Author Topic: Health  (Read 10915 times)

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SteveH

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Re: Health
« Reply #75 on: September 03, 2016, 12:17:40 PM »
Until now, I had no idea about "microbeads".... that there is plastic in my toothpaste, who comes up with XXXX like this.............

The UK government has announced plans to ban microbeads used in cosmetics and cleaning products by 2017.
The small pieces of plastic commonly found in toothpaste, exfoliating body scrubs and other household products and are thought to damage the environment.
Environmentalists fear they are building up in oceans and potentially entering the food chain.
A consultation on how a ban would work will start later this year, Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom has announced.
A number of cosmetic companies have made voluntary commitments to phase out the use of microbeads by 2020.

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Nemesis

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Re: Health
« Reply #76 on: September 03, 2016, 03:13:27 PM »
Not keen on the idea anyway, my skin won't tolerate being scraped !!!!
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SteveH

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Re: Health
« Reply #77 on: February 10, 2017, 02:18:25 PM »
Should I worry about arsenic in my rice?
By Dr Michael Mosley
BBC
Quote...,.
Now, some ways of cooking rice reduce arsenic levels more than others. We carried out some tests with Prof Meharg and found the best technique is to soak the rice overnight before cooking it in a 5:1 water-to-rice ratio.
That cuts arsenic levels by 80%, compared to the common approach of using two parts water to one part rice and letting all the water soak in. Using lots of water - the 5:1 ratio - without pre-soaking also reduced arsenic levels, but not by as much as the pre-soaking levels.
So, while I would now think twice about feeding young children too much rice or rice products, I'm not going to stop eating rice myself. I will, however, be cooking it in more water and, when I remember, leave it to soak overnight.
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Nemesis

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Re: Health
« Reply #78 on: February 10, 2017, 02:58:57 PM »
OMG. Can you imagine the local take away soaking the stuff overnight?
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SteveH

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Re: Health
« Reply #79 on: February 14, 2017, 01:39:03 PM »
Parents are being warned of a contagious winter vomiting and diarrhoea bug that is sweeping many parts of the UK.
Although there have yet to be cases of the infection in North Wales, there have been reports of outbreaks in nearby counties such as Lancashire and Staffordshire.
Parents are being warned to be vigilant, and to be sure to contact the family GP should a child develop Shigellosis symptoms.

What are the symptoms?
The bug has some unpleasant effects, which are mainly;
Chronic diarrhoea (dysentery)
High temperature (fever) - 38C and over, or 37.5C and above in children under five.
Nausea and sickness
Painful stomach cramps
The symptoms usually last around five to seven days.
The diarrhoea can also cause dehydration too.

The infection usually spreads quickly amongst groups of people who are often in close contact with one another, such as families, schools and nurseries.

Fortunately, although the symptoms are nasty, Shigella is rarely serious. There is no magic cure, so those unlucky enough to pick up the bug will have to let it run its course. But there are things that you can do to ease the effects.

Treatment is usually plenty of fluids to ensure that dehydration doesn’t occur. It is also recommended to use oral re-hydration solutions if necessary.
However, it is best to steer clear of anti-diarrhoea medications (such as Loperamide) as they can make symptoms much worse.

Good hygiene is key to preventing the spread of Shigellosis.

You should wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the toilet and at regular intervals throughout the day.
Help children to wash their hands properly.
If you need to clean a child’s potty, wear gloves when handling it and dispose of the contents in the toilet. Be sure to wash the potty with hot water after each use.
Clean and disinfect all toilets you use on a regular basis.
Don’t forget to clean flush handles, taps and sinks with soap and hot water after use, followed by a household disinfectant.
Always wash your hands before handling, eating or cooking food. Do not prepare or serve food for others if you are infected.
Avoid sharing towels and washcloths.
Be sure to wash the laundry of an infected person on the hottest possible setting.
Stay away from work or school until you have been symptom-free for at least 48 hours.
Do not go swimming until you have been free of symptoms for two days.
Avoid sexual contact until symptom free for 48 hours.
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SteveH

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Re: Health
« Reply #80 on: March 19, 2017, 12:54:31 PM »
Not something I have considered before, worth a read.

Skin creams containing paraffin have been linked to dozens of fire deaths across England, the BBC has learned.
The products for conditions like eczema and psoriasis can leave people at risk of setting themselves ablaze.
If people use the creams regularly but do not often change clothes or bedding, paraffin residue can soak into the fabric, making it flammable.
The medicines regulator has updated its guidance and says all creams containing paraffin should carry a warning.
Despite warnings going back more than 10 years, BBC Radio 5 live Investigates has discovered there have been 37 deaths in England since 2010 linked to the creams.
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SteveH

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Re: Health
« Reply #81 on: September 04, 2018, 11:11:32 AM »
I took the test, and my heart age is seven years older than it should be, although a generalisation, I am looking at making some changes, ..................be interesting to hear other comments ?

Public Health England is urging people over 30 to take an online test to find out their heart age, which indicates if they are at increased risk of suffering a heart attack or a stroke.
They predict about 80% of heart attacks and strokes in people under 75 could be prevented if heart health was improved.

Unhealthy lifestyles put four in five adults at risk of early death, they estimate.
People should quit smoking, eat a healthy diet and get enough exercise.

The test is not diagnostic - it will not tell you whether you are going to have a heart attack - but it can be a wake-up call to make healthy changes.              REF BBC     

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Ian

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Re: Health
« Reply #82 on: December 19, 2018, 10:01:43 AM »
It seems the evidence in favour of 'man 'flu' continues to mount. The latest research project at the Royal Holloway University of London has thrown up some interesting information: many infections cause more severe illness in men than women. Men infected with tuberculosis are 1.5 times more likely to die than women; men infected with human papillomavirus are five times more likely to develop cancer than women; and men infected with Epstein-Barr virus are at least twice as likely to develop Hodgkin’s lymphoma as women.

It's not a huge leap extend the reasoning to common viral complaints such as colds. The researchers used mathematical modelling to show that, for pathogens that affect both sexes, natural selection in theory should favour those that cause less illness in women – as long as they can be transmitted from mother to child.

This evolutionary pressure, they argue, could explain a longstanding puzzle: why human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) progresses to leukaemia much more commonly in Japanese men than Japanese women, but affects both sexes equally in the Caribbean. This discrepancy could be because women breastfeed their babies more commonly and for longer in Japan – giving the virus more opportunity to enter another host.

For this to be the case, though, the virus would have to be able to detect whether it’s inside a man or a woman. We don’t yet know how it would do this, but it’s not impossible, says Jansen, one of the Holloway research team. “There are all sorts of hormonal and other pathways that are slightly different between men and women,” he says.

If we were to identify a mechanism, that would open the possibility of manipulating it. “We could try to make the virus think it’s in a female body rather than a male body and therefore take a different course of action,” says Jansen.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.