Author Topic: The Little Orme  (Read 7465 times)

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Cambrian

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Re: The Little Orme
« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2014, 03:31:46 PM »
Dr A H Stamp's very detailed book on the history of Penrhyn Bay contains a chapter on the Little Orme Quarry and a 1906 photo shows the house (actually a bungalow). I believe it was occupied by the quarry caretaker and was still there but abandoned when I visited around 1965.  The bases of the three gun emplacements were flooded by then - Dr Stamp traces some of the history of the site in his chapter on the Little Orme.

The guns at the Little Orme were used by gunners from the east and south coasts for practice purposes rather than training the trainers which was the role of the School at Llys Helig. The Little Orme camp doubled as an operational unit and as such was known as 21 Coast Defence Battery RA.

Ian

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Re: The Little Orme
« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2014, 04:03:19 PM »
Quote
The bases of the three gun emplacements were flooded by then

They were clear and dry in the late '50s and were surprisingly massive. I remember climbing down into one of them and being amazed at just how huge they were. But then - I was only a kid at the time.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

SteveH

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Re: The Little Orme
« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2017, 09:27:53 AM »
Boy, 12, stranded 150ft up the Little Orme, Llandudno.

The boy and his dad had been trying to make their way up the face of the headland when the ground became unstable to walk on.
As a result the boy was unable to continue.

Llandudno coastguard’s specialist rope team, with support from colleagues in Penmon, Anglesey went to the boy’s assistance and performed a “tactical rescue” which involved staking lines at the top and lowering down via rope to the stranded youth.
The boy’s father was able to make his way to the foot of the hill by himself and neither were injured.

The coastguard teams were supported by Llandudno RNLI’s inshore lifeboat, which was called at 3.20pm, and the boy was successfully taken down in a harness by rescuers during a 90-minute operation.
Coastguard officer Rory Howell said: “We always urge the public not to attempt to climb up or down cliffs unless properly equipped to do so.
REF DP



Hugo

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Re: The Little Orme
« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2017, 12:37:48 PM »
That's a dangerous place to go climbing, I've always stayed clear of that spot .   I've got a feeling that the cave where they discovered a printing press was somewhere in that area although I've never dared go to look for it.