Author Topic: Questions about places  (Read 63395 times)

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Quiggs

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Re: Interesting house decorations
« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2011, 01:39:31 PM »
They are more like plaster casts, the one of the artists Palette has recently been painted, as has the rest of the property. It originally had some artists brushes superimposed on the front, but unfortunately have been omitted during this latest repainting. It had been my intention to photograph them but never got round to it, mores the pity, too late now.  :'(
Dictum Meum Pactum

Jack

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Bron-y-Nant Hospital, Colwyn Bay
« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2011, 07:36:39 PM »
I have always understood that Bron-y-Nant hospital on Dinerth Road in Colwyn Bay (down near the council tip) was an isolation hospital for sufferers of TB (consumption).  Although I have searched for more information I can not find any.  Whatever it was built or used for, by the mid 1970s it had closed and then re-opened in various guises as a learning centre for adults with learning difficulties.  CCBC now use the old hospital buildings as offices and a garden centre operate in the former hospital grounds.  A relative of mine maintains that he was admitted to the isolation hospital as a child in the 1940s even though he came from Manchester.  Would admission records still be around?  Thanks in advance.

DaveR

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Re: Bron-y-Nant Hospital, Colwyn Bay
« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2011, 07:55:38 PM »
Yes, it was built as an Isolation Hospital (officially the 'Infectious Diseases Hospital') for Tuberculosis. My Father had a bout of TB and stayed there in the late 1940s. The land was purchased by Colwyn Bay Council from the Cayley Estate in 1903 and the Hospital opened in 1905. Any records would now be with the Betsi Cadwaladar Trust possibly, but I expect they have long been destroyed?

Trojan

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Re: Llangwstenin Hall
« Reply #33 on: May 11, 2011, 07:13:55 AM »
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Who can tell me anything about the history of Llangwstenin/Llangystennin Hall?

Llangystennin Hall was built circa 1638 and occupied by the Lloyd family during the 17th & 18th centuries.

A slab set into the floor of Llangwstennin church records the internment of Robert Lloyd of Hendrewaelod and Llangwstennin on July 25 1691. There's also a grave plot containing the remains of various generations of the Lloyd family, including John Lloyd of Llangystennin who was buried the 25th July 1701 in the 82nd year of his age and Catherine Lloyd Great-Great Grandaughter of the above who departed this life on the 9th day of March 1799

Trojan

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Re: Llangwstenin Hall
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2011, 07:27:50 AM »
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Thanks Dave. I'd be delighted if you could. I've always taken it was something to do with the Mostyns, but as you say there's a dearth of info. $wales

No connection to the Mostyns, however, Bodysgallen Hall and Gloddaeth Hall were linked by family ties since the 16th century.

Llangystennin was the smallest of the local gentry houses and was also the last on the list of status, being overshadowed by Gloddaeth Hall forming the pinnacle, then by Bodysgallen Hall, Penrhyn Hall, Marl Hall.

The Lloyd family were never as powerful in the area as the Mostyns and were not of the same social prowess. At the end of the 18th century, antiquarian Hyde Hall noted further decay of the estate's status - Llangystennin Hall, once the residence of the family of a country squire; but now in the occupation of a tennant.

Micox

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Re: All about the Great Orme
« Reply #35 on: May 17, 2011, 09:43:09 PM »
Ahhhh. Used to love that Pigeons' Cave area. Charlie Delacoe and I would finish our Gas Board jobs by late afternoon and bike around there with our costumes. The ladder was no longer there but we'd jump down to the beach and make an assisted climb up afterwards -  one up on the other's shoulders then the one on top in the cave pulling the other up with an extended arm. Great times. $00$
Micox

Llechwedd

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1820's house?
« Reply #36 on: May 20, 2011, 01:18:58 PM »
Bryan Davies has an ad, in this weeks NWWN.  "An exceptional property originally built in the late Georgian period c.1820 and extended in Victoiran etc. etc.  I can't make out where it is? Perghaps Hill terrace? I thought apart from the copper mining village and the fishing village most of the big houses were built in the 1840's.  Anyone know?  Nemesis you are good at this?



DaveR

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Re: 1820's house?
« Reply #37 on: May 20, 2011, 02:05:02 PM »
It's on Church Walks, immediately to the left of the Warwick Hotel.

Nemesis

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Re: 1820's house?
« Reply #38 on: May 20, 2011, 02:09:32 PM »
Sounds a bit strange to me, I shall see if I can find a picture--have looked on his website, but can't see anything  which looks like that age. Ours was built in the late 1840s, most of the ones before ours were as you say cottages  for the fishermen and miners.
Just read Dave's post-- he beat me to it , so Yes I know it well, on the corner of Tyn-y Maes Hill.
Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know.

Llechwedd

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Re: 1820's house?
« Reply #39 on: May 21, 2011, 10:12:07 AM »
Thanks for this. Still wondering about 1820's.  It looks nice on the agents site, I had a loo.  Who would have lived there?  I thought most housres weren't built until the 1840's like ours in Tudno Street and Abbey Road.

Bri Roberts

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Re: 1820's house?
« Reply #40 on: May 21, 2011, 11:32:56 AM »
I have ancestors who were married at Christ Church in the 1830's so I would have expected them to have lived in a house in Llandudno at that time.

Another line of my family lived at Pwll-y-gwichiad Farm in the 1830's and that farmhouse was also there earlier in the eighteenth century.

Llechwedd

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Re: 1820's house?
« Reply #41 on: May 23, 2011, 12:54:47 PM »
Well I'm really talking about the lower slopes of the Orme where the planned town started not the farms up top.  When was Christ Church built not the 1830's was there one there before it?

DaveR

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Re: 1820's house?
« Reply #42 on: May 23, 2011, 01:07:25 PM »
Christchurch was built in 1858, according to the guide:
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Llechwedd

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Re: 1820's house?
« Reply #43 on: May 24, 2011, 12:03:58 PM »
Thanks Dave I knew it wasn't that old!

TheMedz

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Re: All about the Great Orme
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2011, 06:21:27 PM »
A challenge for someone?
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