Author Topic: Bee Keeping  (Read 193 times)

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Ian

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Bee Keeping
« on: September 02, 2020, 11:23:10 AM »
Honeybees can calculate probability, but it seems they don’t use it the same way we tend to.

Andrew Barron at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, and his colleagues trained 20 honeybees to associate the colours of artificial flowers with the likelihood of obtaining sweet water. Over multiple sessions, they presented the bees with five colours in various combinations of two colours at a time. Each colour was ranked one to five. For each pair, only the higher-ranking colour dispensed sweetened water.

The researchers then tested the bees on a combination they hadn’t seen yet: the second and fourth-ranking colours, representing odds of getting sweetened water of 66 and 33 per cent, respectively.

You might think the best strategy for obtaining the treat would be to only visit flowers with the highest odds of delivering, but the bees did something different, says Barron. They matched the proportion of visits with the probability of getting sweet water, so for flowers with 66 per cent odds of sugar, they visited them roughly two-thirds of the time. This is known as probability matching.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

Hugo

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Re: Bee Keeping
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2020, 12:30:30 PM »
Coronavirus and Beekeepers

SteveH

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Re: Bee Keeping
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2020, 03:26:47 PM »
Perfect ............   $yes$

DVT

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Re: Bee Keeping
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2020, 04:10:15 PM »
Going back to the original posting, I have noticed that bees visiting my lawn are selective.

Apart from the obvious grass, we have daisies (white), buttercups (yellow) and clover (purple).

A bee that goes to a disy will move on to another daisy, and stick with daisies until he's had enough.  A bee that goes to a buttercup will stick to a buttercup until had enough.  Same with the bee visiting clover.  They don't mix their choices.

The daisy bee may well head towards a buttercup but does not land, turns and goes for a daisy.

I've no idea which flower contains the most sweet stuff - the choice could just be their favourite colour!

Ian

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Re: Bee Keeping
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2020, 06:25:59 PM »
Same here. The hive intelligence is remarkable, though.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.