Author Topic: Walking  (Read 330479 times)

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DaveR

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Re: Walking
« Reply #675 on: April 26, 2012, 08:07:16 PM »
Like the old buildings, Hugo.  $good$

hollins

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Re: Walking
« Reply #676 on: April 27, 2012, 05:14:29 PM »
You were brave going out in those conditions yesterday Hugo although you could be forgiven for not realising how bad it was inland compared to the coast. I left home yesterday in torrential rain only to find Llandudno dry and warm!
When I returned home, still raining, and my husband said it hadn't stopped.
I think I need to find a house on the coast.
Dave's latest on the interesting properties thread would suit........I wish!

I looked up the Maenan walk after reading your recommendation and it looks great. Just waiting for some drier weather.

Hugo

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Re: Walking
« Reply #677 on: April 27, 2012, 05:49:19 PM »
It was pretty mucky out there yesterday so it might be sometime before it dries out but you could always just do the walk from the car park to the Cadair Ifan Goch viewpoint and back.
It's just under half a mile in total and that way you'd still have time for a nice coffee in Plas Maenan afterwards.    $good$
Just wait a few weeks for the Bluebells to come out though as they are worth seeing.

Merddin Emrys

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Re: Walking
« Reply #678 on: April 27, 2012, 05:56:43 PM »
We've had bluebells out in the garden for about 3 weeks, just shows how it's much milder by the coast!
A pigeon is for life not just Christmas

Hugo

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Re: Walking
« Reply #679 on: April 27, 2012, 06:14:16 PM »
This is how they looked on the 29th April last year but they seem to be weeks behind this year.

Jack

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Re: Walking
« Reply #680 on: May 08, 2012, 09:24:31 PM »
On Sunday I went on a ten mile ramble taking in Llyn Cowlyd, Cwm Eigiau and Coedty reservoir all of which are behind Trefriw and Dolgarrog.  The first photograph is the view looking down onto Llyn Geirionydd, the second is of Llyn Cowlyd itself, the third is of one of the many abandoned farm-houses high on the moors with the water pipeline behind, the fourth of another farm building this time in Cwm Eigiau and lastly Coedty reservoir.

Merddin Emrys

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Re: Walking
« Reply #681 on: May 08, 2012, 09:34:20 PM »
Looks great up there, I love the first pic, another place I must revisit!
A pigeon is for life not just Christmas



DaveR

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Re: Walking
« Reply #682 on: May 08, 2012, 09:40:19 PM »
Trivia Fact: Llyn Cowlyd provides the water supply for Llandudno & Colwyn Bay.

Merddin Emrys

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Re: Walking
« Reply #683 on: May 08, 2012, 09:49:37 PM »
I'd wondered about that, you should have had that as a quiz question! D)
A pigeon is for life not just Christmas

Hugo

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Re: Walking
« Reply #684 on: May 09, 2012, 02:08:36 PM »
I have walked in Newborough Forest dozens of times but yesterday's walk was quite different because one of our regular walkers has just joined the Forestry Commission and works there.  So we had a guided tour of the forest paths but we didn't see the elusive Red Squirrel that lives there. After a while we walked along a path behind the sand dunes and it was like a petrified forest where the Corsican Pine trees were all dead caused by the continuous winds and salt air.
Another first for me was when we arrived at Llanddwyn Island.  I had never seen it cut off before but the high Spring tides had indeed made it a true Island.  There was nothing else we could do other than to sit on the rocks and have our refreshments and wait for the waters to receed, After about half an hour they did and we took the right hand path where we saw St Dwynwen's Well then a Raven's nest on the cliff edge.   A quick visit then to the lighthouse and then to the Pilot's Cottages where we enjoyed tea and biscuits and had a very interesting talk with a very informative volunteer there. The water supply for the cottages is from a well and the supply of water is a bit erratic. There is no electricity there so it is provided by a generator and they have bottled gas too.
The weather had turned very warm and sunny and we were reluctant to move from this beautiful place but time was moving on and we had to get back to our cars.   We walked along the beach to the car park and the only downside to the day was when we found out that the cafe by the roundabout was closed but it was a very good walk which we all really enjoyed.

Hugo

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Re: Walking
« Reply #685 on: May 09, 2012, 02:11:46 PM »
Newborough Forest Walk

ormegolf

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    • Great Orme family golf
Re: Walking
« Reply #686 on: May 09, 2012, 09:09:29 PM »
I bet you told the helper in the tourist information that you knew a strange man you spends all his time up the Orme who claimed the last lady lighthouse keeper was his great grandmother!!! What was their response? Do I need to go there to leave my autograph Mike

Pendragon

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Re: Walking
« Reply #687 on: May 14, 2012, 11:07:36 PM »
I have been on a few walks recently some with the beautiful Socs others with my Dad but due to a really hectic three weeks, I've had no time to tell you about them.  I must however tell you about today and the walk I had with my Dad and Mike up to Parys Mountain and then down to Bull Bay over to Porth Wen to see the old Brick works.

Parys Mountain in Amlwch Anglesey is one of the strangest environments I have seen to date.  Prehistoric stone hammers and wood found underground have been scientifically tested to reveal that Parys Mynydd (mountain) is one of the earliest metalliferossa (mineral) mines in Britain dating back nearly 4,000 years.  2,000 years ago the Romans trained slaves in the copper mines of Rio Tinto in Spain and then transported them to the mountain to extract the Copper ore. 
More recently on the 2nd of March 1768 a Derbyshire minor called Jonathan Roose made the "great Discovery" of vast amounts of copper ore and thus changed the once small village of Amlwch into what was the second largest town in Wales.  It was said that Amlwch was at one time half the size of the then New York.  Another local minor named Roland Puw was also present at the major discovery and was rewarded with wait for it..........a bottle of Brandy and a rent free cottage for life.
Thomas Williams aka "Twm chwarae teg" which translated means "Tom fair play" was the owner of the mines which employed 1500 men women and children as young as eight years old to extract ore from Mynydd Parys but this was by no means a good job as the procedures used to extract the ore were not only dangerous but also quite often fatal.  Ore was mined and then the rocks were burned to extract the copper which has resulted in the red, yellow, brown, purple and orange almost lunar landscape you see today (pic 1).  Believe it or not there could be at any one time 6,000 fires simultaneously burning on Parys Mountain.  The sulphur released  into the air was potent and deadly, 60% of children living in the surrounding area died before the age of six years old which leads me to the conclusion that "Tom fair play" wasn't that fair a guy after all.
Copper produced by the mine was used to line the bottom of Nelsons battle ships to deter the infestation of the notorious Teredo Worms known to bore into wood immersed in sea water.  Teredo worms are not really worms at all they are a clam type molluscs that stick to the bottom ships etc and due to the fact there was no Toredo Worms on the underbelly of Nelsons ships his vessels were more maneuverable giving him a considerable advantage at Trafalgar.
As we walked along the path we could see the purpose built settling ponds (pic 2) where huge amounts of  scrap iron imported from Amlwch port, were thrown into the copper rich mine water.  A chemical reaction resulted in a "precipitate extremely rich in copper and an iron rich solution which when oxidized was used as a colourant for paint"  pffft I'll be honest that last sentence went straight over my head.
A little further and you can see in the distance on top of the hill what remains of the only wind powered mining pump that exists in Britain.  A local landmark since 1878 it was built to help power by means of five large sails the steam engine pumping the huge Cains shaft (pic 3)
As you round the hill there is a dilapidated engine house, the last of six originally situated on the mountain.  Next to the engine house is what remains of a large fallen chimney.  I got talking to a guy who informed me that the digger you see in the photo (pic 4) is recovering the original stones from the fallen chimney and these in turn are going to be used in the reconstruction of the original structure.  He also said that he believes over the years local farmers have taken the stones to constuct their walls etc.  The windmill is thankfully also going to be restored but probably not with the sails.  I will no doubt return when the work is complete. 
Minors at Parys mountain were paid with "Druid head" tokens (last pic) which could only be spent in the mine owners shops.  This type of payment was widely used in the 18th and 19th century and the method was known as the Truck System.  These tokens were minted by Matthew Boulton in Birmingham in their thousands and when you take into consideration that minors of that time had to buy all their own tools from the mine shops, it doesn't seem that "chwarae teg" either.  These coins can still be bought by collectors for around 25.
My only complaint is that they have spelt the Parys bit wrong as of course it should read Parrys' Mountain  ;D 



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Merddin Emrys

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Re: Walking
« Reply #688 on: May 14, 2012, 11:20:24 PM »
Very interesting, I've been there a long time ago (over 30 years!) it was like another planet!
A pigeon is for life not just Christmas

DaveR

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Re: Walking
« Reply #689 on: May 15, 2012, 08:53:23 AM »
Nice walk and photos, Miss P.  $good$