quarry up to the summit and then over to the main road and along it to Penrhynside.  There we walked through the narrow street until we reached the end of the village and took the footpath leading us to Pant Y Wennol Cottages. From there we dropped down through Bodafon School to Bodafon Road and followed the road until we reached Bodafon Farm.
At the farm we were going to have a quick coffee before carrying on to Nant Y Gammar and Gloddaeth Woods but it didn't turn out quite as planned. We had a lovely cup of coffee and a very interesting conversation with the farmer Mark Roberts and had a look around at the Birds of Prey.  There is so much to see and we were fascinated by it all, so much so that before we knew it it was time to make our way back.   It was a great experience and the staff were nice so I'm going back next week to see the rest of the animals!
We made our way back across the public footpath through the fields and passed a Llama and her baby along the way and then up Ffynnon Sadwrn footpath back to the cars in Penrhyn Bay.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 11, 2012, 04:59:46 PM
Little Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 11, 2012, 05:01:51 PM
Little Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 11, 2012, 05:03:59 PM
Little Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 14, 2012, 04:41:26 PM
I had a phone call from a friend last night asking if I wanted to go for a walk on the Great Orme today so the offer was too good to refuse. We went around the Marine Drive from the West Shore and turned into Llys Helyg Drive for our walk across the Gunsite.  The house getting built next door to Frank Tyldesley's old house is well under way but I couldn't help but notice the severe erosion at the end of Frank's garden.
We went up a steep section past the old WW II look out building and stopped for a nice coffee in the cafe before heading over the Orme and down St Beuno's road to the steps leading to Tyn Y Coed Road.
At the end of the road we stopped and sat on a bench above the zig zag path admiring the view and although it wasn't a particularly nice day the view is still amazing. My friend had lived in the area 27 years and yet he had never done that walk before but I'm sure that he will now that he knows the area better..
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 14, 2012, 04:43:26 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 17, 2012, 04:16:05 PM
We fancied doing  the Capelulo walk described in Carl Rogers' book so we met at the top of Sychnant Pass today to start the walk.  The weather wasn't good and the visibility was poor but we had wet weather gear with us and decided to go ahead with the walk. After about a mile though the rain eased off and we took off our waterproof leggings as it was far easier walking without them and while we were sat down doing that a small white Stoat was scurrying about looking for a meal
As we were walking through an area of burnt Gorse we were able to see the Carneddau wild ponies and a couple of Kestrels and a pair of Fieldfares.   There are some ruined buildings on the way too. 
We sat on a bench near the slate sign post to have our refreshments and then began part of the Jubilee Walk around the contours of Moel Lus.  The weather was closing in again so visibility was poor but on a better day the views from this walk must be outstanding.
We came down to Capelulo via Fairy Glen and chose to walk back to the top of Sychnant Pass through the valley and although it was a bit of a pull up the slope it was worth it as I've never done this walk before.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 17, 2012, 04:18:08 PM
Capelulo Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 17, 2012, 04:20:50 PM
Capelulo Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 23, 2012, 08:40:22 PM
It was a beautiful warm day today so we took advantage of the good weather to do a walk that I have wanted to do for ages. It was the Greenfield Valley Heritage walk, a short walk of about 3 miles but it covered many things like a Medieval Abbey, 19th century mills, a Victorian Farm and St Winefrede's Well.
The walk started in Greenfield and the Basingwerk Abbey and then we worked our way around the site visiting the Lower Cotton Mill where you see the remains of a six storey cotton mill that was built there in just 10 weeks and employed up to 300 apprentices.   Continuing onwards we came to Meadow Mill and then upwards to Greenfield Mills.  At each Mill there is a large lake that was used to power the machinery in the mills. 
Apart from various birds we did not see any of the other wildlife that live in this area but the evidence was there to see.
We then followed the disused railway track up to Holywell and passed under the bridge to where Holywell Railway Station once stood. To look at it now you couldn't imagine that there had been a Railway Station there but a friend had a photo of how it looked in it's heyday and it was reputedly the steepest gradient of any British Rail train.
After looking around Holywell we came down the hill and visited St Winefrede's Well before going back to the car park and a quick visit to the shoreline in Greenfield.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 23, 2012, 08:43:26 PM
Greenfield Valley Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 23, 2012, 08:45:25 PM
Greenfield Valley Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on February 23, 2012, 08:56:09 PM
It was a beautiful day further west too, I was supposed to be working near Bangor but after a mix up over the delivery of materials I found myself at a bit of a loose end after lunch and so went up Aber Falls.  I parked near the old Aber Hotel by the pine furniture manufacturer and walked up thru the village past the cafe and took the second public footpath on the right.  The path rises sharply and steeply and after a few pauses for sharp intakes of breath and admiring the views of the Menai Straits, Anglesey and the coast down to Llandudno the path meets the North Wales Footpath.  This then leads to a smaller waterfall before the main Aber Falls.  After crossing the bridge below the falls the path winds its way down the valley first to the pay and display car park and then back to the village.  Great, brisk walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on February 23, 2012, 09:12:44 PM
Nice walk, Jack, and a great day for it.  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 28, 2012, 07:52:59 PM
The forecast was quite good for today so we arranged to meet at the lay by by Pont Cyfyng for the start of the walk to Moel Siabod.  We crossed the bridge and went up a steep hill on the right until we came to the pair of ladder stiles where the track became less steep. At some disused buildings we stopped for something to eat and drink before carrying on. As we climbed up we passed the water filled quarry and soon came to Cwm Foel.  Clouds hung in the valley but we chose to go up the direct and hardest route straight up the face.    It doesn't seem to get any easier on the route up. The scree was rough and at times it was a case of two steps forward and one down when we slid on the loose stones but we got to the top in good time and the views were well worth the effort. The weather was so warm I actually climbed it in a Shirt which can't be bad for a February day!
The white fluffy clouds hung over the valleys but the peaks were visible and it made a lovely sight. We stopped for further drinks and food before walking down the path to Plas Y Brennin and back to the cars. The only downer on this walk was the fact that all the pubs in Capel Curig were closed and a nice cool beer would have gone down very well.    Z**
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 28, 2012, 07:55:01 PM
Moel Siabod Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: mull on February 28, 2012, 08:20:52 PM
Nice one Hugo. At least you seem to be getting the good weather in North Wales. Up here on the Isle of Mull we have rain, drizzle, rain day after day now for weeks. SAD.
Liked the cloud inversion.
Would have enjoyed that walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on February 28, 2012, 08:28:20 PM
 $cool$

Looks great,we live in Rhos on Sea and through a gap in the hills we can see a distant mountain which we are told is Moel Siabod? Looks like your pic Hugo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on February 29, 2012, 08:26:39 PM
great photos looks well worth the hike, mother nature can be nice when she wants to
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 02, 2012, 10:50:26 AM
Exactly two years previously I did the same walk only that time there was up to 3 feet of snow in that gully and we had to kick into the snow with our feet and also hands to get to the summit.
That time it took me an hour longer to reach the same point and it was quite tiring too.   Here are two photos of me coming up to the ridge then
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 02, 2012, 09:33:06 PM
Amazing, Hugo, the mountain explorer. Lovely photos, looks a splendid walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 03, 2012, 06:47:22 PM
A visit to Chester today. Always a pleasure to visit this great City. It was very busy indeed but, nonetheless, was spotlessly clean and well maintained - what a credit to Cheshire West & Chester Council. The last pics illustrates the madness that existed in Planning Depts in the 1960s and 70s - who thought it would be a good idea to put this concrete car park next to a medieval building?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on March 03, 2012, 06:50:02 PM
Looks a great place, we've only been once, looks like another place to visit soon!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 03, 2012, 07:32:35 PM
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The last pics illustrates the madness that existed in Planning Depts in the 1960s and 70s - who thought it would be a good idea to put this concrete car park next to a medieval building?

Yes it is such a shame what was allowed to happen in the 60's/70's in Chester. It is difficult to know what they can do about some of the monstrosities. The multi storey car parks are horrendous. We used to live near Macclesfield and they did quite a good job of camouflaging their multi storey and several other 60's eyesores.
The horrid pink flats by the river in Chester always upset me.
Nevertheless, like you say, still a lovely characterful place to visit. Hope you had a nice day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on March 03, 2012, 07:38:34 PM
Flashback time. The parking place next to the green gates at the racecourse was mine at 7:00 every morning for over a year when I worked for Cheshire County
Council as it was. Happy times working so close the middle of everything in the city centre but nowhere near as happy as now ! Decided to go out for a short walk this afternoon to the viewing point on Anglesey Road on the Orme and ended up keeping going and walking all the way round the coast and up the Orme to the summit and back down again. Stunning views,sunshine, rain and hail within 5 minutes of each other. Nowhere I'd rather be.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 04, 2012, 05:03:16 PM
Council as it was. Happy times working so close the middle of everything in the city centre but nowhere near as happy as now ! Decided to go out for a short walk this afternoon to the viewing point on Anglesey Road on the Orme and ended up keeping going and walking all the way round the coast and up the Orme to the summit and back down again. Stunning views,sunshine, rain and hail within 5 minutes of each other. Nowhere I'd rather be.
[/quote]

You forgot to mention the wind as well because it was quite blowy on the West Shore today but you're right, that walk is a cracking one with great views in all directions
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on March 04, 2012, 06:50:04 PM
Can anyone confirm that the first big house we would have encountered below us on the walk but above Marine Drive has got a massive covered "hot tub" overlooking the sea.  It looked like it but because the walk was a bit impromptu we hadn't got the binoculars with us.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 04, 2012, 08:31:25 PM
A trip down the Lleyn Peninsula today for some photography at the old Trefor Granite Quarry. A torrential hail shower passed over us as we drove through Penmaenmawr but it soon cleared up and the sun shone as we approached Trefor. A steady climb up for the former incline (that led from the quarry down to the still extant Trefor Pier) from the village and we soon arrived at the truly massive stone processing/loading building - it took up half the hillside! View from the top of the building was fantastic - right along the coast back to Caernarfon and all across Anglesey, you could even see South Stack in the distance. Absolutely freezing though!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 06, 2012, 03:03:34 PM
Those black and white photos of the Granite Quarry are very effective Dave and the views are superb from up there. It's a while since I went to the quarry but I did go to Tre'r Ceiri last year and what a location for that hill fort.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 06, 2012, 06:44:37 PM
DaveR, I love the photo "Looking Back.." that you have put on the blog. It looks like a painting. The buildings are so defined as if they have drawn lines around them. When you look at the one above it is less clear. I was just interested in what you have done to achieve the quality of the one on the blog?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 06, 2012, 07:29:21 PM
Hi H, I used the Clarity function in Lightroom  to make it all look more defined:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 10, 2012, 07:58:00 PM
A visit to Greenfield Valley Heritage Park today. This is a great weekend walk, you can start at the bottom of the valley by the coast road and walk right up to Holywell past all the various lakes, streams and buildings that date from its days as an industrial centre. Only had my pocket Nikon with me, so pics are not as good as normal, I'm afraid. Last photo is of the St Winefrides Well buildings, there is an open air pool behind the building that is in constant use even today by Pilgrims:
http://www.saintwinefrideswell.com/ (http://www.saintwinefrideswell.com/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 10, 2012, 08:15:46 PM
Also passed the rusting hulk of the 'Funship' aka the 'Duke of Lancaster', the former Heysham-Belfast Ferry. How it ended up beached at Mostyn is a long and very convoluted story:
http://www.dukeoflancaster.net/ (http://www.dukeoflancaster.net/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on March 10, 2012, 09:43:25 PM
saw the first superman film when we made a visit out of curiosity on this ship, was a long time ago, can,t remember the year but we had both my children who were still in school with us,must have been before 1982
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: emma p on March 10, 2012, 10:01:43 PM
So enjoy this walking thread........the photographs are amazing.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 11, 2012, 11:58:03 AM
That's a nice pleasant and interesting walk Dave and not too strenuous.   The steep track that runs uphill on the left of the lakes is the old railway track. It goes up through the double arched bridge by Tesco's and that is where Holywell Railway Station once was.
 It's hard to imagine that now with the steepness of the track and the landscaping that has been done since the track closed but I was lucky enough to see some original photos in a book that a friend brought along with him when we did the walk recently.
St Winefrede's Well went dry in 1917 (I think) when something happened at the Lead Mines higher up but later that year they did something again in the Lead Mines and the supply of water to the place re continued.   I don't know about the water being holy but it should put lead in your pencil if you bathe in there!
My friend who once lived in the Greenfield area took me to the place where the water from the mines enters the sea and said that 23 million gallons of water is drained from the mines daily!   It certainly came out of the drainage tunnel in a torrent.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on March 11, 2012, 10:25:27 PM
Snowcap, the funship was docked at Mostyn in the summer of 1979 and opened soon after Mike
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on March 12, 2012, 07:59:15 AM
They do say that a round of golf is a good walk spoilt!    ;)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 12, 2012, 08:51:38 AM
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Also passed the rusting hulk of the 'Funship' aka the 'Duke of Lancaster', the former Heysham-Belfast Ferry. How it ended up beached at Mostyn is a long and very convoluted story:
http://www.dukeoflancaster.net/ (http://www.dukeoflancaster.net/)

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/2012/03/12/meeting-to-decide-future-of-flintshire-s-duke-of-lancaster-funship-55578-30510628/ (http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/2012/03/12/meeting-to-decide-future-of-flintshire-s-duke-of-lancaster-funship-55578-30510628/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 13, 2012, 07:49:44 PM
I enjoyed a pleasant walk around the walls in Chester today. It was a bit grey so sorry for the rather bland looking photos but here is a tour of the good, the bad, and the ugly which follows on from DaveR's last post which mentions the contrast between the old buildings and the 60's additions.

Whenever I park my car in the multi storey in the Grosvenor centre it always reminds me of Adam Adamant! Does anyone remember him? You drive up the ramp and on the right is the plain brick wall that he used to disappear behind.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 13, 2012, 07:51:55 PM
A few more.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 13, 2012, 07:54:09 PM
The last two are quirky pub signs.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 13, 2012, 08:51:31 PM
Great work, H. I always think a walk right around the Walls is one of the great pleasures of a visit to Chester.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on March 13, 2012, 10:15:04 PM
Looks good! we must revisit, what's the car parking like there?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 13, 2012, 10:20:11 PM
There is a big car park by the river and another at the racecourse (as long as there isn't a race meeting on) that are reasonable. The multi storeys are expensive but handy if you have a lot to carry.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 13, 2012, 10:56:49 PM
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expensive
Not a word that Merddin likes to hear...  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on March 13, 2012, 11:09:57 PM
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expensive
Not a word that Merddin likes to hear...  :laugh:

 :laugh:  I'm getting more used to it now though, after buying a new iPad2, a new oven at over £500  :o  (very good though!) a new workshop arriving soon, new carpets coming and just the other day two coffees in Caffe Nero :o  :laugh:   All thanks to GVC  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 14, 2012, 06:43:29 PM
Well then ME, now that we know that you are splashing the cash around there's no need to worry about car park charges.
Here's what to do, drive up to the front or back of the Grosvenor Hotel and have your car valet parked while you pop in to the Brasserie for lunch and then time for a spot of shopping in the arcade before heading home! Perfect $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 14, 2012, 06:47:59 PM
One more architectural disaster and three gems.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 14, 2012, 06:51:34 PM
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Great work, H. I always think a walk right around the Walls is one of the great pleasures of a visit to Chester.

Thanks DaveR. I wondered if you knew about this real ale pub on Lower Bridge Street? It is called the Brewery Tap.

http://www.the-tap.co.uk/ (http://www.the-tap.co.uk/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 14, 2012, 07:00:12 PM
It was such a lovely afternoon that I thought that I'd take advantage of the good weather and have a walk in Penrhynside and on the Little Orme. Parking my car at the bottom of Penrhyn Hill, I walked up the path past Penrhyn Old Hall and the Medieval Chapel that is now in ruins and carried on up the path until reaching the far end of Penrhynside. Turning right and after a bit of a pull up the road I went on the footpath leading to Pant Y Wennol.  Just before reaching there you come across the ruins of "Mount Pleasant" and although there is little left to see it was the family home of Frederick and Emma Hughes who lived there until 1954.
Coming down the hill is Pant Y Wennol which was in the 1800's a community of about 70 people living in fourteen separate houses and they even had a Chapel there and Thomas Kendrick was born in a cottage there in 1821.
Going downhill a bit further is a very overgrown path that seems to be going into the cliff face and infact leads to a cave where a John Thomas lived from 1742 for a good many years afterwards too.  He actually paid Gloddaeth Estates four pence a year rent!   Passing Bodafon School I went down the footpath behind Bryn Y Bia Road and carried on until I came to Ffynnon Sadwrn.  In the 19th Century this well was much appreciated locally as a water supply possibly because it was considered especially good for brewing beer. At this point you can actually see the raised track where the tram used to run through the fields of Bodafon Farm.
  Returning to the footpath I went on to Bryn Y Bia Road and followed Colwyn Road until I came to the public footpath on the left leading to Ty Uchaf the only remaining farm on the Little Orme.   I went that way because I had never been down there before but in actual fact that part of the walk wasn't that scenic and led me to the private road by the quarry.   A quick visit to Angel Bay to see 14 seals on the beach and then it was back through the housing estate to pick up my car.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 14, 2012, 07:02:24 PM
Little Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 14, 2012, 07:07:13 PM
Little Orme
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on March 14, 2012, 07:51:17 PM
Hugo, thanks for telling us about your walks, you always have such interesting information on the places you pass - I didn't know about the medieval chapel, for example. 

I think that I must have been on the Little Orme at a similar time to you.  I went out there with two friends this afternoon and we arrived in brilliant sunshine.  We pottered along watching the birds and I picked up a few tips on identification as my friends are more knowledgeable than me.  By the time we got to Angel Bay it was starting to cloud over again but we were delighted to see 15 seals on the beach.  One swam off while we were watching but was playing about in the shallows later on.  Thank you so much for reporting on the seals in the wildlife thread, we each said that seeing the seals made our day.
 $thanx$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 14, 2012, 08:23:55 PM
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One more architectural disaster
You have to wonder what sort of building was demolished to build that monstrosity. Curiously though, many of the buildings in Chester's main streets only date back to Victorian times, they were actually designed to look much older.

My pet hate in Chester in the Inner Ring Road, so many fine buildings were demolished to build it in the 60s and it still remains today as an unwelcoming, noisy scar right through the City.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on March 14, 2012, 11:16:49 PM
Yes, DaveR, I agree with you about Chesters iner ring road. Unfortunately, however, what was the alternative.
Remembering Chester prior to its being built, the city was absolute hell traffic wise. Without it being built, half of the lovely building you photograph would have collapsed under the vibration, fumes etc etc.
It was also virtually impossible to walk around inside the city walls because of the traffic, and a local rumour always claimed that the police on traffic control duties were specially trained with knowledge of the unique problems they faced.  Mike
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 15, 2012, 10:51:07 AM
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Hugo, thanks for telling us about your walks, you always have such interesting information on the places you pass - I didn't know about the medieval chapel, for example. 

Thanks very much Blodyn.  That Chapel is in the grounds of Penrhyn Old Hall and is believed to be the original St Mary's Chapel built in 1447.  Here's a photo of the interior in 1926. It's a shame that it has been allowed to go into ruin so quickly after it closed in 1930.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 15, 2012, 01:13:02 PM
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Yes, DaveR, I agree with you about Chesters iner ring road. Unfortunately, however, what was the alternative.
Remembering Chester prior to its being built, the city was absolute hell traffic wise. Without it being built, half of the lovely building you photograph would have collapsed under the vibration, fumes etc etc.
It was also virtually impossible to walk around inside the city walls because of the traffic, and a local rumour always claimed that the police on traffic control duties were specially trained with knowledge of the unique problems they faced.  Mike
The solution would have been to route all non-city centre traffic outside of the walls, perhaps? Not sure how difficult that would have been but surely feasible?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on March 15, 2012, 05:19:00 PM
I imagine this subject could fill a thousand page book. But just one thought. The walls "outside" the inner ring road section are very close to the river Dee and then right alongside the roodee racecourse and then the railway. I dont think a ringroad straddling the river etc would be acceptable. But Ireckon we had better discuss this over a pint (or few hundred) Mike
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on March 16, 2012, 10:10:49 AM
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Thanks very much Blodyn.  That Chapel is in the grounds of Penrhyn Old Hall and is believed to be the original St Mary's Chapel built in 1447.  Here's a photo of the interior in 1926. It's a shame that it has been allowed to go into ruin so quickly after it closed in 1930.

Hugo, thank you for that very interesting photo of the old chapel.  As you say, it is indeed a great shame to see it derelict. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 17, 2012, 05:46:35 PM
A trip over to the medieval market town of Denbigh today. Interesting place, lots of old buildings to look at, with a few of them in need of some renovation:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 17, 2012, 06:04:27 PM
Hooray!
I was hoping you would get to Denbigh with your camera one day.
I love the one of the washing line.
Like you say there are some lovely old buildings. Some have received big grants and have been or are being restored but others are boarded up as your photos show.
Here is  one of my photos of Vale Street which has many of the attractive Georgian buildings on it.
Did you take any photos down there?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 17, 2012, 06:32:03 PM
It was just a scouting expedition , so I only had the iphone and compact camera with me. I will return when the weather improves with Big Daddy Nikon to take some proper photos.

Yes, it's a nice little town. I walked up Vale Street, but it started to pour with train, so I wasn't hanging around! First photo is of Mostyn House (built 1722), restored to its former glory - you can see how it used to look before restoration in the photo in the doorway. Second photo is part of of a carved wooden shop front that was almost across the road from Mostyn House - is that a Chinaman's head?!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 17, 2012, 07:00:20 PM
One thing that I did think was a particular shame was the state of the Crown Hotel in the little square. It was only renovated completely a few years ago with HLF/THI money and it is already boarded up and slowly sliding back into dereliction.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 18, 2012, 02:52:44 PM
O'h dear. That is a shame. I didn't know about that.

I went for a nice walk in the woods with my mum today. hasn't it been a gorgeous day?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on March 19, 2012, 08:08:33 AM
That last shot's good, H;  very nice framing.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 19, 2012, 08:39:47 AM
Thank you!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on March 19, 2012, 09:04:53 AM
The last shot is good, hollins, but the other two are very special.  ;)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on March 19, 2012, 09:26:45 AM
That looks a lovely walk, Hollins, and it's nice to see your Mum stepping out there. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2012, 12:00:14 PM
As our indended walk for Friday had been cancelled we reverted to Plan B and had a walk on Holyhead Mountain instead.   The weather in the local area was fine and sunny but in Holyhead there was a white mist throughout the day and the Fog horn was sounding out on a regular basis to warn any passing ships.
We parked the car in the Ellins Tower car park and walked across the road to see the Iron Age hut circles known locally as the Irishmen's Huts.  After that we crossed back over to the car park and walked along the cliff edge path to Ellins Tower, the RSPB centre where there is a great viewpoint to watch the large variety of birds that will be nesting on the cliff edges soon.   There's a good view of South Stack lighthouse from this point too.  Next we were off to Southstack Lighthouse but as it was closed we only walked half way down the numerous steps until we found a good viewpoint to watch the birds again.  We were looking for the Puffins but unfortunately didn't see any.  We did see numerous other varieties of seabirds though. It was back up the steps and along the coast of Gogarth Bay until we came to an old lookout tower where we stopped for some refreshments. We then continued to the ruins of the old Roman lookout tower and then turned back and retraced our way back to the cafe where we enjoyed a nice coffee and cake. We returned to the car park via the cliff edge footpath and spoke to a couple of climbers who were climbing down the vertical side of the cliff!   The path we were walking on was not one for the faint hearted or for anyone who has a trace of vertigo but these guys were going to climb down it.    Definitely not for me.    :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2012, 12:02:00 PM
Holyhead Mountain
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 24, 2012, 03:30:42 PM
Looks an impressive walk Hugo and it must have been very atmospheric with the mist swirling around. My husband and I have very different memories of South Stack. He used to do quite a bit of climbing there. He remembers ones called, A dream of white horses, Wen and Central Park.
My own memory is being taken there for an art course when I was in the sixth form!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 25, 2012, 11:45:17 AM
It was a lovely walk but you had to be careful around the edges of the cliffs as there are no fences  or protection there. Luckily for us there was no wind and it was a calm day so it made it a very enjoyable walk.
Your husband has more guts than me because there is no way on earth I'd try climbing there or anywhere else. 
Every year we used to go to North Stack to watch the Seals being born on the beach about 200 foot below the cliff but we'd crawl on our hands and knees to the edge rather than risk falling over the edge with the inevitable result.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 25, 2012, 03:55:46 PM
Yes, I wouldn't go too near the egde either but he has always liked some "daring" activity or other.
Today he has been ski touring with a friend. This involves walking to the top of the mountain on skis and then skiing down. They put skins on the bottom of the skis which are just like strips of velcro but they stop them slipping backwards for the uphill part. Really hard work!
Here are some photos, worth it for the view maybe!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on March 25, 2012, 04:00:12 PM
This is off piste, presumably? Must be a good skier :-)))
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 25, 2012, 04:04:28 PM
Yes, off piste.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 25, 2012, 08:19:12 PM
Had a wander around Conwy today, lovely in the sunshine and very busy. View of the castle from the hill whose name eludes me:

(http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6222/7014901099_b020c00cc6_c.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/7014901099/)
Looking across at Conwy Castle (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/7014901099/#) by [davidrobertsphotography] (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 25, 2012, 09:25:13 PM
Fantastic photo Dave with the Gyffin Stream in full flow.   Which camera did you use for that photo?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on March 25, 2012, 09:42:15 PM
So fantastic that you almost forget Billingtons' garage in the foreground unless you know it's there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 25, 2012, 09:47:03 PM
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Fantastic photo Dave with the Gyffin Stream in full flow.   Which camera did you use for that photo?
Thanks, Hugo, just a shame about Billingtons garage spoiling the scene a little! I used the Nikon D700 today:
http://www.trustedreviews.com/Nikon-D700_Digital-Camera_review (http://www.trustedreviews.com/Nikon-D700_Digital-Camera_review)

EDIT: Just saw Stan's comment. I tried to hide it behind the trees as best I could!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on March 26, 2012, 10:50:50 AM
A few more leaves needed? ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 27, 2012, 11:09:41 AM
Walking Events--
A Story of Conwy Town, Then and Now - Walking tour!
15th April 2012
A gentle hour and a half walk along pavements, paths and quay around Conwy Town. Led by an experienced local guide who will bring to life the towns violent medieval past, the industrial revolution and Victorian tourism to the present. Easy, mainly flat with two or three gentle slopes. No Steps.
Duration: 1.5 hours Distance: 1.25km / 1 mile Meet: 9.45am Opposite the Castle Hotel, High Street Conwy Start.
16 and over £3, under 16 £1, under 10 free.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 27, 2012, 11:09:58 AM
Walking Events--
Daffodil Walk!
8th April 2012
Come and join us on this traditional Easter/Spring walk from Penmaenmawr to visit Llangelynnin Old Church. We will be accompanied by historian Dennis Roberts and hope to see an abundance of golden daffodils on the nearby mountainside. Return transport provided from “Old Church Car Park” and Ty Gwyn Pub, Rowen. Duration: 5-6 hours Distance: 5-6 miles Meet: 9.45am Fernbrook Road Car Park, Penmaenmawr.
Entry fee is £5.00 but all goes to charity.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: BrianP on March 27, 2012, 08:21:57 PM
Dave,
Do you have to pre-book, or can you just turn up on the day
Cheers,
Brian
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 27, 2012, 08:26:30 PM
I think you just turn up on the day, all these walks are from a group I found on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Walking-in-North-Wales/117761731607491 (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Walking-in-North-Wales/117761731607491)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 18, 2012, 11:28:13 AM
I enjoyed a short walk with the Retirement Group yesterday.  We did a walk up to Aber Falls and back which is always enjoyable as it's a relatively short walk with beautiful scenery all around. The weather was windy and overcast with a few isolated showers but the river and waterfall were in full flood following last nights rain so it was a very impressive sight.
The smaller waterfall, Rhaeadr Bach had more water flowing down than I have seen before and that too was a lovely sight to see.
With rain threatening we thought that we would head straight back and go to the cafe in Aber before it closed and the coffee and Chocolate Brownie I had was as nice as the last time I was there.     :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 26, 2012, 04:49:28 PM
Today we decided to do the Maenan Walk as detailed by Carl Rogers in his book "Walking in the Conwy Valley".   It's a short easy walk of about 3 miles with superb views of the Conwy Valley from the viewpoint at Cadair Ifan Goch.   The first part of the walk is to Cadair Ifan Goch and goes through a Bluebell Wood but we were too early to appreciate the flowers but in another 2-4 weeks they will be at their best and you will be able to smell their aroma as you walk through the wood.   We went to  the viewpoint for some photos but the visibility wasn't good and the weather looked like it was getting worse  so we quickly moved on. Following the track we passed some houses with stunning views of the Conwy River and Carneddau mountains and then walked past an old ruined building before going over a stream using the old stone footbridge.  We then headed uphill across some open fields just as the rain started to bucket down and headed for another wood where we took shelter and ate some soggy sandwiches!
The rain wasn't stopping so we again moved on past another old ruined building where the path was really mucky especially after last nights rain after passing the ruin we made it to the country road and decided to cut the walk short and follow the road back to the National Trust Car Park.  I had planned to take my friends to Plas Maenan for a coffee on the verandah there but I don't think that they would have appreciated 3 wet and dirty individuals arriving on the doorstep..  but instead we ended up getting  coffees and McFlurries from MacDonalds and enjoying them at the RSPB car park overlooking the River Conwy.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 26, 2012, 04:51:19 PM
Maenan Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 26, 2012, 08:07:16 PM
Like the old buildings, Hugo.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 27, 2012, 05:14:29 PM
You were brave going out in those conditions yesterday Hugo although you could be forgiven for not realising how bad it was inland compared to the coast. I left home yesterday in torrential rain only to find Llandudno dry and warm!
When I returned home, still raining, and my husband said it hadn't stopped.
I think I need to find a house on the coast.
Dave's latest on the interesting properties thread would suit........I wish!

I looked up the Maenan walk after reading your recommendation and it looks great. Just waiting for some drier weather.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 27, 2012, 05:49:19 PM
It was pretty mucky out there yesterday so it might be sometime before it dries out but you could always just do the walk from the car park to the Cadair Ifan Goch viewpoint and back.
It's just under half a mile in total and that way you'd still have time for a nice coffee in Plas Maenan afterwards.    $good$
Just wait a few weeks for the Bluebells to come out though as they are worth seeing.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 27, 2012, 05:56:43 PM
We've had bluebells out in the garden for about 3 weeks, just shows how it's much milder by the coast!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 27, 2012, 06:14:16 PM
This is how they looked on the 29th April last year but they seem to be weeks behind this year.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on May 08, 2012, 09:24:31 PM
On Sunday I went on a ten mile ramble taking in Llyn Cowlyd, Cwm Eigiau and Coedty reservoir all of which are behind Trefriw and Dolgarrog.  The first photograph is the view looking down onto Llyn Geirionydd, the second is of Llyn Cowlyd itself, the third is of one of the many abandoned farm-houses high on the moors with the water pipeline behind, the fourth of another farm building this time in Cwm Eigiau and lastly Coedty reservoir.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 08, 2012, 09:34:20 PM
Looks great up there, I love the first pic, another place I must revisit!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 08, 2012, 09:40:19 PM
Trivia Fact: Llyn Cowlyd provides the water supply for Llandudno & Colwyn Bay.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 08, 2012, 09:49:37 PM
I'd wondered about that, you should have had that as a quiz question! D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 09, 2012, 02:08:36 PM
I have walked in Newborough Forest dozens of times but yesterday's walk was quite different because one of our regular walkers has just joined the Forestry Commission and works there.  So we had a guided tour of the forest paths but we didn't see the elusive Red Squirrel that lives there. After a while we walked along a path behind the sand dunes and it was like a petrified forest where the Corsican Pine trees were all dead caused by the continuous winds and salt air.
Another first for me was when we arrived at Llanddwyn Island.  I had never seen it cut off before but the high Spring tides had indeed made it a true Island.  There was nothing else we could do other than to sit on the rocks and have our refreshments and wait for the waters to receed, After about half an hour they did and we took the right hand path where we saw St Dwynwen's Well then a Raven's nest on the cliff edge.   A quick visit then to the lighthouse and then to the Pilot's Cottages where we enjoyed tea and biscuits and had a very interesting talk with a very informative volunteer there. The water supply for the cottages is from a well and the supply of water is a bit erratic. There is no electricity there so it is provided by a generator and they have bottled gas too.
The weather had turned very warm and sunny and we were reluctant to move from this beautiful place but time was moving on and we had to get back to our cars.   We walked along the beach to the car park and the only downside to the day was when we found out that the cafe by the roundabout was closed but it was a very good walk which we all really enjoyed.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 09, 2012, 02:11:46 PM
Newborough Forest Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on May 09, 2012, 09:09:29 PM
I bet you told the helper in the tourist information that you knew a strange man you spends all his time up the Orme who claimed the last lady lighthouse keeper was his great grandmother!!! What was their response? Do I need to go there to leave my autograph Mike
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 14, 2012, 11:07:36 PM
I have been on a few walks recently some with the beautiful Socs others with my Dad but due to a really hectic three weeks, I've had no time to tell you about them.  I must however tell you about today and the walk I had with my Dad and Mike up to Parys Mountain and then down to Bull Bay over to Porth Wen to see the old Brick works.

Parys Mountain in Amlwch Anglesey is one of the strangest environments I have seen to date.  Prehistoric stone hammers and wood found underground have been scientifically tested to reveal that Parys Mynydd (mountain) is one of the earliest metalliferossa (mineral) mines in Britain dating back nearly 4,000 years.  2,000 years ago the Romans trained slaves in the copper mines of Rio Tinto in Spain and then transported them to the mountain to extract the Copper ore. 
More recently on the 2nd of March 1768 a Derbyshire minor called Jonathan Roose made the "great Discovery" of vast amounts of copper ore and thus changed the once small village of Amlwch into what was the second largest town in Wales.  It was said that Amlwch was at one time half the size of the then New York.  Another local minor named Roland Puw was also present at the major discovery and was rewarded with wait for it..........a bottle of Brandy and a rent free cottage for life.
Thomas Williams aka "Twm chwarae teg" which translated means "Tom fair play" was the owner of the mines which employed 1500 men women and children as young as eight years old to extract ore from Mynydd Parys but this was by no means a good job as the procedures used to extract the ore were not only dangerous but also quite often fatal.  Ore was mined and then the rocks were burned to extract the copper which has resulted in the red, yellow, brown, purple and orange almost lunar landscape you see today (pic 1).  Believe it or not there could be at any one time 6,000 fires simultaneously burning on Parys Mountain.  The sulphur released  into the air was potent and deadly, 60% of children living in the surrounding area died before the age of six years old which leads me to the conclusion that "Tom fair play" wasn't that fair a guy after all.
Copper produced by the mine was used to line the bottom of Nelsons battle ships to deter the infestation of the notorious Teredo Worms known to bore into wood immersed in sea water.  Teredo worms are not really worms at all they are a clam type molluscs that stick to the bottom ships etc and due to the fact there was no Toredo Worms on the underbelly of Nelsons ships his vessels were more maneuverable giving him a considerable advantage at Trafalgar.
As we walked along the path we could see the purpose built settling ponds (pic 2) where huge amounts of  scrap iron imported from Amlwch port, were thrown into the copper rich mine water.  A chemical reaction resulted in a "precipitate extremely rich in copper and an iron rich solution which when oxidized was used as a colourant for paint"  pffft I'll be honest that last sentence went straight over my head.
A little further and you can see in the distance on top of the hill what remains of the only wind powered mining pump that exists in Britain.  A local landmark since 1878 it was built to help power by means of five large sails the steam engine pumping the huge Cains shaft (pic 3)
As you round the hill there is a dilapidated engine house, the last of six originally situated on the mountain.  Next to the engine house is what remains of a large fallen chimney.  I got talking to a guy who informed me that the digger you see in the photo (pic 4) is recovering the original stones from the fallen chimney and these in turn are going to be used in the reconstruction of the original structure.  He also said that he believes over the years local farmers have taken the stones to constuct their walls etc.  The windmill is thankfully also going to be restored but probably not with the sails.  I will no doubt return when the work is complete. 
Minors at Parys mountain were paid with "Druid head" tokens (last pic) which could only be spent in the mine owners shops.  This type of payment was widely used in the 18th and 19th century and the method was known as the Truck System.  These tokens were minted by Matthew Boulton in Birmingham in their thousands and when you take into consideration that minors of that time had to buy all their own tools from the mine shops, it doesn't seem that "chwarae teg" either.  These coins can still be bought by collectors for around £25.
My only complaint is that they have spelt the Parys bit wrong as of course it should read Parrys' Mountain  ;D 



Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 14, 2012, 11:20:24 PM
Very interesting, I've been there a long time ago (over 30 years!) it was like another planet!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 15, 2012, 08:53:23 AM
Nice walk and photos, Miss P.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 15, 2012, 06:50:42 PM
That seems a great walk Pendragon, we're arranging one there soon and we will be going down the mines on an escorted trip so I'm looking forward to going there now.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 15, 2012, 07:37:42 PM
There is actually still a Mining Company (Anglesey Mining PLC) operating at Parys Mountain, they have a compound by the side of the road that passes through it. You can buy shares in them if you wish...although it's often said on the stock market that the definition of a mine is 'a hole in the ground with a liar at the top of it'...

http://www.angleseymining.co.uk/ (http://www.angleseymining.co.uk/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 15, 2012, 09:25:26 PM
Hugo the walk I did to Porth Wen brick works on the same day was fantastic, follow the link below to see the photos.  I just haven't got time at the moment to tell you all about it, the walk starts from just before the Bull Bay Hotel on the hill and it's easy flat terrain from then on the coastal path for about approx 2.5 miles.  the views are breath taking my friend I promise you.  If your a bird watcher by chance we saw several varieties inc Peregrin Falcons, Ravens, Wheat Tails (might not be the official term) a Heron....a black and white little bird that for the life of me I can't remember what it was called  ??? oh yeah I do it was a Pied Wagtail....Ducks, Geese, Chuffs (red necks, red beaks...see I'm learning)  and lots of more besides.

http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/show.dml?id=11765522 (http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/show.dml?id=11765522)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 15, 2012, 11:43:14 PM
You must be pretty fit to do those two walks in the same day.  My favourite Anglesey coastal walk is that Bull Bay to Cemaes Bay walk with a return via the Llanbadrig Vinyard.   
The first time I did that walk was in April a few years ago and immediately after leaving the Bull Bay car park we saw 2 pods of Dolphins just offshore and that Raven's nest on the cliff that  you pictured in your photos had 6 eggs in it.  It's a fantastic walk if you do the whole section and the wildlife is great too.
I'm glad that you enjoyed that walk as it's so rewarding and the memories stay with you for ever.
I've enjoyed your reading about your walks around Penmaenmawr and the photos too and I'm starting to do some of them this year. I was thinking about the Huw Tom walk sometime but there's only so much you can do     
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on May 16, 2012, 08:35:20 PM
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There is actually still a Mining Company (Anglesey Mining PLC) operating at Parys Mountain, they have a compound by the side of the road that passes through it. You can buy shares in them if you wish...although it's often said on the stock market that the definition of a mine is 'a hole in the ground with a liar at the top of it'...

http://www.angleseymining.co.uk/ (http://www.angleseymining.co.uk/)

Anglesey Mining PLC...  (AYM)
I was tempted to stick a few bob into AYM shares a couple of months ago, on rumours of a new production facility, and an increase in demand for their output.   Since then they have fallen about 10%, so I'm glad I didn't.

Come to think of it though, the rest of my shares have fallen a lot further than any 10% in that same time!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on May 18, 2012, 12:03:21 AM
Pendragon, thanks for the photos and very interesting account of Parys Mountain.  Like ME, it must be about 30 years since I went there!  In my case it was on a botany field trip and we were studying the plants (not many) which were able to colonise that very harsh environment, with high levels of copper in the soil or spoil and very acidic conditions.  We tested the pH in some of the pools and it was only pH 4. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on May 18, 2012, 12:11:59 AM
not many can remember what happened when they were only 2 or 3 years old never mind going on botany field trips at that age , well done blodyn
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on May 18, 2012, 12:13:49 AM
Snowcap, you are a flatterer!   ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on May 18, 2012, 12:44:00 AM
no church of england
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 18, 2012, 06:38:48 AM
I drove myself there!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on May 21, 2012, 09:07:21 PM
I went walking in the Carneddau again yesterday.  I parked above Rowen and firstly walked up to the summit of Drum.  While the weather was delightful in Llandudno there was a lot of swirling low cloud on the mountains which made photography difficult and navigation only possible by map and compass.  As I was up on the summit of Drum by 7am I had the mountain to myself and only saw half a dozen other walkers all day.  It was beautiful listening to the skylarks even tho I couldn't see them in the mist.  From Drum I walked up to the summit of Foel Fras at 942 metres, then across to Garnedd Uchaf (now known as Carnedd Gwenllian) which stands at 926 metres and finally across to Foel Grach at 976 metres.  I then dropped down past Dulyn reservoir which is the location for three fatal WW2 airplane crash sites before skirting PenyGadair and back to the carpark.  Eight hours of walking in quite testing conditions.
There were occasional breaks in the cloud and so I got a few photos!
Photo1 - View from Drum looking towards the coast at Llanfairfechan
Photo2 - Llyn Anafon and a couple of Carneddau ponies
Photo3 - View from Foel Fras looking towards Garnedd Uchaf and beyond
Photo4 - View from Garnedd Uchaf with Foel Grach, Carnedd Llewelyn and Carnedd Dafydd
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 22, 2012, 10:55:38 AM
Sounds like a very good walk Jack and the weather was good too once the Sun burnt off the mist.  That start's too early for me though.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 24, 2012, 05:22:24 PM
I've been in practice for a sponsored walk in aid of the Blinded Soldiers (ST Dunstans).  I'll be walking 18 miles on Monday from Beaumaris to Moelfre and I'm quite looking forward to it.  Like Hugo I think Jacks walk started way too early and as a rule I don't start until at least 9.30am but the walk on Monday starts at 7.30am  :o 
Anyway on Monday this week Dad and I went up to Llanrwst for a walk around aParc Lake and Mines on the mountain.  The walk was in total between 8 and 9 miles and the scenery as always was breathtaking.
We started our walk along the footpath alongside the river just before  Ty Hwnt Y Bont tea rooms (pic 1) We passed through a kissing gate then up through the fields towards the Forestry Commission buildings.  You follow the road up until you see a rough path just beyond the gap in the fence to your left.  This is quite a trek up hill and the ground is wet and full of tree roots lying in wait to trip you up, believe me I stumbled a few times  :roll: at the top of this path turn left again.  On the way up we saw this really old moss covered wall where two fallen trees rested(pic 2)  It's a shame as walls like these are robbed of the stones bit by bit for people prepared to pay good money to have them around garden ponds and the like.  We followed the road up through the natural forest where you can hear all kinds of birds singing (not that I would have a clue which song went with which bird though, which is where Dad comes in handy  D) ) we even spotted a Buzzard but it was far too fast for me to get my camera, you reach a fork in the road and again you turn left then cut down the bank to walk round aParc Lake (pic 3) this lake supplied the water for the many mines in the area and there's bits of cast iron pipes and valves discarded in the undergrowth.  It was here we sat and ate our sandwiches and had a coffee.  We sat admiring the view and just in front of us there was a Pied Wagtail sat on a rock in the lake (pic 4) it was quite happy running up and down the rock.  This place is truly beautiful and you can only reach it by walking which makes the lake even more peaceful.  We gathered up our stuff and carried on around the lake and followed the posts back up towards the main path passing ruins of old houses or maybe farmsteads then off towards the mines.(pic 5)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 24, 2012, 05:55:00 PM
Once back on the main path you can follow the signs with a red pick and axe on them.  All along this route you can see fenced off areas with "Danger Mines" signs on them and in some areas there's shafts that have been capped off to prevent accidents, although quite what would possess someone to venture too close to one of these shafts eludes me but then you can bet your life it would be me rambling through the forest who "simply didn't see it"  :laugh: (pic 1)
This route takes you up to Hafna Mill, built in 1879 this Mill was used to sort the ore taken from the mines in the area until production ceased in 1915. (pic 2) in (pic 3) you can see the full mill with the large chimney to the left, children used to squeeze through small pipes to clean soot etc from within.  In Victorian Britain we weren't very nice to our kids were we.  Leaving Hafna Mill we headed back down the track towards Llanrwst (pic 3)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 24, 2012, 06:08:40 PM
We took a little detour at the foot of the path and walked round to the left of this lovely little cottage and over a small river with it's bed stained orange due to the minerals in the water.   On the right is a style which we climbed over and followed a zig zag path down through the woods to the Mares Tail twin waterfall.  This was my favourite visit of the day.  I've never been here before in fact I've never heard of it either.  It's wonderful, all you can hear is the rush of the waterfall and the birds singing.  We sat here and finished off our flask of coffee, planned our next walk in a couple of weeks and rested.  It was now time to head back to the car having had a brilliant day  $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 24, 2012, 08:08:56 PM
I really enjoyed reading about your walk and you certainly picked a great walk to do. I loved the photos and you've found loads of hidden gems there and I wouldn't mind doing that one sometime.   Your Dad must be pretty fit too because parts of the walk are very steep.
Good luck on your walk from Beaumaris to Pentraeth, it's a nice walk but watch the tides in Red Wharf Bay as the walk can be difficult at very high tides as we found out when we did that walk.
You need an early start for that one as it's fairly long but very enjoyable.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 24, 2012, 09:39:38 PM
Nice walk and great pics, Miss P. I haven't been down to that waterfall yet, looks great.

Good Luck with your walk on Monday, too.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 24, 2012, 11:08:00 PM
yes, another great walk, story and pics  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on May 25, 2012, 12:34:33 AM
pen you,v done it again, started were you left off last year with some great photo, s and a good story, hope you can make the walk around orme golfs cup charity day you and dad, it would be great to see you both knocking a ball around, give it a go
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on May 25, 2012, 05:18:17 PM
Good luck for your walk Pen.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 25, 2012, 06:04:34 PM
One of the best things about our walks...and I mean all of us on this forum, is getting the chance to write all about it on here.  I'll get my Dad to join in the golf tournament......not sure if he does golf, but I'm a dab hand on the play station so it may be my chance to outshine him....you never know  D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 26, 2012, 01:17:26 PM
Yesterday was a great day for walking so we decided to revisit the Maenan/ Cadair Ifan Goch walk.   The start of the walk was through woodland up a steep path and we were glad of the dappled shade because the temperature was very warm already.  The Bluebells were past their best but the display was not as good as we had seen in previous years.
After a short while we came to Cadair Ifan Goch which is a viewpoint that looks up and down the Conwy Valley and has stunning views in all directions.
After seeing the views we continued on the walk passing ruined farm buildings and crossing a small stream onto open farm land.  The heat was building up so when we came to the next woodland we sat in the shade of a large tree and had something to drink and eat before going on our way again.  On our last walk here we sat under the same tree but then it was for protection from the heavy rain!
There was an unusual rock formation here but it seemed natural rather than man made and immediately behind it was a marshy bit of land. 
Even though we have had a dry period it was hard getting past the next ruined building as the whole path was like a quagmire but we made it and then continued on our way up a lovely but narrow grass track leading to another farm.  Once past the farm we made our way through the open fields with the Ewes and their lambs everywhere until we came to Maenan School and back to the start of the walk.  I  had thought of this walk for our Retirement group to do but after doing it again it wouldn't really be suitable for them. The walk is very boggy even on good days and the gates are difficult to open and close. It's almost like the landowners have put obstacles in the way to prevent people walking there!
It was such a lovely day we drove to Llanrwst and after having an ice cream on the banks of the River Conwy we walked along the bank until we were near the suspension bridge and then turned round and walked back to the car for our journey home.  A great day out and on days like this it makes you really appreciate where you live.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 26, 2012, 01:22:02 PM
Maenan / Llanrwst
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 27, 2012, 10:09:05 PM
Pendragon's walk at the top of the Penmaenmawr Quarries a few weeks back intrigued me and so I headed up that way today with another local photographer. We decided to go up the easy way, from the Llanfairfechan side. ;D After a brisk 10 minute walk, broken only by a stop to look at some Carneddau Ponies who tried to eat my jeans, we arrived on the top and found ourselves by a man made lake. We then carried on along the top of the Quarry until we came to the highest point where, somewhat bizarrely, I found an old electric iron and two shoes (not matching). You get a real sense of how high up you are when you hear the noise of a light airplane flying along the coast and have to look down to see it, rather than up! After having a nose down into the operational part of the Quarry, we headed back down the quarry track and had a look in a pit surrounded by warning signs saying 'soft silt'. In here, we found some animal had walked across the clayish type silt, leaving its tracks clearly visible. Thing was, its feet were massive (see last pic) - what sort of an animal could it have been?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 27, 2012, 10:11:41 PM
Probably not a horse footprint  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 27, 2012, 10:44:05 PM
Great Photos Dave and I bet you were rather warm walking up that slope and in Jeans too!   Pendragon has done some very interesting walks in that area.
That footprint may well be just a large dog but you never know what's up there.  I wish that I had done what you had when I was walking in deep snow up Moel Siabod.   We were the first people there that particular morning and there were no human prints only ours. We spotted those of a Badger and a Fox but there was another which was massive and looked like that of a large Dog or large cat.
What we should have done was to take a few shots of the prints with our boots alongside just to give an idea of the size of the print.
We didn't though and we both regret it even now.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on May 28, 2012, 07:30:28 AM
Maybe?????

http://www.metro.co.uk/news/707250-could-footprints-be-the-durham-pumas (http://www.metro.co.uk/news/707250-could-footprints-be-the-durham-pumas)

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 28, 2012, 10:42:23 AM
Perhaps there is a Penmaenmawr Puma on the loose?  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 28, 2012, 11:08:30 AM
It could be Yorkie's avatar!   ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on May 29, 2012, 12:22:20 PM
For many years there's been various stories and sightings of a large Lynx living up on the pen/Llanfair mountains.  A friend of mine called Phil used to breed cats (the moggy type) and had a cattery under his house at Dingle Lodge in Pen, he once said that one night he could hear a commotion going on down stairs and so he went down to check.  He entered the cattery and to his horror found all the kittens and a few adult cats had been mauled to death, he couldn't understand it there was literally bits of cats all over the place.  As he came back out of the cattery he heard a rustling noise and suddenly a huge cat with tufts on it's ears jumped up at the fencing (at which point I would have had a cardiac-arrest)  :o.  He phoned the Rspca and was told it was possibly a Lynx , apparently a good few years ago a couple escaped from Colwyn bay zoo and the rocky hills of Pen/Llanfair are an ideal habitat for the Lynx.  Also farmers have seen their sheep mauled too.  So you never know.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on May 29, 2012, 05:24:04 PM
So maybe Yorkie was not so far from the truth???     ZXZ
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 29, 2012, 08:24:21 PM
The pawprints we found do look very similar to that of a Lynx:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on May 31, 2012, 08:02:40 PM
great photo's Hugo - can't wait for the next walk. Hope the weather clears up for Tryfan
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 02, 2012, 01:36:37 PM
Monday I took a day off from painting and took part in the "supposed to be 18 mile but turned out to be 22 mile" sponsored walk from Beaumaris over to Moelfre.  Well Socs and I had a brilliant time, the scenery was as always breathtaking.  We started 7.30am (way too early for me) from the greens opposite the Castle and made our way along the coastal path.  It wasn't long before we reached the beaches (pic 1) you could see for miles and even at that early hour it was very warm.  Me being me I had packed just about everything.....even Bear Grills would have been proud  ;D  I had a waterproof coat, binoculars,water bottles for me and Socs, gaters, sweets, sandwiches, dog treats and a fleece....oh and my Dads lead lined flask.  My rucksack felt like I was carrying a dead body and for most of the first leg of the walk I struggled not to fall backwards, the best was I needn't have bothered with half the stuff crammed into my bag as we had a backup team that met us every 3/4 miles along the way.  Something caught my eye as we passed the rugged shore line, someone had collected small pebbles from the beach and painted hearts on them then left them in a crevice on the beach, no idea why but they looked really nice (pic 2)
I had packed Socs ball but didn't want to keep throwing it as the sun was getting hotter and hotter and I was afraid she would over heat but that didn't stop her from collecting sticks and trying to get us to throw it (pic 3).  Socs was making us laugh as she kept running a hundred yards in front of us lying down and waiting with the stick as one by one the seven us had guilt trips as we walked passed and ignored her.  We made up for it as soon as we got to ponds though as it was then we'd throw the stick in so she got to cool down.  We were now well on our way to Penmon and all I could think of was ditching my bag and getting a coffee.  I think that the last pic is an old derelict life boat station.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 02, 2012, 01:49:49 PM
We reached Penmon Priory and met up with the back up team (pic 1) I remember coming here as a kid and climbing up the tower in the Dovecot (pic 2/3) . I had a quick scout over the bridge and went to  St Seriols Well (pic 4/5)  My bag was emptied leaving only the ball, thrower and water ahh that was much better.  We grabbed a coffee filled up our water bottles and headed for Penmon lighthouse. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 02, 2012, 02:00:10 PM
I've always loved it here as I have what can only be described as an obsession with Puffin Island, I'd love to go on the Island but I don't think your allowed unless with a guide (pic 1) on we trekked through wooded areas (pic 2) and along the shore, there's some lovely houses along here what an idyllic place to live (pic 4) the council have done a fantastic job with this coastal path (pic 5)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 02, 2012, 02:08:43 PM
We met up with the back up team again and had a rest before heading for lunch at the pentan Arms.  The Pentan is run by Stuarts (Albion manager) brother an he laid on a great spread of sandwiches, crisps, squash and even dog treats for Socs I was well impressed , what a nice guy and it was very appreciated.(pic 1)  Socs was having a wail of a time but needed to re fuel too bless her.(pic 2) We headed back to the beach to rejoin the coastal path.  I think this stretch was the most scenic of the day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 02, 2012, 02:33:31 PM
We were on the last leg now and blisters and sun burn were taking there toll on most of us.  Three of the members on this walk had already walked over 100 miles fair play to them.  We all kept each others moral up by joking and messing around.  the next few pics are of more glorious scenery.  Finally we made the final push to the end and after 11 and a half hours feeling proud as punch we arrived back at camp 8pm for quite frankly the best can of lager I've ever had (pic 4) and Socs did herself proud too....I love that woofer  :-*.  We had been invited by the owners of the Kinmel Arms in Moelfre for a few pints and a bowl of soup...well it would be rude not to wouldn't it.  What a way to finish an excellent day, in fact I enjoyed myself that much I re joined the gang on the Wednesday for the last walk of the event from Cemaes to Mynych Dy but I have to go to work now so I'll tell you all about it on Monday folks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 03, 2012, 10:17:44 AM
Yet another great walk, story, pics  $good$ when's the book coming out?  D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on June 03, 2012, 08:01:28 PM
Weather was horrendous today; wet, cold and windy so I didn't fancy doing a walk in the uplands or mountains so settled on walking along the coastal footpath from Aber Ogwen (near Penrhyn Castle) to Llanfairfechan and back again.  Aber Ogwen is a bird reserve owned by the North Wales Naturalist's Trust and can be reached off the old A55 just before Tal-y-Bont. 
Its quite an easy walk, very flat and apart from one small area where there is no path and you have to walk on the beach which is very tricky at high tide. 
The path continues past Morfa Aber (where the river from Aber Falls reaches the Menai Straits) and the bird reserve at Morfa Madryn before linking up with the promenade at Llanfairfechan and a welcoming hot chocolate before turning round and doing it all in reverse!!
I didn't take the camera today because of the weather but here are a few pictures from when I last did the walk and the sun was shining!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 04, 2012, 12:05:51 PM
Sounds like you had a great walk Pendragon and the weather was good too.   The photos remind me of when we did the Anglesey Coastal walk and brought some nice memories back.
I see that you just made it at Red Wharf Bay and had to climb on that bank to avoid the sea, something similar happened to us there but just past the Pilot Boat Inn further up the coast we weren't so lucky!
Puffin Island is privately owned and you do have to get permission to land on the Island. We had the permission in March but the night before the boat trip we were told that the walk was cancelled. Apparently the Countryside Commission had landed on the Island the day before but couldn't even make it to the top of the Island because of the thick undergrowth and they would have had to go back there another day to clear a path for themselves and others to use.
Our walk on the Island is on hold until further notice but it's one I'm looking forward to.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 04, 2012, 12:10:11 PM
Jack, that day was atrocious but good on you for doing that walk. We were due to go up Tryfan but called it off as Tryfan is not the type of walk you do in wet and windy weather.
I liked the photos though and have meant to have a walk there sometime.  I believe that there are Kingfishers on the banks of the river there and hope that we can see them when we eventually go for a walk there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: pentan on June 04, 2012, 12:54:42 PM
Love the pics looks like you had a wail of a time, go by shep are you on the pics pen/D?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on June 04, 2012, 02:12:39 PM
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Weather was horrendous today; wet, cold and windy

Jack, I looked at your photos before reading the text properly and I thought, my goodness they really have had much better weather than us today. Then I read your post properly!
Glad you had a good walk and your photos are lovely.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 04, 2012, 02:32:34 PM
Saturday was a nice warm day and the day we chose to do the Mynydd Garthmyn walk as described in the Carl Rogers' book "Walking in the Conwy Valley"
We chose to start the walk from the car park of the White Horse in Capel Garmon and after passing a derelict smallholding we climbed steeply up the field to have commanding views over the village and beyond. The next section lead through a sloping bank with a few Pine Trees to our right but to our left there were Hawthorn bushes in full flower with families of Goldfinches and Linnets on them. Again there were spectacular views across the Conwy Valley. At over 1000 feet the next hilltop gave dramatic views across the woods to Moel Siabod which was clearly visible, as was Tryfan and parts of the Carneddau.
We then followed a farm track downhill which had a deep wooded valley to the right. Towards the bottom of the track we left it and headed for "Tan Y Foel" a stone built Hotel in a lovely secluded setting.  Shortly afterwards we left the Fields to walk on a lane for a short distance until we took a shortcut through some woods to go to the viewpoint at Mynydd Garthmyn. It's worth making the extra journey to get to the viewpoint because the views over Betws are quite superb. As we looked down on the village a pair of Buzzards kept circling way below us.
From there we made our way back to the White Horse Inn car park so we could continue on the next part of our day out.   One thing we found out to our cost was that the directions given in the book are very misleading and as a result the distance of 4 and 3/4 miles for the walk turned out to be 5.82 miles per the GPS. I've since altered my copy of the book to make it clearer for next time.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 04, 2012, 02:34:40 PM
Mynydd Garthmyn Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 04, 2012, 02:48:07 PM
Mares Tail Twin Waterfall

My friends and I were fascinated by reading Pendragons article on the waterfall so after walking above Capel Garmon we drove to the Gwydyr Forest and found the waterfall.  It's a real gem and well worth the effort of going down the steps to see it. A little lower down the stream is a man made waterfall and I'm not sure why it was built although it could have been for a mill as a sign on the Trefriw Road says Coed Y Felin so that second waterfall could have been for  the Wood Mill at one time.
After that we ended up at Ty Hwnt Y Bont where we enjoyed an ice cream. A nice end to a very good day and thanks again Pendragon for finding that waterfall, I've been past it dozens of times without knowing it was there.       $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on June 04, 2012, 06:17:51 PM
Hugo, your Saturday walk looks a cracker so that is one I will have to do sometime soon.

There are often Kingfishers seen at Aber Ogwen especially during the Winter and are best seen from one of the two bird hides that are open from dawn to dusk on the bird reserve.

As an aside it is possible to visit the Grey Mares Tail waterfall and avoid all those steps!  There is a car park through a gate with a Snowdonia National Park sign on just off the B5106 near the Gwydyr Castle junction very close to a detatched 'Victorian' looking double fronted house.  This is especially nice in late Spring as the beech woodlands are full of bluebells, celandines and stitchwort. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 05, 2012, 10:27:34 AM
Hugo I'm chuffed you went to see the Mares Tail.  I didn't walk down stream though but I want to visit again.  Your walks are great too and all in the local area which is even better.  We'll have to meet up for a walk sometime in the future  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 07, 2012, 07:58:29 PM
Yesterday, we went to Amlwch and did a couple of short walks in the area.  The first one was walking around the Copper Mines at Parrys Mountain and going into the deep basin there.  You have to see it to believe it because the photos don't do it justice.  Pendragon did the walk in May so I can't add anything to her comments but later in the year we are going on a guided tour down into the bowels of the mountain which should be interesting to say the least. 
The next walk started from Amlwch Port so we drove there, passing my Nain's old house on the way. By the time we got to the Port it was suggested that we had our refreshments there and as it was a nice sunny afternoon we could leave our rucksacs in the cars to save carrying them.  We started the next walk along the coastal path to Point Lynas and within about 15 minutes we saw our first Dolphin of the season. It was on it's own going along the shoreline looking for food. We had to drag ourselves away and carry on and went past St Eilian's well which apparently is a cursing well unlike the normal ones but we didn't stop there and just carried on until we came to the furthest point of our walk at Porth Eilian. It was here where we realised that we may have made a wrong decision at the start as the Heavens opened and it was bucketing down.  We sought sanctuary or should I say shelter in the Church of St Eilian and it was well worth the visit. It's a very old Church and there were loads of leaflets around describing the history of the Church and we spent some time inside before deciding to go out and brave the elements.
The rain was even worse and we all got drenched but by the time we got back to Amlwch Port the Sun had come out and we were baking hot and steam was coming from our clothes!     A quick visit to the Copper Mine Heritage Centre and a cup of coffee in a nearby cafe and it was time to go home. Another great walk for us despite the soaking.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 07, 2012, 08:01:13 PM
Amlwch Port to Point Lynas walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on June 10, 2012, 09:10:06 PM
 Another brilliant walk Hugo - fabulous photo's D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 11, 2012, 12:29:11 PM
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Love the pics looks like you had a wail of a time, go by shep are you on the pics pen/D?
Yes I'm second from the right in the caravan pic.  I'm disappointed with the photos to be honest as I'd bought a new Nikon coolpix and like a plank had it set on all the wrong settings......but it's sorted now  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 11, 2012, 01:19:24 PM
A few weeks ago my Dad, Mike and I set off from Bull Bay and followed the Coastal path to Porth Wen brick works.  The walk is roughly 5 miles and is relatively easy with lots to see on the way.   We saw countless birds from Chuffs to Peregrine Falcons all pointed out to me by Dad of course  :roll:  We watched in awe as a very miffed Peregrine dive bombed a large Rook just off the shore.  The difference in size didn't seem to bother the Peregrine who was determined to knock the Rook out of the sky, it was an amazing spectacle.  Apparently the Peregrine Falcon is one of the fastest animals in the world and judging from what we witnessed a ferocious predator.
The Brick works were built in the early 20th century and took advantage of the bay as boats were used to transport the bricks out and the coal used to power the furnaces in.  It's funny as you don't expect to see such a large construction in a beautiful bay such as Porth Wen but it looks amazing as you round the cliffs.  There's three large brick beehive kilns, furnaces and 2 huge chimneys on the site all still in tact.  You can even see in places where they dried the bricks.  I learnt a new word too "Sagger makers bottom knocker" isn't that a good word...
"Saggars are used to hold and protect pottery during kiln-firing, and by placing various substances in a saggar it is possible to produce dramatic visual effects on the finished pottery.
Producing saggars to the correct specifications required was a skilled job and needs a craftsman - the saggar maker. However, making the bases of the saggars is a less skilled job which can be left to a lesser craftsman, namely the saggar maker's bottom knocker, who makes the bottom of the saggar by placing clay in a metal hoop and literally knocking it into shape."

On the way back we saw an injured Rook which looked like it had a broken wing I wonder if it was the same Rook we saw desperately trying to out wing the Peregrine.

More photos here  http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/show.dml?id=11765522 (http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/show.dml?id=11765522)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on June 21, 2012, 08:24:04 PM
Thanks Pendragon for the great photos and narrative about Porth Wen brickworks, it inspired me to take a trip over there last Sunday and walked from Bull Bay to Cemaes Bay and back.  What a stunning piece of coastline, can't wait to go back over to Anglesey and complete more of the coastal path that runs around the island!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 22, 2012, 12:35:57 PM
Hia Jack pleased you liked the walk it is a stunning place isn't it.  I've just moved house and so haven't had time to venture out much lately but like yourself I intend to do the whole Coastal path over the next few months (I don't get much time off work).  I had no idea there was so much to see on Anglesey.  I love the photo taken from behind the windows  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on June 22, 2012, 01:12:49 PM
Hi Pendragon, I bought the official guide to walking the Anglesey Coastal Path by Carl Rogers the other day from Smiths, it breaks the path up into 12 sections all about 10 to 12 miles.  It's worth noting that not all the sections are open all year round and one section from Cemaes to Church Bay around Ynys y Fydlyn closes from 14th September through to 1st February.  Its a good book and gives lots of history too! Jack
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on June 22, 2012, 01:49:05 PM
Cheers Jacj I'll get myself a copy  $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 22, 2012, 03:42:14 PM
I've got that book and took it with me when I walked around the coastline all 125 miles of it.  My favourite part of the walk is The Amlwch Port to Cemaes Bay which is only seven and a half miles long but has a total ascent of 534 metres because it is so undulating and has some of the most stunning scenery the island has to offer. We saw Seals, Dolphins, Ravens and loads of other wildlife on the way.
We did the walk by having cars at the end and start of the walk and it enabled us to complete the walk quicker than if we did the circular walk.  The only trouble was that my walking companion who was 20 years younger than me insisted on doubling up on the walks and sometimes we would do about 24 miles in a day!
Another favourite part of the walk for me is the Holyhead to Trearddur Bay section and again it is for the stunning scenery.  If you do it around the 1st week in October make a point of stopping at North Stack and looking at the cave below it and you may see the seals having their pups. You'll certainly hear them long before you get sight of them.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on July 01, 2012, 08:59:26 PM
Decided to do another 20 plus miles of the Anglesey Coastal Footpath today.  It was wet and windy as I left the car at Penrhos and took the path through the Nature Reserve behind the old Aluminium Works and into the port of Holyhead.  Unfortunately many of the the signs have already been broken off in the town itself so if in anyone is thinking of doing this section then you will need a map.  Passing the maritime museum, the lifeboat station and Soldier's Point the walk takes you through the Breakwater Country Park and up Holyhead Mountain.  Had lovely views of Choughs at North Stack and by the time I got over to South Stack the sun had come out!  Crossed through a field of goats and one of them decided to headbutt me - not happy!  The path then winds its way over RSPB land at the Range; an area of coastal heathland.  From the Range to Treaddur Bay the path follows the cliff tops with inlets and bays full of seabirds and small beaches.  Absolutely stunning.  Treaddur Bay is very different from how I remember it (granted I haven't been there for twenty years) full of posh new builds with huge windows and balconies taking advantage of the views across the sea to the mainland and the Lleyn Peninsula.  At Treaddur I took the road back to Four Mile Bridge and the Stanley Embankment to Penrhos to pick the car back up.
Then got stuck in roadworks on the A55 first at Bangor and then at Penmaenbach!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on July 03, 2012, 02:07:56 PM
Ace photos Jack  $good$ I haven't been there yet....but I will  ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 03, 2012, 07:25:06 PM
That's a lovely walk to go on Jack and quite strenuous too, that spooky old building by the water's edge in Trearddur Bay is still there but I'm not sure what it is used for.
We passed it when we went to South Stack recently and it hasn't improved in the 40 years since I first saw it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on July 03, 2012, 08:03:08 PM
Not sure if this is the house your referring to Hugo?

Craig y Mor, Trearddur Bay, is an austere, neo-Georgian, early 20th century house situated on a prominent local coastal landmark. The house was built for William Smellie, a wealthy Englishman and founder member of the Trearddur Bay Sailing Club, as a holiday home. It was designed by F. G. Hicks, architect of Liverpool and the construction of the house began c 1911, work ceased during the First World War and recommenced shortly afterwards. The building was finally completed in 1922. The main part of the house is a 2-storey, 5-window range with a 2-storey, 4-window lower wing set at right angles to the front to form an L-shaped plan with the entrance porch in the angle; the advanced wing continues at a lower level with a storeyed servants wing, garage and boathouse.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on July 03, 2012, 08:19:28 PM
Where is this and which road is below?

Sorry, I put it in the wrong thread. Should be in the quiz!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on July 03, 2012, 08:45:30 PM
Good job I didn't put my answer here then!  _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on July 03, 2012, 08:48:53 PM
Sorry for the confusion, pilot error!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on July 03, 2012, 09:50:16 PM
I was up on Pen Y Dinas, Great Orme last Sunday to do some photos of the town, when I heard this thundering of hooves and at least 30 goats appeared running at top speed towards me. Here's just a few of them:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on July 04, 2012, 06:45:29 AM
Wasn't just a lonely goat you herd then?    _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on July 07, 2012, 09:52:49 PM
I was in Chester today and decided to have my traditional walk right around the Walls. Several sections had diversions posted, as there is considerable rebuilding and repair work going on. Anyway, I found myself at Handbridge looking at the swollen River Dee. It was such a nice day that it was hard to imagine that all that rain fell on yesterday.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 08, 2012, 01:01:53 PM
The weather on Friday was awful so on Saturday we decided to have 3 short walks in the Conwy Valley.  We took Jack's advice and went to see the Mare's tails waterfall from the Trefriw main road and the walk was much easier. We were glad we went because the waterfalls were in full flow and very impressive,then we walked back to the man made waterfall and back along the stream to the car park passing the ruins of the old wood mill on the way.
Next it was to the Fairy Falls in Trefriw, we started by the Woolen Mill  and we followed the river to the falls. It was surprising how many people were on this short walk to see the falls at their best.
The third and final walk was the longest and hardest too and one I won't be going back to do in a hurry.  We had our lunch in Dolgarrog which was just as well as we needed all our energy to climb the "Ancient Ardda Walk".   It starts by the Lord Newborough Pub and is the very steep maintenance road for the Water Board.  The guide we were using said "take this section slowly" which we found funny. The concrete road which zig zags up the hillside is so steep there is no other way you can walk it other than slowly, and very slowly we did it.  We reached the furthest part of the walk at Tai Isaf Ardda and in the far distance we could see the high peaks of the Ogwen Valley and behind us were superb views of Conwy Valley.
The return section was disappointing and had no true pathway but we did see some more waterfalls on the route down and we passed a number of guys in wetsuits who had been enjoying the canyon swimming.  As the banks of the gorge were dangerously slippy we returned to the concrete road and made our way down to the car.   A coffee in Trefriw and an ice cream at Tu Hwnt Y Bont completed a nice day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 08, 2012, 01:03:47 PM
Fairy Falls Trefriw
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 08, 2012, 01:05:50 PM
Dolgarrog Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Micox on July 08, 2012, 02:33:22 PM
 $walesflag$ Absolutely beautiful Hugo. What a service you provide recording esoteric walks around Snowdonia and the Conwy valley. The places you show on this page I didn't even know existed and the photos do my heart good.

Thank you very much.

Heddwch.

Mike.  ZXZ
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 08, 2012, 04:58:04 PM
Thanks Mike, some of these places have taken me over sixty years to find so you are not alone there.   There's one walk I've been reading about and hope to do asap and despite living in the area all my life I had never heard of it before reading Chris Draper's book of walks in the Conwy Valley.
The walk is to the medieval village of Ardda which now lies long abandoned above Trefriw and Dolgarrog.   Tai Isaf Ardda that we saw on Saturday is one of the lowest properties in that area so we know that we have a long slog ahead of us when we come to do it!
Hope that you are keeping well and that you are safe and dry in your home in Norfolk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on July 08, 2012, 05:01:45 PM
Great photos Hugo, that concrete 'Welsh Water' road that leads to the ancient settlement of Ardda is an absolute killer.  However in late Spring it is beautiful as all the bluebells are in full bloom, the ancient woodland is in leaf and cuckoos are calling all around.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 08, 2012, 05:29:03 PM
I'm glad that you thought it was a killer too as I was starting to think that age was catching  up with me!
It's so steep in parts that you have got to be very careful even walking down the track.  I was walking carefully down it on Saturday and watching my steps as the track was slippy when my friend suddenly overtook me and was running down the hill.  He had lost his balance and the momentum and steepnes of the track took him down the hill until he stopped on a corner of the track.
He was ok thank goodness but it could have been different.
I wouldn't even fancy driving a 4 x 4 vehicle down the hill because it is so bad.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on July 08, 2012, 06:19:54 PM
Is that the concrete track that starts by the old bridge in Dolgarrog?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on July 08, 2012, 08:49:36 PM
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Is that the concrete track that starts by the old bridge in Dolgarrog?

Yes, the one close to the Newborough Arms pub.  There is a small car park often full with minibuses from outdoor pursuit centres as they take their clients there to go canyoning in the streams.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on July 08, 2012, 10:42:22 PM
I remember walking up there once to the Welsh Water Treatment Plant at the top...never again!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 15, 2012, 02:34:38 PM
Because of the deluge on Friday, the walk we chose for Saturday was the Little Orme and Penrhynside walk. It's just under 5 miles in length and isn't difficult but it does have some stunning views. We started the walk from the Co-op car park in Penrhyn Bay and went along the private road to Angel Bay.  There were 3 Seals in the water and loads of Guilemots and Cormorants as well as a Peregrine Falcon flying over the quarry above us. After admiring the wildlife it was up the steep grassy incline and then we headed for the trig point on the summit.  Before we got to the summit we made a detour to see the birds on the cliffs and you could actually smell them before you could see them, the stench was that bad. At the top we had our refreshments and enjoyed the spectacular views in all directions. Then it was down to the main road and turn left to go to Penrhynside. There we walked along the narrow road until we came to the public footpath at the end of the village that would take us to Pant Y Wennol.  We went through the first gate ignoring a path immediately on your right and carried on the recognised footpath until we came to another kissing gate where our path was to the right. Now if anyone is thinking of going the same way as us my advise would be DON'T.  The path was so overgrown due to the freak weather we are having that the  nettles and brambles are right across the path and walking there was unpleasant and difficult.
We did get through the jungle that was the footpath and came to Pant Uchaf where there was a most beautiful and massive Great Dane dog in the garden. It was friendly though and we enjoyed a pleasant chat with the lady who lived there. Then down the lane to Bodafon Road, passing the school with it's lovely hanging baskets and along the road until we reached the farm lane on the left and back up there to Nant Y Gamma.  We sat at the top and the views again were superb and then we went down the footpath and through the woods, passing St David's College and then crossed a field and walked down a lane past Penrhyn Old Hall.  We completed the walk by having a nice Cappuccino and cup of tea at Home from Home Cooking and then went back to our cars where we planned our next walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 15, 2012, 02:36:56 PM
Little Orme and Penrhynside walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 19, 2012, 09:26:37 AM
I had a pleasant short walk with a retirement group on Tuesday and we got off the bus by the Pendyffryn Caravan Park in Dwygyfylchi and walked towards St Gwynan's Church but turned left onto a public footpath that follows the Afon Gyrrach to Capelulo. The river was quite fast flowing because of all the rain we have had and on our way we passed some pretty quarrymen's cottages that were situated on the other side of the river.
In Capelulo we walked up the hill to the first bridge and after looking at the river we stopped at the Fairy Glen Pub for a drink. We moved on along Conwy Old Road until we came to the footpath that crossed the Golf Course and took the path until we came back to Dwygyfylchi and to the bus stop.
A short walk on a nice day but it's just good to get out.  I was due to go up Snowdon today but that walk was called off due to the rain and has been scheduled for tomorrow. Fingers crossed.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on July 19, 2012, 09:45:08 AM
Love the picture of the foal Hugo.
I hope you get to do your Snowdon walk tomorrow and as always look forward to your photos.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on July 19, 2012, 12:58:13 PM
Lovely pics Hugo---- Think they were wise to call off the walk today-- I only went onto the Orme with the dog and we were both soaked and it was so misty on my ascent and decent that I had to use the headlights on the car.  July???
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 19, 2012, 04:00:26 PM
I'm sure that I did the right thing then Nemesis if it was that bad on the Orme.  It's not so bad if it rains when you have started the walk but I didn't fancy getting soaked straight away.
Did you see any sign of Mike on your travels?   I was up the Orme this afternoon but it looked deserted on the Golf Course so I didn't call in.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on July 19, 2012, 04:21:57 PM
No I didn't Hugo--- sorry. It was so misty when I drove up I couldn't see the Golf Course-- let alone Mike ! Managed as far as Cwlach Street this pm, but I have rather a strange guest in at the moment, therefore didn't want to leave the house for too long.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2012, 11:03:06 AM
Yesterday we did our Snowdon Walk and met in Llanberis to catch the Sherpa bus to Pen Y Pass for the start of our walk.  Our route was to go up the Pyg Track to the top of Snowdon and then walk down the Llanberis Path back to our cars.   The reason we took the bus was because the car parking at Pen Y Pass is now £10.00 per full day and also we are of the age of concessionary bus passes.
That apart, the Pyg Track has stunning views and the actual ascent to the 3560 summit of Snowdon is less because you are starting the walk at over 1000 feet.
It is a busy touristy walk but the views are worth it and each time you see something different.  One of my photos of the lake shows a young guy climbing over a stile and he looks the part for a serious walker, that is until you pass him and see that he is walking barefoot!
We passed him a number of times as you stop and start on this walk and in the end I couldn't resist it and asked him why he was doing it. was it for a bet? I asked but he said that this way gave him a better grip going up the ascent but added that it wasn't so good for going down!    You do these walks to see the beautiful views but unless you have stopped walking you are usually looking down on the ground to see where you are going.   Later in the walk I wasn't concentrating and looked up and then accidentally kicked a large rock but at least it didn't hurt with my large walking boots protecting my feet. I hope that that other guy was more careful than me.  Anyway we made a quick ascent to the summit and stopped for a while for refreshments and then headed down the long relentless path down to Llanberis.  There were hundreds of people walking up, some obviously would never make it like the little portly girl who was walking up there in a nice pair of Union Jack design wellies!
Near the bottom of the path we stopped at a wonderful cafe called Pen Ceunant that is owned by my friend Steffan.  We had a lovely coffee there and a slice of delicious Bara Brith before saying goodbye to Steffan and making our way back to the cars.  The day had been dry and we were lucky as the rain only started when we were 50 yards from our cars.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2012, 11:05:25 AM
Snowdon Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on July 21, 2012, 11:25:24 AM
I really do envy you, Hugo!  Unfortunately I am not as agile as I was, and find even the most modest incline a problem so am unable to partake of the great outdoors as you do.  I enjoy the illustrations of your daily escapades which bring your travels to life.   With all that you write and all the photographs I think it is about time they were all collated, expanded and published!  There's a little job for the Winter evenings!  Keep 'em up!   
 $thanx$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on July 21, 2012, 11:38:18 AM
This has without doubt become my favourite thread.  I love reading about the local walks, we live in a fantastic area of Wales.   I'm counting down the days until my woofer arrives  ;D I love your photos too Hugo.  I'm limited to walking on Mondays or Tuesdays (only days off) and with the weather being what it is I haven't been anywhere.  I've got a book called Walks from Conwy and I'm plotting my first walk with the woofer, well probably more of a dog carry for the first couple of months  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 21, 2012, 02:46:27 PM
Thanks Yorkie and Pendragon for your comments. I know that I am lucky in many ways, such as living in this beautiful area and having the health to do these walks.  I'm retired so I also have the time to spent on doing what I like doing.
It's nice sharing my travels with people as some may never have done the walks and others who have done them may now be unable to do them for one reason or another. I know Micox would swap places with me if he could and that is why I do things when I can because one day I won't be able to do them also.
I have enjoyed reading about your walks too Pendragon and I am continually amazed by the things that you have found above Penmaenmawr and beyond. It's opened up other ideas for me and my walking friends  and one day we'll get round to doing some of them but there are only so many walks you can do.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on July 21, 2012, 04:11:19 PM
Great photos Hugo, blimey you were lucky with the cloud!  I don't think I've ever been on the summit and not been in low cloud obscuring the view.  My favourite route up Snowdon is via the Watkin Path and then back down the South Ridge as it is always a bit quieter than the other routes mind you haven't been up there for ages, must try and get out more!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on July 21, 2012, 08:42:18 PM
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Near the bottom of the path we stopped at a wonderful cafe called Pen Ceunant that is owned by my friend Steffan.
Think I'm visiting there on Tuesday.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 22, 2012, 12:44:11 PM
I'm sure that you'll enjoy your visit there Dave.  We were chatting so much Steffan, Wayne and I,  that although I took a photo of Steffan with my friend I forgot to take photos of his lovely home and cafe so I've enclosed a photo of a brochure that he gave me. 
Don't forget to take your camera as there are lovely views from the cafe.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on July 24, 2012, 07:16:47 PM
Went with my friend Louise for a walk around Dinorwig, Llanberis today.Parked in the car park by Llyn Padarn. We took  a slight detour to see the Snowdon Mountain Railway leaving the station, then walked around to where the entrance to the Power Station is, then took an old Miners Path up into Dinorwig Quarry. After a verrry steep climb, we found the old Barracks where Miners stayed during the week, then came out on the main access road through the Quarry. Time for a breather and a few photographs. Carried on along through the Quarry and, boy, is it massive - the second largest slate quarry in the world - we covered a mere fraction of the whole site. We followed the road down to where it joins the main road at the head of Llyn Peris and walked back into Llanberis. By this time, refreshments were sorely needed, so we headed up to Pen Ceunant. Louise knows Steffan well, so we were given a special dispensation to drive up to the cafe. I'd not met him before (although he thought he knew me)and he's certainly a real character, a pleasure to talk to. A very pleasant walk on a very pleasant day.  :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on July 24, 2012, 10:45:11 PM
brill photo.s again Dave thanks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 25, 2012, 06:12:00 PM
Great photos Dave and thanks for taking one of Steffan's Cafe.   It's a good job you were able to park the car at the cafe because it's a fair hike up there especially after that walk that you had just done.
Those Anglesey Barracks had names carved by the doors and a lot did seem to come from the Anglesey area so that may be the reason why they were called that.
Dinorwic Quarry employed over 3000 men at its peak and many of these workers lived locally or caught the quarry train on the Padarn Railway to work each day.  However men from Anglesey, in particular, required to lodge or barrack at the quarry each week.  They left home early on a monday morning and returned on saturday afternoon.   Provisions for the week were carried on their journey.  One of their homes for the week was the Anglesey Barracks high up in the quarry.  Anglesey Barracks consists of two identical blocks of 11 units facing each other across an unmade street.  Each unit has a living room with a fireplace and a bedroom with space for four men.  Amenities were few - no electricity, soft mattresses, toilets or running water, just basic furniture and little else.  Windows were provided only onto the street.  This way of life survived until 1948 when an unannounced visit by the local Public Health Inspector saw the barracks condemned as unfit for human habitation.  After that the quarrymen from Anglesey travelled daily by bus.  The, now derelict and ruined, barracks may still be viewed today by following the marked paths in the Padarn Country Park at Llanberis.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on July 25, 2012, 10:36:22 PM
Hugo and DaveR, thanks for those very interesting photos and accounts of your walks on Snowdon and at Dinorwic. 

The Snowdon Ranger is one of my favourite paths up Snowdon.  It's not as spectacular as some of the others but it's usually quite quiet. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on July 28, 2012, 12:07:26 AM
We have some friends staying with us from Switzerland. They took themselves up Snowdon today and were lucky to get these views.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 28, 2012, 09:28:46 AM
Lovely photos Hollins and I hope your friends had a great day on the mountain.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: mull on July 28, 2012, 09:53:53 AM
Remember when I worked in the Marshalling Yard at Warrington in the 1970s one of the track maintenance boys was from Anglesey.
 
In his younger days he had lived in these barracks during the week going home each weekend.

As the slate industry closed down he end up emigrating to Warrington and started work with BR.

Wish now I had recorded  some of his tales .
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 28, 2012, 10:15:56 AM
The walk we did yesterday was taken from Chris Draper's walking book on the Conwy Valley. It was the walk entitled Bobl y topiau (people of the tops) and the lost village of Ardda. It caught my imagination as I had never previously heard of this abandoned medieval village. The walk itself started in Trefriw and went uphill through the forest and ended up at the Chapel in Tal Y Bont. It is a demanding walk with steep ascents and descents and has rocky and wet sections on it.
From the Fairy Falls Hotel in Trefriw we walked uphill and took the forestry road on the right. After a mile and a half we went up a very steep bank passing an impressive stone tower and continued our way upwards passing mine entrances on route. There were fallen trees everywhere and any trace of a path had been washed away with the recent rains. We resorted to scrambling on all fours at times as the ground was extremely unstable and slips were becoming frequent. Eventually we reached a house called Blaen Y Wern which is still without mains water,sewage,electricity and gas and the public footpath goes right through the garden of the house.  We enjoyed a very interesting conversation with the lady owner and she told us all about the history of the area. Coming out of her small holding we came to a surfaced road that ironically we could have driven to anyway and thus avoided the dangerous climb through the forest!
We turned right and walked past Cae Celyn with it's stunning views over the valley below. and then came to the chapel of Ardda. It was built in 1845 on land donated by Thomas Pierce whose body lies in the grave with the decorative iron railings.  Tyddyn Wilym is where the Bard Gwilym Cowlyd lived and also Dr Thomas Wiliems who compiled the first Latin - Welsh dictionary and tipped off Sir John Wynn about the gunpowder plot but sadly it has been casually razed to the ground.  We crossed over the Afon Ddu and the leat and walked along the track and under a pipeline and headed past a pretty abandoned cottage called Coed Sadwrn Cottage and then turned right before Coedty Dam.  After crossing the Afon Porthllwyd we descended quickly but stopped to look at the exquisite waterfalls and rockpools and then continued downhill until we reached the Chapel and the end of our walk.   If I was doing the walk again I would bypass the dangerous forest section and drive to the top and park up there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 28, 2012, 10:19:27 AM
Ardda Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on August 01, 2012, 11:49:24 AM
I'm definitely going to do that walk Hugo.  hHow interesting and excellent photos once again  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 01, 2012, 01:05:04 PM
Whatever you do Pendragon don't do the part through the forest.  I followed the directions to the letter and the steep path up from the main forest track is dangerous.  The friend I walked with is a Ranger from another forest and he was nervous when we were doing it and since then he has spoken to Forest Rangers for that area who have  described it as horrendous!
Apart from the mines which are well fenced off, there is a danger that there may be other shafts that are not exposed.
If I'd have known all that I would have bypassed that part and parked my car by Rhibo or one of the other farms and that would have given us to spend more time up the Cowlyd and Eigiau Valley where the ruins of old buildings litter the hillside.
Having said that we would never have met that lovely lady in Blaen Y Wern.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 05, 2012, 04:38:49 PM
After last week's walk we decided to have a more relaxed walk on Thursday and headed to Rhewl in the Vale of Clwyd to do part of the Lady Bagot's Drive walk.
It's a very pleasant walk and not demanding. We set off from the Drovers Arms in Rhewl and crossed the bridge over the Afon Clywedog and passed the farm buildings on our right before following the track which goes alongside the river. The first thing we noticed was a stone lined leat which probably supplied the water for the mill.   The path was good and we had the river on our left with steep wooded slopes to our right.  It was a nice sunny day but the area is so heavily wooded that we were in dappled shade for the duration of the walk.  We took our time on this short walk which was very relaxing just listening to the water flowing by and stopping t occasional photo.  Soon we reached the road to Bontuchel but we decided to return to the car after refreshments of course and then we made our way back on the same track.
Our day hadn't finished though as we then drove over to Llanrhaeadr to visit the beautiful Church of St Dyfnog's.  The Church was so full of interesting things that if anyone is passing by they should stop and have a look around. From the Church we headed into some woodland and followed the stream to the Holy Well of St Dyfnog's.  When we were there we met a couple of women who had taken their sickly dog there so that it could go in the waters and hopefully have some miraculous cure.  The well in it's time must have been very popular with pilgrims as the bottom of it had been tiled with marble.  Returning to the Church we passed the Alms Houses , the pottery and a 16th Century pub before going back to our car and then back home.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 05, 2012, 04:42:56 PM
Lady Bagot's Drive and Llanrhaeadr Church and Holy Well
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on August 09, 2012, 07:16:13 PM
I would love to do more walking, and I certainly need the exercise, but I have difficulty with anything above a gentle (and I mean gentle) slope.  Does anyone have details of any nice interesting and level walks anywhere within 25 miles of LL30 that would give me a change from Llandudno and its environs?   I have stamina problems also and 2 to 4 miles would be about the right distance for me.  The prom is excellent for exercise but gets boring after so many trips up and down.

A handy cafe on, or after, the route would be a bonus!

 $thanx$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 09, 2012, 08:08:22 PM
There are a lot of pleasant short walks in that area Yorkie.    Once a month I go with a retirement group and those walks are geared for  their ability.
Aber Falls is the obvious one but Llanfairfechan Promenade to the Bird Hides is quite pleasant too.
Sometimes we go by train to Betws Y Coed and just walk along the Golf Course there.  The walk follows the banks of the two rivers Conwy and Llugwy.
One I have done is to Capel Garmon from the Fairy Glen but there is a section of the walk that goes from the Conwy Falls to the Fairy Falls and it is the old stagecoach road before Telford built the A5.   When you get to the Fairy Glen for a small fee of 50p you get to see the gorge and the two rivers Conwy and the Lledr.  You'd have to return slightly uphill unless you had two cars but there is a cafe to go to.  That walk is probably 2 miles max and I've posted some photos of that one.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on August 09, 2012, 08:12:37 PM
A pleasant flatish walk is from Tal y Cafn to the little church at Caerhun and back.  There is a parking space (SH784718) opposite the houses that were built on the old Ferry Pub site.  The public footpath is signposted and you walk along the farm track parallel with the River Conwy to Uchaf Farm, through the farmyard (where there were some lovely calves when I went earlier in the week!!) and keep following the public footpath signs through the woodland and fields to the church.  Always nice to look round the church with its great views down the estuary.    No cafe but if your brave the new Furnace Farm cafe is only a minute or two away!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on August 09, 2012, 08:40:53 PM
Wow this site is marvellous!   Thanks to both Hugo and Jack for their input, but more would be welcome.   I'll print your posts and then transfer them to a map, then I (and the Mrs) shouldn't get lost.   Just to look the part we'll have to invest in a couple of knapsacks!

You have brought back a few memories when you mention the Ferry.  Had many a pleasant meal there in the past.    $thanx$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on August 10, 2012, 12:18:35 AM
your right there Yorkie the sight is marvellous, i realised that not long after my daughter (curly cap) introduced me to it , it helps so many people  and gives so much information to the people who use it its no wonder it keeps growing in popularity , big thanks to Dave and Ian for making it possible.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 10, 2012, 07:14:14 AM
            Yorkie, if you are looking for easy flat walks locally Mrs.Gwynant and I often take the bus to Conwy Morfa and walk back round the Bodlondeb river footpath then along the Quay, across the Cob and back along the West Shore Cycle Path (bring a shovel for sand clearance on the sector after Deganwy!) and have a coffee in the West Shore Beach Cafe. Another one is to get the bus ( X1 or 19) or train (both free with your Bus Pass) to Llanrwst and walk across the suspension bridge over the Afon Conwy behind the Llanrwst North Railway Station, then turn immediately right onto the raised river bank footpath and follow the river round to Trefriw, where there are pubs/cafes, check out the waterfalls behind the Woolen Mill and then walk back across the road on the floor of the valley to Llanrwst to catch the bus/train back home. A very pleasant one we did recently is slightly further afield in Llangollen, where we parked the car in the (free) forestry car park behind the Chain Bridge Hotel in Berwyn (just off the A5) and then walked for approx. 1.5 miles  along the canal towpath into Llangollen  (which obviously has to be completely flat!). You can then go back the same way if you wish but we then carried on along all the way to the canal basin at Trevor where you can walk across the Froncysyllte Aqueduct. The whole walk was about 6 miles and was totally flat through some beautiful scenery and you can retrace your steps at any point if you feel you have done enough. You can catch a bus back from Trevor ( GHA Bus No.5 every 15 mins) into Llangollen and get a coffee/pint there and then catch the GHA Bus No.X94 ( approx every 2 hrs) back to the car in Berwyn. Also don't forget the North Wales Cycle/footpath from Llandulas to Abergele and beyond and also the newly resurfaced Dyserth-Prestatyn cycle/foot path. Happy walking!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 10, 2012, 12:22:36 PM
I forgot about the Conwy Mountain walk.  It sounds hard but it's easy if you stop of the Sychnant Pass (where the ice cream van is) and take the track towards the sea, bear right and follow the ridge to the Iron Age Hillfort and then return in the same direction.
Wonderful views and the occasional animal for company!
Don't forget about the Great Orme too. Park up above St Tudno's Church and follow the wall around the farm. An easy walk with superb views in all directions.  You can avoid the steep pull to the summit at the very end by going to the Bishop's Quarry and over the top back to the car park.
No excuses Yorkie, there are a few to choose so I look forward to your reports of the walk.
PS  If you do the Great Orme walk that map "Secrets of the Great Orme" will be invaluable.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on August 10, 2012, 02:57:50 PM
Thanks Hugo.  The Sychnant Pass walk is a non starter as my wife can't stand heights especially close to a sharp drop!   She even panics when we use that route in the car!   The rest that have been posted are all interesting and we shall start giving them a try.  Thanks again.   ZXZ
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on August 10, 2012, 03:24:50 PM
I agree with Hugo about the pull up by the wall on the Orme-- I tried to do it after circumnavigating the Bishop's Quarry the other week. Thought I was  climbing Everest. Phew ! Hills aren't for me.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 15, 2012, 10:40:31 PM
A visit to one of my favourite places, Beaumaris, yesterday. After having a coffee outside the Bulkeley Hotel on the Prom, we walked along the seafront and decided to keep going for a while along the clifftops in the direction of Penmon. Turned inland at the old Saunders-Roe factory and headed for Henllys Hall, as I've never seen it close up. It's owned by Holiday Property Bond now and is very well maintained. There's a golf club in the grounds, so stopped off at the clubhouse for some food/drink. Then followed the country lane that meanders through the fields and arrived back on Wexham St in Beaumaris. Weather was mostly beautiful, with clear views right across to Llandudno.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on August 16, 2012, 08:29:31 AM
Lovely pics Dave-- looks as though there are storms in the distance. Good job you didn't go yesterday-- what rain !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 16, 2012, 08:34:03 PM
I met my friend in the car park in the Ogwen Valley today as we were planning to walk up Y Garn (3104 ft) via its North Ridge. It was pouring with rain so we opted for Plan B, a coffee and a look around the Pinnacles shop in Capel Curig.
After an hour the rain stopped so we drove back to the Ogwen Vally and parked near the Ogwen Falls.    The Falls were in full flood and there were waterfalls every where following yesterdays torrential rain.
The first part is an easy walk into Cwm Idwal, passing Llyn Idwal on the way and in three quarters of a mile the ascent is only 200 feet. The middle section however is a stiff climb of around 900 feet and required a few stops to catch our breath as not only is it quite strenuous but the higher we got the greater the wind speed. It's relatively safe but you can't take any chances with the sudden gusts that came along. About half way up this bit we saw a transporter plane flying in from the Capel Curig area and then banking to allow for the bend in the valley. The camera came out quickly and I was able to take some photos before it quickly flew away.
The last part was another climb over scree until we reached the top of Y Garn. There's a bit of a windbreak up there so we sheltered from the wind as best we could. I was wearing a base layer and fleece but the waterproof came on and yet I was still cold!  You wouldn't think that this was peak Summer time but next time I'll include my gloves in the rucksack.
We had a bite to eat up there but because of the driving cold wind we decided to go back down via the Devil's Kitchen.  There was a lot of serious erosion on the path down but we took our time and made our way down safely.  On the way down we met a gentleman who had his 80th birthday yesterday and he looked as fit as a fiddle much better than my friend and I.   Yesterday he celebrated his birthday by walking up Snowdon and got absolutely saturated in the process. The girl that was with him said that he had got his brother on his back so seeing my puzzled expression she said that his brother had died and been cremated and he was going to spread his ashes up there.  It was a nice emotional  and personal thing but I didn't like to mention that if they spread the ashes today they are just as likely to end up somewhere over the border.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 16, 2012, 08:37:02 PM
Y Garn walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on August 16, 2012, 09:47:39 PM
Great photos Hugo, from one of my favourite Welsh peaks!  It always amazes me how few people go up Y Garn when so many climb the Glyders and Tryfan  $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 17, 2012, 11:23:39 AM
It's a great walk if you do it from the north ridge and although it's a short walk of about four and a half miles return, there is a steep ascent of 2100 feet and the views are magnificent.   Looking at it from the Llyn Ogwen area it looks just like a volcano that has erupted and one side has blown out.
From Llyn Y Cwn though it looks deceptive and doesn't look that appealing if you haven't climbed  it before.
The friend I took hadn't climbed up Y Garn before and was very impressed and we hope to do Tryfan soon which he also hasn't done  but I'll take him up the easiest route when we do Tryfan
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 18, 2012, 07:00:27 PM
I was in Denbigh today, so thought I would pop into the former Mental Hospital, closed since 1995, for a look around. Denbigh Asylum was built in 1848 with room for over 1,500 patients and 1,000 staff and it closed in 1995. Since closure, it has been extensively vandalised and stripped of any valuables. Denbighshire Council have recently spent over £900,000 trying to secure the site and erect a temporary roof on the main building. As is always the way with these sort of buildings, though, a shiny new fence will be on the front and there will still be a hole in the hedge at the back.  ;)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 18, 2012, 07:20:22 PM
Great photos Dave and they capture the sombre mood of the place. Many years ago when I played football, we had a match against the Hospital and had to go inside to change into our kit.   
The place was very secure but totally depressing and I was glad to get out of there.  Another time I played football against the Sychnant Pass Hospital and had to go in there to change too.  The atmosphere in there though was more relaxed because I think the patients did not have the serious mental  problems that those in Denbigh had.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on August 19, 2012, 08:36:42 AM
I recently had a token to spend and bought a small book on the history of this place. Very interesting it was too.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nearly Retired on August 19, 2012, 02:02:52 PM
Am a new member, moving to Llandudno (hopefully !) next year. We love hill walking, but unfortunately not the steep bits anymore, so have found these posts very useful. We are visiting on holiday shortly and planning on walks with the two dogs. Unfortunately they too are getting on in years, and aren't able to scramble over ladder stiles anymore. They are also too big to carry !!
Most of the Caerneddau walks in my guide book mention ladder stiles, even the "foothills".
If anyone can suggest walks suitable for rickety dogs I'd be very grateful.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 19, 2012, 09:00:28 PM
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I was in Denbigh today, so thought I would pop into the former Mental Hospital, closed since 1995, for a look around.


I was most interested in your post about Denbigh asylum, thanks DaveR.
What a place that must have been/still is.

We have been visiting friends in the Peak District this weekend.
I hope it is okay to post about an "out of area walk."
Please tell me if not.

We started off the walk at John Smedley knitwear factory and being an ex textile worker it gives me great pleasure to see such fine quality garments still being manufactured in the UK. It is still family owned. They make classic garments from fine sea island cotton and merino wool. There is a factory shop at Lea Bridge which is not far from Cromford and Matlock.
It was very warm and humid but we had a pleasant walk up through the woods to see the view over Cromford. Then past Riber Castle which was originally built by the Smedley family.
The last photo is that of a very friendly fellow we met. Pity we didn't have any carrots with us.
Shortly after this the heavens opened and I was not able to take a photo of Dethick church which is in a very scenic spot.
Then a quick rush through wet fields to a nice pub lunch in the Jug and Glass at Lea.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on August 19, 2012, 09:17:05 PM
Gosh Hollins, that gave me a jolt!
Back in the eons of time Diana Smedley was a client of ours. That was her maiden name, she married into a family which lived in Halifax and her husband was Chairman of the Halifax Building Society, Crossleys Carpets and Barclays Bank. She was one of the nicest, most ordinary people you could wish for.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on August 19, 2012, 10:34:07 PM
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Am a new member, moving to Llandudno (hopefully !) next year. We love hill walking, but unfortunately not the steep bits anymore, so have found these posts very useful. We are visiting on holiday shortly and planning on walks with the two dogs. Unfortunately they too are getting on in years, and aren't able to scramble over ladder stiles anymore. They are also too big to carry !!
Most of the Caerneddau walks in my guide book mention ladder stiles, even the "foothills".
If anyone can suggest walks suitable for rickety dogs I'd be very grateful.

Hi Newly Retired, ladder stiles and sheep country do seem to go hand in hand.  I have noticed that some stiles have a wooden pull up slide 'contraption' at the base so that dogs can go thru the fence rather than over the stile, but as the landowner has no legal obligation to allow access for dogs (just people) on public footpaths these seem few and far between.  In the very local area both the Great and Little Orme offer great walks as does Bryn Euryn all without stiles.  Down the Conwy Valley anywhere in the Gwydyr Forest is easy walking with dogs and offer great views as does Llyn Geirionydd and Llyn Crafnant as their is little or no livestock.  Sorry can't be more specific on actual routes  ££$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nearly Retired on August 20, 2012, 08:37:49 AM
Thank you for that Jack, that's very helpfull. Have walked on the Great Orme and realy enjoyed it, as did dogs. Will try the other places you mention. The ladder stiles with the pull up thing are great, but as you say, you can't expect landowners to provide them. It's just a bit frustrating to be half way round a circular walk and then have to turn back. Seves me right for having big dogs !!!!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on August 20, 2012, 09:54:51 PM
had a walk to Aber falls today with my wife and sister-in-law. all who told me it was worth a walk up to see were not wrong. Lovely day for walking sunshine and a gentle breeze, can.t wait to take my grandchildren up there, a bit steep in places but not that bad. I was thinking Yorkie would like it, though you may have to take a rest on some of the seats that are available on the walk (not as many as there could be) look forward to going again soon. Thanks to all those who gave it the nod.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on August 21, 2012, 08:17:47 AM
Yorkie has invested in a bike!    $00$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 21, 2012, 07:22:44 PM
Started off today in Conwy and headed up onto Conwy Mountain. It's a steep pull up to the top. Upon getting to the top bit, I looked over my shoulder to see a massive rain shower heading over Tal Y Fan towards me. Muttering to myself, I took shelter under a rocky outcrop, with only some large spiders for company. The rain passed over after about 10 minutes but the sun constantly going in and out of the clouds afterwards made getting decent photos tricky.

I headed off along the track that runs along Conwy Mountain. Along the way, I saw several hawks hunting for their lunch along with Swifts or Swallows swooping above the heather. Both the heather and the gorse were in full bloom. I eventually came out at the top of Sychnant Pass and headed down the road for my lunchtime stop in Dwygyfylchi, the Fairy Glen Hotel. Although it looks just like a normal country pub, it actually serves very good food in large portions. I had a half a roast duck on black cherry sauce with new potatoes and veg for £10.95. It was such a large portion that i had trouble finishing it!

I eventually decided it was time to make a move, so I headed off along Conwy Old Road and stayed on that until I arrived in Penmaenmawr. A quick detour to look at a derelict chapel and then time to catch the 5 bus back to Llandudno.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 21, 2012, 07:53:00 PM
Wonderful landscapes and in particular the clouds in those photos DaveR. Was that how the photos actually came out or have you done something in photoshop to them?
The reason I ask is that when I take clouds I am usually disappointed that they don't look as good on the photo as they did in real life.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bellringer on August 21, 2012, 07:59:28 PM
Great pictures Dave as usual, and I too like those cloud formations.

That Chapel in Pen. must have been closed for some years, and of course for sale for a similar period.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 21, 2012, 08:34:33 PM
Thanks both, it was a great walk.

Stan, yes, that chapel doesn't seem to be listed on the Dodds website any more. Sturdy building, shame to see it going to waste.

Hollins, the effect is down to a polarising filter fitted onto the lens, it makes the skies a much deeper blue and the clouds 'fluffy'.  ;)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on August 21, 2012, 08:51:03 PM
Very good pics, don't forget your brolly next time though!  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 22, 2012, 08:08:00 AM
Pfft, I like to travel light, ME.  8)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on August 26, 2012, 04:19:02 PM
Today I did a circular walk starting and finishing in the village of Aber (Abergwyngregyn).  Took advantage of the free parking in the car park adjacent to the A55 and walked through the village past the café and took the public footpath on the right.  The path rises steeply and gives great views in all directions, to the mountains beyond, to Puffin Island and Anglesey, to Bangor and the Menai Straits and the Great Orme and Llandudno.  This footpath then merges with the North Wales Footpath and I followed this to the village of Tal y Bont and Penrhyn Castle.  The footpath then continues along the route of the old narrow railway that ran from the Penrhyn quarries to Porth Penrhyn near Bangor that carried slate to the docks.  It is a beautiful section of the walk through lush woodland and a lovely river that apparently has kingfishers on.  I lunched at the docks looking at the very, very expensive boats that Dickies are selling.  To get back to Aber I followed the Wales Coastal Footpath.  The first section back to Penrhyn Castle was the same way as I came, but in Tal y Bont you take a sharp left just after the railway and follow the footpath to a pretty little church with its immaculate shaped yew bushes.  You then have to follow unclassified roads down to the bird reserve at Aber Ogwen and along the coast to Aber.   Really good walk, took me 5 hours, and as an aside there were no ladder stiles on the route at all just gates!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 26, 2012, 05:11:56 PM
That sounds a wonderful walk Jack.
I have also learnt something as I have never seen a slate fence before.
The yew trees are wonderful as well.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on August 26, 2012, 05:31:17 PM
Thanks Hollins!  Slate fences were relatively common in the hills round here at one time but as they have broken down they have been replaced with post, sheep netting and barbed wired.  I guess slate was used as there was so much of it around and so it was cheap!  $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nearly Retired on August 27, 2012, 08:38:09 AM
That looks a lovely walk Jack, and no ladder stiles too !! Will add that to my list.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 27, 2012, 04:40:35 PM
Me too and I hope to get to see those Kingfishers when I go.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 29, 2012, 12:28:37 PM
We have just spent a nice few days walking the cliff path on the southern coast of Guernsey.
The first two photos are me trying to get fluffy cloud photos like DaveR but cheating and taking them from above!
The second one is looking down to Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight.
The third one is on the way back looking down on to St Peter Port.
The cliff path is very well signed all the way with carved stone signs. The signing on the path is much better than the roads where there are few signs.
The path is very varied with open sections with observation towers left over from the war and other parts are wooded and sheltered with lots of ups and downs.
The last photo is of the latest sports craze of coasteering. That is definitely not me on the photo.
The path is very well maintained and has plenty of beach cafes and toilets along the way.
We had a delicious last supper (lunch) yesterday of crab sandwiches and scones at a beach cafe at Portelet harbour.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 29, 2012, 12:29:55 PM
Coasteering!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 01, 2012, 06:37:19 PM
I was back in the Ogwen Valley today with a couple of friends and we decided to walk up Tryfan. My friends had not been up there before so I thought that I'd take then up the easiest way if there is such a thing as an easy route up Tryfan.  We parked up in a lay-by on the A5 and crossed the stile and marshy ground until we reached the well defined stone steps leading to Bwlch Tryfan.  It's a steep pull up past the waterfall but we soon passed Llyn Bochlwyd and climbed up to the Bwlch and turned left to ascend the rocky slopes of Tryfan.  It may be the smallest mountain over 3000 feet in Wales but it's the only one that you have to use your hands for some boulder scrambling.   I took a path which often took us near the edge with it's vertical drops but we all arrived unscathed at the Summit.  It was busy up there today as the weather was fine apart from the winds so you had to make sure that you were holding on when you did the challenging bits.  The visibility was good and we were rewarded for our efforts with stunning views all around. On the summit are two large square stones referred to as Adam and Eve and some jump across from Adam to Eve but not me as one slip on Eve and you're a goner!
One foolhardy guy did though but I didn't catch him on my camera as he jumped.   We had our refreshments at the top and then carefully made our way down back to the cars on tired legs.   A quick coffee and cake at the Pinnacles and it was time to head home after planning our next walk in 2 weeks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 01, 2012, 06:38:38 PM
Tryfan Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 03, 2012, 08:37:39 PM
Really enjoyed reading about your walk Hugo.
My husband was up there today climbing a route called Grooved Arete.
He took this photo at the top!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on September 03, 2012, 09:03:25 PM
I haven't been up Tryfan for a number of years, but the last time I did go up there was a serious gale blowing on the summit and someone tried jumping between Adam and Eve, got caught by the crosswind and fell.  No serious damage to body this time - just pride dented.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 04, 2012, 05:46:19 PM
Rather him than me Hollins!     I'll stick to the easier bits








 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 04, 2012, 07:59:11 PM
Yesterday I decided to revisit the Victorian mine on Conwy mountain and Jj came too.  The quickest way to get there is without doubt following a straight line uphill from Roland Youngs yard on the Morfa but its also the most tiring as its basically a vertical climb and at this time of year you'll be fighting your way through the dense ferns.  I thought I'd give you the directions over the mountain instead as it's not so much of a hike and it's a lot more picturesque.

Jj usually wears a cat harness (I got her the smallest dog harness but she just walks out of it as it's way too big) I decided today to use a collar and lead.   Jj is really friendly bless her and likes to greet everyone we encounter and so when the town is busy it's just easier and a lot quicker to carry her.
I put her down on Bangor road, she was reluctant to walk, I thought she was tired so I picked her up again and carried on a little further towards the Iron railway bridge near the Morfa.  This is no good I thought I don't want her to think she's a Paris Hilton dog, I got Jj to come walking not sit in a handbag with a dress on so I put her down again.  As I tugged on the lead for her to walk she began bucking like a rabbit and yelping, she was adamant that she wasn't walking with the collar.  Can you believe that stubborn little tyke, she'd have to be on a lead up the mountain and so I had to walk all the way back to the house to get her piggin' cat harness. :o

Right harness on we tried again and this time she was quite happy.  We reached the Iron bridge and followed the path up past Beechwood Court the Christian retreat? whatever that means, I can't help but be suspicious of the place  ???  Following the road up we came to a style and then crossed over onto the mountain path.  The views from this path over towards Conwy are magnificent I do love living here. (Pic 1) and (pic 2)

We reached the cross roads at the top (pic 3) The large rock you see in front of you is where people practice rock climbing.......bit out of my league though I'd break my neck.  We took the path round to the right.  As soon as Jj and I reached the path no more than 20 steps ahead you can see a sheep path leading down and round to the right (you can see it in pic 4) it's important you don't miss this path as otherwise you go too high and you'll have to navigate back down quite a way to reach the Mine.  Just follow the trail for roughly 15 minutes and you can't miss the mine.  We passed a large standing stone facing out to sea and a clever sheep that found it easier to eat the grass on his knees? Not seen that before.  It was by this marker stone we ate our chicken and bacon sandwiches and had a drink.  In pic 5 you can see the dog water bottle I bought for Jj it's ideal for her.



Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 04, 2012, 08:24:21 PM
We carried on walking the sheep path.  It's not long before you can see the raised flat landscaping of the slag heap and the characteristic V shape of the mine entrance (pic 1 & 2) although it's not that easy to see this time of year due to the overgrown ferns and thick grass.  Walk up through the middle of the undergrowth and you will see the entrance (pic 3)  I noticed that on this visit the Mine entrance is completely open, all my Dads sticks have been removed making it quite dangerous I thought especially when you have an incredibly nosy puppy hot on your heels.  If she'd have fallen into the Mine you can forget about Angie to the rescue as I would rather enter a cave full of dragons than risk the spiders that might live down there  :o  I might just get on to the Council actually. (regarding the hole not the spiders of course)  ;D



Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on September 04, 2012, 09:02:12 PM
Time was getting on now and so Jj and I made our way back the way we came to the beginning of the narrow sheep track.  Now instead of re tracing your steps back down the mountain path follow the well marked path through the heather and over the top of the hill (pic 1) The area on the other side of this hill is really interesting too you can see if you look large round pits in the ground, could have been round houses or maybe signs of more mining as there are various spoil heaps dotted around.  Carry on straight ahead and follow the path that runs down to the right adjacent with an old stone wall which is protecting private land.  I'd love to sneak a peek over that wall but it's got 2 barbed wire fences surrounding it too and I would only get empailed no doubt and end up phoning for Prince William and his chopper to rescue me  :roll: (might not be such a bad idea  ;D ) This path is just lovely with  flowers and plants, huge trees and butterflies dotting the way (pic 2)  When you reach the end of the wall there's a gate with a sign that Keep Out (pic 3) Follow the next wall down to you right once more.  At the bottom of this path you'll see another style.  Once over the style you follow the path round the side of a house and your back on the road towards the Iron bridge (pic 4)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 06, 2012, 08:48:58 PM
Inspired by our recent cliff top walks on Guernsey we decided to walk a section of the Anglesey coast path today.
Armed with our new book by Carl Rogers (thanks Jack for the recommendation) we set off from the beach below Pentraeth. We were a bit worried about where to leave the car as it looked as though the tide comes right in to the car park.
We set off walking along the tidal road alongside some very marshy ground. We passed the rather unusual wall in photo 2.
We were passing the Ship Inn at 12 noon but I was not allowed in even for a quick sherry by my taskmaster.
Soon we were in Benllech.
I had more luck this time with a rest stop. We had a very good lunch at the Bay Cafe there. What a wonderful view they have from their terrace. It was such a beautiful clear day, quite breezy but we braved sitting outside.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 06, 2012, 08:53:48 PM
From there the walk went over the cliff tops through narrow hedges and we could see a lot of fisherman down below on the wave cut rocks.
All along we saw loads of crocosmia growing wild so it isn't just Guernsey and Portpatrick that it favours.
We were amazed how many caravans and (I'm not sure what to call them) shed like homes that were in the most spectacular positions along the coast.
Most of them looked very swish and well kept. Lucky them having views like that.
I took the photo of the cow and her calf because it was an unusual colour and also because you can see the Great Orme behind them.
Soon we were approaching Moelfre which looked a very pleasant place. I took a photo of the statue at the lifeboat station there thinking it would make a good quiz question but Hugo got it very quickly!
We didn't have long in Moelfre because we were catching the number 62 bus back to Pentraeth and then a mile walk down the lane to our car which thankfully had not submerged.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 06, 2012, 09:03:09 PM
Great walk and photos, Hugo. I really must spend more time on Anglesey.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on September 06, 2012, 10:06:59 PM
That looks a great walk Hollins, this Anglesey Coastal Path really is a little gem - haven't done that section yet but you have whetted my appetite!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 06, 2012, 10:30:03 PM
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Great walk and photos, Hugo. I really must spend more time on Anglesey.

Those are Hollins' photos Dave and they are great it's a lovely walk providing the tide is not in. The best bit of the island is still ahead and quite spectacular.   That meal looks delicious and I noticed two wine glasses on the table, one of which was nearly empty but I'm too much of a gentleman to ask who likes their tipple!      Z**
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 07, 2012, 05:06:02 PM
Hollins is not guilty.....she sips her wine like a good girl!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on September 08, 2012, 12:16:15 AM
Oh yes, my apologies to Hollins!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nearly Retired on September 08, 2012, 08:46:41 AM
Beautiful photos, and lovely looking walk. I bet there's no ladder stiles either !!!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 08, 2012, 09:42:21 AM
No, just a few kissing gates!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 11, 2012, 08:26:53 PM
I had a lovely walk today from Saundersfoot to Tenby.
Here are a few photos showing my progress getting closer to the lovely Tenby.
Dave R, are you impressed with my clouds?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 11, 2012, 09:30:37 PM
I'm glad that you enjoyed the walk in that beautiful area and hope that the weather stays nice for your stay there.  Here's a photo taken from our hotel room on the North Bay and it's very similar to your last photo   $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2012, 05:18:41 PM
I walked another section of the Pembrokeshire path the other day from Amroth which is the start of the walk to Saundersfoot.
This route used to have a tram running along it so some of the walk is along the old track and through tunnels!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 15, 2012, 02:04:46 PM
Yesterday we went to Moelfre in Anglesey for a walk around this lovely village and coastline. We parked the car and took the narrow path alongside the stream to the sea front and made our way up the hill and along the coastal path. Before long we arrived at the Lifeboat station and had a good look around inside. Those medals that the crew have received over the years were impressive and a testament to those brave men that manned those boats in all types of weather.   Further along were a terrace of single storey cottages that must have at one time been the fishermen's cottages and what a location for them!
We came to the Hindlea Memorial and then to the bay where the ship was sunk and the remains are visible at low water.  A little further on was the memorial to the Royal Charter that sunk nearby with the loss of over 400 lives. 
This area had so many shipwrecks over the years that a refuge was build on a small island  called Ynys Dulas,   Upon the island is a cylindrical structure with a cone shaped top, built in 1924 by Lady Dorina Neave of Llys Dulas Manor to store food and provide shelter for shipwrecked seamen.
At Lligwy Bay we stopped and had something to eat and drink and then made our way to the Iron Age village of Din Lligwy and as we entered the field leading to the village we stopped and had a look in an old derelict Chapel that stands in a prominent position there. The village is impressive and well worth the visit but it was soon time to move on to the Cromlech at Din Lligwy.  It's very impressive with a capstone weighing an estimated 25 tons.  After taking some photos and going inside the tomb we headed back to Moelfre and enjoyed a nice drink in the cafe next to the stream.  A nice easy walk of just under 5 miles but very enjoyable
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 15, 2012, 02:07:52 PM
Moelfre walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 15, 2012, 02:25:17 PM
That was really interesting Hugo, thanks!
Now I know what was lying just around the corner from our walk.
I am sorry now that we were rushing for the bus but hopefully there will be another time.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 23, 2012, 03:27:28 PM
The weather forecast was good for yesterday so three of us met in a lay-by opposite Llyn Ogwen and started our walk from there to go to Glyder Fawr (3279 ft)  and Glyder Fach (3262 ft)  via the Cribbin Ridge.   The weather was perfect for the walk as it was dry and sunny with no wind and excellent visibility.  We made our start up the steep grassy slope and crossed the marshy ground until we came to the well built stone path that would take us up to Llyn Bochlwyd.  From there you take the path that leads you on to the Cribbin.  The Cribbin ridge has a well defined path that takes you on to a ridge that overlooks everywhere in the Ogwen Valley. 
This walk although short in distance is quite steep and demanding but we took our time and had frequent stops to drink and admire the surrounding area and very soon we were rewarded with spectacular views.  Visibility yesterday was so clear that not only could we see as far down as Cadair Idris to the South but also to the North the Cumbrian Hills were clearly visible and possibly the Scottish lowlands.
The path is easy and safe in good weather but near the top at Glyder Fawr you have a boulder and rock scramble and yesterday some of the rocks were frozen so we had to be careful when picking our route up to the top.  Anyway we all arrived at the top safe and sound and made our way across the rock strewn plateau to the highest part of Glyder Fawr where we stopped and had our refreshments.
Soon it was time to cross over to Glyder Fach and as we made our way back across the rocky landscape we saw three paragliders  flying over by Pen Y Gwryd and making full use of the therms.   
At Glyder Fach we passed Castell Y Gwynt (Castle of the Wind) and followed the path to the cantilever where we stopped for our touristy type photos. Although I've passed here many times before I've never bothered to go on the rock but as this was the first time my friends had been up this mountain I thought that I would stand on there too.  There were loads of people there and people were queuing up to have their obligatory photo taken on the cantilever rock.
After the photos we set off down avoiding Bristly Ridge but taking a path down the scree slope. Erosion has taken it's toll on this area and to be honest it is now not the safest of routes. The scree was slipping and rocks would be dislodged and as I was in the lead I was always wary of any rocks coming my way!    Safe at the bottom of the scree we then made our way down the steep slope but well kept path to our cars by the Lake.   It was quite a strenuous walk of about five miles and we arrived safe and sound apart from Wayne who slipped on his back about 12 feet from the car park. Thankfully it was only his pride that was hurt.  To end the walk we drove to the Pinnacles Cafe where we had hot chocolates and cakes and then it was time to go home after enjoying a superb walk.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 23, 2012, 03:31:49 PM
Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 23, 2012, 03:39:13 PM
Fabulous photos Hugo, love the last one!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on September 23, 2012, 05:27:08 PM
 
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Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach walk
D) Well done Hugo you did us proud with the walks in Ogwen valley.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 23, 2012, 06:23:45 PM
Thanks Tellytubby, glad that you enjoyed it.  The conditions were perfect, let's hope that they are good when we go over to the Carneddau! 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gaylord Screwsby on September 30, 2012, 09:15:21 PM
Brilliant photos Hugo. I went up Snowdon via the Pyg track about a month ago and the views/weather were fantastic. Having seen your pictures this has gone to the top of my to do list.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 01, 2012, 06:15:34 PM
Thanks Gaylord Screwsby, the Cribben Ridge is a lovely ridge walk with great views.  Save it for a clear dry day when it is at its best and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.
The Pyg track and the Watkin Path are my favourite paths up Snowdon and in July I caught the bus to Pen Y Pass and walked up the Pyg track to the summit and then came down via the Llanberis Path. We were lucky and had good weather on our walk too.
If you ever do the Llanberis Path stop at Pen Ceunant, Steffan's cafe at the bottom of the path as its well worth it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2012, 01:23:35 PM
Yesterday we went to Llanfairfechan to do the Llanfairfechan Upland walk starting from the Nant Y Coed Nature Reserve.  It's a walk neither of us had done before so we were looking forward to it after reading about it previously.  We followed the well surfaced path through the woodland with the tumbling river on our right and soon came to the old Fish pond and it was lovely seeing the Oak trees mirrored in the still waters of the pond.  Rising steeply above the pond on the scree were these Oak trees that covered the lower part of the imposing hill fort.  Carrying on we crossed the river on stepping stones and walked alongside it before crossing it again on more stepping stones.  The track then became fairly steep as we walked uphill along the dry stone walling and the fields are littered with large glacial boulders and the area is peppered with prehistoric sites.  We were heading for the Roman Road so we crossed over the marshy moorland and made our way via the waymarkers to the road. Once at the Roman Road we stopped and had some food and drink and continued on our way in the direction of Aber.  The actual Roman Road is just south of the present track and is still visible in places but we carried on Passing the sign post for Llanfairfechan as I was looking for something further on.  At the next valley we descended across the moorland and after crossing it we decided to stop and have some more refreshments and as we were doing so we saw a russet coloured Stoat running to the dry stone walling.  After enjoying the food and sunshine we followed the original Roman road down to the Roman Milestone that was in a marshy field on our Left above Rhiwiau Uchaf.   This is a concrete replica of the original milestone found in the field.  The original stone was from Minera near Wrexham and was dressed and professionally inscribed at Chester and was then shipped direct to Kanovium (Caerhun)   It was then carried over Bwlch Y Ddeufan to be placed in position 8 Roman miles from Kanovium.   It was built in the reign of Hadrian and is dated AD 120-121 .    It seems that when an Emperor was replaced they removed the milestone and threw it away in the bog and replaced it with one by the latest Emperor. Another milestone to the Emperor Septimus Severus was also found in this field.   We then had a long walk back to the car park and made our way home.   One thing that struck us on our walk was that although we had walked past hundreds of Oak Trees there was a marked absence of Acorns and that may be due to this extreme weather we have had this year.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2012, 01:26:01 PM
Llanfairfechan Upland walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on October 07, 2012, 09:47:18 PM
That is a great walk Hugo, I did't know about it until I picked up a Conwy Council Countryside Leaflet detailing it last year, and have done it twice since.
Beautiful day again today so I went and parked near to Llyn Eigiau at first light and walked through Cwm Eigiau onto Foel Grach and then back via Melynllyn and Dulyn reservoirs back to the car at Llyn Eigiau.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on October 08, 2012, 10:16:29 AM
          Hugo, we were walking across from Rowen to Llanfairfechan recently and while walking down from the rocky outcrop (Garreg Fawr?) above Llanfairfechan towards Terrace Walk we came across a dead mole in the middle of the path by a stone wall. There were no discernible injuries to it and then we noticed a stoat running back and forth across the path a few metres ahead as if to entice us away from his lunch! So there must be a few in that area.
           I enjoy reading the reports of your walks as I used to do a lot "on the hill" when I was younger and before age (and arthritis!) came calling and I can identify with your routes and photos. We passed the tree growing out of the rock recently on our way up to Bwlch Tryfan but it was too windy to summit (gone are the days of the East Ridge and Bristly Ridge!) so we went down and round Cwm Idwal instead. However I want to do Carnedd Llewellyn again this year before the days get too short.
         As Jack was up there in that area last weekend perhaps he could tell me whether the path which goes directly from the Eigiau park up on to the hill above Llyn Eigiau has been closed by the local farmer (as I have heard) as it was a great way to gain height quickly instead of having to go all the way around the hill on the Dwr Cymru track up to Melynllyn. Thanks.   $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on October 08, 2012, 01:44:31 PM
Hi Gwynant
The path across Cefn Tal Llyn Eigiau was open yesterday, never heard of it being closed but maybe it is at lambing time? Jack
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on October 08, 2012, 02:22:30 PM
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Hi Gwynant
The path across Cefn Tal Llyn Eigiau was open yesterday, never heard of it being closed but maybe it is at lambing time? Jack
           Thanks for that Jack. It was about 3 months ago that someone told me about the closure. He said that it had been blocked by the farmer so the lambing theory could be correct. Thanks again.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 08, 2012, 02:53:14 PM
Jack,  we were stuck on two walks to do on Saturday and went for the Llanfairfechan Upland walk because neither of us had done the walk before. The other one was the Cwm Eigiau walk which we will do later sometime.    That photo of the peat mound was interesting,do you know anything about it?

Gwynant,  last winter we saw a Stoat on the moorland on the Penmaenmawr side and it was white and in its Winter coat.  I'm hoping to take my friends to Carnedd Llewelyn via the steep section of Pen Yr Ole Wen but at the moment my knee is dodgy because of the descent on the scree from Glyder Fach so that may be put on hold until next year as the walk is quite strenuous.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on October 08, 2012, 04:29:52 PM
Hi Hugo, No I don't know anything about the peat rounds on the summit of Cefn Tal Llyn Eigiau but there are a few of them but this one was so perfectly round it was the most photogenic!  I've just done a quick search on google also and that hasn't helped,if you find anything out could you post it because I'm really fascinated.
I guess you've been up the car park at Llyn Eigiau many times but I was surprised how busy it was, I arrived at about 7.20 am and there were only three spaces left.  I guess it isn't as busy in the week though.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 08, 2012, 06:11:42 PM
7.20AM    :o 
 my alarm clock doesn't go off until 8.30AM    :) 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 21, 2012, 12:37:48 PM
Yesterday six of us set out to do the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct walk and we met at the Eisteddfod field in Llangollen for the start of our walk.  The canal is nearby so we went on to the towpath and immediately on our left was a pretty black and white timbered cottage that looked so tranquil with all the ducks feeding on the lawn. Turning to our right we headed to the Wharf Tea Rooms and waited there while they made some sandwiches for one of our members.  Then it was over the bridge and up the steep winding track to the Castle.  If anyone has been up this route they will know that it's quite steep so for this part of the walk we were fortunate that the weather was overcast and not too hot but it didn't stop a few of us from struggling up the slope.  Once up at the top of Dinas Bran the pull was worth it for the wonderful views in all directions.  The Aqueduct was visible from there too although it seemed a long way away and it was as we found out later!       After a quick stop there to get our breath back we headed for Trevor Rocks and the Offa's Dyke Path that was to take us part of the way to Trevor.   The weather had picked up by then and it was sunny and warm  so some of our gear came off and we walked along the path enjoying the views and the sunshine.  There were dozens of like minded people doing the same and it was nice to see them making the most of the weather.    We left the path after a while and headed down through the woods, passing Trefor Hall and followed the lane to the main road where we turned left towards Trefor but then took the public footpath which led us to a road and a bridge that had great views of the Aqueduct above and also in the other direction to a building that at one time must have been a water mill. 
It was a walk uphill then until we reached the other side of the aqueduct and we stopped there for lunch as by then we had all built up a healthy appetite.  After having our refreshments we then crossed the 126 feet high aqueduct that Thomas Telford built. It took ten years to build at a cost of £47K and is now a World Heritage site.  In Trefor Basin we picked up another friend and the seven of us then followed the canal for four and a half miles back to Llangollen.   The canal overlooks the River Dee and the whole of the Llangollen Valley and this part of the walk is very easy walking but in addition to the views and Autumn tinted trees, you are rewarded with a variety of wildlife like Ducks, Buzzards and other birds as well as seeing the fish rising up in the waters of the canal.  Soon we reached the Wharf Tea Rooms where we stopped for coffees and that was the end of our walk, but we are planning to return here again soon.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 21, 2012, 12:41:02 PM
Llangollen Aqueduct walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on October 21, 2012, 03:55:37 PM
how much more colorful are the photos in the Autumn, beautiful
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 22, 2012, 12:05:54 PM
I agree, lovely autumn colours and looks like a great walk Hugo.
Here are a few photos from a walk we did in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland last week. Despite being in the mountains you are never very far from a nice cafe and there is nearly always a cable car on hand to help you up or down if you have too much lunch! ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on October 22, 2012, 01:40:46 PM
           Hugo, we did the low level version of your Llangollen walk earlier this year, and since then I have wanted to go up to Castell Dinas Bran, and after seeing your pics I will have to make the effort! We left the car in the free Forestry car park behind the Chain Bridge Hotel in Berwyn (just off the A5) and went over the pedestrian bridge to the Hotel and down to the canal. We then followed the canal towpath down to Llangollen and then continued down to the viaduct at Pontcysyllte, which was approximately 6 miles and beautiful scenery throughout, where we walked up to the main road at Trevor and caught a No.5 GHA bus to Llangollen (every 15 mins), and after a bite to eat caught the X94 GHA bus (every 2 hours) back up to the car at Berwyn. These pics show the views en route.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 22, 2012, 01:44:08 PM
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Despite being in the mountains you are never very far from a nice cafe
I like the sound of Switzerland!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on October 22, 2012, 06:16:33 PM
OMG Hollins I should need a hoist if I ate all those chips-- they look lovely though !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on October 22, 2012, 06:22:39 PM
You've all been on some fantastic walks lately and I've enjoyed seeing your lovely photos while I've been stuck at my desk.   $thanx$

Hollins, I'm glad to see you restrained yourself long enough to photograph your lunch!   ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 23, 2012, 11:19:19 AM
Gwynant, I'm glad that you enjoyed the canal walk in Llangollen and it looks like you had nice weather too.    Another walk we did in Llangollen last year was the Llangollen History Trail.  That meant walking along the canal to the Horseshoe Falls and then going up Velvet Hill to the Valle Crucis Abbey and finishing at Dinas Bran.   It was a lovely walk of 6 miles but was quite steep in parts and took about 4 hours to complete.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 23, 2012, 11:22:53 AM
Hollins,  breathtaking scenery over there in Switzerland and I hope the chips tasted as nice as they looked. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on October 23, 2012, 02:14:13 PM
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    Another walk we did in Llangollen last year was the Llangollen History Trail.  That meant walking along the canal to the Horseshoe Falls and then going up Velvet Hill to the Valle Crucis Abbey and finishing at Dinas Bran.   It was a lovely walk of 6 miles but was quite steep in parts and took about 4 hours to complete.

        Thanks For that info Hugo, I'll mark that down for the future.  $thanx$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 23, 2012, 04:01:52 PM
If you go back to pg 3 on the walks you'll see some of the photos from the Llangollen History Trail.  We found the route on the Rural Walks in Denbighshire ( 1st one) booklet and slightly modified it so we could walk to the top of the Velvet Hill.
I hope you enjoy it if you decide to do it one day Gwynant.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 24, 2012, 08:48:27 AM
Nemesis and Hugo, yes the chips are really delicious in Switzerland, up there with the Belgian frites. Crispy on the outside and soft inside and a bit salty. They seem to be standard spec wherever you go over there.
I didn't eat them all myself! They were shared with husband and even then we didn't manage them all, honest!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on October 24, 2012, 10:55:21 AM
Hollins--really enjoy your pics, as for the chips, this last week we had an old friend down from Yorkshire, thus, rarely for us, we had 2 meals out. The first place came recommended by various people-- I wasn't impressed and was sure that both my chips and our friend's veg had been re-heated. The main part of my meal was fine, but it is somewhat off putting.Later during the week we went to another local eatery, much more modest and the fish and chips which I had were excellent. I don't often ever get to eat fish and chips as my OH won't eat them since he once had food poisoning, so they are a treat and only when we go out.
Back to walking ! Have you been to the Picos de Europa in Northern Spain? We used to take the car across to Santander and the scenery heading along and down from the coast to Gijon and Potes is very similar to Switzerland.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 24, 2012, 11:14:01 AM
Thanks Nemesis. No we haven't been there but funnily enough when the weather was so bad in September we did find some cheap flights to Bilbao and thought about it but we never got round to going.
We'll move it up the list following your recommendation. It does look gorgeous from the pictures I have seen of it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on October 24, 2012, 02:15:16 PM
This was over 20 years ago, but we used to sail Plymouth to Santander with Brittany Ferries, some of the packages we went on were pre-booked, others weren't, but the scenery, both along the Costa Verde and down into the Picos was stunning. I do believe the roads have been improved since then, as the main road through the Asturias was single track and you had to veer into a dirt track lane if a covoy of HGVs came along. Also in those days no-one spoke English, so if you didn't speak Spanish you were somewhat stuck !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 28, 2012, 10:41:19 AM
What a difference in 7 days!   Last week I was wearing a T-shirt to walk along the Llangollen Canal but yesterday when I walked up Moel Famau I wore the full Winter walking gear.    We started the walk up to Moel Famau and the Jubilee Tower from the forest car park and followed the steepest path uphill stopping just for breathers and sometimes to admire the Autumn tints in the trees.  In the sheltered parts the ground was frozen as were the pools and puddles we came across but the walking wasn't difficult as the footpath was dry. Soon we could see the steep path leading to the summit but the Jubilee Tower wasn't visible from this pathway.  With all our Winter gear on we were building up quite a sweat but couldn't take some off as it was still too cold to do so.    When we reached the Jubilee Tower we went to the top of the Tower and had commanding views of the surrounding moorland and hills.  Patterns that appear in the heather are done for a variety of reasons including experiments to encourage Black Grouse breeding. 
From the Tower we were looking down onto our next destination which was the Iron Age hill fort of Moel Y Gaer but before we ventured down we took shelter from the wind and had some food and drink.  Our Winter gear certainly came in handy because there was a bitterly cold north east wind blowing in our direction!
Afterwards we went down through the heather and came to the Iron Age hill fort. Neither of us had been there before but we were very impressed with the fort and it's location.  Its steep rampants were still clearly visible and the views of the Vale of Clwyd were stunning.  We stopped for more refreshments there and explored the fort some more before leaving it on its steep southern side. A descent through 5 foot high heather and thistles that I wouldn't recommend to anyone else.  However when we got to the bottom of the fort and on to the proper path what greeted us for the rest of our journey was a twitchers delight.   We saw a Buzzard and Kestrel and other birds but all of a sudden from a large tree came hundreds of Fieldfare that had come here to Winter on the berries of the Rowan, Holly and Hawthorn hedges that litter this area,   The path began particularly muddy as we passed a field of Guernsey cows but then became a lovely grass track as we headed uphill to Bwlch  Penbarass.  Ahead of us was another large tree that was full of Fieldfare and as we slowly moved forward to take some photos they all took off suddenly. At first we thought we had disturbed them but we saw the reason why the had moved so quickly.  A Sparrowhawk had dived at the tree and was flying after the flock of Fieldfares!    We carried on up this track stopping to look at the Goldfinches and other birds on the way and soon reached Bwlch Penbarras.  It was downhill then to the Forest car park and after coffee and cake in Ruthin we headed home.  It was a lovely 5 mile walk that was enjoyable for so many reasons.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 28, 2012, 10:45:25 AM
Moel Famau
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 28, 2012, 03:07:03 PM
Sorry but I tried to post something on here but the file was too large.    :-[
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on October 28, 2012, 03:25:59 PM
Great photos Hugo on what looks like a lovely walk, it is somewhere else I have never walked.  Where did you park and start off from?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on October 28, 2012, 04:33:00 PM
           Hugo, I went up Moel Famau earlier this year following a route from the old Daily Post "Weekend Walk" features that they used to publish on a Saturday a few years ago. We left the car by the Dwr Cymru shed in the bottom of the valley just south of Cilcain and walked westwards along the track past the reservoir/fishing lakes and up onto the ridge overlooking Ruthin. We then turned left (S/E) and followed the path up to the Jubilee Tower, where there were fantastic views over the Wirral and right down as far as the Rhinogs. Leaving the tower we started back down directly towards Cilcain (N) and when we came to the end of the Forestry turned sharp right (E) and followed the track down to the lane which runs between Cilcain and Loggerheads. We went straight across the lane over a stile and over the river and up to the dry leete bed where we turned left (W) onto the path which runs along the valley above the river  past the caves and quarries till we reached the Mold/Cilcain road. Turn left onto the road, go across the bridge, and at the end of the railings halfway up the hill take the signposted footpath through the woods back up to the lane, turn right and follow the lane back to the start point. It's a great walk on a good day and takes about 3-4 hours with a stop for eats.
     Some of the routes which appeared in the "Weekend Walks" series a few years ago were very good, (if you didn't go on the following day as there would be lots of energetic Daliy Post readers everywhere!), but I have mislaid most of them or borrowed them to someone and I can't find them on the Daily Post Website anymore.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 28, 2012, 05:55:06 PM
Love the autumn colours in your photos Hugo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 29, 2012, 10:19:18 AM
Jack,  I didn't start walking on the Clwydian hills until recent years and I'm sorry that I didn't do them sooner.  The walk we did started from the Forest car park ( about a mile below the one at Bwlch Penbarras)  and followed the well signposted path up to Moel Famau.  We started there because the walk is more strenuous and therefore quieter than the well known Offa's Dyke Path from Bwlch Penbarras.
My fascination with the area apart from the Offa's Dyke Path which goes along the top of the ridge and therefore gives you superb views are the numerous hill forts there.   On Saturday we saw Moel Y Gaer for the first time but previously we have visited Moel Fenlli and Moel Arthur and both those are worth a visit.   If you do go up there don't forget that the wind at the top can be very bitter!

Gwynant,  That sounds a lovely walk and I'm glad that you enjoyed it.  I can picture where you have been because some walks I have done up there have crossed that walk that you did.  Moel Famau is only 1818 feet high but the views as you say are quite breath taking from there. The Daily Post does have some good walks and it's always worth a look in their website for any new walks to do.    I also enjoyed a drink in the pubs at Cilcain and Llanferres when I've been walking in that area.   Z**

Thanks Hollins but those Autumn tints would have looked a lot nicer if I had had your large bowl of chips to warm me up!     $dins$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 30, 2012, 03:51:50 PM
Approximately 4 miles.
Easy terrain
Map: Explorer OL (Snowdon and Conwy Valley) Neither use nor ornament to me I'm afraid (sorry Dad)
More photos of the walk here.. http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/ (http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/)
 
I have been meaning to go on this walk for the last three weeks but due to work and mostly weather I have had to wait until today.  The Betws Bridges walk was featured in the Daily Post not so long ago and I can honestly say it's absolutely worth doing, you won't be disappointed I promise.
Jj and I set off for the 1:30pm bus from Conwy.  It took approximately 50 mins to get there.  The weather was fine although it was threatening rain and it was a tad cold.
 
The walk starts outside the Information centre which is just around the corner from where you get off the bus.  Your turn right and through a gate which says private road.   Pic 1
 
From here you walk along a really muddy path and I mean muddy but the views of the Llygwy river more than make up for it.  This really is a beautiful place all you can hear is the river rushing along and the birds singing.  As I walked along I took photos of the river and the old moss covered walls.
Taking photos with Jj on a leash is much like doing the egg and spoon race with a ferret tied to your leg.  Most ended up blurry as she yanked away and stopped to sniff absolutely everything and so the walk was taking a lot longer that I had anticipated.
You now approach the railway bridge (pic 2) and the path takes you around the golf course on your right.  Not far along is where the Llygwy meets the Conwy river.  You can see the trees which line the river bank are all bent over giving you some idea of the rivers ferocity when swelled by rain.  Apparently the average rainfall collected in the Llygwy is the highest recorded in England and Wales.
 
Follow the path round to your right, you are now walking along side the Conwy river, through a gate and along the edge of the golf course.  A little further along this path you will see large stepping stones,  This is the oldest crossing on the Conwy river and was used until a woman drowned in 1912. (pic 3)
On the other side of the golf course is a gate which takes you passed the golf club.  When you get to the road turn left and you come to St Michaels church built in the 14th century.  Leaning practicaly right around thre church are a number of large slate and stone head stones, some of which date back to the 1700s.
 
As you come out of the main entrance to St Michaels turn to your left.  Here you will see the Sappers suspension  bridge.  This bridge spans the Conwy river and it was built by the army in the 1930s as a means to get to the army camp on the opposite side.  There was originally a wooden bridge here but it got washed away in storms. (pic 4)
 
Cross Sappers bridge and walk up through the field and follow the track up to the main road, turn to your right and follow the main road down to Waterloo bridge.
This cast iron bridge is one of only seven of its kind and was built in 1815  another one of Thomas Telfords engineering feats.  Thistles, shamrocks, leeks and roses adorn the arch of the bridge.  The steel inscription over the arch reads "This arch was constructed in the same year the battle of Waterloo was fought" although the bridge was finally completed just after 1815.
 
Cross the bridge and follow the main road round and back into the village.  Walk to the other end of the village and you will arrive at the stone built Pont Y Pair (bridge of the Cauldron).  When you look over the edge and see the swirling waters you can see how it got its name.
 
There is another Minors bridge about a mile away if you follow the path along the river but by the time we reached here the light was fading and I didn't want to chance it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 30, 2012, 03:56:12 PM
Some more photos from Betws.
I love the walk you did in Llangollen Hugo I haven't been there for years.  Another mission added to my list  ;D

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 30, 2012, 04:51:48 PM
That's a nice walk Pendragon and I've done it once before with a Retirement Group but not in the Autumn with all those lovely Autumn tints. Those photos are great and I loved the mirror images you have captured by the river, it makes you realise how lucky we are to live in this area.
I've received an e-mail from Spain also called "mirror images" and it has a lot of nice photos like yours but unfortunately it is too large to post on here. It's a shame really as it is well worth seeing.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on October 30, 2012, 10:00:00 PM
Thanks Hugo it was a fantastic walk.  Sometimes the best photos are taken this time of year as you can see so much more when the leaves on the trees have dropped.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 04, 2012, 12:37:01 PM
Yesterday four of us met at Betws Y Coed and then travelled in one car to Llyn Geirionydd for the start of our walk.  We went over Pont Y Pair bridge and turned left along the forest road and drove along the very narrow road until we came to the car park at Llyn Geirionydd.  The road was awful but we did see a Peacock along the way so that made up for it.   It was a beautiful day when we started our walk to the southern part of the lake, but within 200 yards we stopped to put on more gear as the Sun was deceptive and it was actually very cold.   We then started walking uphill and through the forest.  The forest is quite dense and therefore dark and the Conifer needles cover the floor.  The walk brought us out by the Cafe at Crafnant Lake so we turned left and walked along the lane to the far end of the lake passing the old Phone Box and ruined buildings on the way.  Looking across the Lake to the mountains on the other side you could see several waterfalls that tumbled down the slopes and they looked impressive.  Soon we were walking along the track on the other side and heading towards the car park where we could stop and have some refreshments because by now we were all feeling a bit peckish.  As we left the lake we walked down the Trefriw road to the car park and as this part of the walk was in the shade it was really freezing and we were glad to get to the car park and picked a picnic table in the Sun where we could thaw out a bit.
After a while we continued down the road because we wanted to see the Klondyke lead mine as none of us had seen it before. It was very impressive indeed and only Pete was brave enough (or daft enough) to cross the plank that crossed the icy river to the shaft!
I've copied something which explains a bit about some dodgy dealing that went on here years ago:-
 The mill itself was built in the early 1900’s and processed ore from the Pandora Mine near Llyn Geirionydd. Ore was transported via tramway and then aerial ropeway to the mill. The Klondyke achieved a degree of notoriety just after the First World War as the scene of an elaborate fraud - See Below.
 
"The ‘Klondyke’ Fraud It seems that during the period 1918 to 1921, the Klondyke was the scene of a massive fraud. The story is related in some detail in Mines of the Gwydyr Forest, but briefly what happened was this. A certain Joseph Aspinall took over the mine in 1918 and claimed to have discovered a huge vein of silver. What he did was to clean the passages of dirt, purchase 20 tons of powdered lead concentrate and glue it onto the walls giving the impression that the entire passage passed through a huge vein of silver. He then bought parties up from London to view the vein and procure an investment in the venture. A mass of miners were employed who actually did no work, let alone any mining. Whenever Aspinall turned up with a viewing party, a hoot of his car horn triggered the miners to busy themselves around the premises - some guarding the adit with cudgels, others running around the place like ants on an ant hill. By the time he was rumbled, he managed to secure £166,000 ! He got 22 months."
After having a look around we took the path uphill and came up to the Northern end of Llyn Geirionydd and the Taliesin Monument. We didn't stay long there as we could see the weather closing in and Wintery showers were on their way. It was a quick walk back to the car and then we headed off to see the Grey Mares Tails waterfall by Gwydir Castle. After seeing it it was back to Betws Y Coed and home but not before Pete and I had a nice coffee and cake in one of the Station cafes.
 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 04, 2012, 12:41:18 PM
Llyn Geirionydd and Llyn Crafnant walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on November 05, 2012, 02:58:00 PM
            Nice photos and an interesting walk on Saturday, Hugo. We stopped to look at the Klondyke mill when we walked over from Capel Curig to Trefriw earlier this year but I had no idea of its history so thanks for that!
          Decent day yesterday so we caught the bus to Aber intending to go to the falls then walk on to Llandegai on the Coastal path, but when we saw the dusting of snow on Llwytmor we turned left over the bridge and went on up to the Roman Road and took the path up to Drum. When we reached the summit  we stopped for a break, and as the wind was starting to get up a bit (and we had come up from sea level!) we turned off down the (very wet and boggy!) path down to Llyn Anafon, which was empty last time I was there. We then followed the Dwr Cymru track back down to Aber and went on down to the Bird Reserve and along the coast to Llanfairfechan, where we had a coffee in the excellent Cafe on the Prom there. It was a good "leg-stretcher" on the day and there were quite a few heading on up to the higher Carneddau from Bwlch-y-Ddeufaen.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 05, 2012, 03:21:19 PM
That was quite a walk you did yesterday Gwynant and the miles don't tell the full story.  That very steep section past Bont Newydd is enough for anyone let alone the walk you did afterwards.  We usually "cheat" a bit and take our car up the steep lane and leave it at the small parking space at the top of the lane, then we do the route to Llyn Anafon and go left at the ridge to Drum.   I think there is or was a problem with the strength of the dam at Llyn Anafon and it was only half full when we were there last time.
I hope you enjoyed your Coffee in Llanfairfechan because you certainly deserved it after that long trek.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on November 07, 2012, 07:12:50 PM
Hugo and Gwynant, you had some beautiful views on your walks.  I've not been to either area for a while, so it was nice to be reminded about them.

Hugo, what an interesting story about the Klondyke - it sounds as if Joseph Aspinall got off quite lightly!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on November 08, 2012, 10:22:54 PM
My husband did a walk today starting and finshing at Croesor and walking over the three peaks of Moelwyn Fach, Moelwyn Mawr and Cnicht.
He passed by the Rhosydd quarry.
Here is a link to a website about it.

http://www.penmorfa.com/Rhosydd/ (http://www.penmorfa.com/Rhosydd/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on November 08, 2012, 10:43:48 PM
Very nice, as I said on the quiz thread I've been inside Rhosydd, inside Croesor mine too! There was a very nice cafe at Croesor last time I was there!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 09, 2012, 12:32:31 PM
It's a really nice cafe ME and they have an art gallery there too.      $cofffee$
 I was there over a year ago and it was a boiling hot Summer day yet the area around Cnicht was very boggy so I bet it was even worse when Hollins' OH was there this week.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on November 13, 2012, 10:44:30 PM
My plan yesterday was to go for a walk along the woodland path near Porth Penrhyn at Bangor.  Ever the organised I got to the bus stop and realised I'd forgotten my smoky joes (those stop you smoking Marlena Deitrich plastic thingys) so I missed the bus going back to the house to get it...typical.  The best was on returning home I found them in my other pocket hehe.                                             
So Jj and I decided to get the next bus that came and sort a walk out from there.  Call it fate but it was the Betws bus.  I didn't really want to go to Betws again so I thought about getting off at Llanrwst then spur of the moment we got off at Trefriw.                                                       
 
I had no idea where I was going but I could hear the rushing of the river and decided to find a way of walking along it.  We turned up the hill by the antwacky cafe and came to a lane where on the wall was marked Trefriw Trails 4 and 5.  Laughing I thought I'll just follow the signs from here. 

I don't need to give you any other directions now as these trails are very well sign posted.  I still didn't have a clue where we were going though...kind of a mystery tour if you like.  We followed Trail 5 which took us first along the river and up to Fairy falls.  At this time of year the river is practically bursting but in the summer it's reduced to a trickle as the water is directed through the huge steel pipes that run along the river and the water is used to power the woolen mill.

Following the trail you get to cross over a bridge and look down on the swollen river.  Then you follow the path up and cross the road picking up a woodland trail.  It was really muddy here and so I had to put my gaiters on.  Everywhere was covered in fallen leaves and the track is really rocky so make sure you've got proper boots on.

The woodland path seems to last forever and as you get deeper into the forest it becomes what I can only describe a positively spooky.  At one point I was honestly going to turn back the place just gave me the creeps.  Every tree and stone was completely covered in thick moss and it looked really strange.  The trees were covered all the way up to their crowns.

All through these woods are remains of old fallen buildings and walls.  It's really wet and muddy here.  Poor Jj had to be carried in places as she was sinking lol bless her.  We came to a steep incline where huge rocks covered the ground it did look like an old river bed, barely visible through all the moss.

When you reach the top the views are fantastic, in the distance you can see what remains of the Klondyke Mill Constructed in 1900, the mill was built to receive lead ore (and some zinc ore) from Pandora mine, some 2 miles away - with which its history is inextricably linked - this ore travelling along a tramway which followed the eastern shore of Llyn Geirionydd. The mill saw little usage; Pandora mine was never profitable after construction of the mill, and the mine ceased operation in 1905. Klondyke mill itself closed in 1911 after having a short succession of optimistic owners.

We were now very close to Lake Geirionydd although it was still out of sight.  Climbing over a style we eventually got to the Lake.  What a beautiful place it is too.  I think I came here as a child with my Dad.  I would have liked to walk right round it but time was getting on so we'll have to go back there another day.  There's a lovely little house up here and a monument to Taliesin a 6th century chief bard believed to have lived on the banks of the lake.

By now it was approaching 4pm and although the trail looks like it goes a circular route back down to Trefriw the thought of walking through the spooky woods in the dark terrified me and so I walked back to the road and turned left up the road and followed it through a gate and down a public footpath that goes past a farm building and followed the lanes down to the village.  Below is a fallen tree on the banks of the lake which I think is probably my favourite photo of the day and an old cottage above Trefriw.

For some reason I can't post my photos so I'll you'll have to follow the link below.  My computer is playing up something rotten of late sorry folks.

http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/show.dml?id=13040202 (http://my.opera.com/pendragonnw/albums/show.dml?id=13040202)


I have a face book page now called Pendragon Conwy I'm not sure if you have to be on fb or not though.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/294321944015984/ (https://www.facebook.com/groups/294321944015984/)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on November 14, 2012, 11:29:58 AM
Pendragon, that sounds a very interesting walk and you took some lovely photos.  Jj looks so sweet in her little coat! 

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 14, 2012, 04:39:53 PM
Lovely photos Pendragon and nice Autumn colours too.     $good$
That walk uphill from Trefriw is a bit daunting so we bypassed that part when we did the lakes walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on November 15, 2012, 11:08:44 PM
I have checked back and seen that previous posts have mentioned the Beaumaris to Penmon walk but it was such a lovely day for us I am hoping that these photos will be of interest.
We set off from Beaumaris in bright sunshine and soon discovered that the tide was too far in to continue on the coast path despite my husband's efforts (first photo)!
We made our way eventually to Penmon using some roads and small lanes. Very little traffic so not really a problem.
I recognised the Penmon area from quiz questions on the forum, very educational!
We walked out to the lighthouse and the view of Puffin Island and the Great Orme in the distance.
We set off back for Beaumaris, this time keeping to the coast and beach as much as possible with the tide now out. It was a bit hard going for the tired legs walking on the rocks and pebbles but we eventually made it back to our car in Beaumaris with the light fading quickly.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on November 16, 2012, 12:34:38 AM
Hollins, we often go to Penmon, but usually park up at St Seiriols Church and walk over the hill.

You say that you walked out to the light house, I have never been there when that was possible, I didn't know that the tide went out that far.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on November 16, 2012, 07:45:38 AM
Sorry Fester, I just meant that we walked to the end of the road. I think there was a sign saying it was never possible to actually walk out to the lighthouse.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on November 16, 2012, 08:52:44 AM
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I have checked back and seen that previous posts have mentioned the Beaumaris to Penmon walk but it was such a lovely day for us I am hoping that these photos will be of interest.
We set off from Beaumaris in bright sunshine and soon discovered that the tide was too far in to continue on the coast path despite my husband's efforts (first photo)!
We made our way eventually to Penmon using some roads and small lanes. Very little traffic so not really a problem.
I recognised the Penmon area from quiz questions on the forum, very educational!
We walked out to the lighthouse and the view of Puffin Island and the Great Orme in the distance.
We set off back for Beaumaris, this time keeping to the coast and beach as much as possible with the tide now out. It was a bit hard going for the tired legs walking on the rocks and pebbles but we eventually made it back to our car in Beaumaris with the light fading quickly.
A pleasant detour on the way back is to turn right at the old Saunders Roe factory and then left along the country road that leads past Henllys Hall and then comes out in Beaumaris. A short way up the drive to Henllys Hall is the Golf Clubhouse, where the cafe is open to all and has a pleasant verandah to sit out on and admire the view.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on November 16, 2012, 03:18:47 PM
Some lovely views there, Hollins.  If you have not yet been there, Penmon Priory, St. Seiriol's Well, the dove cote, etc are very interesting and well worth visiting. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on November 16, 2012, 03:26:28 PM
Yes, thanks Blodyn. We saw them for the first time yesterday.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 18, 2012, 11:50:49 AM
Yesterday we met at Waunfawr Railway Station and then drove up a narrow winding road to Gwylfai Common in Rhosgadfan for the start of our moorland and quarry walk.  The rain from the previous night made the paths wetter and muddier than they would normally have been and it was overcast for a lot of the time but at least it was dry.  It's nice to get out and get together as we always have a lot of banter and laughs on our walks. We walked upwards through the heather and passed a farm which we recognised from a TV series of life in Snowdonia 100 years ago. Ahead of us was Mynydd Mawr or Elephant Mountain to the locals on account of it's shape but we are saving that walk for another day.  At the end of the forest we turned west and walked along the faint track in the direction of the slate heaps. The ground was boggy and one particular spot was like a sponge but at least it gave Pete a chance to practise his Gangnam style dance moves!   The Nantle Ridge was on our left and ahead of us in the distance was the outline of "the Rivals" but it was overcast and not conducive  to any good photos.  Anglesey on the other side was bathed in sunshine and we had great views over the whole of the island.   The main quarry came into view but before we explored that area we stopped in an old derilict building and had our refreshments while sheltering from the wind.  We then carried on to the quarry and then went inside the big pit to have a look around, this one near Rhosgadfan was a film set for the Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life.   Looking around this site and it's remoteness makes you understand how hard life must have been for the workers in those days!
We then headed steeply downhill to the village of Rhosgadfan passing a ruined building on the way. We were in the centre of the village and heading downhill when a concerned Keith thought that Caernarfon Castle was getting a bit too close!   Our two guides for the day Pete and Geraint then studied the map more carefully     $booboo$  so we changed direction and after about a walk of mile we retraced our steps to the car park.   It was a walk that none of us had done before so it was a nice change to do something different.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 18, 2012, 11:53:15 AM
Rhosgadfan walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on November 18, 2012, 02:21:21 PM
             That's an interesting walk, Hugo. I don't know a lot about that area except what I have seen travelling on the W.H.Railway and also cycling on the Lon Eifion Caernarfon-Bryncir cycle track but I did the Nantlle ridge a good few years ago. I recognised the farm from the TV series shown on one of your photos and can see Llanddwyn Island in the background on others.I have attempted to follow your walk (as you described it) from Rhosgadfan on Google maps from and I presume it was a circular route. It looks a good one for the shorter winter days (if it hasn't been raining too hard previously!) so could you tell me how long it took in total please?   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 18, 2012, 04:44:48 PM
It was the first time that we had walked in that area and Pete had found it in one of his walking books (can't remember the author) and it was a circular walk, starting and finishing in this small parking space that has panoramic views of the area. The paths are poor and not well defined and there were no waymarkers to guide us so for our first time there we were quite careful and took our time walking with many stops on route.
I would estimate our time at just over 3 hours and the distance about 5 miles but I'll check on this again. 
I hope that you have " the card"  for your journey on the W. H. Railway or otherwise it'll cost you an arm and a leg to go on the train. I did a walk once from Bangor to Porthmadog and walked along that Caernarfon- Bryncir track.  It was a lot better than walking on the main road.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on November 18, 2012, 05:36:21 PM
             Thanks very much for that info Hugo. I have  the W.H.R card  ("y cerdyn"),already, it saved me £18 on the trip from Caernarfon through to Blaenau Ffestiniog recently (£9 instead of £27!)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on November 18, 2012, 07:04:24 PM
Gwynant - the walk Hugo and our friends did on Saturday was called The Kate Roberts Walk and is 6.5miles in distance. The walk was taken from a book From Mountain Tops to Valley Floors by Dave Salter and Dave Worral.

I can't say too much of Hugo's map reading but we do have a good laugh and excellent walks. $cool$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on November 18, 2012, 10:42:22 PM
             $thanx$ Thanks for your reply and info. on the book title Tellytubby. $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 22, 2012, 09:19:36 AM
On Tuesday the Retirement group had a pleasant little walk in the Graig area of Glan Conwy.  We all got off the bus at Fforddlas for the start of the walk and crossed the road to walk along the banks of the fast flowing river. Through the thick undergrowth we could see the old mill Pentre Felin and the mill lake.  The Mill had traded as a Tea Room and tourist attraction but sadly closed some years ago and now looks a bit neglected.
We left the lane by a farm and followed the footpath through a wooded area until we came to a steep field and walked diagonally down it towards the Conwy river.  The views were superb as we looked over to the Pydew and Llandudno Junction area and the Afon Conwy was in full flow.  At the end of the field we had a look at a Cromlech on the edge of the field.  This burial chamber at Hendre Waelod was erected C3500 BC  and the large capstone has slipped on its northern side. 
We then crossed over to another field and headed downhill to the farm gate followed closely by a herd of curious Bullocks.  Although it was a fine day on Tuesday there had been torrential rain on Monday night and this together with the fact that the Bullocks must have been near the gate led to some very muddy conditions indeed.  Once past the gate though we were on a country lane and we followed this lane back to near where we started from.  Carefully crossing a busy road we followed another lane uphill past the Baptist Church and made our way to Talgoed where we enjoyed a welcoming coffee and cake.   Soon it was time to get our OAP bus passes out and make our way back to the bus stop and to home.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: SDQ on November 22, 2012, 03:51:40 PM
I was wondering if it was your group waiting at Glan Conwy corner on Tuesday as I passed on my way to work. I've never seen that many people waiting at that stop before.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 22, 2012, 05:04:54 PM
We must have looked like a group from Last of the Summer Wine standing there!  ;D
We caught a bus from there just after 1.00 pm and then  caught the bus back at about 4.20pm and we had a good turnout of 15 people to do the walk. 
I'm not allowed to set the walks in case they are too long or hard but it's always nice to have an easy walk for a change and then I can save the other walks for weekends,
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Blodyn on November 24, 2012, 07:55:59 PM
That sounds a pleasant walk, Hugo.  It's interesting to hear about the cromlech, I didn't know about that one.  That capstone must have taken some lifting!  :o
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 24, 2012, 11:31:48 PM
It was a big capstone alright but not as big as the one at Din Lligwy in Moelfre, that one weighs an estimated 25 tons!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2012, 04:57:17 PM
It was pouring down with rain today when the alarm clock rang at 8.00am and I was half expecting a phone call to say that our walk had been cancelled. By 10.00am when we met on the Promenade in Llanfairfechan the weather had changed dramatically and the weather was fine and sunny.   Because of the recent atrocious weather we reverted to plan C and Pete took us to the top of Llanfairfechan for the start of our Quarry walk and thankfully he was able to drive up there and thus avoiding any steep hills.
This was my first visit to the quarry and I was looking forward to it very much after having enjoyed Pendragons descriptions and photos of the area.  We started walking up the track to the quarry and had fine views of the Carneddau behind us, the snow was quite low on those mountains but thankfully that was in the far distance. The path kept going uphill and we soon arrived at a building that had a man made like beside it and although some of the workings were still there we couldn't figure out what its original use was for. Carrying on uphill we came to the top of the quarry and were rewarded with superb views in all directions.  Visibility was very good and we could even see the Isle of Man and snow on the hills in Cumbria.  There is a lot of industrial history here and having seen it first hand I can understand and appreciate Pendragons love of the area. We skirted around the top of the quarry and found a suitable place to have our refreshments and at the same time shelter from the cool wind that was blowing over the top.   After that we headed down and back to the car and home but not before we enjoyed a nice coffee latte at a cafe on the promenade in Llanfairfechan.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2012, 05:02:26 PM
Llanfairfechan quarry walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on December 01, 2012, 05:32:07 PM
   The first picture.  Am I correct in thinking the upright walker is staring out thinking "I wish that bloody golf course was open"?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2012, 10:57:35 PM
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   The first picture.  Am I correct in thinking the upright walker is staring out thinking "I wish that bloody golf course was open"?

You could be right Mike because he's looking in that direction.     $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on December 11, 2012, 08:20:29 PM
My husband took these photos today walking up Carnedd Dafydd via Crib Lem ridge. He says there wasn't a breath of wind up there which is quite remarkable.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 12, 2012, 02:05:43 PM
Lovely photos Hollins, it looked really cold up there.   Did your husband wear crampons for that walk?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on December 12, 2012, 02:53:21 PM
Yes, Hugo he did because the snow was very hard. He says it wasn't that cold because it was so still but I agree with you it certainly looks it!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 15, 2012, 06:25:21 PM
Today six of us met up in Pentraeth to have our Christmas meal together but prior to the meal we set off for a walk through the Red Squirrel Woodland at Pentraeth.   We wanted to build up a healthy appetite for the meal and also to see a dilapidated cottage which was once owned by Keith's father.  Both Keith and Pete had been there before and we also had the benefit of another member who was a Forest Ranger who had been working in the area recently so we knew that we were in safe hands!!
The forest track was well maintained but there were a lot of windblown trees that had been uprooted and fallen down. Before long we left the main track and went on to a footpath which quickly turned into a bit of a quagmire and later on became overgrown with brambles and young trees.  In the clearings we had good views to Llanddona and then we changed direction had lovely views of Red Wharf Bay.  The path again became boggy and bramble covered and Wayne fell backwards when a Pine tree branch pushed him over but thankfully Pete was behind him and prevented him from hurting himself.  We continued uphill and walked through a garden with a beautiful cottage that had stunning views across the bay and carried on until we reached the dilapidated cottage.   It's a shame that it has been left to deteriorate so badly as it also enjoyed panoramic views of the area.  After looking around the outside of the cottage we made our way back to the cars and drove to the Bull Inn for one of their carveries and a pint and then after the meal drove home.  Although we all enjoyed the walk we all agreed that we won't do it again unless they drastically improve the footpaths in the Forest.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on December 15, 2012, 07:13:22 PM
is that the Bull Bay Inn, Hugo? Any good?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 15, 2012, 11:07:57 PM
It was the Bull Inn, Main Street Pentraeth that we went to Dave not the one in Bull Bay itself.     The Bull Inn is  on the main road not far from the centre of Pentraeth and good value at £6.75 for the carvery.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 28, 2012, 05:17:40 PM
When Pete phoned me up last night and suggested that we go for a walk today to blow the Festive cobwebs away I thought that it was a good idea.  When we arrived at the West Shore to start our walk on the Great Orme I realised that he wasn't joking.  It was blowing a gale and there was horizontal rain but at least the windsurfers were making the most of the weather.
We donned our wet weather walking gear and made our way up to Invalids Walk and took a diagonal path upwards by the cave Ogof Arth.  We made a detour to see inside the cave but could smell it about 10 yards before we got there!   Luckily the wind cleared our nostrils and we continued uphill and crossed under the rockface to reach the rough grassland area at the top.   Following a sheep track we came to the Gogarth Tunnel which was in full flow after the recent rain and then walked past Ffynnon Gogarth to the farm wall. 
The wind had built up tremendously and we struggled to walk alongside the wall but by the Limestone paving area we went through a kissing gate and sheltered from the wind on the other side of the wall while we ate our food. After that it was time to go downhill and visit the cafe.  The cafe was packed but we got a seat and had a nice Latte and coffee cake and watched people outside struggling to walk in the atrocious weather. Soon though it was our turn to brave the elements and we walked back along the Marine Drive and just after Ffynnon Caseg we left the road and went down the steep slope to the Gunsite and had a look around there passing the places where Quiggs and Tonyf  would have once lived.   After going along Llys Helyg Drive and seeing those expensive houses we turned up Pen Y Ffordd Goch and looked over to where Miriam Jones (Yr Ogof) once had her tearooms and then turned into the old Monks Path above the Marine Drive.  A Sparrowhawk accompanied us for a lot of the way but unfortunately we couldn't get a good photo of the bird .  The section near to the Toll House is eroding very badly and for public safety has been fenced off but you can see by the size of the recent rockfall that this area is potentially dangerous. We didn't stay there too long and tempt fate so we made our way back to the car then home.   Despite the weather it was another enjoyable walk and probably our last for this year!   Roll on 2013.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 28, 2012, 05:20:26 PM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on December 28, 2012, 05:35:25 PM
Hugo, Mrs Fester and I can vouch for that weather report... as we did a slightly smaller Great Orme walk today in the opposite direction.
At 2.30pm the wind was ferocious, and it was a massive relief to get back to the safety of the car.

The Latte in the R&BT cafe, was one of the best I have ever had!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on December 28, 2012, 05:55:27 PM
 $good$ it was very windy today but an excellent walk as always. Will look forward to many more walks Hugo -  Early Happy New Year to all.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on December 29, 2012, 08:51:49 AM
Lovely pics Hugo, my it does look bleak. The 'pond' reminded me of my old dog, she always used to jump in there and come out green and dripping weed !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 29, 2012, 11:26:18 AM
Thanks Nemesis, have you taken Frizzy up there yet or are you a bit wary of him doing the same?

Fester, we were in the cafe at about 1.00 ish and it was howling outside and pouring down, The cafe certainly lived up to its name and those Lattes did taste as good as they looked.    $cofffee$   
Hope that you and Mrs Fester both enjoyed the walk despite the weather.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on December 29, 2012, 04:09:07 PM
some great photos Hugo, wander were the rock would have ended up if the fence wasn't there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 29, 2012, 05:33:27 PM
I'm afraid that there is worse to come Snowcap because there is a lot of erosion going on, especially on the west side of the Orme and that fence is only on a short stretch of the Monks Path near the Toll House.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on December 29, 2012, 08:43:44 PM
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I'm afraid that there is worse to come Snowcap because there is a lot of erosion going on, especially on the west side of the Orme and that fence is only on a short stretch of the Monks Path near the Toll House.
I was saying to Fester only a couple of days ago that the day may come when the Marine Drive has to be permanently closed to traffic for that very reason.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on December 29, 2012, 09:19:58 PM
they say the wet weather is hear for some time to come so that is not going to help
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on December 30, 2012, 09:11:37 AM
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Thanks Nemesis, have you taken Frizzy up there yet or are you a bit wary of him doing the same?



Alsa Hugo I haven't, he is not good on a lead ( he pulls), we daren't let him off, or we'd never see him again, so I daren't risk being pulled down the hill!.
At present he is still on short walks and no jumping having just had his stitches out from quite a big op for Cryptorchidism. ( Look it up on Google--after breakfast !!) He is wearing his 'bonnet' or he would have chewed himself to bits by now. We are now hoping that the internal stitches have healed OK, but he is being very good--just fed up.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 30, 2012, 12:31:42 PM
I Googled that word and it made my eyes water thinking about it. Poor Frizzy, he's got my sympathy and I hope he feels better soon   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 30, 2012, 12:38:54 PM
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I'm afraid that there is worse to come Snowcap because there is a lot of erosion going on, especially on the west side of the Orme and that fence is only on a short stretch of the Monks Path near the Toll House.
I was saying to Fester only a couple of days ago that the day may come when the Marine Drive has to be permanently closed to traffic for that very reason.

It was closed for a while in recent years when a large rockfall happened just before St Petrocks.  The rockfall broke the boundary wall on the Marine Drive and residents in Marine Drive and Llys Helyg Drive had to travel to Llandudno  the wrong way around the Orme.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on December 30, 2012, 12:42:26 PM
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I Googled that word and it made my eyes water thinking about it. Poor Frizzy, he's got my sympathy and I hope he feels better soon

Thanks for that Hugo-- he rather likes all this fuss and sympathy, but not desperately all these visits to the vet!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 05, 2013, 05:58:13 PM
Today we had a visit to the Iron Age Hillforts of Penycloddiau and Moel Arthur which are situated on the ridge of the Clwydian Hills.   It's a fairly strenuous route of nearly eight miles and has steep climbs and ascents between the forts.  We drove down a lane next to the Afonwen Craft Centre and after a few miles came to a small parking area for the start of our walk.  Then it was a steep climb following the Offa's Dyke path, the paths are good but today were very muddy so we had to be extra careful especially on the steep descents.  We reached the hill fort of Penycloddiau fairly quickly and this hillfort is very impressive being the largest on the Clwydian Hills.  It's triple banks are still remarkably well preserved and 50 acres lie within its enclosure.  The views on a clear day from here are breathtaking but unfortunately visibility wasn't so good today and the light was poor but even so you could see the Carneddau to the west, the Berwyns to the south and the Wirral and Liverpool to the east.  Keith and Pete could make out the Cathedrals in Liverpool but they have younger eyes than me!    After a good luck around we continued on the path to the car park at Llangwyfan Woods and then another steep climb up to Moel Arthur faced us.  We came to a brow of a hill and Pete said that it was only 100 yards further but when we reached the brow it still seemed miles away but we got there quickly.   It was so windy and cold on that summit and with no shelter we had to wait until we got down to the car park  before having well earned refreshments.   From there the route was more sheltered and took us through a forest following the contours of Penycloddiau.  It was a muddy track for most of the way but it was nice to see so many people out walking and some with their dogs too. Eventually we reached our car, tired but happy after enjoying a nice walking experience together.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 05, 2013, 06:01:37 PM
Penycloddiau and Moel Arthur
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 09, 2013, 09:55:48 PM
Had a gorgeous walk today in the Lake District. We walked from the Lodore Falls Hotel to Keswick along the west shore of Derwentwater. When we reached Keswick we had a look around the Pencil Museum. The pencil factory has moved from Keswick to newer premises but thankfully they are still manufactured in Cumbria.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 09, 2013, 10:27:45 PM
Great pics there Hollins! looks lovely! $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on January 09, 2013, 11:29:48 PM
Yeah, I heard about the Lake District.  I didn't used to live too far from there. So I went.

All I found was a district, full of lakes.... geographical indentations full of water, valley flooded for thousands of years.
I mean, whats all that about?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 11, 2013, 09:23:04 PM
We did another walk when we were in the Lake District this week. The day could not have been more different weather wise with the hills all shrouded in mist.
The walk was along the shore of Lake Windermere near Far Sawrey and the area was beautifully maintained by the National Trust.
My reason though for putting these two photos on are because I thought they fitted Fester's vision of the Lake District ("geographical indentations full of water, valley flooded for thousands of years") much more accurately than the ones with blue skies.
These are colour photos but they could be black and white. What a difference the weather makes to the experience.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on January 11, 2013, 09:30:24 PM
Mmmm, I like picture 2 Hollins!

Moody, atmospheric and evocative.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 12, 2013, 09:19:20 AM
I take it you stayed at the Lodore Falls Hotel, H? How did you find it?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 12, 2013, 09:50:44 AM
Sat nav?  :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on January 12, 2013, 10:34:30 AM
Map?   ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 12, 2013, 11:09:21 AM
Definitely no sat nav in this household. We prefer to use our own brains and a map!
Yes Dave we were staying at the Lodore Falls Hotel.
We weren't actually planning a trip but an offer from Travelzoo landed in my inbox and we decided to make the most of it.
The deal was two nights dinner, bed and breakfast with a few add on benefits such as winter Pimms and crumpets on arrival which was nice.
We didn't really have very high expectations but were pleased with the accommodation we chose and the food was very good indeed, both the breakfasts and the dinner.
There was plenty of choice for dinner and the menu changed almost completely each night. The breakfasts were cooked freshly to order.
The main criticism would be that the main building has been added on to and there are several flat roofed extensions. It is a bit of a mess at the back because of this and also various ducts and extractors.
The room we chose was at the side which was fine as were the ones at the front but the ones at the back mostly have a poor outlook.
The hotel is quite old fashioned in terms of the decor and many of the rooms have heavily patterned carpets. We chose this one which looked as if it had been more recently renovated.
All in all though an excellent break and we were very lucky to get the gorgeous weather on one of our two days at least.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 12, 2013, 11:42:22 AM
Thanks for the review, H. I've signed up for the Travelzoo newsletter as well.  :)

I always think its a real shame when you see a grand old hotel that has had these tacky modern extensions added. I actually like old fashioned hotels, they have a lot more character, I think.

Do you have any other Lake District hotel recommendations? I've been thinking about Storrs Hall, looks pretty nice:
http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Hotel_Review-g186330-d269494-Reviews-Storrs_Hall-Windermere_Lake_District_Cumbria_England.html (http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Hotel_Review-g186330-d269494-Reviews-Storrs_Hall-Windermere_Lake_District_Cumbria_England.html)

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 12, 2013, 11:56:24 AM
Can't help with Storrs Hall. I have had lunch at Holbeck Ghyll which is a lovely old house with original "arts and crafts" features. It has a good view of Lake Windermere from high up above the lake. From 18 January onwards they have a special offer rate. They were closed for 10 days when we were there, having some work done.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: mull on January 16, 2013, 11:37:50 AM
For Lake District I recomend Bridge House Hotel, Grasmere.
Stayed for a week last year, top quality.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 16, 2013, 09:48:02 PM
Mr Hollins braved the cold today (rather him than me) and did a circular walk from the forestry car park at Aber.
He and his friend walked over the peaks of Llwytmor, Foel-fras, Garnedd Uchaf, Foel Grach and Bera Mawr. The third photo shows the refuge at Foel Grach which was found to be in good condition.
They had to hurry at the end but still found themselves coming down in the dark under head torches.
Apologies if there are mistakes in the name spellings.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 19, 2013, 11:11:01 AM
That's a fairly long walk Hollins, especially in this cold weather. Rather your hubby than me as it looks bleak up there. We cancelled our walk today because of yesterday's snow so we're going out for a nice coffee in town instead.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 02, 2013, 06:06:07 PM
I've always liked the villages of Glanwydden and Bryn Pydew so today I took advantage of the weather and did Walk 8 in Christopher Draper's walking book. I started from the Old Windmill and walked down the street to the Queens Head, in this small street years ago were at least three public houses and a few shops too so there have been some considerable changes over the years.  Turning right up Waun Road and after passing the old Chapel I crossed over the Afon Wydden and made my way to the old Baptist Cemetery which is just in front of the Ffolt Cottages.   If as hoped some volunteers can clear this Cemetry sometime this year then I think chain saws will be needed in addition to loppers etc as it is a mess.   I left the Cemetery and continued uphill and passed the quarry that supplied the stone which was used to build the Grand Hotel in Llandudno and then passed Wiga Farm Cottage before crossing the Pydew Road and going on to Tan Y Bryn Caravan Park. At the top of the ridge at 400 foot there are good views all around and you could see the Afon Ganol in full flood.   Somehow I couldn't find the footpath described in the book and as all I could find was a dead sheep I decided to go the longer way along the main road to Llangystennin Church.  At least I had a bakewell tart in my ruck sack for some comfort eating but when I reached into the rucksack it was squashed  flat!   Instead I had to settle for a Kitkat.   It wasn't far to the Church so a very quick look at it and then a look at Llangystennin Hall and then a search for that elusive footpath.   The book said retrace your route through the woods but as I hadn't come through the woods that was going to be a problem.    There were no obvious paths or waymarkers so I just took the direct route straight up but wouldn't recommend it to anyone else and certainly not to the OAP's that I walk with once a month,   After reaching the top I crossed a couple of fields and got back on to the Pydew Road and made my way to the centre of the village.   Around this village green years ago was a shop,school, Chapel and pubs but now all converted into private houses.  I turned right down Goedlodd Lane and again you can see how the village has changed so much. There is a beautiful building on the left that was formerly Midacres Tea Gardens but I was about 60 years too late for a cuppa and across the road was the Bryn Awelon Bungalow Cafe so in years gone by this little village must have been a busy little community.  I took the footpath through the woods but had to be especially careful as it was very muddy and slippery but managed it ok without falling.  Passing through Cilmeityn Farm I continued on my way along the road until I came back to my car in Glanwydden.  I'll do the walk again sometime but will bypass Llangystennin next time.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 02, 2013, 06:11:01 PM
Glanwydden and Bryn Pydew
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Cordyline on February 03, 2013, 05:55:56 PM
Lovely photos there Hugo; most inspiring

Especially  the 3 ducks
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 03, 2013, 10:45:00 PM
Thanks Cordyline,  when I was coming back to Glanwydden there was a line of 5 similar Ducks heading to a very large pond on the land belonging to Cilmeityn Farm.   I could see that there were loads of other Ducks on the pond too which was nice.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on February 16, 2013, 06:27:15 PM
My mate has decided to visit every aircraft crash site in the Snowdonia National Park and informs me that there are around 100 or so! Yesterday he went up Llwytmor behind Aber Falls to find the remains of a German WW2 bomber and a British plane called a Blackburn Botha (Which I'd never heard of!).  As it was such a lovely day I tagged along especially as I had never taken the path to the left of Aber Falls but had always wanted to.  The weather was perfect at sea level but by about 1500 feet it was starting to get pretty cold and the cloud was closing in.  We saw a red kite over the falls itself and walked into the Carneddau following the stream.  After a mile or so he showed me an engine of the Blackburn Botha that crashed on 28th August 1943, it crashed much higher up the mountain but the engine ended up in the river at the bottom.  Four RAF crew were killed and the plane was from Hooton Park on the Wirral.
We then walked up the slope to the summit of Llwytmor, you could see no further than 20 or so metres in front of you and Foel Fras looked very foreboding with its dark pinnacles of rock in the gloom.  It was a map and compass job to navigate ourselves to the crash site of the German Heinkel bomber that crashed in April 1941.  The bomber had been tasked with bombing Barrow shipyard but was hit by anti aircraft fire damaging its navigational aids, lost it crashed into the mountain in low cloud.  Three airman survived and one was killed.  The survivors walked off the mountain and went to the first farmhouse to surrender.  All three ended up in a Prisoner of War Camp in Canada!  Great walk, even in tricky conditions, and on a better day would like to carry on up Foel Fras and around to Drum before dropping back into Aber, however yesterday we just retraced our route back to the Falls and the Aber valley.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on February 16, 2013, 07:10:27 PM
Thank you Jack for posting such an interesting story. I thought I might have to bore people to death with my latest crochet project before you came to the rescue with your tale.
 $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on February 16, 2013, 07:33:20 PM
   The last post has jogged my memory a bit. Whilst I was still in school some of the lads had stories of "crashed planes" up above Aber.
   One or two went up there to some of the sites. One thing they brought back with them, I remember it well.
   It was broken pieces of perspechs, probably spelt wrong. Its was used for the windscreens and windows, you could see through it but when broken it wasn't sharp like glass.
   These pieces became like a currency. They were bought and sold amongst us, the price in LSD determined by the size and condition. "I'll give you two four inch square pieces for four sweet tokens from your ration book."
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on February 16, 2013, 07:41:19 PM
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   The last post has jogged my memory a bit. Whilst I was still in school some of the lads had stories of "crashed planes" up above Aber.
   One or two went up there to some of the sites. One thing they brought back with them, I remember it well.
   It was broken pieces of perspechs, probably spelt wrong. Its was used for the windscreens and windows, you could see through it but when broken it wasn't sharp like glass.
   These pieces became like a currency. They were bought and sold amongst us, the price in LSD determined by the size and condition. "I'll give you two four inch square pieces for four sweet tokens from your ration book."

Bet the German debris was worth more than the RAF bits?

When I was a kid we used to swap and barter Panini football stickers in the schoolyard  :(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on February 16, 2013, 08:42:25 PM
when i was in school we swapped cardboard milk tops
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 16, 2013, 11:50:25 PM
Jack, I am fascinated by WWII, and that story is excellent.
Its incredible that we know today what the mission of the German Heinkel Bomber was when it thankfully came a cropper.

The engine of the British Plane looks to be in remarkable condition considering how long it has be open to the elements.
The steel, for some reason reminds me of the 1980's robot, Metal Mickey,


Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 17, 2013, 09:22:15 AM
Didn't Pendragon post something about the 'crashed' planes somewhere above Pen ?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 17, 2013, 10:37:51 AM
I've never walked that scree path to the left of the waterfall but might do it this year Jack as it sounds good.  We are hoping to visit one crash site in the next few months too.


http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk/articles/aircraft-wreckage-in-snowdonia.html (http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk/articles/aircraft-wreckage-in-snowdonia.html)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 17, 2013, 05:47:57 PM
It was a lovely sunny day today so I thought that I would do the Llanrhos and the Vardre walk that Chris Draper describes in his book.  It's a short walk of about three miles and it takes in two of the most historic sites in the Llandudno area.  Llanrhos Church and Deganwy Castle, both are said to have been founded by Maelgwn Gwynedd in the sixth century. 
I started the walk at the public footpath by Maesdu Golf Course and made my way first of all to Granny's Armchair as we called it on account of it looking like an armchair from our front window.  It's actually a watch tower, part of a chain of watch towers constructed in the sixteenth century to keep an eye out for the threat of Pirates offshore!   After a quick look around it was down over the muddy fields to Llanrhos Church. It was nice to see all the Snowdrops growing over the graveyard and amongst many headstones.  One Chris Draper describes a touching story " Here lieth the body of poor Betty who for upwards of 50 years was a houseless wandering maniac, died February 1824. Y mae gorphwysfa yn y Nefoedd"   The Welsh translates as "there is a resting place in Heaven."    After visiting my own families grave I crossed the road, passing the Old School and the Cocoa House and took the footpath past St Mary's Well and made my way to Plas Dolau Farm as I wanted to see the sunken footpath that Chris Draper described in his book. It is an ancient path called a hollaway so I was interested to see it but the reality is disappointing to say the least.  It is the muddiest muddy path I've come across and has a stream flowing down the middle.  After what seemed ages I exited the path and then crossed two fields towards the castle and saw what would have looked like a good photo opportunity so I looked in my rucksack and there was no camera so I must have dropped it along the way from Plas Dolau. Carefully retracing my steps, I was halfway down the muddy path when I saw it. It was in the middle of the stream but sticking out of the mud on which it landed.   I was quite relieved when I found the camera so I made my way to the top of the castle where I had some refreshments and just stayed for a while admiring the views from the top.  It was then time to make my way back to my car and home.  I've never used them before but I'm going to have to invest in a pair of gaiters as the paths seem to be worse than ever.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 17, 2013, 05:50:01 PM
Llanrhos and the Vardre
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on February 17, 2013, 05:57:03 PM
Thank goodness you found your camera and that it survived. Lovely pictures and great views from up there. What a nice change it was to have such a clear sunny day today.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on February 19, 2013, 02:29:40 PM
                Took advantage of the beautiful weather to take a short walk in the Menai Bridge area yesterday. We parked behind the Antelope Inn on the Gwynedd side (with the prior permission of the Landlord) and then walked over the bridge into Ynys Mon and turned right down into the village. We then went down to the Pier area and walked  past a tiny whitewashed cottage and then under the bridge and round through the wooded area with a stone circle  onto the lane which follows the straits round to St. Tysilio's Church and then up through the woods and back over the bridge for a very enjoyable (2 for £10) lunch in the Antelope with a table overooking the bridge. There was hardly a ripple on the straits and it was 2 "shirtsleeve order" which is very unusual for this time of year.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on February 19, 2013, 02:45:08 PM
           More photos from Menai Bridge taken yesterday. The last one is the view from our table in the Antelope Inn where we had our lunch.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on February 19, 2013, 02:51:53 PM
Fabulous, makes me want to go there now!
We are being spoilt with this weather.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: martin on February 19, 2013, 06:11:50 PM
Lovely photo's from both walks.  Hugo, we were parallel to you today, but on the very easy Conwy to West Shore footpath, it's the first time I have done this walk, and my now fairly well healed broken ankle held up well.  The walk you did is one I have always wanted to do, where do you start please, and are there any maps that show the route?   One question you and many other will know, but I do not, is what is/was this place on West Shore please?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 19, 2013, 06:35:54 PM
That run down building I think is Welsh Water's pumping station for the sewage.  It broke down when Llandudno had the floods a few years ago and was replaced by the new pumping station by the Yachting Lake. 
I started that walk from the public footpath that runs alongside the 17th fareway on Maesdu Golf Club.  It's the field where the Donkeys are kept in the Summer.
The walk is easy to follow as you can see each place you are heading for but I would suggest that you leave it for now and do it in the Summer.   The ground is so wet and saturated that it made walking hard and my trousers were so dirty that I'm going to buy gaiters for the first time ever.
If I do it again, next time I will bypass Plas Dolau  and walk along Bryn Lupus Road and turn into Maes Castell where there is a decent public footpath to take you to Deganwy Castle.
Glad to hear that your broken ankle is healed and look forward to seeing your posts on walking  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on February 19, 2013, 11:58:43 PM
The building is indeed the pumping station at West Shore, Llandudno.... but I am not aware of another to replace it... I'm not aware of a yachting lake either, am I missing something??

Gwynant, fantastic photos by the way.  :)

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: SDQ on February 20, 2013, 12:50:08 AM
I thought that pumping station replaced the underground one opposite the old Gogarth Abbey hotel.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on February 20, 2013, 08:53:36 AM
Fester, I think you will find Hugo is referring to the model boat pond on West Shore.

Yes, and brilliant photos Gwynant.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 20, 2013, 10:55:44 AM
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I thought that pumping station replaced the underground one opposite the old Gogarth Abbey hotel.

Isn't it the other way round SDQ.   The one in the picture, flooded immediately in the floods and some mechanism failed and as a result the water couldn't be released into the sea.  From previous comments made it would appear that the pumping station was moved to opposite the old Gogarth Abbey Hotel because that was on higher ground.
If my memory is correct didn't you work there and you were instructed to release the sewage when the tide was not ebbing?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 20, 2013, 11:09:07 AM
It was bus passes out yesterday when I went for a stroll around Bodnant Gardens with the Retirement Group.  Although it was too early for a lot of the trees and plants there was still a lot to see in the Winter gardens.
A beatiful Winter's day followed by a coffee and cake made it very enjoyable. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 20, 2013, 12:10:45 PM
  The walk you did is one I have always wanted to do, where do you start please, and are there any maps that show the route?   

Martin,  You start the walk from where the Golfers cross the road at Maesdu Golf Club and you will see the public footpath sign.  Here's a brief description of the route:-
Cross the stile and follow the path on the right by the houses. At the last house cross the stile on the right and keep to the path following the wall and at the end of the scrub on your left, keep going left until you reach the base of the hill then go up to the Watchtower.
Retrace your steps to the field but don’t go through the farmyard, but take the stile on the right and then the next stile ahead of you. Turn right and keep along the hedge on the right until you reach the Church.
After you’ve had a look around there, cross back over and go into the cul de sac Cae Mor and follow the footpath to St Mary’s well then make your way to Bryn Lupus Road and turn right.
I would suggest that you keep on the road until you come to Maes Castell and then at the top of the road go through the public footpath to the Castle
As I've said before, try and keep this for a Summer walk as the ground is very wet and deeply rutted and I wouldn't want you to damage that ankle again!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: martin on February 20, 2013, 01:19:56 PM
We were at Bodnant on Monday afternoon, the warm weather had brought the people out, even 10 minutes before it was due to close at 15.00 hrs, people were still coming in.  I am posting the attached photo to test the settings on my newly acquired file size reduction application, fingers crossed.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on February 20, 2013, 02:21:40 PM
Smashing picture Martin
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: martin on February 20, 2013, 02:50:25 PM
Thanks Nemesis, it was the lovely weather and the low angle of the sun, not really much to do with me.   It looks like I have sorted the file size reduction.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: SDQ on February 20, 2013, 03:25:48 PM
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I thought that pumping station replaced the underground one opposite the old Gogarth Abbey hotel.

Isn't it the other way round SDQ.   The one in the picture, flooded immediately in the floods and some mechanism failed and as a result the water couldn't be released into the sea.  From previous comments made it would appear that the pumping station was moved to opposite the old Gogarth Abbey Hotel because that was on higher ground.
If my memory is correct didn't you work there and you were instructed to release the sewage when the tide was not ebbing?


That was nearly 30 years ago when I was doing my apprenticeship, the pumping station in the picture wasn't even built then.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 20, 2013, 04:18:31 PM
I know it wasn't built then but didn't you have instructions to release the sewage when the tide wasn't ebbing as it would have caused a backup somewhere and the damage would have been worse than releasing the stuff on a flow tide.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: mull on February 20, 2013, 05:20:14 PM
Is the building in the photo still in use ?

In addition to the building in front of the Gogarth Abbey I recall lot of work carried out in front of the Sandringham Hotel  few years back.

Was this also sewerage related ?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: SDQ on February 20, 2013, 06:32:18 PM
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I know it wasn't built then but didn't you have instructions to release the sewage when the tide wasn't ebbing as it would have caused a backup somewhere and the damage would have been worse than releasing the stuff on a flow tide.


What I was trying to say was the pumping station in the picture is newer than the one opposite the Gogarth Abbey, what I don't know is if it replaced it or if they run in tandem as the old one struggled in very bad weather as the tanks were built before Llandudno expanded to it's current size. On a couple of occasions we had to open the storm valve, which is a bit further again towards the Toll House, regardless of the tide to stop the pump house from flooding, probably why the newer one wasn't built underground.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 23, 2013, 04:21:38 PM
I've often walked on Nantlle Ridge and Moel Hebog and looked down on Cwm Pennant but have never walked in that valley before.  I've been fascinated about it after reading the quote of Eifion Wyn a Welsh Shepherd-poet who famously wrote "O God why did'st thou make Cwm Pennant so beautiful and the life of an old Shepherd so short"
Eifion died in 1926 aged 59 but lived at the time when the valley was being exploited for slate so I was keen to see for myself how beautiful it was.
Three friends and myself met in Penygroes and then I drove down the lane to Cwm Pennant. The first thing we saw were some unusual cottages but we drove on and parked by a lovely old bridge just past the old Church of Llanfihangel Y Pennant. We then followed a narrow lane into the valley and the first building we came to was the old school with a school house attached.   The valley is one of the most beautiful in Snowdonia and is cradled by high stark peaks and drained by the deep and crystal clear waters of the Afon Dwyfor.
We kept our eyes open for the Otters but couldn't see any, but Buzzards followed us all down the valley making their distinctive call.  Passing a Chapel that was closed and up for sale we carried on and saw many abandoned cottages that litter the hillside. There were numerous bridges too that criss crossed  the river. Towards the head of the valley we took a right fork in the road which took us up an incline to an old tramway and there we took shelter from the biting wind while we had our refreshments.  It was soon time to move on but instead of exploring the Prince of Wales slate mine ahead,  we decided to save that for another day and followed the tramway back along the side of the hill and further on we descended across scrubby ground to cross some stepping stones and walk the rest of the journey back along the lane.  A quick visit to the Church finished the walk and after the seven mile walk we all agreed that this area is quite unique.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 23, 2013, 04:24:16 PM
Cwm Pennant walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on February 23, 2013, 05:09:32 PM
Fantastic photos and walk Hugo, yet again you have found somewhere else I need to go  ;D

Wow, we are so lucky to have these amazing places on our doorstep.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 23, 2013, 10:29:32 PM
Thanks Jack, it was a lovely walk and I'm glad that we did it from the Church at Llanfihangel Y Pennant. There's history all around and you can imagine that 100 years ago it would have been a busy Welsh community. Next tiime we plan to drive higher up the valley and do a shorter walk up to the head of the valley and have a look around the slate mines there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 01, 2013, 04:48:13 PM
Late on Wednesday evening I had a phone call from my friend Harry asking if I was interested in having a walk up Moel Siabod on Thursday so I met him on the Thursday and drove to Pont Cyfyng where we always start our walk up Moel Siabod from.  We must have done this walk many times and in all sorts of weather but Thursday was such a lovely day, dry,  warm and no wind so perfect walking conditions.
We walked briskly up the steep hill until we came to the building that has been in the process of renovation for many years, but now it has finally been completed and looks a treat. It's now a holiday rental property and  has 3 letting cottages within the property.  Just after the next stile the incline levels out and we followed the tramway until we came to the ruins of the old miners cottages where we had our first stop for refreshments. Carrying on for a short while we passed the water filled quarry that looked impressive with the frozen waters and stopped to take some photos.  After the snapshots we then followed the path which is also quite steep until we were approaching LLyn Y Foel where we stopped for the final break before taking the difficult and steep loose scree path to the summit. It was at that point that I realised that I had left my favourite gloves by the quarry.  I was mad with myself but I had no alternative other than to go back the few hundred yards and retrieve them. My comments to myself are unprintable  ####### ##### but they are expensive gloves and are ideal for rock scrambling.  Anyway about 15 minutes later I'm back slightly the worse for wear while Harry was as fresh as a Daisy after his rest.  The final pull up the scree is never easy and much of it is walking on your toes which really pulls on your calf muscles and the loose scree doesn't help either.  At times it seemed like a test of endurance but we did it and the only dangerous part was in the final gully when we had to do some rock scrambling to avoid the frozen ice and snow that lay there.  I was glad when we got to the windbreak at the top because the wind had picked up by the gully and it was freezing.  A good 15 minute break having our final refreshments and it was time to take the path to Plas Y Brennin and walk back along the river to our car.  Another lovely walk completed but what we both said was that we have never seen the path up to Moel Siabod being so dry and the Afon Llugwy seemed to have a lower river level too.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 01, 2013, 04:51:03 PM
Moel Siabod walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 03, 2013, 07:38:19 PM
We did a fantastic walk yesterday in beautiful weather on the Stackpole Estate in Pembrokeshire. We set off from Stackpole Court and walked by the lily ponds to the coast and on the coast path to Stackpole Quay.
Here is a link if any one is interested in the history of the area.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stackpole_Estate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stackpole_Estate)
The last photo wasn't on the walk but is for Hugo because I know he likes Tenby!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 04, 2013, 10:00:06 AM
It sounds like a nice walk Hollins and lovely photos to go with it too.  Thanks for posting the photo of Tenby as it brings back nice memories of holidays down there. Did you take the photo from the street or hotel as I've got one taken from the same angle.    $good$

I saw that old Lifeboat house on Grand Designs and it was being converted into a house, what an incredible location.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 04, 2013, 10:09:07 AM
Yes, I saw that programme too. What a job.
I took it from the street. We had just popped in to the town after the walk because I like going to that shop called the White Lion Gallery. I've got a few pots by Simon Rich and they have a good selection there but I managed to resist buying another this time.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 04, 2013, 10:53:47 AM
I remember watching that episode as well. Not sure if I'd like to be living there when there's a storm, the whole place must shake a bit as it's only sitting on wooden piles.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on March 06, 2013, 04:38:46 PM
      We took the Valley line train up to Blaenau Ffestiniog last Monday and were very impressed with the completed improvements to the Station/Bus Station area which are now complete, ecpecially the work that has gone into the pillars. The lady in the cafe across the road told me that approx. £3m. had been spent on the regeneration of the town and it looks money well spent.
      From there we walked on up Lord Street and through the gate onto Path 104 (I think!) and joined a recently cleared footpath up to what I know is Maenoffren Quarry. I was going to ask Dave.R. for directions as to how to get there after seeing his recent photos but now I know! At the top of an incline where the winding gear is still there we turned right along a shelf towards the quarry but as there were a couple of big guys loading up even bigger Komatsu trucks we didn't bother going near the sheds, but turned left again and went up to the hill overlooking Llyn Newydd and Llyn Bowydd. We bumped into a lad from Birmingham there who was staying in a local B&B and had been up Cnicht and the Moelwyns in the previous two days and couldn't believe his luck with the weather. We then walked across to look down onto the Llechwedd Quarry area and then retraced our steps back down to town as we had a train to catch. On the way down we met another lad who I knew who had caught a bus up to Penmachno that morning and then walked across the tops to Blaenau. He remarked on how dry the ground was up there and also that the lake levels seemed low for the time of year. I hope to walk from Dolwyddelan Station across the tops to Blaenau later this year and would be grateful if anyone who has done it could tell me the best route and walking time required.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on March 06, 2013, 04:54:05 PM
      More photos from Blaenau last Monday.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 06, 2013, 05:11:48 PM
The odd thing with that Public Footpath up the incline is that it ends up at the top and a sign advises you to turn around and go back down!

Nice walk and pics, Gwynant.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on March 06, 2013, 05:57:23 PM
        Thanks Dave, I spotted that notice too, which is why we didn't go into the area where the lads were working. Apparently there are discussions going on between Gwynedd County Council and the Company working the surrounding area concerning Health and Safety issues. I think they are worried about someone claiming for an injury in the Quarry areas and the litigation which might follow.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2013, 03:39:46 PM
Fantastic pictures and walk Gwynant, my friends were so impressed with your walk that we were going to do it yesterday but the weather had turned and we had a short walk on Anglesey instead. We'll save your walk for another day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2013, 04:20:55 PM
Because of a change in the weather we decided to have a walk in Anglesey instead. We were meeting Wayne in a layby on the left between Menai Bridge and Llandegfan but as Wayne hadn't arrived Pete and I had a look around the location. I've been past dozens of times but never stopped there before which is a shame. It was originally the old road to Beaumaris but the new flyover bridge has cut this part off.  Plascadnant Gardens are there and there are some lovely old buildings in this hidden valley, when Wayne arrived we got in his car and drove to Aberlleiniog for the start of our walk to the site of the first Norman Castle to be built on Anglesey. The walk followed the fast flowing stream of Afon Lleiniog through hundreds of wild Garlic plants that thrived in the damp conditions. After a few hundred yards we climbed up the wooden steps to the castle which was originally built in 1090 by the Earl of Chester. The original structure was destroyed by Gruffydd ap Cynan three years later and the Normans kept away from there for another 100 years. We retraced our steps and then drove to Penmon and parking just a short distance from the Church there.  We had a good look around the old Priory, Church and Dovecot  before going into the tranquil surroundings of St Seiriols well.  I tossed a small coin into the water and made a wish but the lottery numbers didn't come up yet again! But still I'm blessed with the health to take me on these walks so there's no complaints from me.   A friend, who shall remain anonymous to save his embarrassment was doing something similar a few years ago and went to get a small coin from his pocket but a pound coin rolled out instead into the water.  He needed that coin for something and was desperately rolling up his sleeves to retrieve the coin and hoping no one who saw him would jump to the wrong conclusion.
We carried on to Penmon point and had something to eat and drink while looking at the misty shape of Puffin Island.  We returned to the car after having had another nice day and on the way home Pete stopped to show me the Nature reserve of the Spinnies at Aberogwen Nature Reserve where over 185 varieties of birds have been seen. That is well worth another visit
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2013, 04:23:02 PM
Penmon walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on March 10, 2013, 09:32:21 AM
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Fantastic pictures and walk Gwynant, my friends were so impressed with your walk that we were going to do it yesterday but the weather had turned and we had a short walk on Anglesey instead. We'll save your walk for another day.
            Thanks Hugo, we were very lucky that the weather was so good on that day, I reckon it will be a lot wetter underfoot now! I haven't done any walking in the Blaenau quarries area on that side before and I could see that there is a huge area to pick from. I've done all the Moelwyns, Cnicht, Cwm Croesor and all the lakes in the Llyn Edno,Llyn LLagi, Llyn-y-Adar area etc. over the years from Croesor, Tanygrisiau, Nant Gwynant and from the top of the Crimea but only done a couple before on  that side of the A470, but starting and finishing in Dolwyddelan. The handy thing is that you can use your Bus Pass in conjunction with the Valley line and there are the stations of Pont-y-Pant and Roman Bridge to take advantage of as well for lower level walks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 31, 2013, 11:50:18 AM
Conditions were still treacherous in the mountains so Pete and I took advantage yesterday of the winter sunshine and had a nice walk along the paths and hills surrounding Dyserth, a village where we have both lived at sometime.  The start of the walk was in the car park near where the old railway station used to be and we dropped down and followed the fast flowing Afon Ffyddion  which had been swollen from the melting snow in the hills above the village.  This delightful woodland walk takes you under some overhanging rocks and has a number of caves in that location, the origin of which we don't know. Kingfishers are there but we never saw any but Pete was captivated by a Dipper that was sitting on a rock in the fast flowing water and managed to take some photos of it. Later on in the year Guneras are abundant but at the moment the wild Garlic plants are thriving.  Carrying on down the path we came to Dyserth Waterfalls and the water was thundering over and the noise quite deafening.  It's a must see for anyone who hasn't already seen it.
From there we had a pull up the steep hill and made our way to Lower Foel Road where we had a woodland walk along the contours of Moel Hiraddug and crossed a field or two before coming out in the village of Cwm.   Years ago The Blue Lion in Cwm was our local and we had many pleasant evenings there, the food was good and the host Geoff Copeland ran a well run pub.  Across the road is the Church of St Mael and St Sulien and we wandered through the Churchyard and then up through Cwm Woods until we came to Marion Ffrith and we stopped to eat our sandwiches in the pleasant Winter sunshine and in the shelter of an old stone wall.   After that it was onwards and upwards passing the disused quarry on our way to the Ironage hill fort of Moel Hiraddug.  When I was living in Dyserth the quarry was still working and blasting daily.  One day they must have used too much blasting powder and a shower of rocks rained down on the village one of which hit the roof of my neighbours house!   Shortly after that the blasting stopped.   We stayed at the top for a bit to admire the views of the snow covered mountains in the distance and the swollen river Clwyd nearby.    We then walked steeply downhill along a slippery muddy path and Pete did a great impression of a skier as he slid sidewards until some Gorse bushes stopped him going further.  We came to a lane and then followed Cwm Road until we came back to the village and to our car. A nice coffee at the Waterfall Café finished off another good walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 31, 2013, 11:52:59 AM
Dyserth Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on March 31, 2013, 01:57:57 PM
                That's an interesting walk and great photos, Hugo. We have used that car park a few times and walked down the old B.R. branch line to Prestatyn (which is now a tarmac cycle-path) and we have also picked up the last couple of miles of the Offa's Dyke Trail (which also ends in Prestatyn) by turning off to the right uphill to Pandy Lane and Allt-y-Graig at the first bridge on the cycle-path. The handy thing is that you can get a P & O Lloyd bus back from Prestatyn back up to the car park which saves retracing your steps. As you say the views from that area are both impressive and extensive, over the Vale of Clwyd and also up to the Carneddau and beyond on a good day. I have noticed the path you took from the car park down to the river before but have never followed it so it will be one for the future. You are absolutely right about the mountains being treacherous at the moment, another lad was killed ice-climbing in the Glyders yesterday, so we are also sticking to the low-level walks until conditions improve. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 31, 2013, 03:07:51 PM
Enjoyed reading about your walk and interesting photos, thanks Hugo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 31, 2013, 03:21:50 PM
Thanks Gwynant, you'll have to try the section of the walk that we did from the car park to the waterfall.  It's a short but very interesting walk and  I hope to go back when the Guneras are there.  You can always extend it by taking the lane past the church and return to the disused railway track.
Have you ever visited the Fish Caves above the Golf Course as there is a nice walk up there as you go to Gwaenysgor?

It's just not worth it going in the mountains at the moment especially if you are not kitted out properly.  The mountains will always be there so it's best to wait for the good weather to come.

Thanks Hollins,  it was a lovely day and a nice walk of about 5 miles so not too exhausting.  Pete could have done with a skiing lesson from you as he's the only one I've seen that skis side wards down hill.     ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on March 31, 2013, 08:25:08 PM
Yet again, thanks Hugo. Don't know how you have the patience to type out your long posts without a sign of any mistypes.
  I wish I had your patience, although I am not impatient by nature, just a careless typewriter Mike
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 31, 2013, 10:17:39 PM
The secret is that I can only type with one finger but I do use the spell check most of the time.     :-[

Hope that you have a good start to your new season and hope to see you up there on the course soon Mike            $good$          :golf:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on April 02, 2013, 10:45:29 PM
  True to his word, Hugo went to the trouble to come and see me earlier today. A nice chat until, believe it or not, my car got too hot in the sunshine. Mike
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 04, 2013, 05:13:17 PM
Today we were heading for a walk in Rhoscolyn, a delightful seaside village on the west coast of Anglesey and Keith drove us down a very narrow lane with right angle bends until we arrived at the beach car park.  It was a bright sunny day but the easterly wind made it very cold so we all donned our warm gear before setting off.   The walk itself is an easy walk of about 3 or 4 miles and passes by some beautiful houses that you have to walk or drive across the beach  to get to.   Shortly afterwards we passed the Holy Well of St Gwenfaen that was believed to cure mental illness but as we are past curing we declined to take the waters.  The rest of the walk followed the edge of the cliff and you get commanding views of the area as the land is slightly elevated.  We were lucky to see quite a few Choughs on the walk and also a pair of young goats who had some how got to the middle of a sheer cliff face.   The rock formations along here are quite fascinating and none more so than the sea arches of Bwa Gwyn and Bwa Du.    We kept an eye open for a memorial stone that Keith was hoping to see and found it it is inscribed `Tyger Sep 17th 1819`, and commemorates the bravery of a dog that guided his master and crew to safety when their ketch sank half a mile offshore in mist. One of the younger crew hung on to his collar and, after taking him to land, the retriever dragged another man onto the rocks. Although all the men survived, Tyger died from exhaustion.    We then stopped to have some refreshments in the Spring sunshine and made our way back via some farmland.  The field was full of sheep and their lambs and we were lucky to see a lamb that had only just been born so we passed by quickly so as not to scare the mother who was trying to clean it and get it up on its feet.  Not long after we passed the church and drove off to Four Mile Bridge where Pete treated us to a hot chocolate and a delicious piece of coffee cake.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 04, 2013, 05:15:39 PM
Rhoscolyn Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on April 04, 2013, 07:57:30 PM
  As always a great story, great photos, great pieces of cake Mike
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 05, 2013, 02:31:33 PM
Thanks Mike, it was an absolutely delicious piece of Coffee Cake fresh from the oven.    Sorry that I forgot to save you a slice!    ;D 


Pete and I were just saying that we haven't seen any posts from Pendragon on walking recently as we have always looked forward to reading about her walks and seeing the photos.
Hope that she's ok and keeping well.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on April 06, 2013, 12:11:49 AM
I spoke to Gez last night, who is Pendragon's husband.
Apparently is working her little tail off at the  moment, and has less time for walks or messing about on Forums!

Hope hear from you soon Pen! X
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 06, 2013, 10:09:44 AM
Thanks very much Fester, it's good to know that Pendragon is keeping well.     $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 13, 2013, 04:27:42 PM
Today we decided to do the Machno Falls walk described in Carl Rogers book "Walking in the Conwy Valley" and started from the car park at Cwmanog Isaf by Fairy Glen.   We followed the stagecoach road that was built by the Capel Curig Turnpike Trust in the early part of the 19th Century.  It is fairly narrow in places with steep wooded slopes that go down to the Conwy River,  ok for walking on but it must have been difficult and dangerous for the coaches. When Telford built the A5 in 1815 the road became redundant.  The track emerges on the A5 near the Conwy Falls café and care is need for about 150 yards as there are no pavements on the road.  At the café we followed the road to Penmachno stopping briefly to look over the bridge on to the River Conwy.  Just before the village of Penmachno we turned right and  walked over the old stone bridge spanning the Afon Machno.    To the right is an even older stone bridge known locally as "Roman Bridge" but in all probability is a medieval packhorse bridge
The Woolen Mill on the left was built in the 1830's and remained a family run enterprise until the 1960's when it turned into a craft centre but sadly looks like it is disused now.  Continuing along the forest road we deviated from Carl Rogers' walk and took the path to the right which followed the raging waters of the River Conwy and we came across the Salmon Ladder which helps the fish overcome the obstacles of the waterfalls in this steep section of the Gorge.  The views of the river from this side of the river were breathtaking and I'm sorry but photos cannot capture the rugged beauty of what we saw today.  The lane eventually crossed over another lovely stone bridge and emerged out on to the A470 where we turned right and followed the road passing what looked like the ruins of an old Toll House on the way until we returned to the car park.  We had a quick look at the Fairy Glen but the highlight of the walk was undoubtedly the views of the River Conwy from its western banks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 13, 2013, 04:31:07 PM
Machno Falls Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 13, 2013, 06:09:15 PM
Another interesting walk and with good pics again!  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 26, 2013, 06:15:50 PM
I had a fabulous walk today from Sidmouth to Ladram Bay and back. The scenery is dramatic and the weather was lovely.
All was going well on the  health and exercise front until I returned to the hotel and a melting middle hot chocolate pudding presented itself to me!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 28, 2013, 10:44:33 AM
That looks like a lovely walk Hollins and I hope that you weren't too tired to finish off that delicious looking chocolate pudding.     $dins$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 28, 2013, 01:02:08 PM
Don't worry Hugo, it was well and truly demolished!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 28, 2013, 06:16:00 PM
Yesterday, we decided to have a walk in Cwm Eigiau one of Snowdonias wildest Cwms and Pete drove the four of us up the hairpin track until we reached the small car park near Llyn Eigiau.   We started the walk at about 10.45am ( unlike Jack who gets there at the ungodly time of 7.00am!   ;) )    The view is immediately impressive as we head up the valley and our first stop is where the dam wall collapsed in 1925 with the torrent of escaping water  killing 16 people in Dolgarrog.  Looking at the wall now you can't believe how they were allowed to build a dam like that.   This area is littered with the remains of derelict and abandoned cottages but as we headed towards Hafodty Y Rhiw, the only cottage that appeared occupied we saw a Sea King rescue helicopter going around in circles above us and it landed near us.  One of the crew got out and we thought that he was coming to see us but he then ran behind the dam wall so we presume that it was for a comfort break!
Heading on down the valley we came to another unoccupied cottage and stopped for some refreshments and it was nice to see a number of the wild Carneddau ponies grazing in the valley.    Sadly though when we looked behind the cottage there was a dead pony which may have fallen or suffered from the severe Winter weather they had up on here the mountains.  A little further on we also saw a skeleton of a pony.        Following the tramway we carried on until we reached  the main quarry at the head of the valley and had a look around the barracks and ruined buildings.    After resting there for a while we headed up a steep incline over marshy grass and it was difficult and energy sapping.   I think we all found it difficult reaching the plateau at the top but we took our time and finally made it.    On the plateau we saw those strange peat formations that Jack mentioned previously and then looked down on the two lakes of Melynllyn and Dulyn before dropping down the slope to walk along the Waterboard road to the car park.  What we also noted on the plateau was  Frogspawn in the many pools there and it seems to have been laid much later that normal which we found strange as the severe weather came after the spawn is normally laid
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 28, 2013, 06:18:23 PM
Cwm Eigiau walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 28, 2013, 06:50:29 PM
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Today we were heading for a walk in Rhoscolyn, a delightful seaside village on the west coast of Anglesey and Keith drove us down a very narrow lane with right angle bends until we arrived at the beach car park.  It was a bright sunny day but the easterly wind made it very cold so we all donned our warm gear before setting off.   The walk itself is an easy walk of about 3 or 4 miles and passes by some beautiful houses that you have to walk or drive across the beach  to get to.   Shortly afterwards we passed the Holy Well of St Gwenfaen that was believed to cure mental illness but as we are past curing we declined to take the waters.  The rest of the walk followed the edge of the cliff and you get commanding views of the area as the land is slightly elevated.  We were lucky to see quite a few Choughs on the walk and also a pair of young goats who had some how got to the middle of a sheer cliff face.   The rock formations along here are quite fascinating and none more so than the sea arches of Bwa Gwyn and Bwa Du.    We kept an eye open for a memorial stone that Keith was hoping to see and found it it is inscribed `Tyger Sep 17th 1819`, and commemorates the bravery of a dog that guided his master and crew to safety when their ketch sank half a mile offshore in mist. One of the younger crew hung on to his collar and, after taking him to land, the retriever dragged another man onto the rocks. Although all the men survived, Tyger died from exhaustion.    We then stopped to have some refreshments in the Spring sunshine and made our way back via some farmland.  The field was full of sheep and their lambs and we were lucky to see a lamb that had only just been born so we passed by quickly so as not to scare the mother who was trying to clean it and get it up on its feet.  Not long after we passed the church and drove off to Four Mile Bridge where Pete treated us to a hot chocolate and a delicious piece of coffee cake.
We did a similar walk on Saturday, the weather was glorious. We started out in Trearddur Bay and walked along the Coastal Path as far as Rhoscolyn (and a well deserved drink at the White Eagle) before heading back across farmland. Funnily enough, there was a pair of goats sunbathing in that exact same spot on the cliff face!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on April 28, 2013, 08:11:54 PM
Great pics, Hugo and Dave, I especially like the Bentley pic, where was that Dave?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on April 28, 2013, 08:50:12 PM
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Great pics, Hugo and Dave, I especially like the Bentley pic, where was that Dave?
It was at the White Eagle pub at Rhocolyn, there was some sort of classic car rally going on. The White Eagle is apparently a favourite eating out place of Wills & Kate, as it's not that far from where they live. The food there is certainly lovely and there's a large balcony for sitting out.

http://www.white-eagle.co.uk (http://www.white-eagle.co.uk)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on April 28, 2013, 10:22:51 PM
Hugo glad you found the round peat formations, they are quite spectacular.  I was up behind Aber Falls today and sadly there were a couple of bodies of Carneddau ponies up there too.  They really have had a rough time this winter.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 29, 2013, 11:16:51 AM
We couldn't work out how those peat formations were formed Jack and they are quite tall,  Wayne is 6 foot and they tower above him.
It's possible that in times gone by they used peat as a fuel and did systematic excavations and that ceased when the cottages and the quarries were abandoned, but that is only a guess.
There was a plane crash at Craig Yr Ysfa in 1940 and some remains of the WW 2 Bristol Blenheim remain in the area, I did make a note of the coordinates for the various wreckages the night before our walk but then forgot to take them with me!    :-[   
It's sad to see the bodies of those ponies on the mountains, there is no shelter for them up there and the weather has been atrocious.
The skeleton of the pony we saw had been picked clean and it's hind legs were missing but we found them some distance away and we started to wonder what animal living up there would be able to do such a thing!
Whatever creature did that, at least we won't have to worry about the animal as early birds like yourself will have frightened them away by the time us OAP's get up there.    ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on April 29, 2013, 11:27:59 AM
Quote
Perhaps the private health should be left to boob jobs and other non-essential cosmetic stuff.

The ponies have a well established pattern whereby they come down from the higher reaches in late December and early January to foal and to avoid the worst of the weather, and they remain down until late March, as I'm sure you know.  This year, however, the heavy snows in April caught them out, just as they were moving back up to the Carneddau peaks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on April 29, 2013, 07:05:11 PM
Hugo, I did find some debris of the Bristol Bleinheim and one engine.  The second engine I believe is still at the top of Craig yr Ysfa stuck fast in the cliffs.  It is amazing how the aluminium debris blends in with the scree, the easiest bits to pick out were in the wet, reedy area at the bottom of the cliffs.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 30, 2013, 05:01:32 PM
Thanks for posting that Jack.   Last night I was arranging another walk with a friend and mentioned the plane wreckage and Geraint said that we have seen wreckage in a gulley at the top of Craig Yr Ysfa some years ago when we were walking to Carnedd Llewelyn.
I can't remember seeing it but I'll have another look for it when I go up there next.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 02, 2013, 02:50:49 PM
Yesterday was such a lovely day that my friend Geraint and I decided to do a walk from the beautiful village of Rowen to the Iron Age hillfort  of Pen Y Gaer.  It's a long and moderately strenuous route over the lower slopes of the eastern Carneddau of about seven and a half miles according to the book but with our navigation skills it seemed a lot  longer.    We started opposite Swan Cottage and walked over a bridge crossing the Afon Ro and just as we were preparing to take a photo of the river, a large Heron flew off to another feeding ground.    When we entered the field a farmer was driving a quad bike down the sloping field followed by dozens of sheep and their lambs as they knew that it was feeding time for them.  After the severe cold spell in March it was refreshing to see so many of them together.   The walk took us up alongside the Afon Ro with its steep wooded banks until we came to the lane going to Bwlch Y Ddeufaen.   We turned left here and after about 150 yards went up a long straight tarmac lane that runs directly up the hillside.
At the top of the lane we had a break and our refreshments and then turned left to follow the wall towards Pen Y Gaer.   Along the way we saw an unusual rock formation of hexagonal columns that reminded us of of the ones in the Giant's causeway in Ireland.
We soon reached the Hill Fort of Pen Y Gaer and one unique feature of the hill fort is the use of pointed stones in the sides of the fort that was hardest to defend,    The views from the top were stunning and we could see Llandudno to the north and the Conwy Valley to the south.    Cwm Eigiau where I went last week was clearly visible too.
We skirted round the contours of Pen Y Gaer, crossing fields and ruined buildings on route and descended down various woodlands including Gorswen Nature reserve until we eventually arrived back at the start of our walk.   A well earned pint awaited us in the Ty Gwyn and we just sat in the warm sunshine outside recapping the walk and promising to do it again soon
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 02, 2013, 02:52:58 PM
Rowen to Pen Y Gaer
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 02, 2013, 07:56:33 PM
I have enjoyed reading about your walk again Hugo. I'm glad you have been making the most of this wonderful weather.
I have been down in Devon for a few days walking the South West Coast Path.
They have got real problems with landslips down there. There are many diversions on the coast path and lots of homes are in danger of falling in to the sea in places.
I must say though that of the various resorts I visited there were some beautifully maintained cliff top gardens.
It made me realise, I'm sorry to say, how the pride seems to have been lost in much of the Three Towns area.
 There were also clean and accessible public toilets everywhere.
They still seem to have the same seagull problems though. I'm not sure what can be done about that.
Anyway it was great being by the sea in such lovely weather. The last photo is me taking a well earned rest at the end of my walk in Exmouth.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 03, 2013, 11:15:09 AM
Those boots of yours have certainly travelled Hollins and now you are down there in a beautiful part of England.  Lyme Regis is a nice little town and it's very hilly around there but has some stunning views.
It's a pity the CCBC can't learn from other resorts and improve the facilities etc that we do have.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on May 03, 2013, 01:57:18 PM
Re seagulls :-
Not many around at the Alice Tea party today.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 03, 2013, 02:27:44 PM
A'h, that's the answer then! Fabulous photo Nemesis.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 03, 2013, 04:29:52 PM
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Re seagulls :-
Not many around at the Alice Tea party today.
Nice to have a chat with you at the Tea Party today.  :D I also had the pleasure of a quick chat with Wrex, who was taking a brief break before the Extravaganza setup starts in earnest.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on May 12, 2013, 05:05:03 PM
Haven't had much chance to get out walking in the last few weeks and the forecast today wasn't promising so I decided to stay relatively local and do a section of the North Wales Footpath that I hadn't walked before.  I know that Pendragon and I think Hugo have done this walk so I won't go on too much!!
I parked in Penmaenmawr and took the steep grassy path that rises above Graiglwyd Hall and gives panoramic views of Pen and the Great Orme.  At the top this path links with the NW Footpath which is also the Wales Coastal Path (Upland) walk!.  From this junction you can either go to Llanfairfechan or as I did Conwy. 
It was pretty miserable on the tops, cold and windy, but there were a few buzzards and wheatears around and a herd of Carneddau ponies too.  The path takes in the top of the Fairy Glen above Capelulo and then brings you out on the Sychnant Pass close to Pensychnant house.
After crossing the road here the path takes in Alltwen before you descend down Conwy Mountain with great views down towards the castle and beyond.
The path comes out close to where the old hospital was in Conwy and I then walked to the Morfa and followed the Wales Coastal Path (Lowland) back to Penmaenmawr.
It was the first time I had been on the new path through the sand dunes that runs parallel to the A55.  I did once go the old way which was to walk on the pavement with the traffic coming at you at 70 odd mph and quite frankly it was not at all pleasurable so the new route is preferable.
Stopped at the cafe on Penmaenmawr prom for a quick brew before climbing the hill back to the car in the car park behind the Spar.

I know I walked 18.06km in 2 hrs 55 minutes cos my new gadget is a Garmin GPS and it told me so  :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 12, 2013, 05:28:47 PM
That's a good walk on a day like today Jack and a big pull up to the top of Penmaenmawr and that time is very good in these conditions.
Which Garmin GPS have you got?    My neighbour has a basic Garmin GPS but  it tells you nearly everything which is quite handy.
Keith a friend of mine has just e-mailed me photos of a Carneddau mare and her foel which he saw on the Sychnant Pass road today and they looked good which is nice to see after this severe Winter.  I hope he posts them on here for everyone to see.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on May 12, 2013, 05:48:39 PM
Hugo, it is the Garmin etrex 10, it was the cheapest in the range and I got it from Cotswolds in Betws and got the 'locals' discount so it was about £70.  It doesn't have the map facility like the expensive ones but personally I like an OS map to navigate with.  It is great tho - tells you where you are, altitude, speed, how far walked and you can program it with waymarking points if you want to do a specific route or find something specific.  Like I say I prefer a map and compass for navigation so it is a bit of fun really.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 25, 2013, 12:28:23 PM
Thanks Jack,  I'll have a read up on that model.   $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 25, 2013, 12:55:10 PM
Yesterday we enjoyed a few short walks in the area starting with a circular walk through the Llangystenin Woods.  We started from by the Church and walked uphill through the woods passing many Badger Setts on our way.  The Bluebells were there but looked past their best but we were lucky enough to see wild garlic in flower as well as a lot of wild orchids and other flowers. Pete rattled off the names of each variety of plant but I'm afraid that I have forgotten the names of them.   Walking back down it was nice to see so many rabbits running about in the fields.
Our next walk was from the National Trust car park in Maenan to the viewpoint at Cadair Ifan Goch.  It's a short linear walk along a good path and through a Bluebell Wood which far surpasses what we had seen in Llangystenin.  At the end of the walk we sat on a bench enjoying the panoramic views across the Conwy Valley and had our refreshments until the weather closed in and we returned to the car.
We then drove through to Rowen and just stopped by the Afon Ro as Pete was hoping to take photos of the Dippers that can sometimes be found there.  He didn't see any of the birds but did spot this unusual thing hanging underneath a bridge and we can't figure out what it is.    Next we travelled to the Dutch Pancake Barn and had a walk around the lakes and the Nature Trail.  It's well worth a visit and we were kept amused by the antics of three little Otters  named Harry, William and Kate.  We finished off another good day at the Pancake Barn by having a nice Latte but unfortunately didn't have any room for those delicious looking pancakes. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 25, 2013, 12:57:18 PM
Bluebell Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 25, 2013, 01:01:54 PM
Bluebell Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 26, 2013, 09:06:41 PM
Nice bluebell photos Hugo.
Here are a couple of photos of Mr Hollins being rescued last weekend after breaking his ankle on a wet grassy path in the Lake District.
They had been scrambling but had done the hard bit.
It happened in a place with no phone reception and so one of his friends had to go down the valley to call for help.
The mountain rescue team were fantastic and carried him on a stretcher for about 5 mins to their Landrover and on to a waiting ambulance.
It just shows it can happen to anybody as he is an experienced, walker, climber, skier etc!
Please be careful Jack and Hugo and anyone else on the hills.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on May 26, 2013, 09:37:53 PM
Hope Mr H is OK Hollins?  Thank goodness for the voluntary Mountain Rescue teams and the fantastic work that they do!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 26, 2013, 09:47:09 PM
Yes Jack, you are right. They do a wonderful job. He'd never had to call anyone out before thank goodness but it is good to know that someone is there to help if needed.
He is fine now, thanks, although not looking forward to 6 weeks in plaster.
He had made a bit of a mess of it, dislocated, two broken bones and torn ligaments.
He had an operation on Monday to somehow put wires in to repair the ligaments.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 27, 2013, 07:45:46 AM
Hollins, great pics, hope Mr H recovers quickly! I only just noticed your Devon pics too! Very nice down there! 
Hugo, Jack, more good pics of good walks!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 27, 2013, 09:58:15 AM
Thanks ME.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 27, 2013, 10:34:49 AM
Oh dear! Hope Mr H makes a speedy recovery.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 27, 2013, 10:47:21 AM
Sorry to hear about your Hubby and I hope that he soon makes a full recovery.   As you say accidents can happen to anyone even the experienced people.
A friend of a friend of mine had a book of walks in the area as a birthday present last year and she and her husband who are both elderly went for their first walk in the hills above Sychnant Pass and when they were miles from anywhere she slipped on the grass and broke her leg.
The Air Ambulance were called in and her only comfort for the incident was that the pilot of the helicopter was Prince William!   The walking book never came out again.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 27, 2013, 11:05:52 AM
Thanks both.
I am hoping the recovery is quick too as this is not a man for sitting down!
Hugo, that is quite a story!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 29, 2013, 11:46:22 AM
Yesterday, five of us met in the Ogwen Valley for a walk up Y Garn via its North ridge. Pete and Mel hadn't done the walk before so they were looking forward to it.   Conditions looked ok at the start with just a bit of cloud cover on the summit but in the mountains the weather can change quickly and it did later in the walk!    We took the short cut through the gap in the rock by the Ogwen Cottage to get to the wall and the start of the climb which is a stiff climb of about 900 feet, mainly on the crest of a ridge.  The last part is a reasonable climb around the top of Cwm Clyd  and that is when the clouds descended to around 2000 feet and the visbility was restricted.   It's a hard climb but we did it by having many stops on route and at the summit we sheltered in the windbreak to have some refreshments and catch our breath a bit.  Luckily for us the clouds then broke and we were rewarded with magnificent views all around.  We then followed the ridge to Foel Goch where we made a very steep descent and the weather turned again when the clouds came down and it started raining. Geraint took his time putting on his waterproof trousers and when he did it took him another 15 minutes to realise that they were on back to front.  The grass and rocks were getting wet and slippy and bearing in mind what had unfortunately  happened to Mr Hollins we were very careful coming down especially on the very steep sections.   It didn't stop Mel having a couple of falls on her bottom but she was ok thank goodness.   When we got to our cars we headed down to Capel Curig and to the new café there called Siabod and had a coffee while we discussed our next walk.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 30, 2013, 08:25:37 AM
I'm glad you all got safely down Hugo.
I read about this accident this morning.


A walker has been critically injured after falling while on a mountain in Snowdonia.

The man was with his dog on Carnedd y Ffiliast near the Atlantic Slabs, a steep rock face, when he fell a long distance.

Ogwen Valley Mountain Rescue was called at 15:30 BST on Wednesday but an RAF rescue helicopter from Valley on Anglesey reached the casualty first.

The man was airlifted to hospital at Ysbyty Gwynedd in Bangor.

Chris Lloyd, chairman of Ogwen Valley Mountain Rescue, said: "We believe the injured man was a solo walker out with his dog and he was scrambling up an area near the Atlantic Slabs.

"It's not a very popular area and a bit remote. It's high above the Ogwen Valley towards Penrhyn slate quarries.

"He's critically injured and is currently being treated in Ysbyty Gwynedd in Bangor.

"Members of the team will search for the dog tomorrow."
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on May 30, 2013, 08:38:00 AM
Great walk and pictures Hugo  $good$
Nothing more rewarding than the clouds clearing for a few minutes at the summit after a long slog.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 30, 2013, 02:25:00 PM
Thanks Jack,  it's a good feeling once you are at the top and can see the views.   Mel said that it's the steepest walk she's ever done so I didn't have the heart to tell her that we'll soon be going up Pen Yr Ole Wen by the front route!       ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 01, 2013, 03:49:10 PM
Today Pete and I decided to do a short walk that we have talked about for a long time but never done before.  I think Gwynant's walk from some months ago prompted us to do it.    It's an easy walk from Llanfairfechan to Penmaenmawr but along the shore so the only thing you have to do is to make sure the tide is correct.  We parked on Llanfairfechan Promenade and walked along the beach until we passed the A55 roundabout and found that there is a nice little promenade running below the railway and we followed that until we came to an old railway building and had a look around it. We then carried on along the promenade with the high buttress of the railway embankment to our right. The walking along the prom was easy until we came to a slippery section but we just moved down to the shore until we passed that section.  We soon approached the railway and road viaducts and stopped for a while to admire the impressive workmanship that has gone into the creation of both features.  There is no Promenade after the viaduct so you have to walk across the rocks which was easy as they were not slippy at all.   Along the rocks we noticed many cave entrances but they are all bricked up and not accessible which is probably a good thing.   One nice surprise for us that we didn't expect was a path from the beach which took us under the A55 and came out by the Penmaenmawr tunnel entrance and the cycle track that we followed back to our car in Llanfairfechan.    We then headed to Aber where I wanted to see the Roman Road that has recently been excavated but thirst things thirst and it was a trip to the Café in Aber for a drink and slice of a double choc cookie.     $cofffee$  We then went to Cae Celyn and had a look at the excavations which I believe are ongoing.    A nice end to a long awaited walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 01, 2013, 03:51:31 PM
Llanfairfechan Shore Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on June 01, 2013, 09:05:06 PM
Hugo, very interesting, not seen that before.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on June 02, 2013, 10:37:07 AM
               Hugo, just as you say that my seashore walk from Llanfairfechan to Llandudno prompted you to try that route, (but I used the cycle path on the section from Llanfair to Pen as I wasn't sure if you could go round the headland on the beach at the time) you have now prompted me to do it! I have seen the road viaduct and the railway line from the "Balmoral" on the round Anglesey trip a few years ago and I have also been lucky enough to fly alongside it in a Cessna light aircraft when I knew someone with a Private Pilot's Licence and it does make you appreciate the workmanship and effort put into the construction of the viaduct. I will be doing the walk in the near future (after checking the tides!). I seem to recall a story from the sixties about a lad who didn't know the area was giving two girls a lift on the road between Pen and Llanfair at night (before the Westward tunnel was built) and he stopped and hopped over the wall for a pee on the viaduct and after a few minutes passed and he didn't return the girls got out to look for him and realised there was a huge drop down onto the beach.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 02, 2013, 05:56:52 PM
I remember that story too and that he died after jumping over the wall.    We were pleasantly surprised by how far we could walk on the prom bit by the railway and the only bad bit was where water was lying on the path.  There are even escape ladders along the way but you won't need them on a low ebbing tide as the water is well away from where you walk.
Hope that you enjoy it as there are lots of things to see along the way.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 09, 2013, 10:42:41 PM
The injured climber's dog was found on the mountain  10 days after it's owner was airlifted.     $good$


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-22832224 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-22832224)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 30, 2013, 01:13:54 PM
Yesterday was busy in Betws Y Coed as we set off from the Railway Station car park to do our Llyn Y Parc walk.  We followed the fast flowing River Llugwy to Pont Y Pair and then crossed the bridge and then followed the river to the Miner's Bridge. Swallows and Dippers seemed to follow us along the way and we saw a Yellow Wagtail strutting his stuff on a rock in the middle of the river.  From the Bridge we went uphill and crossed the Forest road and took the path opposite which is a lovely terraced track that runs diagonally through the forest. Just after the top of the track you come to a ruin on the left and there were spectacular views of Moel Siabod, Snowdon and the serrated summit of Tryfan could be seen.  In the next field we were treated to a pleasant surprise when a Deer came to the edge of the field and just carried on feeding as if we weren't there, it even seemed to be posing to let Peter take a photo of it.  We carried on and came to a pretty white painted stone house called Coed Mawr  and followed the well signposted blue route until we came to Llyn Y Parc where we had our refreshments.  We didn't stay long there though because we were plagued by midges and Pete and I were wearing shorts and have the bite marks to prove it!     We retraced our steps and took a path which took us to a wide path that overlooks the gorge on our left and just before we came to a ruined farmhouse a large Buzzard flew from a bush in front of us and took off in the air.   At the  farmhouse we stopped to had a good look round the old buildings.   Just before the farmhouse was a very steep path that we took that eventually brought us back to Betws and after stopping at a café by the bridge we headed back to our cars and to home   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 30, 2013, 01:16:18 PM
Llyn Y Parc
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on June 30, 2013, 01:17:58 PM
Llyn Y Parc
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 06, 2013, 11:35:22 AM
Late on Thursday evening my friend phoned me up and asked if I wanted a walk on the Friday.  The forecast was good and it was only going to be a short walk so it was too good an opportunity to miss.  We started from the car park by the Ogwen Lake and walked up to Llyn Bochlwyd and took the Criben Ridge to Glyder Fawr.    It's a nice ridge walk, steep in parts but you are rewarded with good views all around.  We had made some height when we heard a noise of a jet engine and saw the jet plane flying way below us.  The day was perfect we thought, as we did the final rock scramble to reach the rocky plateau of Glyder Fawr.   Moving on further onto the plateau we stopped to have our well earned sandwiches and drinks but very soon the conditions and our day took a drastic turn for the worse.  The mist came down quickly and very thickly and we weren't able to see very far and this happens sometimes on the Glyders.    I couldn't see any paths so we opted on the side of safety and went down westwards in the valley away from the cliffs on the east side.
There were no paths there so we had to make our way through the bracken and heather and boggy ground until we came to a path we knew.   Half way down the valley the clouds cleared but at this point it was easier to go down than up so we followed the contours of Glyder Fach until we could see the Pen Y Gwryd to Tryfan path.   It was quite energy sapping and I nearly tripped at one point but Harry following me did take a nasty tumble and was lucky to get away with a bad graze on his knee and a sore back.      When we reached the style to get to the proper path this is when we made our second and biggest mistake.     I hadn't brought my map with me and didn't know the distance from there to the Ogwen.   Hindsight is a wonderful thing and on reflection we should have walked the half  mile down hill to Pen Y Gwryd and caught the Sherpa bus back to the Ogwen  but instead we went uphill to Bwlch Tryfan and then down to the Ogwen Lake.        We had made good time of 2 hours getting to Glyder Fawr but then it was another five hours of continuous walking to get back to the car and spoilt the day a bit.    Hopefully there are a few lessons to be learnt from this walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 06, 2013, 11:36:36 AM
Y Gribin
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on July 06, 2013, 11:53:19 AM
Glad you still had some energy left to take the photos to show us. Thanks Hugo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 06, 2013, 02:46:22 PM
Thanks Hollins,  I'm still aching after all that walking yesterday.  I've looked at the map today and it feels and seems like we did the equivalent of two of our normal walks!
I've also looked at the Sherpa Bus timetable and if we would have gone down to Pen Y Gwryd we could have caught the 2.27pm bus back to the Ogwen.       :(
I was due to go for a walk today with two other friends but had to call it off last night as I knew that I wouldn't be up to it today
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 14, 2013, 12:41:28 PM
The weather was already in the high 20C's when we started our walk in Penmorfa and when I saw the cliffs of Craig Y Gesail I was pleased that Pete was taking us on a circular walk around the outcrop and not directly up it.  The walk itself was across farmland and was quite undulating with one or two steep pulls uphill.  By the time we had got to the farm Gesail Gyfarch the temperature had risen a bit and we stopped to have a drink and admire the first of many magnificent views that we would encounter on this walk.   Because it was so hot it was very hazy and the distant views were restricted but we could still see Criccieth Castle and parts of the Llyn Peninsula.
From the Farm we changed direction and had a steep pull up hill and were rewarded with outstanding views to the East.  Nantle Ridge was towering above Cwm Pennant and the mountains of the Eifionydd   range encircled Cwm Ystradlyn.   In Cwm Ystradlyn we could see the ruins of Ynys Y Pandy Slate Mill and other old ruins,  We carried on and stopped for refreshments on the edge of Craig Y Gesail and looked down on the villages of Penmorfa and Tremadog with impressive views of Porthmadog in the distance.
The views are unbelievable and makes you appreciate the area that we live in.   From this point it was downhill all the way, thank goodness and we passed some ruined buildings and old tramways until we arrived at Tremadog a village that has suffered a bit as a result of the new Porthmadog bypass.  We completed the walk by a long trek along the main road to the lay by in Penmorfa where the car was parked.  After changing gear we sat in the car and by then the temperature on the gauge showed 33C so we drove to the Slate Mill with all the windows down in an effort to keep cool.   The ruins of the old Mill were impressive and we are going to have a walk in Cwm Ystradlyn soon so I'll post some more photos then
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 14, 2013, 12:45:47 PM
Penmorfa Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on July 14, 2013, 03:22:55 PM
Hugo, brave of you to go walking uphill and down dale in this heat. Not many walkers about on the footpath near us in this weather.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 14, 2013, 03:50:33 PM
The saying "there no fool like an old fool" is quite appropriate in our case.   There were four of us and our average age was 64+ so we should know better, if anyone saw us they'd think we were like the cast of " Last of the Summer Wine".
To top it all the walk details said 3 miles so how come the GPS said 4.77 miles     :-[
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Micox on July 15, 2013, 03:16:26 PM
 &well& Hi Hugo.

The detail in the photos and text of your walks is wonderful. Mouth watering places for an exile who can no longer walk.

Have you thought of doing a 'Wainwright' type booklet. I'm sure it would be readily snapped up commercially.

Heddwch.

Mike.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on July 15, 2013, 03:56:11 PM
Yes, great walks and pics again!  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 15, 2013, 04:56:03 PM
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&well& Hi Hugo.

The detail in the photos and text of your walks is wonderful. Mouth watering places for an exile who can no longer walk.

Have you thought of doing a 'Wainwright' type booklet. I'm sure it would be readily snapped up commercially.

Heddwch.

Mike.

Thanks Mike,  hope that your keeping well over there in Norfolk.  I know that you'd love to be able to join me on some of those walks but are unable to but I'll keep on doing the walks as long as I can and hope that they bring back some of the hen wlad fy nhadau for you.       $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 15, 2013, 04:58:35 PM
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Yes, great walks and pics again!  $good$

Thanks ME,  I've been walking in your old territory this year and can appreciate how beautiful the area is.    $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on July 15, 2013, 06:19:03 PM
The slate mill is a great building, they went to a lot of trouble building that, unfortunately the quality of slate in the quarry wasn't too good!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 15, 2013, 08:22:30 PM
It cost a lot to build and wasn't operational for long due to the poor quality of the slate as you've said
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 17, 2013, 10:44:36 AM
Hollins,  I'm sorry but I forgot to ask you how Mr Hollins is,   hope that his injuries are healing well as I'm sure that this good spell of weather will make him want to get back on the hills again.     
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on July 17, 2013, 02:36:53 PM
Hi Hugo, How kind of you to remember about Mr Hollins injury.
The cast came off a week last Friday. he is progressing, now down to one crutch and supposed to be wearing a big black boot but I fear it will be a longish recovery time.
The injury was about as bad as you can do to an ankle, i.e two bones broken and ligament damage but he is determined to be fit again as soon as possible.
We both enjoy reading about your walks and they inspire him to get going again.
Thanks for asking.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 17, 2013, 06:23:09 PM
Thanks Hollins,  I'm pleased that Mr Hollins' injury is progressing and trust that it continues to do so. Give him our best wishes for a speedy recovery.
If it can happen to an experienced walker like him then it can happen to anyone.  I hope I'm not tempting fate but I've programmed the Mountain Rescue number into my phone as we had a bad experience on the Glyders the other week.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on July 19, 2013, 10:43:31 AM
              I'm not sure if this is the correct location for this post, but it's the nearest I could find. I have just watched two TV programmes that I recorded earlier this week on the S4c "Mynydd" ("Mountain") season, which I found incredibly interesting and in some cases terrifying! They were "Dringo i'r eithaf" ("Climbing to the limit", ) and "Defaid a dringo" ("Sheep and climbing"), subtitles available on both programmes, the latter repeated on this coming Sunday on S4c at 2030.
          The two programmes describe the life of a young Bethesda climber, Ioan Doyle, and his fixation on becoming a successful climber and subsequently his chosen career and lifestyle in North Wales. I found both programmes to be really inspiring and interesting, and also an insight into Welsh farming and  family values. A lot of it is filmed in the Nant Ffrancon and Carneddau areas and also some of it on the Great Orme. Well worth a visit to S4c clic home, or if not catch the repeat on Sunday.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 25, 2013, 11:12:59 AM
It was well worth watching but not for me at all.   I wouldn't have the nerve to do what those guys goy up to.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 25, 2013, 11:44:49 AM
By the time I arrived at West Shore for the start of our walk up the Great Orme it had stopped raining.  Thank goodness, because I hadn't brought any wet weather gear with me.  We started the walk from Invalids Walk and went to have a look at Ogof Arth and found it hard to imagine that John Stevens an Irishman lived in this cave for over 14 years in the mid 1800's.  From there we walked straight up the slopes and followed the cliffs and the sheep tracks until we came to the Gogarth Tunnel.
What we noticed along the route was that the grass was parched, the paths badly cracked and there had been a lot of activity with Badgers or Rabbits near the path.
The Gogarth Tunnel was bone dry as it has been for years now but water was still flowing from the nearby Ffynnon Gogarth.  The sheep track took us to near the wall of the farm and we were surprised to see what was an exposed electric cable just below the surface of the ground but didn't bother to investigate any further.    It was then downhill to have a nice coffee and cake at the café by the lighthouse and then it was time to continue our walk along the farm wall and down St Beuno's road to have a look at the Cromlech.     Mike's Golf Course looked parched along with the rest of the Orme and as we passed by we found him busy watering one of the  greens.   After a quick chat with Mike who looked fit and tanned and we continued down the steps of Haulfre Gardens and along Invalids Walk back to the car.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 25, 2013, 11:47:27 AM
Great Orme Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on July 25, 2013, 12:26:35 PM
                Nice walk Hugo, I did more or less the same route a couple of weeks ago when I took the photos of the recent wooden structures by the Copper mines which Tom Parry told me about. Somebody once told me that the exposed wiring you came across is something to do with the viewing screen that they have in the visitor centre on the summit complex, which is connected to a camera on the cliffs below the light house, to enable you to pan in on the seabirds there, but they could be wrong.
               We walked from the Spinneys in Llandygai to Llanfairfechan yesterday along the sea-shore and I forgot my camera, which was a shame as the views and colours were exceptional. It was a very big tide and the path by the footbridge over the Afon Rhaeadr-Fawr at Aber was underwater in places and it was still coming in! All the birds on the spit of land between there and Llanfair which is designated as a nesting site were in a right panic, and the noise was deafening. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on July 25, 2013, 01:29:54 PM
That sounds a nice walk Gwynant and one I've never done completely.  I did visit the Spinneys for the first time this year and was quite impressed but never saw those elusive Kingfishers there.
Shame about the camera as the pictures would have been superb but at least you have the lasting memories of them.  I wasn't prepared yesterday either, no wet weather gear, no walking trainers, so I ended up walking in my mountain boots and carrying an umbrella in my rucksack.  It's a sure sign of old age with me!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 02, 2013, 12:53:44 PM
It was just over a year ago that Wayne and I did this walk before and yesterday we were again walking up Snowdon via the Pyg Track and then returning down the Llanberis Path to where we had parked our cars.  The first thing was to get our bus passes out and catch the Sherpa Bus to Pen Y Pass for the start of our walk.   Pen Y Pass car park was already full up by 9.30am despite the charge of £10.00 for parking there for the day! 
Yesterday's torrential rain meant that the streams and rivers were in full flow and waterfalls were everywhere.  A big cloud hung over Crib Goch but we hoped that it would burn off as we neared the summit but it was not to be and if anything the clouds got lower the higher we walked.  One couple we got talking to as we sat down for a breather by the zig zag path just before the summit ridge  were from Newcastle.   Apparently they had caught the train up Snowdon on Monday but were unable to see anything because of the cloud but they were walking up yesterday to see the views.  Unfortunately they were going to be unlucky again as the visibility was awful.
A quick pull up to the Summit trig point and then we had to find a place amongst the hundreds of visitors to have our drinks and food.  We didn't stay long there and went down the Llanberis Path which seemed very loose and stony and made our way down to Penceunant Café where we stopped to have a nice coffee and chat with Steffan the ownere of the café.   From there it was a steep walk down the tarmac to the high street and to our cars, only stopping long enough at Giorgio's for one of their nice ice creams.    The visibility wasn't good yesterday but it didn't spoil what was otherwise a nice walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 02, 2013, 12:55:49 PM
Snowdon walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on August 02, 2013, 04:13:19 PM
Looks great, I like the steam loco, must have a ride up again some time! Some amazing colours on the buildings!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 02, 2013, 06:21:00 PM
You wouldn't have liked this one ME even if you could see it.  It's a diesel one.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 03, 2013, 08:06:39 AM
                What a difference a day makes Hugo! We were up in Llanberis yesterday and it was a beautiful day as the photos will show, although the train was only going up to the halfway point because of the wind.
          We took the Valley train to Betws and then got the Sherpa S2 over to Pen-y-Gwryd and down to Llanberis. We then followed the "Woodland Trail" from the Padarn leaflet and went up behind the old Quarry Hospital, round the back of the quarry where the divers practice and came out of the woods (where we bumped into some feral goats), halfway up the big quarry workings.
        We then went out to the "Viewpoint", took a few photos of the surrounding area, and then took the trail back past the old "Anglesey Barracks" back down to the town where we had a coffee in Pete's Eats and caught the bus down to Caernarfon and home. The only problem was I left my stick on the bus on the transfer in Caernarfon, but the next bus the driver told me that he would arrive in Bangor before him, (as he went a more direct route on the Yfelinheli bypass and I was able to meet the original bus at the Cloc in Bangor and retrieve my stick from the back seat, much to the amazement of the driver, who couldn't understand how I got to Bangor before him! All in all a good day out and all it cost was a coffee in Pete's.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 03, 2013, 08:14:31 AM
                 More photos from the  Llanberis Quarries yesterday.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 03, 2013, 09:55:09 AM
Gwynant, I am beginning to learn how useful this Concessionary Travel Pass is in conjunction with the Cerdyn Card.

We recently travelled by train from Llandudno to Blaenau Ffestiniog and caught the Ffestiniog Railway over to Portmadog.

After an hour in Port, we caught the Welsh Highland Railway up to Caernarfon where we hopped onto an Arriva Bus number 5 back to Llandudno.

Total cost £10.90 each for a full day out.  D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 03, 2013, 10:08:07 AM
That's a bargain and a wonderful day out Bri.      $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 03, 2013, 10:15:59 AM
Sounds like you had a full day's adventure there Gwynant and a lovely walk as well.   The photos were good and the walk is quite demanding in places with those pulls up the railway incline.  We hope to do a similar walk when we are in Llanberis next.
Our walk was scheduled for Wednesday but cancelled because of the weather forecast, thank goodness.  It's a different world up at the summit and you can't always tell what it's going to be like until you get there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 03, 2013, 10:27:45 AM
Sorry you didn't get the view Hugo but I did like your photo of the train in the fog.
Thanks to you and Gwynant for describing your days out, both sound great.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 03, 2013, 11:45:19 AM
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Gwynant, I am beginning to learn how useful this Concessionary Travel Pass is in conjunction with the Cerdyn Card.

We recently travelled by train from Llandudno to Blaenau Ffestiniog and caught the Ffestiniog Railway over to Portmadog.

After an hour in Port, we caught the Welsh Highland Railway up to Caernarfon where we hopped onto an Arriva Bus number 5 back to Llandudno.

Total cost £10.90 each for a full day out.  D)

    Bri, we have done that journey a few times but always in the opposite direction to you , spending a couple of hours in Portmadog for a bite to eat and drink etc. The true cost on the W.H.R. and the Ff.R. without the Cerdyn concessions etc is round about £33.00, and the Cerdyn lasts for 5 years, but even if you purchase it on the day of travel you save around around £7.00 on the day, and about £23.00 every time you use it for the next 5 years! It's a pity the Railway companies haven't got some similar arrangement. I know there's the Family railcard but the percentage savings are nowhere near as good.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on August 03, 2013, 11:49:55 PM
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Gwynant, I am beginning to learn how useful this Concessionary Travel Pass is in conjunction with the Cerdyn Card.

We recently travelled by train from Llandudno to Blaenau Ffestiniog and caught the Ffestiniog Railway over to Portmadog.

After an hour in Port, we caught the Welsh Highland Railway up to Caernarfon where we hopped onto an Arriva Bus number 5 back to Llandudno.

Total cost £10.90 each for a full day out.  D)

Better enjoy it whilst it lasts, because it is entirely unsustainable in the time to come.
This is a common conversation I have with my retired neighbours.
They think it is entirely acceptable to pay nothing (in their case) for unlimited bus travel every day, whilst young folk are paying over £8.00 per day to get to a job which pays only £6.18 per hour.
Can anyone see the problem with this?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on August 04, 2013, 07:27:39 AM
I have been predicting for some time that just before I reach 60 (in two and a half years time! ) that the free pass will be scrapped! At the moment it seems that a minority pay very high bus fares, I don't know what the fair answer to this is, any ideas?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: SDQ on August 04, 2013, 07:45:00 AM
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I have been predicting for some time that just before I reach 60 (in two and a half years time! ) that the free pass will be scrapped! At the moment it seems that a minority pay very high bus fares, I don't know what the fair answer to this is, any ideas?


You could start with re-nationalisation of public transport so instead of it being there to make a profit from fewer more lucrative routes it might actually be there to provide a service, especially to people in more rural areas.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 04, 2013, 08:30:46 AM
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Better enjoy it whilst it lasts, because it is entirely unsustainable in the time to come.

You now have me thinking, Fester.

Whilst my 'Cerdyn' expires in 2018, I do not remember seeing an expiry date on my 'Concessionary Travel Pass' provided by CCBC.

Doesn’t that mean it lasts a lifetime and cannot be withdrawn?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 04, 2013, 08:36:41 AM
Quote
Better enjoy it whilst it lasts, because it is entirely unsustainable in the time to come. My retired neighbours...think it is entirely acceptable to pay nothing (in their case) for unlimited bus use

Your neighbours could argue (with some justification) that they have been paying tax for many years and are only now - in their twilight years - starting to see some immediate benefits, since transport - particularly rural transport - is heavily subsidised through the RSG.

An outstanding example of this process is the Conwy Valley railway.  Speaking to one of the conductors on that, recently, he told me he rarely has anyone that actually pays on the train. Yet for the denizens of BF, for example, it's something of a lifeline.  I've long wondered why the various operators don't do two things: firstly, devise an integrated ticketing system that would allow people to travel the circuit for a single price, starting and ending in Llandudno - or anywhere else on the circuit, for that matter. 

The second thing is in Arriva's court: they could introduce special carriages for the season. Viewing carriages, dining carriages and so on, and link that with 'packages', possibly 2-day tours, star-watching tours (the air's remarkably clear near BF, for example), Victoriana tours and more.  It does require some imagination, and it requires the existing companies to start working together and realising that there's money to be made if the thing's properly organised and managed.

Quote
You could start with re-nationalisation of public transport so instead of it being there to make a profit from fewer more lucrative routes it might actually be there to provide a service, especially to people in more rural areas.

Modern nationalisation might be workable, but that would have to be within the framework of an integrated transport system, and that's widely regarded in Whitehall as the poisoned chalice of politics.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 04, 2013, 08:45:04 AM
This might work....

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 04, 2013, 08:46:59 AM
Or this...

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 04, 2013, 08:55:37 AM
Wishful thinking thre, Ian.

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They think it is entirely acceptable to pay nothing (in their case) for unlimited bus travel every day, whilst young folk are paying over £8.00 per day to get to a job which pays only £6.18 per hour.
Can anyone see the problem with this?

£8.00 per day to get to a job?

A Day Saver on the bus currently costs £6.50 and a Weekly Saver costs £19.00.

So a Weekly Saver for a six day working week works out at £3.17 per day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 04, 2013, 09:12:16 AM
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The second thing is in Arriva's court: they could introduce special carriages for the season. Viewing carriages, dining carriages and so on, and link that with 'packages', possibly 2-day tours,





I think that is a great idea Ian. Some more inspiration from the Rocky Mountaineer.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 04, 2013, 09:28:38 AM
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The second thing is in Arriva's court: they could introduce special carriages for the season. Viewing carriages, dining carriages and so on, and link that with 'packages', possibly 2-day tours, star-watching tours (the air's remarkably clear near BF, for example), Victoriana tours and more.  It does require some imagination, and it requires the existing companies to start working together and realising that there's money to be made if the thing's properly organised and managed.
It would require a miracle, rather than imagination, Ian, as I don't believe there is any suitable rolling stock on the UK railway network today. Design & construction of a single new observation carriage would easily reach well into six figures. A shame, as it would be an excellent idea.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 04, 2013, 09:33:52 AM
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Wishful thinking thre, Ian.

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They think it is entirely acceptable to pay nothing (in their case) for unlimited bus travel every day, whilst young folk are paying over £8.00 per day to get to a job which pays only £6.18 per hour.
Can anyone see the problem with this?

£8.00 per day to get to a job?

A Day Saver on the bus currently costs £6.50 and a Weekly Saver costs £19.00.

So a Weekly Saver for a six day working week works out at £3.17 per day.
Many jobs are part time these days, Bri.  A typical working week can sometimes be just 3 or 4 days, with a shift of a few hours every day. Taking 3 days as an example, that gives a cost of £6.33 a day - or nearly an hour's pay at minimum wage.

How can it be right that millionaire pensioners can travel around for free on buses, yet working people on minimum wage have to pay full price?

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/sharp-rise-cost-free-bus-1909803 (http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/sharp-rise-cost-free-bus-1909803)

 &shake&
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 04, 2013, 09:37:08 AM
            I use my Bus Pass mainly for travel to and from a walking trip, to save having to return to the car  and therefore have to do a circular route every time. I also used to have to travel to work on the buses when I was on an apprentice's wage many years ago and so I appreciate the high relative costs involved for young people, as Fester points out.
            At the moment when you get on a bus and submit your pass, the machine registers the point of entry to the bus but not the point of exit, which could be the next stop or 40 miles down the road, and you also do not get a ticket now on Arriva but you do on other companies. I assume that the bus company gets the same amount from Conwy Council for each concessionary journey taken, but they cannot know the duration, which I agree cannot be fair.
       Surely a system similar to the "Cerdyn" used on the WHR, which gives you a substantial discount based on the distance travelled on the journey, so the more you use it the more you pay rather than a flat rate every time, or free as it is at present. This is somewhat like the idea which frequently comes up about scrapping the car tax and putting up petrol prices, so the more you use your car the more you pay to use the roads. I also use my bike whenever I can locally instead of the car, (yes, I am that motorist's nightmare, a pensioner on a bike!), mainly because it is quicker to get to town that way and you don't have to drive round looking for a parking space.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 04, 2013, 09:41:56 AM
According to WG's figures, the concessionary bus pass scheme cost £67m in 2010/11 and there were a total of 651,000 passes issued, giving a cost of £102.90 per pass issued per year.

http://www.assemblywales.org/qg11-0014.pdf (http://www.assemblywales.org/qg11-0014.pdf)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 04, 2013, 09:52:36 AM
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                         At the moment when you get on a bus and submit your pass, the machine registers the point of entry to the bus but not the point of exit, which could be the next stop or 40 miles down the road, and you also do not get a ticket now on Arriva but you do on other companies. I assume that the bus company gets the same amount from Conwy Council for each concessionary journey taken, but they cannot know the duration, which I agree cannot be fair.
       

A valid point, Gwynant.

The new system seems to now be open to abuse and possible fraud.

Also, when Arriva issued a paper ticket it provided customers with the driver’s ID number and a telephone number for their Customer Services for disgruntled passengers to phone with any complaints.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 04, 2013, 10:01:46 AM
Of course, if we were being sensible about all this, then public transport would be free and many countries are in the process of introducing zero-fare or free transport systems.

The case for zero-fare systems is disputable; staff costs are reduced, timetables can be better maintained, it's fairer to the low paid, apparently there's far less aggressive behaviour and - of course - the benefits to the environment can be substantial;, especially if electric buses are used. On the other hand , costs are entirely met by the tax payer so taxation increases and - as it's a free system - there's always the risk of vandalism increasing, since people often don't tend to value things provided free at point of sale.  But I really think Llandudno and Colwyn Bay need to think in terms of a system that would attract visitors and that implies Trams or a monorail.  But then we're back to investment.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 04, 2013, 10:11:48 AM
              Exactly Bri, but I imagine you would have to be extremely disgruntled to complain about a free service!
                        *cycle*     $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 04, 2013, 10:16:28 AM
Like getting on a number 25 signposted for Eglwysbach to visit Bodnant Garden and later asked by the driver to get off at Fforddlas Bridge because it was now a school bus for Ysgol Aberconwy.

Does that count?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on August 04, 2013, 03:53:45 PM
What about such as I?  I have had a Bus pass for 12 years and have only used it for one journey when my car went in for a service.  As my wife took me to collect the car I did not even use it for the return journey!
 ^*^0
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 04, 2013, 04:59:09 PM
You should get your money's worth from that Bus Pass Yorkie.    ;D    Even if you don't use the bus, try the Conwy Valley railway line, it's a pleasant journey and there are lots to see along the way.
Once a month I go walking with the OAP's and if the weather isn't good we settle for a train ride instead.    $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 04, 2013, 05:10:28 PM
I couldn't agree more.  D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on August 04, 2013, 09:32:58 PM
I think my original point was a much wider one, although it seems to have turned into a fanciful nostalgic journey about luxurious rolling stock and monorails.

My original point was borne out of concern, in fact worry, about the young people of today being able to aspire to some of the finer things in life we have all benefitted from.

When I was the same age as my daughter is now, everywhere I turned there was well-paid employment, always with a pension, always with good advancement prospects and bonuses.... and often with a company car included.

This is not for the Walking thread, I admit, but it seems to me that it is much harder now for the youngsters.
There is now only one wage,   THE wage,  the minimum wage.
Free bus fares was the original point.  What I feel about that is that it came from an era of 'fictitious' wealth, borrowed money... as did the bloated value of our houses.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 07:45:29 AM
Quote
This is not for the Walking thread, I admit, but it seems to me that it is much harder now for the youngsters.
There is now only one wage,   THE wage,  the minimum wage.

That's simply wrong.  There are still extremely good jobs with all the perks you mention to those willing to become suitably qualified. Youngsters who gain degrees in Engineering, for instance, will find no shortage of good jobs available. This fanciful nostalgic image you seem to have of "well-paid employment, always with a pension, always with good advancement prospects and bonuses.... and often with a company car included" did exist - for those suitably qualified. But for those who were unable - for one reason or another - to become suitably qualified, before the minimum wage was introduced, they were frequently paid as little as the employer could get away with.

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Free bus fares was the original point.  What I feel about that is that it came from an era of 'fictitious' wealth, borrowed money... as did the bloated value of our houses.

On that we agree. In fact, we can even trace the start of all this fictitious wealth to which you refer: it came about when the greatest con trick of all time was mounted - the decision to sell back to those who already owned them the nationalised industries. It continued when building society after building society suddenly declared itself a bank, promising all manner of goodies if the members voted in favour of the conversion. Suddenly, those who'd had a few quid in a Building society account for ten years found themselves the recipient of a wad of cash. That, plus the essential rationale on which the capitalist economic system is predicated - speculation - ensured that money was apparently in abundance.  Except no one queried where it was all coming from - until it didn't.

Free Bus passes, however, are a different issue, partly because they seek to assist less fortunate members of society, for instance those who may no longer be able to drive, or those who live in remote areas. It's true that issuing them to everyone on the basis of age is a little odd, but I seem to remember there was a study done when it was first mooted which suggested it was actually cheaper to issue them to everyone as means testing each applicant would actually cost more.  The other aspect was that the wealthier would probably choose not to travel on public transport, anyway. I suppose the cities don't all have the delights of the Conwy Valley line.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 07:49:32 AM
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It would require a miracle, rather than imagination, Ian, as I don't believe there is any suitable rolling stock on the UK railway network today. Design & construction of a single new observation carriage would easily reach well into six figures. A shame, as it would be an excellent idea.

Yes, but what about buying in a couple second-hand from those who already use them? Even allowing for transport by container to these shores, I bet that'd be a lot cheaper.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on August 05, 2013, 08:35:21 AM
I am sorry, Ian, but that Rocky Mountaineer would never squeeze through the long tunnel leading into Blaenau Ffestiniog.

Do you think if they abandoned the Concessionary Travel Pass or stopped it being used on the Conwy Valley Line, would the line remain financially viable?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 08:57:06 AM
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that Rocky Mountaineer would never squeeze through the long tunnel leading into Blaenau Ffestiniog

Yes - some of the curve radii on the line are very tight, I'd noticed that. But I suspect there are similar requirements on other railways, some of whom might want to flog a couple of the shorter coaches. We should consult our resident rail expert.  Any ideas, ME?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 09:03:45 AM
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Do you think if they abandoned the Concessionary Travel Pass or stopped it being used on the Conwy Valley Line, would the line remain financially viable?

The WA is considering upgrading the line to carry slate from BF but I'm guessing that without utilising the line's numerous attractions and marketing it carefully then it would struggle. But this is precisely why Railways tend to be operated by governments in most countries. They're expensive things to maintain.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 05, 2013, 09:08:04 AM
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It would require a miracle, rather than imagination, Ian, as I don't believe there is any suitable rolling stock on the UK railway network today. Design & construction of a single new observation carriage would easily reach well into six figures. A shame, as it would be an excellent idea.

Yes, but what about buying in a couple second-hand from those who already use them? Even allowing for transport by container to these shores, I bet that'd be a lot cheaper.
I doubt that foreign rolling stock would work on UK railways due to operational/design differences. At very least, significant modifications and testing would be required before permission could be obtained to use them.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 05, 2013, 09:09:41 AM
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I am sorry, Ian, but that Rocky Mountaineer would never squeeze through the long tunnel leading into Blaenau Ffestiniog.

Do you think if they abandoned the Concessionary Travel Pass or stopped it being used on the Conwy Valley Line, would the line remain financially viable?
The line has NEVER been financially viable, Bri, so it wouldn't make a lot of difference. As a community/visitor transport method, however, it has great value.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 09:31:48 AM
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I doubt that foreign rolling stock would work on UK railways due to operational/design differences. At very least, significant modifications and testing would be required before permission could be obtained to use them.

As to the second part, yes;  I imagine the biggest stumbling block would be insurance.  But much of the UK stock is or has been made abroad, anyway, so I'm not sure.  New coaches cost £1m+, which is unsustainable, but I wonder how much it would cost to convert existing stock?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on August 05, 2013, 09:48:49 AM
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that Rocky Mountaineer would never squeeze through the long tunnel leading into Blaenau Ffestiniog

Yes - some of the curve radii on the line are very tight, I'd noticed that. But I suspect there are similar requirements on other railways, some of whom might want to flog a couple of the shorter coaches. We should consult our resident rail expert.  Any ideas, ME?

Me an expert?  :laugh: I love the old preserved lines, especially the Festiniog Railway of which I am a member and shareholder. I always found that the old DMUs from the Sixties, with their larger windows gave the best views on a scenic railway (as used on the preserved Llangollen Railway). I'm sure there would be many problems using foreign stock, loading gauge, braking systems for a start, would any companies be interested anyway? The Conwy Valley line could no doubt be marketed much better than it is, some time ago I tried to find the fares online, not easy, seems it is in fact very cheap, it would be good to see regular steam on it too if viable! The biggest problem though is that railways are very expensive to run and a good percentage of passengers do not pay (I am in favour of free passes for retired people, they've paid enough taxes over the years! )
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 05, 2013, 10:03:06 AM
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I doubt that foreign rolling stock would work on UK railways due to operational/design differences. At very least, significant modifications and testing would be required before permission could be obtained to use them.

As to the second part, yes;  I imagine the biggest stumbling block would be insurance.  But much of the UK stock is or has been made abroad, anyway, so I'm not sure.  New coaches cost £1m+, which is unsustainable, but I wonder how much it would cost to convert existing stock?
Made abroad, yes, but to UK specification, that's the difference.

Perhaps the Conwy Valley line should be handed over to the Festiniog Railway to operate. They could use heritage DMUs like Class 101s and the odd steam train as a visitor attraction, whilst maintaining or even enhancing the current timetable in order to receive a yearly subsidy from WG.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 05, 2013, 10:13:27 AM
If volunteers can do it.......WHR photos.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 10:20:28 AM
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Made abroad, yes, but to UK specification, that's the difference.

Indeed, but I'd be interested to know how UK requirements differ.  Presumably they'll be the rail equivalent of the Custom and use regulations that cover vehicles.

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Perhaps the Conwy Valley line should be handed over to the Festiniog Railway to operate. They could use heritage DMUs and the odd steam train as a visitor attraction, whilst maintaining or even enhancing the current timetable in order to receive a yearly subsidy from WG.

It was actually those lines - Highland as well - that made me wonder just how difficult it is to run bought-in stock on our lines. I know there are some pretty stringent regs covering the inter-city stock, but that's because of the speeds they attain. The Conwy Valley trains rarely exceed 50mph flat-out, downhill with the wind behind them and - I'm guessing - with observation carriages they'd actually go a lot slower so people could - you know - observe :-))  But the heritage aspect is appealing and could have some mileage.

Trains are incredibly appealing to folk and I just think Arriva could do a lot more than they do at the moment to market that line.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 10:26:39 AM
H's pics of the WHR (very nice, H:-) and a recent visit to the Virgin train website brought another thing to mind: hiring a train for a special party. You can hire any Virgin train or just a carriage, if you wish, for parties, excursions or just private travel, so I wonder if Arriva would do the same?  Or - and here's a thought for the entrepreneurs - what if someone formed a limited company that would hire an Arriva train, then sell that train for the day to companies for training or management bonding exercises.  The company could provide catering, cleaning, and any extras requested.  On the longest single-track line in the UK, could it be a money-spinner?
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: SDQ on August 05, 2013, 10:36:03 AM
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H's pics of the WHR (very nice, H:-) and a recent visit to the Virgin train website brought another thing to mind: hiring a train for a special party. You can hire any Virgin train or just a carriage, if you wish, for parties, excursions or just private travel, so In wonder if Arriva would do the same?  Or - and here's a thought for the entrepreneurs - what if someone formed a limited company that would hire an Arriva train, then sell that train for the day to companies for training or management bonding exercises.  The company could provide catering, cleaning, and any extras requested.  On the longest single-track line in the UK, could it be a money-spinner?


The biggest problem with that is the fragmented privatised railway. As well as hiring a train from a TOC you would then have to negotiate with Network Rail to run it on the infrastructure between the many scheduled services that run daily.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on August 05, 2013, 11:03:21 AM
Perhaps a different thread required to reply to Ian, but I cannot accept him dismissing the FACT that the labour market is more difficult now than in the 1970's, 1980's etc...

You see, some of my schoolfriends went on to University, and as you say, did VERY well in high levels of the MOD, or banking sectors.
But the rest of my friends, (including me) left school with reasonable A level passes I suppose, but in subjects that were entirely unrelated to anything we subsequently went in to.
In actual fact, the A-level certificates that I was so proud of, have never been seen or requested at any interview I ever had!

What I noticed was, that by age 20, everyone I knew had a decent disposable income, we all had cars, holidays and many of us were easily affording our own houses.  It seemed very normal.
At 20, I was a supervisor in a retail company, (not a manager til a couple of years later), yet I still had a tidy salary, non-contrib pension, and loads of other benefits.

All I am saying is, that I am sure that there are are very good careers still to be had, BUT they ARE only for a lucky few Uni Graduates.  In the past, such jobs were much more prevalent, the labour market has most certainly changed.

It has changed in another way too.  Most jobs now are part time and very menial.  Lots of checks and systems in place to rein-in any free thought.  (Nick Leeson probably caused that).
Looking back, it is remarkable how much free-license and responsibility I was allowed to have at such a young age.

The 1980's is the era I am talking about.....a real Golden Era,  I accept that things were MUCH harder for my parents.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: mull on August 05, 2013, 11:03:57 AM
Longest Single line in the UK is the West Highland Line .
Has a steam service each day between Fort William and Malliag during the summer season.It is now so popular that this year they are running 2 round trips on most days.
Worth a trip if you are coming this way for a holiday.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 11:41:19 AM
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All I am saying is, that I am sure that there are are very good careers still to be had, BUT they ARE only for a lucky few Uni Graduates.  In the past, such jobs were much more prevalent, the labour market has most certainly changed.

Agreed.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 11:44:03 AM
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Longest Single line in the UK is the West Highland Line .

You're quite correct,. M;  I meant longest single track railway tunnel. Sorry about that :-)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on August 05, 2013, 12:17:19 PM
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H's pics of the WHR (very nice, H:-) and a recent visit to the Virgin train website brought another thing to mind: hiring a train for a special party. You can hire any Virgin train or just a carriage, if you wish, for parties, excursions or just private travel, so In wonder if Arriva would do the same?  Or - and here's a thought for the entrepreneurs - what if someone formed a limited company that would hire an Arriva train, then sell that train for the day to companies for training or management bonding exercises.  The company could provide catering, cleaning, and any extras requested.  On the longest single-track line in the UK, could it be a money-spinner?


The biggest problem with that is the fragmented privatised railway. As well as hiring a train from a TOC you would then have to negotiate with Network Rail to run it on the infrastructure between the many scheduled services that run daily.
Was it easier to hire a train in the BR days? I remember both the trains and service as being dreadful back then - even now, I can recall a train trip from Crewe back along the coast in the early 90s where the train was so filthy that pretty much every surface had ingrained dirt on it. The trains in use now along the coast are relatively modern in comparison and far cleaner, in my view.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 05, 2013, 02:26:18 PM
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Was it easier to hire a train in the BR days?

I don't think so. Virgin provide their own security but I doubt that would be necessary for the Conwy Valley specials....
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on August 05, 2013, 09:42:05 PM
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All I am saying is, that I am sure that there are are very good careers still to be had, BUT they ARE only for a lucky few Uni Graduates.  In the past, such jobs were much more prevalent, the labour market has most certainly changed.

Agreed.

I nearly fainted when I saw that....  :laugh: :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on August 06, 2013, 07:14:18 AM
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I nearly fainted when I saw that....  :laugh: :laugh:

Ah, well, if you'd said that in the first place...  _))* _))* _))*
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 08, 2013, 01:07:21 PM
Yesterday Wayne and I revisited Cwm Ystradllyn (https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&q=Cwmystradllyn&ie=UTF-8&ei=95kEUuHqLuyZ0QX084GgDQ&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAg) and enjoyed a delightful and very interesting walk in this remote but beautiful valley.   As you are driving down the very narrow and winding lane to Cwm Ystradllyn the first thing you see as you enter the valley is the very imposing Ynys Y Pandy Slate Mill that stands on high ground and looks just like the ruins of a medieval Abbey.   We passed the mill and carried on to the lake where we parked the car and commenced our walk.  The next thing that hits you is the beauty of the place as this moorland valley stands in a bowl flanked by the steep slopes of Moel Hebog and Moel Ddu.  At the head of the valley are the slate terraces of the Gorseddau Quarry and we were heading there following the tramway that went from the quarry to the slate mill.  The first house we passed was empty and a couple of old cars lay abandoned in the long grass nearby but it strangely had a small water wheel in the back of the property.   Ruins of old buildings were everywhere as we followed the waterlogged path to the quarry and as we approached the quarry there was a fascinating  and massive corbelled wall protecting the line of the slate tramway at Gorseddau from the slate tips above.  We had a walk around the quarry and then returned along the tramway until we took a diagonal path to the ruins of the old ruined village of Treforys. 
Cwmystradllyn was not always so quiet. For eight brief years from 1859-1867, the mountainous dead-end of the valley was a hive of industry as the native Welsh workers laboured in the quarry.  A small village was built for them in 1857 overlooking the lake, and named Treforys, and according to the census of 1861 there were thirty-six houses laid out in three streets, each possessing a quarter acre of acidic, peaty, sodden soil.   We walked along the old streets and then descended to the lake where we stopped for our refreshment break.  Apparently by the time of the 1871 Census the village was abandoned!
Afterwards we crossed the dam and briefly looked at the Trout darting in the water and then made our way over farmland until we came to the Slate Mill.  Another quick look at the Mill,  which in its day had an internal waterwheel, large arched windows, and a (presumably ornamented) slate roof which was said to be the finest in the district. The Company spent ten thousand pounds on the mill machinery alone; to put this into context, its maximum entire capital was £125,500, a very large figure for an undertaking of this scale in the 1850s.    After looking around we walked along the lane back to the lake and our car passing the old Chapel, which is now a holiday let and school next door. 
It's a great walk for anyone and especially for those people who also like a bit of history.

Hugo:  just tried something and I hope you won't mind:  I've added  a link to the Google Maps database so that folk can see - geographically - the excellent walks you describe.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 08, 2013, 01:09:25 PM
Cwm Ystradllyn walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 08, 2013, 01:11:22 PM
Cwm Ystradllyn walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 09, 2013, 09:47:29 AM
             Nice walk and photos Hugo. That area and the neighbouring Cwm Pennant perfectly represent the words of the old welsh shepherd, "Oh Lord, why did you make Cwm Pennant so beautiful, and the life of a shepherd so short?"
            We had a short walk over from Conwy over to Penmaenmawr yesterday, taking in the top of Foel Lus and the Jubilee Path. We started from Cadnant Park, Conwy, and took the Mynydd Dref path up over to Pensychnant, passing some totally unconcerned Carneddau ponies on the path, (see attached photos, also note the tower sticking out of the trees situated directly below Conwy Castle in the 1st photo, which I have never noticed before), and then made our way up past the isolated Penfforddgoch Cottage on our way up to the bridge over the Afon Gyrach where we had our buttie break. While we were sat there a group of mountain bikers (fully kitted out) carried their bikes across the bridge and continued up towards Tal-y-Fan, still carrying their bikes on their backs.
           We then carried on up the other side of the valley to the track and passed the memorial stone to Huw Twm situated high above Pen and continued up to the top of Foel Lus, passing a grave with a poignant inscription which must be the resting place of a much loved and missed pet which I spotted in the heather well off the beaten track. The views from the top were beautiful in all directions and there wasn't a breath of wind. Finally we set off down towards Dwygyfylchi and then took the Jubilee Path back around Foel Lus and then down to Pen for a coffee and the bus back to Llandudno.
             
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on August 09, 2013, 09:52:23 AM
                More Foel Lus photos.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 09, 2013, 03:28:42 PM
That's a nice walk and quite long too  Gwynant and the views make you realise how lucky we are to be living in such a beautiful area. 
I've treated myself to a Garmin e-trex 10 GPS just to get more info about walks I do but haven't been able to work it out    :-[    I'll have to get lessons from Jack as he's got one and knows how to use it.   :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 14, 2013, 09:28:20 PM
Mr Hollins managed his first 3 mile walk in Norfolk last week after the ankle injury. Mind you he was limping badly at the end of it. I thought I would put some photos of it on here because the landscape is in such contrast to ours over here.
Anyway it was a nice flat walk across the marshes from the hotel to the beach and back with lots of wildlife and flowers to enjoy on the way.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 14, 2013, 11:37:39 PM
It was nice to hear that Mr Hollins was back in action.  Hope you enjoy the rest of your stay there but don't let him overdo it.
You're in Micox's adopted part of the country over there and although it's pretty I think Mike still misses the hills and mountains of home.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: rhuddlan on August 18, 2013, 04:51:15 PM
Hi,  An old friend asked me to take him for a walk in the hills the other day. We went to LLyn Ogwen where we had intended to walk from Ogwen cottage up to Llyn Idwal and back. In the end we decided to ascend slightly to just below the Devil's Kitchen. The path crosses a stream which was in full spate so we decided to stop just  to admire the view of Llyn Idwal with Pen yr Ole Wen behind it before returning. I thought I would attach a few pictures,its a well known walk but one I have done many times before. It was so quiet far away from the madding crowds. The only noise being the helicopter which flew along the ridge. The waterfall pic is just behind Ogwen cottage.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: rhuddlan on August 18, 2013, 04:57:26 PM
oooops ! We parked at Llyn Ogwen and walked to Llyn Idwal! Mea culpa .
I hope have been able to amend the text using"modify" !
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 18, 2013, 05:12:59 PM
Gorgeous clear photos rhuddlan.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 21, 2013, 01:02:12 PM
Yesterday I had a very enjoyable circular walk with 7 other OAP's when we walked to Capel Garmon from the Fairy Glen car park.    It started with the usual skirmish with the farmer who thought that we hadn't paid our dues until he checked the money box and found that it was accounted for.  We then set off on our way and crossed the A5 where we climbed steeply through the trees until we reached the forest road and the angle eased considerably.  The walk then was undulating and the higher we walked the more spectacular were the views.  Before long we reached the compact village of Capel Garmon and walked along the street and had our sandwiches and drinks sitting on the wall of the now closed White Horse Inn.  Most of the group had never been to the village before and knew little of it's history, but I've seen it in different times and enjoyed many a nice meal and a drink or three in the bar of the White Horse Inn and on some nights have been treated to some fine Welsh singing.
Now though the place is in a sorry state and the village needs some urgent TLC.  the old school house though was still looking fine and looked after.  In the main street which is about 100 yards long the pub, church, chapel and village shop have all closed and as I was walking along I noticed that there may have been a second shop in this small street judging from it's appearance.   We left the village and travelled to the 4000- 4500 year old Neolithic Burial Chamber and spent some time there before travelling downhill  to the Conwy Falls Café.   I've never been in there before but it is really nice and the staff are very pleasant too.  A coffee latte and a piece of chocolate brownie went down very well before we set off on the last part of our walk which was down the narrow and steep stage coach road that took us back to Fairy Glen where we had a walk down to the Glen and along the banks of the River Conwy as it merged with the River Lledr and then back to the car park and home.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on August 21, 2013, 01:06:37 PM
Capel Garmon Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on August 23, 2013, 05:13:45 PM
We had a lovely walk over the Little Orme yesterday and in to town. Great view from up there.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 06, 2013, 12:41:37 PM
Yesterday, three of us decided to do a leisurely walk in Aberffraw on Anglesey but before we started we stopped at Porth Trecastell  ( Cable Bay) and had a quick walk to see Barclodiau y Grawes which is one of the most famous prehistoric relics on the island.  After that we continued to Aberffraw and parked at the Llewelyn Heritage Centre.
The walk started in the village and after a short trip up the lane we headed across open fields until we came out by the causeway which leads to the ancient Church of St Cwyfan which is situated at the top of a tiny walled island.  We climbed up the steps and had a look at the few scattered gravestones that remain there.  One of which was of a young man who drowned in nearby Porth Trecastell the  bay that we had come from.    The Church door was locked as usual so we sat on a bench behind the Church and looked across the Irish Sea while we had our refreshments.  The mountain ranges from the Carneddau down to Aberdaron were clearly visible as was Bardsey Island and while we were looking at what appeared to be a mirage between Bardsey Island and the mainland, Pete's eagle eyes spotted some Dolphins leaping up out of the water.  We were entertained by them for a while and stayed longer than intended but it was lucky for us because three people arrived with keys to the Church.  One of them was a young woman who had brought some things over for her wedding there in two weeks time.  We had a good look around inside the Church and then left after wishing the future bride all the best for the forthcoming event.   We continued then along the Aberffraw headland and around to the small estuary and to the old bridge and headed to a large Chapel that was in the process of being converted into holiday apartments.  We spoke to the builder who very kindly showed us around the conversion and it has been very sympathetically converted blending the old with the new. From there it was back to the Llewelyn Centre for a coffee and a look around the museum there.    It was a cold day and the Church is in a rather exposed position so I hope the weather will be kinder for the bride on her big day.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 06, 2013, 12:43:54 PM
Aberffraw walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2013, 12:06:51 PM
Yesterday, we did a walk that we had been looking forward to for a while.  The walk was from the Ogwen Valley, up the metalled access road to Carnedd Llewelyn (3485 ft)  via Ffynnon Llugwy Reservoir and then returning by Carnedd Dafydd (3423ft)  and Pen Yr Ole Wen  (3211ft).   
Wayne and Pete hadn't done the walk before and had been looking forward to seeing the views from the Carneddau mountain that I had been describing to them.   Heavy clouds hung over the peaks as we pulled our way up the water board road but we were not unduly put off because the weather forecast was good and a dry day expected so we were counting on the Sun burning off the cloud base.  After a while we reached Ffynnon Llugwy and paused there to have a drink and a breather before we set of for the steep ascent up to the ridge of Pen Yr Helgi Du.   There has been severe erosion on the path and the large wire mesh baskets filled with stones had collapsed in a number of spots.  Once on the ridge we looked down into the large remote valley of Cwm Eigiau and remembered our walk there earlier this year.  The ridge at first has steep drops on either side and then comes to a reasonable rocky scramble that took us to Craig Yr Ysfa where the views through the gullies are a bit scary.  We then looked to Carnedd Llewelyn and set off along the upward path to the summit.  As we started walking the weather took a turn for the worse and we donned our wet weather gear.   The summit was reached in a reasonable time but we didn't stay there long as the visibility had dropped to 50 yards or less and it was pouring down. We decided to continue to Carnedd Dafydd and Pen Yr Ole Wen and this tested our navigation skills to the limit.  Along the route we met 4 other individuals who were either keen walkers or a bit nuts like us.  We couldn't see anything so we concentrated on our footing on the wet slippery rocks but as we were descending the steep section of Pen Yr Ole Wen Pete took a tumble and hurt his knee badly but was still able to continue walking, albeit with a marked limp!    One section of the descent is tricky at the best of times when you have to navigate your way down a chimney like bit of the rock face but we managed it going very carefully down.   The last part was along a boggy section made worse by the recent rainfall.  From the A5 it was another mile back to the car and no time for a coffee as it was straight back home to dry out and have a relaxing bath after our nine mile walk. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2013, 12:08:23 PM
Carnedd Llewelyn walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on September 14, 2013, 03:03:26 PM
         That's a good strenuous walk Hugo, shame about the weather!  I hope your mate's knee is OK. I took a fall on wet ground on the final section of Offa's Dyke above Prestatyn a few months ago and I'm still restricted by a pulled thigh/hip muscle and knee strain. It always seems to happen on the descent, mind you I've never fancied going down Pen-yr-Ole Wen ever, even in the dry! A good few years ago on a Good Friday a group of us got a lift to Ogwen Cottage and set off straight up Pen-yr-Ole-Wen, on up to Carnedd Dafydd, Carnedd Llewellyn and then down the Carneddau ridge to Drum, Bwlch-y-Ddeufaen and then round Tal-y-Fan and on over  Pensychnant and Conwy Mountain and finally finished up in the old "Farmer's Arms" in Deganwy. We decided (in the "Farmer's" that night!), that we would do it on Good Friday every year but it never happened for some reason! 
        Another marathon we used to do when we were younger (and fitter!) was to leave the cars at Pen-y-Gaer above Llanbedr-y-Cennin and then go up to Carnedd Llewellyn via Drum and Foel Fras, down across Craig-yr-Ysfa, up over Pen-yr-Helgu Du and Pen Llithrig-y-Wrach and then down past the old quarry workings at Cedryn and back along the floor of Cwm Eigiau past the burst dam and back over to the start at Pen-y-Gaer.   
         Those were the days!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2013, 03:36:51 PM
Careful you lads, don't overdo it!
 :)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2013, 03:45:42 PM
You've certainly done some marathon walks in your time Gwynant and I hope that your leg soon gets better.  I'm sure that when your injuries heal you'll do some more.
I like walking up the face of Pen Yr Ole Wen, rather than the other route up it past Ffynnon Lloer but it is quite an effort and you need a good supply of water with you too.
One time I did it with a regular walking friend of mine and as I'm only a month younger than his mother I put my one and a half litre bottle of water in his rucksack and claimed that my rucksack was not big enough to hold the bottle.   He still beat me very easily to the top but by that time I had drunk most of the water.    That stretch is real thirsty work.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2013, 03:51:07 PM
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Careful you lads, don't overdo it!
 :)

That's very kind thing to say Hollins,  "Lads" that is.     When the three of us were walking through the rain and mist yesterday we remarked that our average age was 64,  so perhaps there is still life in the old dogs.     ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 14, 2013, 04:02:19 PM
Go for it while you still can, that's my motto!
You are a credit to our age group. We are lucky to be retired and fit, sadly so many don't make it that far.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Gwynant on September 14, 2013, 04:30:37 PM
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We are lucky to be retired and fit, sadly so many don't make it that far.
                Very true, the average age of the group that I used to walk with in those days, and still do when we can is now 68.  Your'e absolutely right Hugo, Pen-yr-Ole Wen "direct" is a killer, especially straight out the car!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2013, 06:34:54 PM
One of the nice things about walking  apart from the views is that you get to meet some very pleasant and interesting people.    Yesterday we met a lady about the same age as ourselves and she asked me if I knew where the short cut from Carnedd Dafydd to Yr Elen was and I couldn't see more than about 20 yards at that time so advised her that the safest bet was to go to Carnedd Llewelyn and then descend to Yr Elen.
Apparently she and her companion had come up via Pen Yr Ole Wen and they were going to Yr Elen then to Foel Frach before doubling back and dropping down to the Water board road and the A5.   In those conditions I really admired her spirit and determination.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Michael on September 14, 2013, 09:10:49 PM
   And you call these "walks"?   Misrepresentation I would say !!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 14, 2013, 10:44:53 PM
There's room for another old timer on our walks if you fancy it Mike.     ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Ian on September 15, 2013, 09:27:12 AM
Quote
Apparently she and her companion had come up via Pen Yr Ole Wen and they were going to Yr Elen then to Foel Frach before doubling back and dropping down to the Water board road and the A5.   In those conditions I really admired her spirit and determination.

I think she deserved a medal. Pen Yr Ole Wen is probably the hardest route onto the Carneddau. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 21, 2013, 12:41:54 PM
Many years ago a friend was telling me that he went diving in a quarry called Dorothea and described the deep murky waters of the lake and the dangers that lay beneath. He also told me stories of divers coming up too quickly and suffering from "the bends," something that I've heard of too often since then.
Anyway, yesterday three friends and I drove  down to the Nantlle Valley to have a walk around the quarry area.  We started the walk from Talsarnau and walked uphill towards the Cilgwyn quarry and as we got near the top we looked back and could see the pumping station near Dorothea quarry. After walking through the Gorse and Heather we had stunning views in all directions and could see the Nantlle Vale littered with quarries and the spoil from their workings.  The Nantlle Ridge was very imposing in front of us and Mynydd Mawr looked impressive too as did Yr Aran which appeared as a pointed summit between the two mountains.
After passing a number of quarries we stopped in a ruined building to have our refreshments and afterwards headed on our way.  At a ruined farmhouse we stopped and had a long and very interesting chat with an elderly gentleman who had actually been born in the 16th century farmhouse. He turned out to be the brother of the former MP Betty Williams who had also been born there and he very kindly lent us a key to the pumping house so that we could have a look inside the building. On our way there we passed Dorothea Quarry which is a vast lake and up to 600 foot deep.  We couldn't wait to get inside the Pumping Station and probably frightened the resident Barn Owl away with our enthusiasm to see the impressive working which are virtually intact.  After locking the place up, we  followed the tramway back along the sheer cliffs of Dorothea Quarry to the ruined farmhouse and handed the key back.    Then it was back to the car, but not before we explored the ruins of Talysarn Hall.    This was a small mansion standing beside the main road predating the quarry workings but later almost engulfed by them.  The Nantlle tramway curves around the back of the ruined hall and we followed it back to our car.  A very interesting walk, full of unexpected surprise was finished by having  tea and biscuits at Wayne's property nearby.   

http://www.penmorfa.com/Slate/beamengine.html (http://www.penmorfa.com/Slate/beamengine.html)



Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 21, 2013, 12:44:28 PM
Dorathea Quarry
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 21, 2013, 12:46:43 PM
Dorathea Quarry
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: rhuddlan on September 21, 2013, 01:08:41 PM
Nice shots and summary of our walk. How lucky we were to meet the gentleman you referred to.
Here is a panorama made from a sequence of shots taken on the hillside looking towards the coast.(early on in the walk)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on September 21, 2013, 02:13:09 PM
Hugo, you did well there! I've been there many times over the last 40 years, but never managed to see inside the beam engine house! Thanks for sharing those pics!  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 21, 2013, 03:08:16 PM
Really interesting photos and location. Thanks.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on September 21, 2013, 04:43:41 PM
This walking thread is producing so many pictures, perhaps it would be a good idea to start a special album page for them all with a description of each of them.   :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on September 21, 2013, 05:32:32 PM
Our chance meeting with that man was a special bonus as not only were we able to go into the three storey pumping house but he also advised us of Talysarnau Hall and that provided us with a quicker but more interesting route back to our car.
Some more pics ME to show you what you've missed.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on September 21, 2013, 05:40:54 PM
Very good Hugo! I would have loved to see inside, for years there have been signs warning of guard dogs etc, I've never seen one there!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 21, 2013, 09:17:19 PM
I have been walking too today. Can you guess where from these photos? The last one should give it away!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on September 21, 2013, 09:45:01 PM
A walk in the Black Forest!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on September 21, 2013, 09:52:43 PM
Well done ME. Badenweiler.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2013, 11:21:31 AM
I had a short but very enjoyable walk with my friend Pete on Saturday.  It was a circular walk to the Watch Tower in Abergele and from the Pen Y Bont pub we followed the path and the River Gele until we came to a bridge and crossed over it to follow a public footpath. The river was merely a trickle of water by the bridge but we could still see loads of Sticklebacks darting through the water. As we approached the old pumping station now converted into a splendid looking house we saw a Rabbit running through the field and could hear the call of a Buzzard high above.  At the end of the path we turned left onto a lane, passing by the old pump house and then taking a right turn up a steep lane, Before the brow of the hill we took another path into the woods and before long came to Tower Hill and saw this impressive looking Watch Tower.  It was built in the 1600's and partially restored in 1930.  It was there to warn of attacks on the coastline and was connected to a chain of other Watch Towers such as the ones in Llandrillo Yn Rhos and Whitford.    There were clear views all around as you would expect from this elevated site and in the field we saw a Buzzard flying low as it was carrying it's prey in its talons.  We crossed the field and descended through the trees until we came to the ruins of an old building and sat down to have our lunch. It was a perfect spot to stop at with views across Llanfair Road to the Snowdonia Mountains and to the sea. As a bonus we were rewarded by seeing thirteen wild deer feeding in the field below and five Buzzards flying just above our heads.  When the Deer went back into the woods we carried on downwards and took the path by the Pump House but on the other bank of the river and followed that back to the main road.  We saw several Badger setts along the way and Pete had explained to me earlier that Badgers are very clean animals and they actually build a latrine when they do their business.    This was well and truly confirmed further down the path when we saw dozens of latrines and judging by the deposits they had left these Badgers were very well fed!   There were hundreds and hundreds of crab apples on the ground and in the adjoining field Pete spotted some mushrooms so he quickly climbed over the fence and came back with a bag full of mushrooms.  A nice coffee in the Threeways Garage finished another enjoyable walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 07, 2013, 11:28:16 AM
Abergele Watch Tower walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 14, 2013, 02:18:19 PM
On Saturday we had our long awaited visit to the Shropshire border areas to see the site of Owain Glyndwr's home at Sycharth and The Old  Oswestry Hill Fort.  It wasn't intended to be a long walk but just a couple of short walks to see something that has always fascinated me.    Pete made a detour just to show me the beautiful little village of Llanyblodwel with it's magnificent quirky architectural take on Gothic styling. It was one of the most beautiful Churches I have ever seen and the story of the Rev John Parker who rebuilt and enlarged the Church is well worth reading.   We parked by the old public house  (unfortunately now closed) to take photos and as I stood on the bridge I was lucky enough to see a large Trout jump clean out of the water. 
We then continued along the narrow lanes until we came to Sycharth and to the site of Owain Glyndwr's palace.  Nothing visible remains of the building as it was burnt down in 1403 but it was still an experience to see its defences and the lovely area surrounding the former palace.  We were fortunate to have Maria with us as she has conducted tours there before so she was able to tell us all about the place.     Shortly afterwards we moved on to Oswestry for lunch and then on to the old hillfort in Oswestry to look at this massive hill fort with its steep ramparts, a guided tour by Maria took us around the perimeter of the fort and then we headed home. On the way we came across a Buzzard that was a bit reluctant to leave its prey of a Pheasant but as we approached it took off, but only as far as a nearby tree.  Our day wasn't finished though as Pete took us to Glyndyfrdwy. The tree-covered mound is reputed to be the site of another of Glyndwr's houses and the views from the top of the mound were spectacular as we looked down onto the River Dee.
From there it was a long journey home but with four happy people on board who had enjoyed a very interesting and varied day.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 14, 2013, 02:23:20 PM
Sycharth and Owain Glyndwr
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 14, 2013, 02:27:58 PM
Super Hugo. That brought back some nice memories for me and Mr Hollins of ramblings with his father.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on October 14, 2013, 04:03:33 PM
Fantastic photos and walk Hugo, somewhere else to put on the list to explore  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 16, 2013, 03:22:55 PM
Thanks Hollins, that's a lovely part of the country to have lived in and I'm pleased that it brought back nice memories for you.

Thanks too Jack, I hadn't walked in that area before so had been looking forward to it for ages.  We were fortunate to have Maria with us and get the benefit of her knowledge on the walks and found out that she shares the same fascination with Roman history as I do.
About seven years ago I was walking with the Retirement Group for the first time and thought that I had found a classic Roman Road on the walk but had no camera with me at the time.  Four years later I visited the area again but couldn't find the spot again.
A chance conversation with Maria solved the puzzle for me as she confirmed that the Roman Road was in the exact position I had described but that the landowner had covered the area with soil to prevent people going on his land looking for it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 16, 2013, 05:36:14 PM
While I was busy shopping today Mr Hollins found some death defying act to do with a friend.
I've put it in walking but it was a bit more than walking!
They went up to a Klettersteig or Via Ferrata which is climbing with the assistance of fixed ladders and wires.
Here is a link to the website and a film that someone else has put on youtube about their ascent.


Kandersteg Klettersteig Allmenalp (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jJ7WimRyW8#ws)

http://www.allmenalp.ch/klettersteig.html (http://www.allmenalp.ch/klettersteig.html)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 17, 2013, 08:22:38 PM
Action man has walked up the Sigriswiler Rothorn (2,050m) today starting the walk at about 1200m.
Looks like the surgeon did a good job on the ankle.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 20, 2013, 12:46:18 PM
OMG  Hollins I hope that fella of yours is well insured.      There's no way I could do that. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 20, 2013, 01:26:53 PM
Yesterday we went back to Llangollen to do the Llangollen History Trail and parked in the field where they were holding the Food Exhibition for the weekend.    From there it was a short walk to Telford's canal and past one of the prettiest cottages along the canal. Before long we came to the Chain Bridge Hotel and could see why the bridge is closed to the public as it's falling to pieces but the good news is that I heard that it is going to be restored in the future. We carried on to the Horseshoe falls and the water was flowing quite fast in the River Dee and you could see many canoeists taking advantage of the conditions in the river.  A group of about 6 in an inflatable boat came past us and it was only their screams that alerted us to the fact that they had gone over the falls.  They were quite safe though and they were only screams of excitement.
We went past Llantysilio Church and along the lane before we took the turning for Velvet Hill and there was a steep and strenuous pull up to the top but the views in all directions were worth the effort.   Stopping  for lunch at the top we then headed down hill to the ruins of the Valle Crucis  Abbey.   The Abbey Tea Rooms looked very inviting so we stopped there and we were treated to coffee and Welsh cakes by Pete and they were delicious and it was tempting not to move on from there but we had to. I had a quick trip around the ruins and then we crossed the river to take the path back towards Llangollen.   There was a point where we could have gone up to the castle but we chose not to take it and decided to carry on back to the car. That decision proved to be a wise one because no sooner had we sat in the Wharf Tea Rooms  by the canal for yet another drink, when the Heavens opened and the rain was torrential.  We waited for the rain to ease a bit before heading back to our cars and a muddy field but thankfully we could drive the cars off without any trouble. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 20, 2013, 01:28:47 PM
Llangollen History Trail
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: snowcap on October 20, 2013, 09:41:13 PM
I used to deliver wines and spirits to the Chain Bridge  hotel and have had many a cold drink stood on that swing bridge back in 1963.Those photos bring back some good memories.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on October 21, 2013, 09:51:00 AM
When we were staying in Llangollen earlier this year, we went for a walk along the canal and ended up having coffee in the Chain Bridge Hotel. There was a lot of refurbishment work going on at the hotel but the bridge itself looked very sad, needs completely rebuilding.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 21, 2013, 11:19:42 AM
They have done some work in the part of the hotel facing the River Dee and it looked quite inviting but the canal side of the Hotel didn't look any different since I last came past.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 27, 2013, 03:04:08 PM
I have driven over the River Clwyd thousands of times but not once have I walked along the banks of the river, so on Saturday I thought that it was time to do part of it and do the walk from the pretty village of  Rhuddlan to Rhyl and back.   Pete and I met by St Mary’s Church and took the cycle path to Rhyl.  This was my first walk along the path and I was very impressed by its condition and its close proximity to the river.   The tidal river was ebbing quickly and sandbanks were being uncovered and providing an unlimited food supply for the thousands of birds wading on its banks.  The place is a mecca for bird enthusiasts and among the birds we saw were Greylag Geese,Curlews, Lapwings, Shell Ducks, Mallards, Buzzards, Goosanders and many others but the one that struck me most was a Chinese Swan Goose.   Pete told me that this solitary Goose had been there for the last three years and there it was on the other bank honking away and not another female in sight.   We kept our eyes open for the Otters but never managed to see any of them unfortunately. Before long we were by the Marine Lake in Rhyl where we decided to stop and have our refreshments in the shelter of the Model Railway Station there. After the snack we passed by the front of the station and saw two men busy working on a steam engine there and they kindly treated us to a tour around the place. Pride of place was the steam loco called Billy that had been lovingly restored and placed in their museum. After that it was a quick walk across the new bridge Pont Y Ddraig and to our return journey on the other side of the river.    A large impressive looking house stands on the buttress to the previous road bridge and we passed it and the railway bridge as we made our way to walk along the top of the flood defence bank all the way back to Rhuddlan.    The best view of the river is from the cycle track as it is so much nearer the river but it was still nice to do them both.   A quick view of the Rhuddlan Nature reserve across the road and we finished the seven and a half mile walk at the KFC with a nice hot coffee.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on October 27, 2013, 03:06:54 PM
Rhuddlan River Walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on October 27, 2013, 04:25:26 PM
That was a good idea for a walk, didn't know you could do that. Thanks Hugo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 08, 2013, 04:31:40 PM
As yesterday was deemed to be the best day of the week weather wise, we decided to have a couple of short coastal walks in the Menai Bridge area. We met at the car park by the Chinese Restaurant in Menai Bridge and then had a short walk through pleasant woodland until we came to the Belgium Promenade, so called because it was built by Belgium refugees for the kindness and hospitality shown to them by the residents of Menai Bridge during World War 1.   We followed the Promenade back to the town and went under the Menai Suspension Bridge and just admired the views from there before returning back and then going on to the island to see the Church of St Tysilio.  After spending some time looking around the place we returned to our cars to travel to the lay by near Brittania Bridge.  From there we took the coastal path down to the waters edge and made our way along the banks of the Straits and under the impressive Brittania Bridge.  A little further on and we came to the Church of St Mary and the coastal path goes through the Churchyard and then emerges by the water.  We couldn't carry on along the path as the stepping stones there were under water so it was an ideal time to have our refreshments.  By the time we had finished our refreshments, the stones were above the water so we carried on and passed a statue of Admiral Nelson standing in the water.  After about half a mile our path was again blocked by the tide but we did a bit of improvisation and built our own stepping stones so we could continue on the path.  The rest of the path was elevated above the tidal waters and walking on it was easy.  It took us to a lane and on the way we passed a converted mill that was up for sale, I'm not sure if the boat was included in the price but unless one of us won the lottery it was out of our league.  The lane took us to the main road which we followed back to the lay by and we completed the day with a drink and piece of cake at the Treborth Garden Centre.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 08, 2013, 04:34:50 PM
Menai Bridge walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 13, 2013, 05:42:11 PM
Yesterday, with a good weather forecast,  I drove down to Beddgelert for the start of a Beddgelet and Cwm Bychan walk.  Wayne and I parked our cars in the centre of the village and walked along the river to the Aberglaslyn Pass.   The  Winter Sun was so low and shinning brightly we couldn’t take any photos of the stunning scenery or the fast flowing river that we followed down to Nantmor.    From Nantmor it was a gradual climb up Cwm Bychan and the weather was so warm and sunny that our fleeces had to come off straight away.  Not long into the walk we disturbed hundreds of Fieldfares that were feeding from the Rowan trees and then we came to a small but fast flowing waterfall,a little further on were the four pylons that still remain in the valley.  These pylons were an aerial ropeway for the Copper Mines and date from 1870, ore was transported on the ropeway to a crushing mill near Nantmor.
We stopped there and had some refreshments before continuing up to the top of the valley and then crossed the stile and headed for a signpost.  For a change we took the path down to the Copper Mines.  The path was very steep and we had to be careful at one point,  Wayne took a tumble on a path but was unhurt, bar his pride.   From the Copper Mine we headed for the village down a very narrow lane which  at one time  must have been the main road as we came across a milestone saying it was half a mile to Beddgelert.   That distance soon passed and when we arrived back in Beddgelert  we put our gear into the car before heading to the Bistro and Tearooms by the bridge.   A nice hot chocolate and coffee cake finished of a very pleasant walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 13, 2013, 05:44:46 PM
Beddgelert and Cwm Bychan
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on November 13, 2013, 08:06:56 PM
 ;) Another great walk - it's a pity I wasn't invited. :'(
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 13, 2013, 10:23:25 PM
You're lucky being in a central heated office while us OAP's have to go out and walk up hills to keep warm!    ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: welshwiz on November 15, 2013, 09:26:56 PM
A nice walk Hugo,
i have done this one a few times, have you tried the path down to llyn Dinas its a bit more forgiving than the copper mine path
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 16, 2013, 11:13:21 AM
That's the way we normally go Welshwiz and it's a lovely walk of about six miles.  The first time I did the walk down to Llyn Dinas we were lucky enough to see a Kingfisher on the boathouse there.  Never seen another since but I'm always looking out for one.
It's the first time I have walked down the Copper mine path but next time I think I'll take the path to Beddgelert instead as it would be nice to see the village from above it.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on November 17, 2013, 10:04:32 PM
I spotted a kingfisher on a couple of occasions at Talacre. If you go right along the coastal path instead of left towards the lighthouse and about 150 yards down there on the land side of the path is a little pond. The kingfishers were down at the furthest point of the pond on a branch overhanging the water.

I've also spotted a kingfisher a couple of times on the pond in the park in Ruthin.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 17, 2013, 10:57:23 PM
Thanks   TM  they are quite shy birds so anyone is lucky if they ever see one. there is a Nature Reserve by Penrhyn Castle called the Spinnies and I think one of the pools is called the Kingfisher Pool on account of the birds being there.   I've been there but never seen one yet but I'll go back again soon.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on November 18, 2013, 11:17:30 AM
Whilst doing a bit of Googling today, I came across this web site/ blog that is a wonderland for nature lovers.  It is well worth a visit for the photographs alone!

http://theresagreen.me (http://theresagreen.me)

Enjoy. :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 18, 2013, 02:47:23 PM
That's a fantastic site for everyone, a really good find.     &well&
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 26, 2013, 09:00:58 PM
Today my neighbour and I went to Dyserth for a short circular walk in the area.  We started from the car park at the end of the High Street and made our way down to the fast flowing Afon Ffyddion and followed it down stream.  We hadn't gone far when we disturbed a heron that was wading in the water and it slowly rose up and flew away probably to another feeding area where it wouldn't be disturbed.    Continuing along the route we came to the caves and the unusual rock formation,  the Guneras had all died by now but it's still an impressive sight to see and especially for my friend who hadn't seen it before.  Soon we could hear the thundering roar of the waterfall and it was in full flood as we passed over the bridge in front of it.   We had a quick look at the Church of St Bridget before having a steep pull up the lane and onto the old disused railway track.    By then it was time for a rest and a drink which we had on one of the Memorial benches situated along the track.   We then followed the track to Meliden passing the many old lead mines of Talargoch on the way and soon ended up at the old railway yard in Meliden.  From there we took the footpath which went steeply up to Graig Fawr and when we arrived at the top we were ready for another rest and finished off our refreshments sheltering from the cold wind at the trig point.   From there it was downhill all the way and we followed the lanes until we picked up the old railway track and followed it back to Dyserth and the car.   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on November 26, 2013, 09:02:31 PM
Dyserth walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on November 27, 2013, 08:19:10 PM
 $good$ that's a great walk Hugo one of my favourites while walking my dog Jess and of course it's my old home ground.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: rhuddlan on December 01, 2013, 09:34:24 AM
For those that might be interested, there is footage of a 1968 rail journey from Prestatyn to Dyserth here....
A bit of nostalgea,particularly for tellytubby!
Prestatyn to Dyserth Branch Line in 1968 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGj65vfwrJg#)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2013, 12:02:39 PM
Yesterday we met near the White Horse Inn in Cilcain and then drove down the lane towards Pantymwyn and parked our cars by the lovely River Alyn.  We then crossed over the little bridge, barely wide enough for modern day traffic and walked up the hill in the direction of Pantymwyn.  Before the brow of the hill we turned right and took the Leete Path which was to take us all the way to Loggerheads Country Park a distance of about 2 miles.     The path is an excellent walk through mature Beech woods and follows the contours of an old leete along  Alyn Gorge with the fast flowing River Alyn below.
The Leete was built in 1823 by John Taylor of the Mold Mines Company, it was originally 6 foot wide and 4 foot deep and was designed to carry water along to power waterwheel driven mining machinery in the valley.  It was abandoned in 1845.
A short time into the walk brought us to the Devil's Gorge, a legacy of the lead mining carried out all along this valley and a footbridge takes you over this deep gorge.  Pete and I walked down to the bottom of the gorge and had a look at the mine working down there before returning to Keith and Ian who were waiting on the bridge for us.   Carrying on we passed a half buried remains of a small bridge that once spanned the leet.    As we came nearer to Loggerheads the path dropped down to the river and we followed it into the Country Park and had our sandwiches and drinks sitting in the Autumn sunshine.    For our return journey we walked along the road and took the footpath through the woods that took us to the top of the cliffs overlooking the park and we took some more photos before continuing through the woods onto a lane which brought us out by the Alyn Kennels.    There was a river ford below the Kennels which looked a bit deep for ordinary vehicles but we didn't have to cross the footbridge so we returned back to the Leete Path and followed it back all the way to our cars.   This was an excellent walk along the Alyn Gorge and for anyone wishing to do it then it's a must to drop down to the Devil's Gorge to appreciate the rugged beauty of the area.    A takeaway Latte from McDonalds completed a memorable walking day out.
 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2013, 12:04:53 PM
Devil's Gorge walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on December 01, 2013, 05:25:02 PM
I've been walking a few times in the Loggerheads area recently. What's interesting is that there's a sinkhole in that river, so the water vanishes completely during the Summer months and then reappears further along.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2013, 05:59:02 PM
That's interesting Dave because my friend Pete who was on the walk mentioned that in the Summer the river is sometimes dry,  so that explains the reason why it dries up.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 01, 2013, 09:21:57 PM
I've just read this about the River Alyn

One of the major tributaries of the Dee, the River Alyn (Afon Alun) crosses the Carboniferous Limestone from Halkyn Mountain and runs down through the Loggerheads area before making its confluence north of Holt. Throughout the length of the Alyn there are numerous swallow holes and caverns and during the summer months long stretches of the river bed run dry. These caves include Ogof Hesp Alyn and Ogof Hen Ffynhonnau. A significant part of this lost flow re-emerges in the Milwr Tunnel, a man-made tunnel, entering the west bank of the Dee estuary and carrying 12 million imperial gallons per day (600 L/s). This tunnel was originally constructed to drain metal mines in Halkyn Mountain
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on December 09, 2013, 08:41:29 PM
Since we were staying on Anglesey this weekend, a walk along Newborough Beach to Llanddwyn Island was almost a must! The car park on Newborough Beach has been completely rebuilt this year and new facilities like Toilets have been added - a great improvement. There's also a new boardwalk platform viewing area.

As we headed along the beach towards the Island, I noticed that the tide level was pretty high. The storms of last week had taken a massive chunk out of the sand dunes along the beach, the level of erosion was very noticeable. We got nearer to the Island and could instantly see that a walk over to the Island itself was not going to be possible, as the normal footpath was under several foot of seawater, making Llanddwyn a true island for a few hours at least! That was disappointing, but we decide to carry on along the beach towards the Malltraeth estuary for a while and then turned back. The whole area is so peaceful and scenic.

Then we headed over to the Oystercatcher at Rhosneigr for lunch in the downstairs Wills Bar.

Photo 1- Oystercatcher at Rhosneigr.
Photo 2 - Rough seas at Llanddwyn Island
Photo 3 - Heading towards Malltraeth
Photo 4 - Llanddwyn Island lives up to its name for once. The area in the foreground is usually sand.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on December 10, 2013, 10:48:53 AM
Very good Dave, one day we will pay a visit to Llanddwyn!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on December 10, 2013, 11:16:35 AM
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Very good Dave, one day we will pay a visit to Llanddwyn!
It's a great place, ME, well worth a visit.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on December 10, 2013, 11:33:25 AM
Great photos of Llanddwyn Dave, they capture the atmosphere of the place on a rough Winter's day.


You must go there sometime ME it's well worth the visit.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on January 04, 2014, 10:05:24 PM
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Today we set off to the top of Sychnant Pass to start the walk over the Conwy mountain and back again.  Just a short, enjoyable walk to blow the cobwebs away and it did because it was quite windy up there despite the weather forecast to the contrary. We soon reached the ridge and followed it down through the Iron Age hill fort past the herd of wild Mountain Ponies until we found a sheltered place to have our lunch and look at the stunning views all around.
Returning back we had a look at the old quarry workings and what looked like a man made lake or reservoir (Pendragon would know what it was)
We walked along the edge, then past the farm until we got back to our car. A nice easy walk that was finished off with Milk shakes and coffee at the RSPB reserve in Junction.  It makes you realise how lucky we are to live in this area.   

Hi Hugo,
I have resurrected your post (above) of 2 years ago, because I fancy the walk over Conwy Mountain.
I have never done it, and it sounds like a shortish one for a man with dodgy knees to attempt, before we move on to some of your longer ones.
So, my question is, where would you recommend that I park my car, to start the walk off?
Thanks in advance.
Fest.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 04, 2014, 11:38:24 PM
I'm  pleased that you want to do that walk Fester but choose a nice day to appreciate it.    We parked our car at the top of Sychnant pass where you sometimes see the Ice Cream van parked.   The path towards the sea is quite obvious from there and follow it along and then bear right to go in the direction of Conwy.
Keep to the ridge to see the sea views.   We stopped shortly after the Iron Age Hillfort and then dropped down a bit to see the quarry workings and then returned to the top of Sychnant Pass.
Hope that you enjoy the walk whenever you decide to do it.     $good$
 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 05, 2014, 12:58:22 PM
At the top of Sychnant Pass this is the path to take to get to Conwy Mountain.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on January 05, 2014, 02:20:15 PM
Not advisable for anyone who suffers from Vertigo!    ZXZ
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 05, 2014, 04:20:32 PM
It's not that bad Yorkie,  if those two OAP'S can do it then anyone can,      ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on January 05, 2014, 05:13:56 PM
I would be fine, but my Mrs gets all het up about the drop there, when we are just passing along the road!  She has terrible vertigo. 
 Z**
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on January 05, 2014, 05:48:31 PM
Thanks for the replies and the good advice Guys.

Hmmm, Mrs Fester is not so keen on heights either, but she has done the walk high above Penmaenmawr with Pendragon, which she enjoyed immensely.    Where is Pendragon these days I wonder?  She used to love the Forum?

We will pick a suitable day, pack our flask, and report back here!

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 05, 2014, 10:39:33 PM
Once you have gone up that path and turned right at the end, it's flat and very much like walking on the Great Orme.
The views from up there are well worth the walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on January 06, 2014, 08:33:39 AM
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Thanks for the replies and the good advice Guys.

Hmmm, Mrs Fester is not so keen on heights either, but she has done the walk high above Penmaenmawr with Pendragon, which she enjoyed immensely.    Where is Pendragon these days I wonder?  She used to love the Forum?

We will pick a suitable day, pack our flask, and report back here!

I keep wondering about Pendragon as well Fester-- same with Blodyn.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on January 06, 2014, 08:51:16 AM
Me too. They were a real asset to this forum. Hope they are okay.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on January 06, 2014, 10:58:57 AM
Angie has a Facebook page - Pendragon Conwy, so presumably can be contacted.   :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on January 07, 2014, 11:22:19 AM
Today is the 70th anniversary of an American bomber crashing into Moelfre - a hill above Penmaenmawr.  This morning, before work, a few of us visited the site to leave crosses at the memorial to the five crew members who died.

With permission I have copied across details of the incident from the War Museum blog:

On a windswept plateau in the hills above Penmaenmawr is a memorial stone dedicated to five American airmen and their mascot, a terrier called Booster.  They were killed when their B-24 Liberator bomber crashed here in low cloud exactly 70 years ago today – the 7th January 1944.  The aircraft, named ‘Bachelor’s Baby’ by its crew, had left their base in Palm Beach, Florida a month earlier and had taken the “southern” route to Britain, via Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Brazil then across the Atlantic to Dakar, Marrakech and onto RAF Valley on Anglesey.  The plane was then due to fly from RAF Valley to RAF Watton in Norfolk where the American Air Force had a base.
On that fateful afternoon the Liberator took off from the R.A.F. station on Anglesey with orders to follow a B17 ‘Flying Fortress’ which was to act as their escort to their new base in eastern England.  Heavy cloud and drizzle meant that they lost sight of the B17 and to make matters worse the magnetic compass was malfunctioning.  The clouds broke for an instant and they realised that they were too low and despite the best efforts of the pilot, Adrian Shultz, the plane struck a ridge, crashed and burst into flames.  The plane was carrying a huge cargo of ammunition and on impact it started to explode.  The surviving airmen struggled valiantly to help their comrades who were trapped in the burning airframe but sadly for some it was too late.
The bomb aimer, 2nd Lieutenant Norman Boyer managed to make his way down to a local farmhouse near Rowen and raised the alarm.  However local men working at the quarry and PC Hughes-Parry of Llanfairfechan had arrived at the crash site after seeing and hearing the plane in difficulty overhead and on arrival administered first aid before carrying the injured all the way down the mountain to Graiglwyd Hall in Penmaenmawr.  They were treated here by a local doctor before being taken by ambulance to hospital in Bangor.  Before being transferred to hospital Sergeant Harold Alexander, a gunner on the aircraft, pleaded with one of the quarrymen, Ellis Lewis, if he would go back to the crash site and bury their mascot – Booster.  Mr Lewis did as he was asked and buried the little black and white fox terrier on the windswept plateau next to the burnt out aircraft.
One of the survivors was the plane’s navigator 2nd Lieutenant Julian Ertz.  Before the war he played American football for his high school and later for Temple University in Pennsylvania. He was known to his fellow crew members as the “singing fullback”.  However after treatment at hospital in Bangor and then at American military hospitals he returned to America in a full body cast after breaking his back in the crash but recovered enough to finish studying law and become an attorney.
In 1980 a memorial was dedicated to the crew and today virtually nothing remains of the aircraft, just a scar of exposed rock and soil on which the commemorative plaque stands and where no vegetation grows.  Today, 70 years since the crash, as gale force winds howled across the hillside and the incessant rain beat down we laid a simple cross in memory of co-pilot, 2nd Lieutenant Arthur Davis; engineer, Staff Sergeant Samuel Offutt; gunner, Sergeant William Lorenz; gunner, Sergeant William Nichols; Technical Sergeant Nicholas Cennemo and Booster the fox terrier. Lest We Forget.



Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on January 07, 2014, 11:24:37 AM
A great gesture to make, Jack.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on January 07, 2014, 11:50:55 AM
Thanks DaveR, it was very moving and poignant up there this morning.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on January 07, 2014, 02:09:28 PM
I salute them all, and you Jack for making the effort to mark the occasion.   $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 12, 2014, 03:16:15 PM
Yesterday was such a nice day that I thought that I'd have a walk from the West Shore to the old gunsite  walking along the shoreline.  After the recent storms I had expected to see a lot of debris scattered along the shore together with more erosion but I was pleasantly surprised to see hardly any debris on this part of the shore.  It must all have gone on to the West Shore instead.
The expensive properties had various types of sea defences but they are fighting a losing battle as the erosion not only comes from the sea but from the Orme itself and the westerly winds that cause the cliffs to dry out and then crack.  Frank Tyldesley's old boathouse was a victim of the erosion with landslips behind the retaining wall causing the wooden bridge that linked the boathouse to the garden to collapse but that happened years ago and has got worse since.
After the last property in Llys Helig Drive there are no sea defences and the erosion has escalated quite alarmingly.   At the second lookout buildings that I passed the three of them have all subsided and are looking at the shoreline rather than looking out to sea.  At one time concrete steps went up the slope from these buildings but the botton steps have long since been eroded. I climbed up the remaining steps and noticed in many places cracks appearing in the ground which are an obvious sign of further erosion to come.   After huffing and puffing up the track I went up the grass track above Hornby Cove and then headed for the café where I enjoyed another nice latte and piece of coffee cake.  The place was really busy with many people making the most of the Winter sunshine.   I came back to the West shore via the concrete road and the sheep track past Ffynnon  Gogarth and stopped to watch the goats feeding on the edge of the cliffs before descending past Ogof Arth above the old Penmorfa Hotel.  The tide was low so I finished off the walk by going on the shore and looking at the shipwreck of a wooden boat that lies on the beach opposite the car park.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 12, 2014, 03:39:18 PM
Llandudno Gunsite
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 12, 2014, 03:40:57 PM
Great Orme walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on January 12, 2014, 03:50:20 PM
Great walk and photos Hugo; the concrete steps down to the second group of three gun emplacements collapsed about four years ago and as you say it won't be long before those three structures are in the sea.  The other 3 and the generator room (Angie's special place!) are still in remarkable condition after 70 years.

Is the shipwreck the 'Flying Foam'? The timbers of this ship were used in the building that is now the Cottage Loaf but have never been sure where the ship actually floundered.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Cordyline on January 12, 2014, 04:13:48 PM
Thanks for the article and photos Hugo; very impressive !!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on January 12, 2014, 04:22:22 PM
Yes very good Hugo, if only you had put this up before your quiz question!  :twoface: :laugh:
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 12, 2014, 04:46:15 PM
You're correct Jack with the name of the shipwreck

The building of the pub.....
flying foam schooner
The “Flying Foam” was a coal-carrying schooner that was wrecked of Llandudno’s West Shore on 21st January 1936. The vessel itself was abandoned, but much of the decking and the main masts were salvaged.  Dunphy's bakery and warehouse was made up of the timbers from the wrecked schooner.  Many of these timbers were saved during the demolishion of the warehouse in 1980 and reused in the building of the Cottage Loaf.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: norman08 on January 12, 2014, 06:33:58 PM
i was close then i thought it was the gunsites , my 1st job was at franks house as gardener with mr thomas .
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 12, 2014, 09:32:16 PM
I couldn't remember whether you lived at the Gunsite or not Norman but I knew that your parents lived there.   Our cousin Peggy Whittle lived there with her husband Harry and left the Gunsite to go to Canada.
Did you ever go into the Boathouse when you worked for Frank?    It was a shame to see the wooden bridge by the side of the building but the building itself appeared to be in a good state despite the elements.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: mull on January 13, 2014, 10:52:56 AM
Well done Hugo, a good report and photos. Looks like you had a fine sunny day.
Amazing the amount of damage caused by this winters storms.
I spent Saturday and up to midday yesterday repairing and strengthening my fence on the south side of the garden. Just got it finished as the weather closed in again and we had heavy rain and a south eastery gale until midnight.
This must be the worse winter since we came here in 1995 and I have not had much chance to get out walking for a few weeks .
Never mind spring is on the way.
Thanks for the walking reports, keep them coming.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 25, 2014, 11:10:09 PM
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You're correct Jack with the name of the shipwreck

The building of the pub.....
flying foam schooner
The “Flying Foam” was a coal-carrying schooner that was wrecked of Llandudno’s West Shore on 21st January 1936. The vessel itself was abandoned, but much of the decking and the main masts were salvaged.  Dunphy's bakery and warehouse was made up of the timbers from the wrecked schooner.  Many of these timbers were saved during the demolishion of the warehouse in 1980 and reused in the building of the Cottage Loaf.

I was talking to my brother the other night and mentioned this shipwreck to him.   The boat must have been laden with coal when it was wrecked because he can remember our mother telling him that as a young girl she went out to the wreck to gather coal from it for the family fire!     
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on January 26, 2014, 11:49:57 AM
I watched Weatherman Walking on TV this week and Derek Brockway did a walk on the Great Orme.    It was a nice day when he did the walk and the photography was really good.
The walk was 6 miles long and must have been a good advert for the town
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Jack on January 26, 2014, 12:57:38 PM
Thanks for the extra information Hugo regarding the Flying Foam $thanx$
Weatherman Walking was certainly a great advert for the town and I'm not sure when it was filmed but they were certainly lucky with the weather.  $walesflag$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Fester on January 26, 2014, 07:11:44 PM
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Thanks for the extra information Hugo regarding the Flying Foam $thanx$
Weatherman Walking was certainly a great advert for the town and I'm not sure when it was filmed but they were certainly lucky with the weather.  $walesflag$

The Derek Brockway programme was great, and I saw my house... twice!

Given that the cable car was running, yet there was refurb work underway at the Pier Head, this suggests it must have been September at the latest.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Cordyline on January 26, 2014, 09:35:19 PM
Derek link

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006rh64 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006rh64)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Nemesis on January 27, 2014, 08:40:21 AM
I seem to remember going onto the Orme the day it was filmed and being told that a film crew were working by the toll gate chap.
Must have gone to a different area, as I didn't see anything, but the gorse and heather were both out, so I think your time guess was right Fester!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: TheMedz on January 27, 2014, 01:35:50 PM
If I remember correctly he mentioned about the weather being good for September. Really good views of Black Gate taken from near the donkeys at the top of wyddfid road.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on February 19, 2014, 05:00:33 PM
I had a pleasant walk down the River Clwyd yesterday with the Retirement Group.  I chose to go by car and  met them in Rhuddlan where we set off for a walk along the cycle track to Rhyl.   Conditions for this type of walk were perfect as it was dry and there was no wind.
The river was full and flowing fast but in recent weeks it had come very near the top of the flood defences as there was debris everywhere.  Because the water was high there wasn't as much bird life as normal but we saw about 12 Swans and dozens of Canada Geese and Shell Ducks on the way. After a while we reached Rhyl and the Marine Lake and crossed over the new pedestrian bridge Pont Y Ddraig and the group headed to one of the pubs on the Kinmel Bay side of the river.
Unfortunately for me I couldn't join them for a cuppa as my car was in Rhuddlan and I needed to walk back before it became dark.  Once on the path though I motored along and got back in half the time it took us to do the walk from Rhuddlan.
I was lucky enough to see a Cormorant on the way back as it dived and came back up with its dinner,  I did keep a look out for the Chinese Swan Goose and the Otters that are near Rhuddlan but unfortunately didn't see  them
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2014, 12:25:09 PM
Yesterday, I enjoyed a gentle village and riverside walk and explored a hillside castle when Pete and I travelled to Caergwrle and Hope.  After parking up, we set off uphill to the Castle which was probably built by Dafydd ap Gruffydd, the brother of Llewelyn the Last.   Quite a large part of the Castle has collapsed because of quarrying on one side of the hill but it's still worth a visit and is quite easy to walk up to it.
We returned back to our car just to pick up our rucksacks and crossed the road past the Derby Arms and to the right of there was the site of Caergwrle Brewery founded in 1861.  Apparently the local spa waters were highly valued for brewing beer.   Not far from there on our return journey we saw a torrent of water  coming from a spring in the garden wall of a terraced property so there was no shortage of water for that brewing industry.
We then walked over a delightful six arched packhorse bridge built in the mid 17th  century and carried on up the lane until we came to Rhyddyn Farm from there we walked along the footpath which was on a raised bank and was part of Wat's Dyke.  Soon we arrived at Hope Church and had a look at the grounds before continuing on our way down Sarn Lane towards the River Alyn.   Instead of crossing the river we took the public footpath to the right and followed the deep and fast flowing waters along it's banks.  An old tree that had fallen near the river provided an ideal place for us to sit and have our refreshments and we sat there watching the waters flowing by and keeping a keen eye open for the Kingfishers that frequent this area.   Unfortunately we didn't see one this time but all the time we could hear a Woodpecker drumming on the trees nearby which is a good sign that Spring isn't far away.  Further upstream there are two bridges together that cross the river so we went over on the old bridge and followed the river back on the other bank.
Our chances of seeing the Kingfishers greatly diminished when we passed a noisy old eccentric who was dressed like a long haired cowboy, but at least he was happy doing what he was doing.
Before long we arrived back at the car park and it was time to go home after a nice easy and enjoyable walk.  On our way back we stopped at Sychdyn  for a while to look at one of the best preserved sections of Wat's Dyke  and then carried on home. 
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 09, 2014, 12:27:46 PM
Caergwrle and Hope
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Bri Roberts on March 09, 2014, 01:31:00 PM
Hugo, I am surprised you didn't tell everyone the tale of those who live in Hope and die in Caergwrle.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 13, 2014, 11:54:45 AM
What a difference a day makes!   Today there is an icy cold mist around with visibility down to about 100 yards but yesterday it was a beautiful warm sunny day.     We parked the car in the small car park by the Roman Road in Aber and set out down the water board track that takes you into Cwm  Anafon.   Seeing snow on the northern slopes of Foel Fras we had brought a load of gear with us but once inside the valley the fleeces quickly came off and it was T shirt weather for the rest of the walk.   
On our way we saw many of the Carneddau ponies around and a lot looked pregnant too.  The track gradually winds its way up to the head of the valley and that was where we were heading for.   At Llyn Anafon we stopped for a while to have our refreshments by the side of the lake and just relaxed in the  warm sunshine while admiring the scenery and pockets of snow on Foel Fras just above us.
The next part of our walk was a steep pull up the slopes of Drum and we took it easy going up there with frequent breaks to catch our breath again but before too long we arrived at a well defined track that was to take us down to the Roman Road and back to the car park.
We heard a tremendous explosion from somewhere which may have been from the Bethesda Quarry but it did sound too close for comfort.     On our way down we could first of all smell something burning but lower down could see great plumes of smoke billowing into the air from the Tal Y Fan area.  I just hoped that they were controlled fires rather than fired started deliberately or by a discarded cigarette.     We drove from the car park down to the village and Wayne left to go home early while Pete and I went to the cafe and had a Latte and a delicious cake to finish off another very pleasant walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 13, 2014, 11:56:53 AM
Cwm Anafon & Drum
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2014, 04:21:01 PM
On Saturday I had two very interesting walks in St Asaph with my friends.   We met at the car park by the Plough Inn and crossed over the bridge and followed country lanes which took us over the A55 bridge and eventually to another bridge which crossed over the River Elwy.
From there we walked alongside the river back to the Plough Inn on the top of the flood defences and watched the Dippers strutting their stuff along the way. The water was flowing fast but those Flood defences are quite high and it's hard to imagine that the water rose so high as to cause such devastation to so many  properties and people a short time ago.
From there we headed along the Lower Denbigh Road before turning up the lane to Cefn.  Parking the car at a safe spot we followed the footpath and came to a cottage that had a leet flowing underneath it and not far away were the ruins of St Mary's Chapel and well.  Across the river and almost hidden by trees was Dolbeldyr.  Dolbelydr is to be treasured on two main counts. It is a fine example of a 16th-century, stone-built manor house, which has survived remarkably unaltered. It was also where Henry Salesbury (1561-c 1605), physician and humanist scholar, wrote his Grammatica Britannica, published in 1593. The Grammatica was one of the first attempts to impose formal grammar on the Welsh language.   Rhuddlan and Tellytubby my friends on this walk had been in the property previously and the photo of it was taken by Rhuddlan on his visit there.
We carried on walking along a clear defined track in delightful woodland  alongside the river, then crossed a field before climbing upwards to the natural arch where the Denbigh to Abergele road once passed through.    We then climbed upwards towards the well known Cefn Caves  These caves in the parish of Cefn Meiriadog, Denbighshire, have long been places of interest for scientists, artists, poets and antiquarians.  Excavations within Cefn Cave in 1832 found bones of straight-tusked elephant, rhinoceros and hippopotamus of last interglacial age (c. 125,000 years old), 
Carrying on past the caves we went along the clear footpath and saw many Deer footprints but did not have a glimpse of the White Stag that is seen in this area.  Descending along this footpath we then came to the ruins of St Mary's Chapel and the holy well of Ffynnon Fair.  It  is set on the floor of a broad river valley flanked by steeply sloping woodland well below the level of the road. Beside the well are the remains of the ruined well chapel, encircled by an iron fence
The earliest part of the chapel building dates from the 13th Century. In the 15th Century a chancel was added to the south. The altar was then situated, unusually, below the southern window, traces of its base remain.
The well basin beside the chapel is in the form of a star and the water was flowing freely out of it, underneath the Chapel ruins and eventually into the River Elwy.
We then retraced our way back to the car having enjoyed a very interesting and historical walk.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2014, 04:23:44 PM
St Asaph walk
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 24, 2014, 05:18:27 PM
Really interesting photos and description. Thanks Hugo.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on March 24, 2014, 06:01:41 PM
You can rent Dolbelydr for a holiday from the Landmark Trust.
This link has some photos of the inside as well.

http://www.landmarktrust.org.uk/search-and-book/properties/dolbelydr-6288 (http://www.landmarktrust.org.uk/search-and-book/properties/dolbelydr-6288)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 24, 2014, 10:30:58 PM
Thanks for your comments and posting that link Hollins.   It looks like they have done a very good restoration on that property.  I've posted some more photos that Rhuddlan sent me just to do the building justice.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on March 25, 2014, 09:15:42 AM
You've done a couple of great walks, lately, Hugo. Very interesting, thank you.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Yorkie on March 25, 2014, 09:43:59 AM
Hugo, it really is about time that you committed all these interesting walks to print, in the form of a nice book!   I am sure what you have to say would be well worthy of the effort, and of interest to many others.
 ZXZ

Please can I have the first signed copy?    :D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on March 25, 2014, 02:30:33 PM
Thanks for your kind comments Dave & Yorkie,  I'm just glad that I can do the walks and share them with others.

There won't be any book coming out Yorkie as I'm too busy enjoying the walking and I'm lucky enough to have friends with a depth of knowledge on the local areas.
I'm planning to go on another interesting walk soon, so be prepared for something to pop up on the out of area quiz questions      ;D
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2014, 10:36:08 PM
We are recently back from a short visit to the Llyn Peninsula. We enjoyed this walk around the headland at Llanbedrog. We parked in the National Trust car park and walked down to the beach. There were lots of families on their Easter holidays enjoying playing in the sand and rock pools.
We decided to walk up the very steep stepped path up the cliff passing by Foxhole Cottage as we went. This cottage dates from the 17th century and has Gothic windows.
When we reached the top we were not only rewarded with a spectacular view but also came across the sculpture called the Tin Man which is the work of a local artist Simon Van de Put. (see quiz question for photos).
There is a lovely view from here down to Glyn y Weddw Hall and the beach with coloured beach huts.
Further around the headland more gorgeous views of the Tudwalds Islands and across to Abersoch.
When we reached a cottage called Mount Pleasant we turned inland and made our way across the top where there was a useful plaque giving the names of the hills and mountains in the distance.
From here we walked back through the woods to Oriel Plas Glyn Weddw where we had a cup of tea on the lawn and a look around the various exhibitions inside.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2014, 10:41:33 PM
Part two.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2014, 10:52:44 PM
We did a second headland walk while visiting the Llyn Peninsula. This one was to see the village of Porthdinllaen. We parked in the National Trust car park at Morfa Nefyn and walked up to the golf course and then along the road which led down to the village and the Ty Coch Inn. What an amazing location. neither of us had been there before. It was really busy with people enjoying an old fashioned seaside holiday in gorgeous weather.
From the village we walked along a path which closely followed the shoreline and on turning the corner we found to our surprise a brand new lifeboat station being built. The contractors had had to erect a huge scaffold staircase to make a diversion for pedestrians. It was quite a climb up it and at the top there was a sign saying, "We won't be here for long but the improvements to the area will be." It reminded me of BigMurph!
Turning another corner we found a nice bench seat and watched the seals for a while.  Then over the hill and past a coast lookout building and back down to the village. From here we walked back to the car along the beach as the tide had recently gone out.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 15, 2014, 11:00:06 PM
Part two.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 16, 2014, 11:29:10 PM
As you may be aware Elaine and I (A and E tours) are walking the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path June 6th - 21st this year.  In addition to this fund raising effort we have also organised a walk for everyone else on the Sunday 22nd June called the Port to Port which starts in Porth Penrhyn and finishes on the Conwy Quay.  We recently walked from Porth Penrhyn to Llanfair (I'll post photos later).  Yesterday we walked Llanfair to Conwy along the coast path and the cycle path, it's approx 8 and a half miles.  We started on Llanfair beach the weather was lovely.
To be honest it's not very picturesque until you reach Penmaenmawr as the path takes you along the express way.  The actual Coast Path gets to Llanfair and then it's up and onto the mountain but we think that having walked nearly 12 miles from Bangor on the day it would be a bit tight to expect people to go this way which is why we decided the rest could be done on the cycle path. 
Armed with plenty of coffee and chilli chicken rolls oh and some ham for my darling little Jj we set off along the prom.  I'm quite surprised at Jj she loves walking and doesn't seem to tire until she gets home then she's knackered hehe.  She's as bad as Sox with her ball though, she looks at you like that Puss in Boots from Shrek so you'll throw it. :roll:
We walked over the bridges on the express way and down under the road bridge in Penmaenan onto the beach.  There was a young girl there desperately trying to control 3 Alsatians, what looked like a Husky and a Rottweiler we could hear her shouting "Lunar, calm down Lunar" to one of the Alsatians hehe I just looked at Elaine and said I hope that's not short for Lunatic!
We sat at the end of Pen beach and ate our sarnies and fed and watered Jj.  It was very busy down there and I'm not surprised the weather was cracking.  We walked along the path that joins the road and made a detour down to what we have always as kids called Dead Mans Beach as Elaine has never been there.  It's always quiet here and I wanted to show her some rocks I'd noticed.......they're interesting I promise  :P you can see from the photos the rocks are large and one has a cross carved intio it and another has been tooled.  You can see my pen in the corner to give you a perspective of the size.  I like to think these rocks and stones are what's left of Heligs Castle.
We went back up onto the road and continued on and into Conwy cutting down the cycle path and along to the Mulberry, where we had a well deserved pint.

   
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 16, 2014, 11:30:43 PM
We are so lucky to have all these beautiful places on our door step Hollins.   D)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on April 17, 2014, 07:47:09 AM
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We are so lucky to have all these beautiful places on our door step Hollins.   D)

Yes, you are so right there Pendragon and I love reading your walk reports. They are always so entertaining. Good luck with the Pembrokeshire coastal path walk. I have done a lot of it but not all in one go like you.
















Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 21, 2014, 03:25:28 PM
It was great seeing those lovely photos and reading your comments about the two walks you did on the Llyn Peninsula Hollins.  The weather looked perfect and you can understand why so many people go there on holiday. 
I haven't done a lot of walking in that area but must do it sometime soon.   The photo of the Ty Coch brought some nice memories back as I sailed there with some friends in a 6 berth yacht many years ago and enjoyed many a pint in the bar there!     
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 21, 2014, 03:41:03 PM
I've missed seeing your photos and reading your very entertaining reports of your walks so it's nice to see that you are back walking again Pendragon.   $good$
I'll look forward to reading about your walk on the Pembroke Path in June.

Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 22, 2014, 09:59:16 PM
Our walk today was going to be on the Carneddau but when we met in Caerhun it had started to rain and the clouds were very low on the surrounding hills and that coupled with a forecast for heavy rain made us decide to go to Betws Y Coed to try a walk there instead.
Parking by the railway station we made our way to Pont Y Pair and walked alongside the river to the Miners Bridge. 
It was rather ironic with the heavy rain forecast that the water in the  River Llugwy was the lowest that I have ever seen it as it flowed very slowly downstream.
We then crossed over the Miner's Bridge and then the A5 to head uphill up the loose rocky path to Rhiwddolion, a village that was finally abandoned in the 1940's.   We had our refreshments on the steps of the ruined terraced cottages and noted how the ruins have deteriorated from our previous visit.  I don't know the age of the buildings but a date in the 1600's was carved into one of the massive fireplace lintels in one of the cottages.
Before long it was time to head on to Llyn Elsi and to see the bird life that was on the other side of the lake and then to take the path down to Betws.   In the village we had a pot of tea and a cake before going to our cars and back home.   It only rained for about 10 minutes on our walk and that was very light so next time we might not take too much notice of the weather forecast. 

















Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 22, 2014, 10:03:25 PM
Rhiwddolion
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Pendragon on April 24, 2014, 02:31:06 PM
Hugo the walk up to Llyn Elsi is really nice.  I've just bought a book "Walks in the Conwy Vally" We caught the bus from Conwy which in itself was a nightmare as the  bus driver was foreign and he must have misheard me when I said "Betws please" he sold me the ticket and then made his way to piggin' Llandudno  :o.  Luckily the bus changed drivers to one that understood english.  He let me use the same ticket for Betws and we arrived there an hour late.
Jj and I started the walk from the Minors bridge in Betws.  We crossed the road and took the footpath up and into the forest.  We stopped at the old quarry buildings and had our sandwiches, I say ours as Jj always shares my butties as well as her little bag of fridge raider sausages (I love that little dog) We carried on up through the woods following the guide book.  It wasn't a very good day so the photos aren't very good either.  Passing a small water fall and derelict barn, the views were amazing.
We were looking for a stile to cross, I'm not sure what happened but I couldn't find it anywhere however we arrived albeit on a different approach from the book.  We finished our food and coffee and as the walk was a circular one I read the guide book.  It was quite funny really as it said "with the monument behind you and facing the path you arrived on turn to 2 o'clock and take this path back down into Betws"  hehe first problem was the monument is square so which side is behind you? second problem was we had arrived via a different route and there was 3 paths.  So for safety reasons as I'm a bit of a calamity we decided to return the way we had come up.  It was now knocking on so I didn't want to go through the forest so we followed the quarry road down and into Betws. 
By now it was around half 5 and the bus wasn't for another hour so we went to a coffee shop and chippy.  As I walked in  a woman was at the counter complaining she hadn't asked for mushy peas.  I asked for a sausage for Jj and a small chips, the girl said why don't you have this fish and chips free of charge....well it would be rude not to so Jj and I shared the spoils....bonus.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 26, 2014, 06:46:22 PM
That's quite an adventure before you even started the walk Pendragon!       I've a few books on walks in the Conwy Valley, one  is by Carl Rogers and his walks are good, even if the directions are not always clear.
Another by Chris Draper has walks with history attached and is great to read even if you don't do the walk itself.
We did part of the walk you did from the Miner's Bridge but went straight up the valley to the abandoned village of Rhiwddolion instead of going left to the quarry.
We then stopped at the Monument by Llyn Elsi and then took the path down to the Royal Oak Hotel but some how we took a tricky and very steep path down and ended up by the  Pont Y Pair Bridge area.
Tonto, our route finder for the day (name changed to protect his embarrassment) has been rested as a guide until further notice.      ;)
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Tellytubby on April 26, 2014, 08:39:29 PM
 :D if i remember Hugo i do recall that you where the leader. It was a good walk.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on April 26, 2014, 10:44:08 PM
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:D if i remember Hugo i do recall that you where the leader. It was a good walk.

Yes, but only as far as Llyn Elsi and then Tonto took over but I enjoyed it as I'd never been down that way before.     $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2014, 12:21:26 PM
Yesterday, we headed to the little remote village of Croesor for the start of our walk up the Cnicht.  We met Wayne in the car park there and the four of us sat in the car park contemplating what to do.   It was raining quite steadily and the summit of Cnicht was covered in cloud but after 15 minutes or so we decided to go for it as we had travelled some way to get there.
Croesor is a lovely compact village that once was an area humming with activity, the slate quarries have long since closed and the valley has returned to a quieter life, the Chapel and School have both now closed but at least they still have a great cafe there, sadly the Oriel Caffi was closed yesterday!      Everything seemed to be against us but it was great to get out walking again as it has been a while since the four of us had walked together.
The first part was a steep pull up the lane until we came to the Cnicht path and we followed it uphill.  The wind had picked up and it was quite cold, our Winter gear would have been welcome but that had been left in the car.  After about half an hour we sought shelter behind a wall and had our refreshments while enjoying the sound of a Cuckoo that seemed to be following us up the valley.   From the south west the mountain has a distinctive shape, pointed with sheer faces on either flank - and nicknamed the "Welsh Matterhorn".
It also has false summits but as we couldn't see anything it didn't really make any difference to us.  The final rocky scramble to the summit was taken very carefully as the wet weather had  made the slate rocks very slippery indeed.  We didn't stay long at the summit as we couldn't see anything anyway and the wind had picked up again.   Descending from the summit was slow and careful but apart from teletubby slipping and landing on his bottom there were no other mishaps. Our caps all blew off at some stage but we were able to retrieve them before they flew over the cliff edge.  Safely arriving back in the village we arranged our next walk together and then drove home, just stopping at the Siabod Cafe in Capel Curig for a nice warm drink.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 08, 2014, 12:23:13 PM
Cnicht
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: DaveR on May 08, 2014, 02:01:00 PM
Another great walk, Hugo.  $good$
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 16, 2014, 11:31:35 AM
Yesterday, with good weather forecast I took a couple of friends on a walk that I had been on once before.  It was to see the medieval village of Ardda set high in the hills above Trefriw and Dolgarrog only this time I was going to take the easier option which was leaving a car in Dolgarrog and taking the other car up the steep and winding single track road to Ardda.    This cut out a very strenuous section of the walk but would allow us more time to spend on the rest of the walk.
Parking our car safely on the side of this narrow grass verge we walked towards Tyddyn Gwilym and straight away we were rewarded with spectacular views of the Conwy Valley.   We went through Tyddyn Gwilym and came to the Chapel Ardda.    This little chapel was built in 1845 and today is a ruin surrounded by a small graveyard.  Ardda was  once a sizeable village above Trefriw, but now consists of only a few inhabited houses.   The hillside is surrounded by the ruins of dozens of homes that once house the inhabitants of this upland area.
 Just as we got to the Chapel it started to rain so we took shelter for about 15 minutes until the rain stopped and then carried on walking up the ancient track that goes to Llyn Cowlyd until we crossed over the leat and followed it around the contours of the valley.  Just before we crossed over the leat again to take the path leading upwards we saw a Brown Hare jump into the leat and then run uphill through the bracken until it was a safe distance away.   The path then took us to a track which led around the side of the hill and the Bluebells were amazing, acres and acres of them turning the hillside into a shade of Hyacinth blue.  We crossed under the hydro electricity pipes and stopped to have our food and drink and just watched breathtaking scenery below us.  Soon it was time to move on and have a look at a cottage that was remarkably well preserved, but when we looked through the open window, the strange thing was that there was only one room in the building.   From the cottage we went to Coedty Reservoir but didn't stay long as the whole area is now like a construction site so it was nice to leave the work site and travel downhill following the river and a number of small but very beautiful waterfalls.   At the bottom we came to a place where they made pottery and we struck up a conversation with the owner who had rebuilt the cottage himself and we enjoyed an interesting conversation with him about the place..   Down at the bottom in Dolgarrog we picked up the other car and Wayne drove us back up to Ardda to the first car.  Believe me it's a lot easier going up to Ardda by car than by the route I took last time.  I still remember that experience very well.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 16, 2014, 11:33:38 AM
Ardda
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: hollins on May 16, 2014, 11:51:28 AM
What amazing doors and windows in that cottage. The owner must have been a talented carpenter as well as a potter.
How lovely to see open fields of bluebells like that. The ones around here are mostly in woods or verges.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 16, 2014, 12:58:16 PM
Here is a photo of a door he made and also his garage which he built in a "Dutch barn style"     We did see a lot of Bluebells on our drive up to Croesor the other week but those yesterday were fantastic.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: mull on May 16, 2014, 05:21:59 PM
Thanks for the commentry Hugo. Wish I could have done the walk myself.
Can you tell me what the construction site is all about.
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Merddin Emrys on May 16, 2014, 05:46:26 PM
What an amazing house! Love those windows and doors!
Title: Re: Walking
Post by: Hugo on May 16, 2014, 10:13:12 PM