Author Topic: Cars  (Read 94902 times)

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Tosh

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Re: Cars
« Reply #150 on: September 08, 2013, 08:26:56 AM »
The baby Austin was the little round one.
The first model was the A30 with the small elliptical rear window and the last model was the A35 with the enlarged rear  window.
It had built in indicators and red leather seats.
They were usually in black but they came later in grey and white.
I saw one a few weeks ago in Leek Staffs which was sky blue and in mint condition.

Yorkie

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Re: Cars
« Reply #151 on: September 08, 2013, 09:03:28 AM »
Tosh - you are a bit later than the old Austin Seven.  The A30 (small window) and A35 (large window) were around in the late 50's and I actually had an A35 as a company car!  Big deal!

The more "rounded" version of the Austin Seven was the Ruby model with a covered spare wheel on the Boot lid.  My (first) Mrs had one of these.

The Austin Seven was transformed into all different "specials" with the "boat" shaped model and others.   Even the engine was used in one of the first "build your own sports car" the Super Seven.  The Super Seven eventually became the Lotus and was variously fitted with the Ford 105 and 109 E engines with improvements made by Cosworth. 

The Austin was a good car to modify for hill climb events and probably there are still a few round today!   Have a look here to see a few interesting examples.

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Tosh

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Re: Cars
« Reply #152 on: September 08, 2013, 08:10:33 PM »
Our A35 was reg VVT986 and the very first car was an Austin 8 reg HOB 68.

My sisters boyfriend had a 1948 Morris 8 reg MEH 480.

My first works van was an Austin A55, what a work horse, bench seat, column change, umbrella handle hand brake, dip switch on the floor, the apprentice took on a 90 mile run and drove it all the way back in third, mind you that was the gear he usually drove round in anyway.
He used to descend the hill and under the railway bridge, just before the bridge he turned off the ignition and turned it on again as he got midway through.
The resultant bang from the backfire was tremendous, he got away with it for a while 'til the exhaust almost blew off and he was reported by the residents.
One day when selecting reverse the centre of the stick came out and I hit my passenger in the you know whats with my fist.
Ah, those were the days.

Yorkie

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Re: Cars
« Reply #153 on: September 09, 2013, 07:13:45 AM »
Talking about going down hills, I remember some of the vehicles I drove had a "free wheel" where you could disengage the drive and coast down hills to save fuel.   Why they did not just use the neutral slot I don't know!

There was also the "fluid flywheel" on such as the Daimler where you changed gear and then, when you felt like it, dipped the clutch to actually engage it!  Fun, fun, fun!    :D
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Nemesis

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Re: Cars
« Reply #154 on: September 09, 2013, 11:18:03 AM »
I remember my Dad 'coasting into the town from home during the Suez crisis to save fuel !

I also recollect a friend in the '60s had an Austin A40-- A Flying Meringue as it was called.
Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know.

Tosh

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Re: Cars
« Reply #155 on: September 09, 2013, 12:39:30 PM »
I liked the last A40, two tone green with black roof, sort of an estate car.
Have a look at this, the Austin Metropolitan, super duper, sporty car.
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Trojan

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Re: Cars
« Reply #156 on: September 09, 2013, 05:37:28 PM »
I remember the Metropolitan. Sure is a classic.



Yorkie

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Re: Cars
« Reply #157 on: September 09, 2013, 07:00:30 PM »
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I remember the Metropolitan. Sure is a classic.

I remember seeing the Metropolitan for the first time in Blackpool in 1955 when I was at RAF Trade Training at RAF Kirkham.  I didn't like its looks at the time, and it hasn't grown on me in the meantime.  Wish I had one now though!    ^*^0
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Gwynant

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Re: Cars
« Reply #158 on: September 09, 2013, 07:15:30 PM »
                 I can also remember another Sedan/Coupe of that era which was the Hillman Californian.

Tosh

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Re: Cars
« Reply #159 on: September 09, 2013, 08:42:43 PM »
Yup, I had completely forgotten about the Californian.
Nice motor but not as nice or as sexy as the Metropolitan.

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Or, what about the Triumph Vitesse, ME knows a thing or two about Triumphs.

Tosh

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Re: Cars
« Reply #160 on: September 09, 2013, 08:50:24 PM »
and then I got to thinking about the Hillman Husky.
My cousin had one and he used to drive all the way from Cirencester to Staffordshire before the motorways, with his wife, 3 kids and their luggage on board.
In fact he drove us home after our wedding reception in it, wonderful memory, thanks for reminding me.
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Trojan

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Re: Cars
« Reply #161 on: September 10, 2013, 01:50:33 AM »
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In fact he drove us home after our wedding reception in it, wonderful memory, thanks for reminding me.

Did it have tinted windows in the back?  8)

Trojan

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Re: Cars
« Reply #162 on: September 10, 2013, 07:50:58 AM »
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In fact he drove us home after our wedding reception in it, wonderful memory, thanks for reminding me.

I expect you remember it fondle-ly.  :laugh:

Trojan

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Re: Cars
« Reply #163 on: September 10, 2013, 08:05:19 AM »
Who remembers the Wolsley Hornet and it's twin the Riley Elf?

The Riley Elf and Wolsley Hornet were upmarket versions of Sir Alexander Issigonis masterpiece, the Mini. The distinctive grille was the standout feature, while the tail received its own makeover, which included extending the length so that the car looked much more like a typical saloon.

Tosh

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Re: Cars
« Reply #164 on: September 10, 2013, 09:14:06 AM »
Didn't the little Wolsley badge on the radiator light up when the side lights came on?
I've always been a gadget man.   L0 ;D