Author Topic: Cars  (Read 94797 times)

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Nemesis

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Re: Cars
« Reply #750 on: January 06, 2019, 04:04:59 PM »
Over 275 rally plates had been sold the organiser said, but they weren't expecting them all turning up, but she reckoned over 200! It is a yearly event which we nearly always attend, but this year was different as they could not have their usual toilet/refreshment stop at Rhos 3 of them had a slight shunt on the zebra in Rhos which caused mayhem and a tailback for a short while . There is a good picture from the summit on FB.
Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know.

Hugo

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Re: Cars
« Reply #751 on: January 19, 2019, 11:30:29 PM »
Tellytubby sent me an e-mail that showed a picture of this car on facebook with these comments  "Re: Old car on Wonder if this is now a local footpath.  Oops...a car accident on the mountain road to Nant Gwrtheyrn, Wales. That's a bit steep, probably his bill was too! "
If anyone has walked down to Nant Gwrtheyrn in the early 70's or prior then they will have remembered what a bad track it was.   It was just an uneven  dirt track that zig zagged it's way down the steep slope to the abandoned village at the bottom.    We did the walk on the hottest day of the year and it was horrendous, it wasn't fit for walking on let alone driving down
I think that Nemesis may have walked there around about that time too.
The track is now a tarmac road but if we ever have a walk in the area we always leave a car in the village as that hill is so steep so we opt for the easier option of a ride up the hill

Nemesis

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Re: Cars
« Reply #752 on: January 20, 2019, 09:09:29 AM »
Yes Hugo, we did walk down and back up.....never again. ! The mark 8 Jaguar was a heavy old beast and would take some shifting ! We went back many years later, after the new road had been 'built', but it was a dreadful day, siling it down with rain, so my OH decided that it would be foolhardy to attempt the road, given the volume of mud. The fact that we had just got a brand new car must have also been a factor ! Tell Tellytubby that we thought that his picture was great.
Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know.

SteveH

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Re: Cars
« Reply #753 on: January 30, 2019, 11:12:09 AM »
Jaguar take F-TYPE sports car on road trip of North Wales - see where they visited...... Gt. Orme
The car giant is the latest brand to use the region to showcase a new vehicle.
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SteveH

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Re: Cars
« Reply #754 on: March 27, 2019, 10:07:55 AM »
Speed limiting technology looks set to become mandatory for all vehicles sold in Europe from 2022, after new rules were provisionally agreed by the EU.
The Department for Transport said the system would also apply in the UK, despite Brexit.
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snowcap

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Re: Cars
« Reply #755 on: March 27, 2019, 11:16:39 PM »
not before time if you ask me

A.Muse

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Re: Cars
« Reply #756 on: March 28, 2019, 08:58:46 AM »
Fine, good idea but.... the technology isn't good enough and probably won't be in time for implementation.

If the proposed technology relies on recognising signs, one kid with a paint brush could create havoc.  If it is GPS based, our satnav shows speed limits and is usually accurate, but sometimes throws a wobbly as it passes under bridges or goes along side a minor road on a motorway. (this of course relies on Mr Trump not turing off or 'fuzzing', the GPS signals as they have been known to do in times of national emergency.   

Imagine 1: doing 70 and passing under a 30 mph road.... car slams on the the brakes to stay legal, and a multiple pile up ensues.

Imagine 2: 3 lane motorway with artic in lane 1 doing 55.5mph, 3 artics in lane 2 doing 56mph and little you in lane 3 doing 70 mph, no acceleration available to get past quickly to clear the lane for the blue flashing lights behind you. 

Feel free to let your imagination add further scenarios.

As the limiter will be computer controlled there will be an industry in hacking to remove the limiter.  Recent air crashes seem to show that computer control isn't all it should be.

 
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Ian

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Re: Cars
« Reply #757 on: March 28, 2019, 09:54:30 AM »
I have a limiter on one of our cars but I've never engaged it. I do use adaptive cruise control quite a bit, but not so sure abou-t using a limiter.  A lot will depend on the implementation, as you say.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

DownUnder

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Re: Cars
« Reply #758 on: March 28, 2019, 10:38:41 AM »
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Fine, good idea but.... the technology isn't good enough and probably won't be in time for implementation.

If the proposed technology relies on recognising signs, one kid with a paint brush could create havoc.  If it is GPS based, our satnav shows speed limits and is usually accurate, but sometimes throws a wobbly as it passes under bridges or goes along side a minor road on a motorway. (this of course relies on Mr Trump not turing off or 'fuzzing', the GPS signals as they have been known to do in times of national emergency.   

Imagine 1: doing 70 and passing under a 30 mph road.... car slams on the the brakes to stay legal, and a multiple pile up ensues.

Imagine 2: 3 lane motorway with artic in lane 1 doing 55.5mph, 3 artics in lane 2 doing 56mph and little you in lane 3 doing 70 mph, no acceleration available to get past quickly to clear the lane for the blue flashing lights behind you. 

Feel free to let your imagination add further scenarios.

As the limiter will be computer controlled there will be an industry in hacking to remove the limiter.  Recent air crashes seem to show that computer control isn't all it should be.

 

Very apt scenario to the aviation industry's reliance on computerisation. Working within the IT industry as an auditor has demonstrated to me that implementation of a computerised solution as specified by the scheduled implementation date and to budget is priority one.  Risks are often minimised in order to achieve that implementation date. Exotic "work arounds" are often used as solutions to Risk Management issues to support achieving the implementation date. Despite audit findings, Management can accept the level of risk expressed by auditors and continue on with an implementation schedule which gives them some measure of isolation from responsibility.

When it comes down to computer vs human, humans have an innate ability to take all environmental conditions into consideration but they may not necessarily take the most appropriate action. Perhaps the only satisfactory human vs computer combination is that  computerisation feedback from various input sensory detectors installed on a vehicle are presented to the driver both audibly and visually (such as reversing/proximity cameras/proximity sensors). For example, humans and perhaps computers can work in parallel to establish a safe environment, but what happens when a siren is heard whilst driving? Is it an ambulance, fire brigade or other emergency service? Does your vehicle's computer suggest you navigate to the left or navigate to the right or does it leave it to the driver's decision?

Collision avoidance generally involves leaving a sufficient distance between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of you based on road conditions, weather conditions and the proximity of vehicles immediately behind you. This means that you may think the driver of the vehicle behind you also has the skills to follow you with a similar road skill.

Regards Hugh

DVT

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Re: Cars
« Reply #759 on: March 28, 2019, 04:40:27 PM »
Totally stupid and dangerous suggestion, as per the scenarios posed by A.Muse above.

All cars already have a speed limiter ... it's called the driver's right foot.

My car has a claimed top speed of 169mph (and it's a family saloon) - I doubt I will ever get anywhere near that, but linked to that is the accelaration so that if I do wish/need to overtake something I can do it in the shortest/safest time/distance possible.

There is one scenario that would benefit the whole country if this happened - it will soon become manadatory to employ a person off the dole to walk in front of the car carrying a red flag.  So, no-one on the dole, all that money can go into the country's economy to pay for inflated salaries for even more people with stupid ideas.

As the manufacturers who "rule" the industries are also the manufacturers of the high powered cars will this suggestion ever come in - imagine Porsche/Mercedes/Ferrari/Bentley selling their latest model but it won't go over 70mph.

Ian

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Re: Cars
« Reply #760 on: March 28, 2019, 06:15:10 PM »
The current design of the EU directive will make it optional and easy to disable. Of course, that might change, but it's very hard to rid oneself of the idea that this is merely tiptoeing around the real issue: driver competence. Many drivers are good, but the small minority that are both selfish and thoughtless with a large helping of incompetence are those who threaten the rest of us. A typical example of this is the idiot driver who pulls out onto a 60 mph road and accelerates away from following traffic at 40.  Happened to us this afternoon on the 470 as we drove past the Welsh Food centre.

This is more than simply misjudging the speed of approaching vehicles; the driver was happy to know we'd have to brake fairly hard to avoid hitting him when he could easily have waited until; the road was clear.

One solution is to make the training in and passing of the IAM advanced driving test compulsory within a year of passing the normal test. I did that, many years ago, and it made a difference - significantly lower insurance premiums being one.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

Quiggs

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Re: Cars
« Reply #761 on: March 28, 2019, 08:18:14 PM »
I cannot for The life of me understand why manufacturers are making cars with such high speed capabilities,when the maximum road speed is 70 mph, it might make more sense to improve mpg capability with a max mph around 80 / 90 mph to allow extra speed to g et out of some situations
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DVT

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Re: Cars
« Reply #762 on: March 28, 2019, 09:23:37 PM »
The problem is not the speed ... it's the driver using it in the wrong places.

As an example ... drive down Mostyn Street on a Saturday afternoon at 29mph and you will be driving within the speed limit ... but I wouldn't mind betting you will have/cause an accident.

Hugo

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Re: Cars
« Reply #763 on: April 14, 2019, 02:54:52 PM »
Yesterday on a walk in the Dyserth area we passed a very large and beautiful stone building that had an enormous open garage underneath part of the building.
It was so big I bet it could have garaged all of ME's collection of motors.     ;D
One car took our fancy and it was a very old Porsche, there was a Lotus behind that car but the other 5 or 6 cars there were more modern and nothing special

A.Muse

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Re: Cars
« Reply #764 on: April 14, 2019, 03:20:00 PM »
Oh!  For all that space!  Room to work and store all my spares.  On the down side it looks as if it would be very cold to work in, but I think I could pur up with that.
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