Author Topic: Consumer news and scams  (Read 85631 times)

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SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #465 on: November 26, 2018, 11:47:48 AM »
I think the simplified version, as I understand it,  Diesel affects our health due to poor air quality, and the lead in petrol affects the ozone layer, resulting in contributing to global warming.   

squigglev2

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #466 on: November 26, 2018, 11:57:41 AM »
I think the lead aspect of petrol (see eg. here. You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
) has gone Steve.  But otherwise what the two fuels may produce is probably reasonable...

andyCYD

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #467 on: November 27, 2018, 11:37:47 AM »
It is very difficult to find any reliable information about which is best for the environment, petrol or diesel?  They have different impacts and technology is changing continually.  There were benefits of diesel over petrol a few years ago which are not so clear now because the design of petrol engines has improved so much.

My conclusion is that if you want a small car for driving around town you should select a petrol engine.  This is because it will emit less particulates.  However, if you want a larger car for driving on open roads you want a diesel engine because you will use less fuel, emit less CO2 and particulates are not such a concern. 

There are so many other factors to take into consideration.  For example, how much energy does it take to produce a litre of petrol vs diesel?  If we only look at the emissions from the car we overlook the full impacts.  Also, how much energy does it take to manufacture the engine and how long will it last?  From what I can see diesel engines seem to outlive petrol my quite a margin, which is significant.

Another factor is the real life experience.  I know diesels are not great to drive in slow and stop-start traffic.  But small petrol engines are not great on open roads.  Large petrol engines use so much fuel that it is hard to see any environmental justification.

I am a bit bemused by Steve's mention of lead.  This was removed from petrol about 20 years ago because it was causing brain damage.  I am not aware of it having any effect on the ozone layer (that was CFCs).

SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #468 on: November 27, 2018, 12:10:26 PM »
Sorry Andy, that's what I get for not putting brain in gear, I was thinking generally in terms of exhaust emissions, carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide,  :-[   


Merddin Emrys

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #469 on: November 27, 2018, 12:16:50 PM »
We are car enthusiasts so have several cars, a Fiesta with a tiny 1.4 petrol engine, ideal for local stuff, easy to park etc, a Mercedes estate which is a 2.7 turbo diesel for longer runs and carrying bulky items, does about 48mpg on a long run, then the 3 hobby cars, all Mercedes-Benz,  a 2.3 petrol saloon, a SL320 sports car 3.2 petrol,  and the big one is a CL55AMG which has a 5.4 litre V8 petrol engine. Think that just about covers every variation lol.
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SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #470 on: November 28, 2018, 11:28:05 AM »
'Rip-off' 118 calls spark price crackdown

The price of a call to directory inquiries will be capped at £3.65 for 90 seconds.
Phone industry regulator Ofcom said it is responding to a "steep" rise in prices.
The most popular service, 118 118, charges £11.23 for a 90 second call, the regulator said.

The number of calls being made to 118 services has been falling by 40% a year, but more than a million people a year still use the service.
Many of those using 118 services are elderly, Ofcom said.

People aged over 65 are four times more likely to call 118 numbers than those aged between 16 and 34. They are also "significantly" less likely to have internet access, meaning they cannot search for a number online.

"Directory inquiry prices have risen in recent years, and callers are paying much more than they expect. Our evidence shows this is hurting people, with some struggling to pay their bills," said Jane Rumble, Ofcom's director of consumer policy.

The regulator found that some providers are charging almost £20 for a 90-second call.

Although there are cheaper services, customers tend to call the numbers they can most easily remember, Ofcom's study found.                     
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Hugo

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #471 on: November 28, 2018, 01:02:26 PM »
Thanks for bringing that to our attention Steve.     It's a complete rip off and I did post something on here earlier this year about the directory enquiry 118 call
My wife tried to contact me by phone but couldn't as my mobile was not working and in a panic dialled the 118 number.    It cost her over £9.00 for a short duration phone call and in the end the 118 operator said that they couldn't find the phone number!

She was looking for the phone number of The Queens Hotel  Promenade Llandudno and the operator couldn't find it.     >:(




Dave

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #472 on: November 28, 2018, 02:12:14 PM »
I was just reading this out loud to my other half and added "just realised we haven't had a new phone book recently" to which she added " no, we haven't had one for years".
As an over 65 I haven't phoned a directory enquiry service either.
Google is so much quicker!

SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #473 on: January 08, 2019, 11:11:21 AM »
Police warn Facebook users over holiday park scam
Police have warned social media users to beware of online scammers posing as a well-known holiday park brand.
A post on Facebook which claims people can win a Center Parcs holiday if they share it is not genuine,

SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #474 on: January 31, 2019, 07:21:09 PM »
Residents have been warned not to give money to a potential fraudulent caller pretending to be working on behalf of a charity.

Earlier this week police urged members of the public to stay alert following reports of a Flintshire resident being scammed out of £15,000 over the phone by a person purporting to be working for BT.

Now the Wales Air Ambulance Charity has stated: "We have been made aware of a potential telephone scam where somebody is trying to gain money from people under the guise of Wales Air Ambulance.

"Individuals/organisations have been contacted via phone by a man selling advertising for the 'Wales Air Ambulance magazineí.

"He describes himself as a 'fundraiser' for our charity and indicates that the money would go towards our lifesaving work.

"The telephone number from which the call is made is flagged as being from Liverpool.

"We do not believe that this is a valid fundraising exercise on our behalf and we have made the police aware.

"If you have received this call, please contact the Wales Air Ambulance PR team on 0300 0152 999 (option 1) or email media@walesairmabulance.com."                ref Pioneer

     

SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #475 on: February 07, 2019, 05:09:18 PM »
A cunning new text message scam is making the rounds in the UK, with those behind it pretending to be from Tesco.

It comes just days after some customers reported receiving another scam, about a fake Tesco prize draw, which promised £500 or an iPhone.

However, unbeknown to the recipients, they actually get charged a staggering £4.50 of they respond to it.
The suspicious text messages have continued into the week though, with one targeted shopper warning others about the latest scheme.

Posting to the company's Facebook page, one women shared a screenshot of the message, as reported by Essex Live .

The confused customer fortunately realised the text wasn't all that it seemed, posting: "I'm guessing this is a scam text?!" along with a screenshot.

But it's not just one customer who's received the suspicious message, with others sharing their own screenshots to social media of similar scams.

Targeted customers are then being asked to confirm the details, in order to secure a prize, by clicking on a link within the text message.

Scams of this kind are typically known as phishing scams, which allow hackers to steal personal information from unsuspecting victims.

Harvested information and date can then be used by scammers to defraud the victims of money, potentially even stealing their identities.

The recent scam has now been confirmed by Tesco, who have assured customers that the company is looking into the matter.
A spokesperson for the supermarket explained: "I can confirm this is a scam and our Phishing Team are aware and currently investigating.
"Our customers' security is extremely important to us and I'd like to assure you that we would never send any of our customers a message which asks them to input any personal or security details."

They advised anyone who receives a suspicious text claiming to be from Tesco to email phishing@uk.tesco.com before deleting the message.
"We thank you for your patience while we look into this," they added.
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SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #476 on: February 11, 2019, 03:45:24 PM »
Conwy and Denbighshire Councils are warning the public to beware of potential phone scams from individuals reportedly selling telecare equipment.

A number of complaints have been received by both councils with some residents reporting they have received cold-calls from individuals selling telecare equipment, but also requesting personal bank details over the phone.

Galw Gofal / Care Connect, the North Wales Regional Call Monitoring Service, does not sell telecare equipment and does not cold call to sell equipment.

Both Councils are urging residents never to provide bank details to anyone, unless you are completely satisfied the individual is genuine and works for a legitimate organisation.

The authorities are also reminding people about the North Wales Buy with Confidence scheme, established in response to worries about rogue traders.
The scheme provides a list of local businesses, that give their commitment to trading fairly.

Buy with Confidence is the largest scheme of its kind and continues to expand its geographical coverage.
For more visit your local Council website.
ref Pioneer
 

SteveH

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #477 on: March 21, 2019, 10:55:40 AM »
A phone and text scam is sweeping across Wales and Conwy residents are being urged to be vigilant.

A number of incidents have been reported across Wales where text messages or callers claim they can help the householder get a council tax refund, they then go on to ask for personal bank account details.

Conwy County Borough Council (CCBC) said residents are advised to never give their personal banking details over the phone unless they are 100 per cent sure they are speaking to a professional individual working on behalf of a recognised organisation.

A CCBC spokesperson said: "If in any doubt, take the caller's number and check itís valid. Anyone working in a professional capacity won't mind you doing this.

"Itís also worth regularly reminding elderly relatives and friends to be cautious with their personal and bank details."

Conwy residents can get free help and advice on council tax and benefits direct from CCBC by phoning 01492 576 607, by emailing ctax.enquiries@conwy.gov.uk or online at You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login.

Dave

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #478 on: March 25, 2019, 10:43:28 AM »
Two attempts to scam me about my BT broadband by what seems like an organisation rather than an individual. You are greeted by a pre recorded message which is extremely poorly spoken telling you you are about to be cut off, press 1 to speak to someone,2 to terminate your line. Press 1 re-directs to an American accent who put you through to what sounds like India but it could be anywhere.

On the second call, just for a change I told the "BT" man that I had Sky broadband to which he replied BT handle their accounts too.

You can guess my response but at least he hadn't hung up when he got my outpouring unlike the first one who was quick to cut off at his end when he knew his cover was blown!!

Ian

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #479 on: May 18, 2019, 08:43:03 AM »
I'm posting this in here as it's extremely relevant to anyone who does online shopping.  The links are somewhat technical, as they're links to the actual legislation, but it's very much worth reading.

Some online retailers are using the letter of the law to muddy the waters with regard to returns.
Recently, women ordering clothes from Boohoo.com and Missguided.co.uk have continued accepting returns but not refunding the delivery charges.

This is contrary to You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login Regulations 2013.

The small print

The problem is that simply using the using the prominent returns procedures on the retailersí web sites doesn't cancel the contract. In order to receive a refund of the original delivery charge, one additionally has to cancel the contract pursuant to You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login, which involves a separate procedure such as e-mailing a special e-mail address or even printing a PDF form, filling it in and sending it back by post.

Most consumers donít understand the difference between the standard returns procedure and cancelling the contract, mainly because most decent online companies don't attempt to confuse the issue.
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